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Orange County Times Press Newspaper Archive: November 18, 1913 - Page 1

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Publication: Orange County Times Press

Location: Middletown, New York

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   Orange County Times-Press (Newspaper) - November 18, 1913, Middletown, New York                               Than a Week Will Paper to Ton W4 a tear ORANGE appwlnf m toll sn UXOM ot rt- Leading Weekly Newspaper of Orange County ALMOST everybody CAD an subscribe (or s Bswipsiwr tlui but 11.64 per year. VOL XXIII -NO. 6 MIDDLETOWN, N. Y., TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 1913-EIGHT PAGES 51.50 PER YEAR WILSON DECLARES THERE IS NO NECESSITY YET FOR CLOSING THE AMERICAN EMBASSY President Says Situation Has Not Changed For the Better in Mexico- General Exodus Has Commenced (By Awoclated Presn.) Washington, Nov. "Wilson says that trie Mexican situation does not yet require the closing of the American Embassy. Summing up the situation the President indicated that iwhile thte personal attitude of Huerta might have changed, circumstances upon which the American government bases the conviction that elimination is inevitable, have not. General Exodus Begins. Vera Cruz, Nov. American families arrived from Mexico City and reporte d that a general exodus is be- ginning. Hnerta's Preparations. Mexico City, Nov. is preparing to organize Ms new congress- and continue Lis military campaign. Many belie've that tbe Unite d States continue its "'hands off" policy, permitting the Federals and constitu- tionalists" to fight it out, point to the large exodus of Americans au'd other foreigners now renewed as bearing out their belief. Employes of-business houses having headquarters abroad report that they have receive d instructions to get women and children out of the Federal capital. FOWLER DENIES HE INTENDS TO CONFESS i (By Associated Frees.) New York, NOT. 'Fow- ler, indicted lor extortion, has em- ployed counsel and la prepared to trial, denying rumors that he would to anything. Fowler pleaded not guilty when ar- raigned and released In hall, a iurety company signing tha bond. The examination was postponed ten days at tbe waert.of Martin W, Littleton, counsel, but Dis- trict Attorney Whitman said he was f to consent, as he hoped Fowler would confess In the Secret BInghamton, NOT. 17 A secret In- Teetirmtion of the State Highway De {Hutment lit this section Is in prog- ress here regarding the suspension K Assistant Engineer Kelly. Albany, Xov. Representatives Independent asphalt manufacturers attended a hearing before Highway Commissioner Carlisle anent their complaint that State business goes to the True; because ot his speciSca- Hous Carlisle's removal Is threatened un- ices the specifications are changed. FIRST SLEIGH OF WINTER WAS OUT ON SUNDAY HARRY F.COHEN IS ALIVE AND IN NEW YORK Newburgh, NOT. letter, ar- riving in this city gives the first def- inite information received here since his departure concerting Harry F. Cohen, tha young man who waa ported near Maybrook several weeks ago, and about whose mysterious dis- appearanca there was a great deal of excitement ac the time. The lettei was received by the Newtturgh Iron ft Metal Company at their plac', of business, 50-54 Has- brouck street, and was written from the Childrer's Aid Society and West- side Boys' Home at 225 West 35th street. New York city. It states that the young man applied lor aid at the Home, and there said he had been employed by the Newburgh Iron and Mottl Company In July and August cf this year. Information regarding the boy Is requested. The letter was not addressed to WALDEN MAN MAKES AN ASSIGNMENT (Prom the Newburgh News.) Walden, Nov. surprise was occasioned last night when it be- came known that David P. Decker, hardware dealer, at 17 Main street, had made an assignment, naming Cyrus B. Kowler, his largest creditor, as assignee. Anson J. attor- ney tor ma assignee, was in tnis vil- lage last evening and in an interview wiuo. The ivews correspondent stated the assets, consisting' of stock and outstanding bins, etc., would amount to auout while Uie imuiuues are about Tins business was established uy the late JNr J. Fowler about 40 jears ago He later toon. CJTUS B. .bowler into the business, Uie nrm name be- ing N. J. Fowler Company lor maty years. About 17 years ago K. J Fowier retired in favor of nis sou, Alison J. A'owier. Tne lirm con- tinued ander die name of tne Fow- ler Hardware Co. until about 12 years when David P. Decker pur- chased Alison J. Fowler's interest, and under the name of Fowter Decker, th-a business was continued until four jears ago, wJieu Cyrus B. Fowler sold out his interest to David P. Decker, who had enjoyed a large trade. (This firm employed about twenty men ana Lad iiiled large contracts for plumbing, heating, etc.. in many places thr-jughout tne county. Only last week David P. Decker was awarded the contract for installing a heating system in the new lire houso in Montgomery. An inventory of tha stock was com- menced this morning, and as soon as completed, the business wi 1 be con- ducted, temporarily, by Uie assignee until" the stock can be as a PET STOCK SHOW OPENS AT ARMORY Many exhibits began to arrive in town Monday morning from different parts of Orange county by wagon and express for the poultry show which is to begin at the morning. The work Armory tils of setting up the display coops and arranging the exhibits is this year under the direc- tion of G. B. Seeley, of Chester, who is acting as superintendent in place of W. Q. Minturn, of Warwick, who is unable to officiate this year. MAIL CHRISTMAS PRESENTS IS THE WARNING Postmaster James F. Moore has re- ceived notice from Daniel 0. Roper, First Assistant Post.nnster Gvm-ral tLat the local authorities ire to do all in their power to urge euly Christmas shopping, and the hhippinr of Christmas parcels ear.y, .n .idor to avoid the rush wul ensue at the last few days. Parcels for Christmas gift-; may be st-nt through the Parcel Post sjslein, according to a ruling of the Depsirr nitnt, bearing the wouU, "Not 10 be opened until or word? of a similar import, this and tint, ruling means a great lessening rht work of the clerks and car- t-rs, if it taken up by the shoppeis. Placards are to be dis'.ru.ute'l to the different offices to he plat, til in the offices and sub-station', and to j bo distributed among the lart.o irging early shipment of Cat [slums and proper wrapping. A large percentage of those ulio ship Christmas packages, arc In the habit of mailing them at the m ment, in. the hope that tha.- wi'i reach the recehers on Christmas day, and this very object is moie than likely to be defeated if this cus- tom is adhered-to, owing Jrf the great rush during the last Cew days. Wrap your Cnristroas gifts secure- ly; address them plainly and ligibiy. HASTY MARRIAGE HAS ANGERED WALDEN PARENTS Mr. and Mrs. Busene Goeteohius, of Stony Point, are very much upset at the news of tae marriage of their daughter Gladys to Gem go G. Gillson, of Waldeii, which took place in Wal- den, on Thursday night The young lady, less than 20 years old, hod been visiting at uiie home of her grand- parents, Mr. and) J.Irs. Richard Pouter, until the grandlather died two weeks and remained in die village to care or her granamother. The fam- ily knew that she was acquainted with Sir. Gillson but were unyiepaied for Lhe te.epaone message tr.ey received from aunouiiciag the ninr- They have received no woid MISS PARKS SPEAKS BEFORE SUFFKAGbTS The regular monthly meeting of the Kqinu suffrage Association of was ueid at me norne of .urs. K, M. Korty, on Saturuay aitur- 110011, Novcinoer 15. At tne close of me iroin the bride or groom since the emiuewi message and do not know where they are. .They to have the New- hurgh Journal iinfaijn the daughter and her husbaud that they are very angry at the niairiage and desire to uie daughter or son-in-law. Mr. is employed with the Central New England Railroad Company at M.iy- SOUTHERN PACIFIC'S STEIKE IS OVER whole, or in other words, as a going and if you wish, mark them "Not concern to some persons or com- pany. In this v> ay the business will De retained in Walden. Attentions to Girl Cause. David P. Decker has been doing an excellent business and had no inten- tion of failing until last Tuesday, when as a result of a climax in his domestic difficulties, caused by com- plications with a young girl, it is said Decker "lost his nerve" and decided to YVoldeii, with ail his troubles, behind him and seek a new home per- haps in Missouri. He once lived in that State Icr several years following his marriage 17 or IS years ago. It has betn rumored about tne vil- lage from time to time that family jars were quite frequent in the Deck- er home OB Orchard street, due, it wae stated', to Decker's attention to other, women and girls. It was stated the situation was aggravated some- what, and perhaps justly so, by a jealousy en the part of his wife, jb'or some ume Mrs. Decker had no- ticed that ber husoand, under the ex- cuse of loss of appetite or a "press- ing" business engagement. would leave his dinner unished and hur- ry from the house. Suspicion was Haeorouck street, but to 232 South uaaiiy 'formed in the he opened until and them at once. GRACE WILL IS ADMITTED TO PROBATE Goshen, Nov. contesting of the will of the late Patrick Grace, of Montgomery, was enoed in surro- gate's court this morning. At the opening of court. A. H. F. Seeger, who with W. L. Dickerson represented the executors, renewed his previous motion to admit the will to probate. Surrogate Swezey, how- ever, announced that he would firs; hear some testimony as to the prop erty. Mrs. Grace was then put on tho stand and testified that -.be total %-t.lue of the estate was about real session, the preaiueui, MISS Kiena A earing, presented .Miss oura liubn ParKs, oi lork city, A magazine writer on sociaiogicai ULC cue of uie editors ol uie Voter" ranis in ue a ,L .iuu r uuiiug me tars, biiice sautjii Uie "liie of Woman Suffrage have been so satisiactory to tne people ot tne said the speaker, tiiat in a period of three have nothing more to do with their J monuib and moving ireeiy among peopie of all conumons, i was not auiu to laid any opposition but on _______ _, .the contrary all approved and coula brook. The bride's father is an ex- only see seod in its operation. tensive dealer in lumber, feed, etc. "The prioeiple euorts ot tne women havp been directed toward laws re liumir to women and ciiildren and those for the bettermeut of labor conditions. The women have a leg- isiame committee keeps close watch of ah legislative actiou. The powpr of tliis committee in further- ing 'jood laws aud deieatmg bad ones is recognised by the Legislature bince it cxktrols a large vote aad a which is never partisan for the women have well the lesson of scratching' MKs Parke alluded to the efforts being coiitaiualiy made to discredit Judge Ben Lindsey in Denver, aud describing the crooked political meth- ods of his opponents, she said. He is so strong in that city that recog- nizing the futility of attacking him therp, efforts are concentrated on long distance attacks where the mer- its of the case are not known. In closing, the speaker gave as one of the results of the movement in Colorado a mental broadening and a larger out'ook in governmental af- fairs all classes of women. The association and its friends en- joyed a most interesting afternoon, and are gieatly indebted to Miss Parks for coming to them at great personal ir convenience. (By Associated Press.) Houston, Tex., Nov. strike operating employes of the ir.na was ended when the railroad j ielded to the demands of the men. to meet a Federated committee of four unions. orlc was resumed Immediately. CONGRESSMAN PLATT GOES TO WASHINGTON Congressman Edmund Platt ond Airs. Platt left Pougbkeepsie Friday afternoon for New York and Wash- ington. They spent Sunday m New York, going on to the Capital tCHfiay. It is the expectation of Mr. and Mrs. Platt to make their home in Washington during the winter. AMENDED PETITION IN THAW CASE (By Associated Press.) Concord, X. H., Nov. amend- ed petition for a writ of habeas 'Cor- pus, which acts as stay In the re- moval of Harry K. Thaw from Xew Hampshire to'New York was filed to-day. There will be a hearing ro morrow. OLD-FASHIONED DANCES AT GRANGE Wallldll River Grange, No. 9S2, hold its first dance of the season. Fri- day evening, at their rooms. In East Main street. Tho progrcm is to con- sist oX old-Cashioned dances sivoly. exctu- REPUBLICAN COMMITTEE'S REPORT FILED Albany, NOT. election ex- pense of the Republican committee of Orange county filed to-day with the Secretary of State shows re- ceipts from the following: T. B. Glb- scn W. F. Durland 250, A. J. Fowler and C. J. Boyd each, J. B. Montgomery S. V. Schoon- maker S. B. Heaton J. E. Dubois ?5. Expenditures amounted to The sum of was given to L, G. Alison for services, to J. G. Wil- kin and to E. Smith Webb, all of Middletown. POLICE PENSION FUND BALL ON WEDNESDAY The first annual ball of the Police Department, in aid of Pension Fund, will be held at Umien Hall on Wednesday evening of this week, November 19. The members of tb.3 are making every preparation far liu leception of the large oroard which. is expected to attend, and. A en- joyable time is osB-icvi all. McWilHame' full orchestra has been engaged to furnish. for 'ha affair, and the committee in eharje composed of Officers Fred B. John Gier, William H. Faulkner aad Frank H. Benton. Willam street, where Isidore Cohen, the boy's father, lives. Several weeks ago the young man receved from his step-brother to buy Junk with. He lost the moaey playing pool and abandoned the horse and wagca of his step-brother at May- brooii. The was found there, aad the fact that the body of aa unidenti- fied young man had been found near there and taken to the morgue at Mlddletowa, it was rumored that Co- hen had been murdered. MUdtetown rlslted toy the snow Imll ot the season, oa San- dey. tie fa33 comaesclac earjy that luoraiajc, aad coatia-alnc latennitteav ly a33 daring lha day. Charles A Jr.. of 255 North street. tbc first to be Keen oat in the cttj t73th a ftlelgb, as far oa tie BlooaJngiBrg road, and to tils city. At iuterraift, rain daring day, the result Snnday m that Reports from op the of "O mad W. aad Erie, state ihat the azaoCTt of rain and the weather ia aearJr iriti. that TO SPEAK AT PUBLIC MEETING AT COUNTY SEAT er's wife, as result, lonuation Jie niina of Deck- dlTlded aboat equally between it is said? ot Personal property, irom patroud of a I Taft- edjtor -xlon' NAMES OF PLACES CHANGED. Washington, D. C.. Nov. United States geographic board, which fixes the names of places, designated the following in New York: Navy, a point in Sacket bor, Jefferson county, not Shiphouse: Allan Otty, a shoal two miles south hy west from Bear Point, southwest- ern end of Wolfe Island, SL Lawrence rUer, Jefferson county, not Allen OUy, Keill or Keills. Garrison, a tillage in Puutnam county, not Ga.-- rison-on-Hudson, Garrisons, Garri- son's, or Garrison's Landing. UNIDENTIFIED MAN KILLED BY A TRAIN An unidentified man, aged about 29 years, was killed by being run over by an O. and W. tram, on woidi ho evidently stealing a riUc, neur Rcscoe, Friday night One leg was cut off and his head was horribly ciushed and mangled. The accident was reported to Ct--i? Grant R. Wilson in this city, who made inquiries, and learned that the man had been seen in Cooks Falls. Friday afternoon, and had told -i chance companion that he intended 1'. jump a freight train and get to Rtoscoe that night. The authorities are investigating his Identity. WHO OWN3 IT. About a month ago a sum of money was found in the business section of and has been advertised in the local paper for three weeks, if the owner does not call within a week MRS. KNICKERBOCKER DIES AT BEACON it will become the finder. property of tho Mrs. Elizabeth A. Knickerbocker, mother of H. H. Knickerbocker, of this city, died Sunday mornim; at at Beacon, N. Y, mfcer a long illness of heart ailment, which had been complicated wiiu pneumonia. Mr Knickerbocker waa summcned on Saturday morning, and with, hit wife was at her bedside when end came. She was conscious up to tbe time of her death and suffered the most excruciating pain for twelva hours until death brought relief. Kind hands ministered all that toman Knowledge could offer her for the past few mouths and only a wonder- ful constitution warded off the final during the many weeks cf saf- f ei ing. ElUabetn. Ann Knickerbocker thf widow of Ferry Knickerbocker, and was In Amenia, county, July 25, 1S50. was daueater of John Thompson, deceas- ed and oue of seven children, two of tkhom surrlre: William Thompson, of Waterbury. Conn., and Mrs. There n Bronson, of Wlnsted, Conn Also surviving is one son, H. H. Knickerbocker, manager of the rimes-Press. One daughter died Hi Infancy. Mr. and Mrs, Knickerbocker had lived at Betcon since 18SS, Mr. erbocker dying there oa July J, 1911, The funeral was held at the hte home Monday, with interment at Millerton, Tuesday, being conducted by Rcr. M. H. Car- of the Pmsbytsriaa Churon. The Ladies' Keltof Corps, Mrs. Knickerbocker was chap- lain, will participate in the serrtan, a cemm grocery store near Viamut'ery was then called. He strwt. She became convinced ner husband's less of appetite press- ing engagements were all centered on the in tnis store. Detective Moore engaged. Acting the actuce oi utr family 1 had known Mr. Grace for some 20 j years in ali, and went over severa conversations witb A 1 Grac-; r Mrs. tne County H. .uoorc. wno arnvfcu ia this viuage oa tae n conversations actior.s him as being perfectly r.iiionaL One bit of tcs'Jmcny r.-as that dut converjjiticin Grace said s, "Let's go in aad bart-j SurroKate of 5llB a tfaf BOARD OF HEALTH MEMBERS INSPECT HULL'S CREAMERY Tuewiaj- morning aad said- ts'nls i-1511 Js ra-ionaJ." isef o! j'Viiicn troKt-j ____. immediately called Zhief 01 T'biice Seegtr atriic renewed j KOUK to the Eagiti liotci, Iroai to admit tJi" place a vitw of the "Kceae of coa- Ju'-5Pe Swcsey rated that it be quest" obtaiiicu. i n: sited to pmJwie Greea] 32-SO ocjock Decker was ZJanncnaaa c3 the con j served passing through a "Jjacijardi Of the grocery store and into tun rear floor. Aitur a wan of about msa- in j ales Cbjttf Konk waikcti UirougJj {innate the rear. Hi- Uecktr SJABUJI is, li'Jy c-islJirtr. oSjce 5a a Jaiiilj w sxirj I _ speak the yaWc me-t- were at for o5aa< r i ing on the qacsJIoa at the jat thin unat tie caskitr waited i loose. This iBeetan? offictsr, jmrcJiafced a Ims of matches. At thai DeKvtixe Moori en- I'-rcd the i-tore from the- fryat n- trance to f-i a i to w533 S. Hojt. lale o5 HOIK', was a3so ad: to pro Jfte t-iurc CaarJca W. 3s APvE Sin S and St 3s to Uhe Jntfr- of every cMzen ol Goshen to at- tend and be as to lie oe- tai3s. pJan.s, etc.. of jirofwcd new system. It to this en3 tnat all are urzod to Jn adffiUcm to Mr. Hcrton. Ovdc ing wjji a3so spca'fe, Mr. roite in I caiSmjer wbo the ji3atis for i As tbe sewer system The i Bacon ajad a of JoraJ lEca n Gaz. ft" )Tj a nt Tim" offlfc. !OVrn h? U-.V, will spsafc farther on sAe ytf Q. APPOINTED TRUSTED traa Mrs ir  in s most Xor. tows. Biros." HM is hwiaess. in jn ar.fl at to rrf-r, I'.r. H. 3. C i Roard, R. no lt< ,ncs. o lie of Jr.-. 1O f-w of 
                            

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