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Orange County Record: Thursday, January 6, 1927 - Page 1

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   Orange County Record (Newspaper) - January 6, 1927, Middletown, New York                               ORANGE COUNTY RECORD VII-NO.49 MIDDLETOWN WASHINGTONVILLE, N. Y., JANUARY PER YEAR. STATES I ON MMFKAflON Avent If k Seeat ef Ike Cwfr __ TflElAlQUOtT district Is not saofficatlo. of the pvovMtng It "eosies 4ke scope of the Constitfr helps to bring about be Mr. fish's statement as to the fatnre eMrse he wfll perm in connection the idteate prob- less of pfoMbiUon answer se taieffur the nun sovetinio asUag him far his attltnwf dry law in view of the OBtcoaw of the refer- ondwn ta which Own district together with aost the dis- tricts of the state went "wet" by aa overwbelniing majority. Mr. fish's reply in .letter form cane yesterday. White not suggesting any plan of his, own whereby the enforce- ment measure might be given a more liberal interpretation or wholly rewritten or giving adher- to aay pltj brpogbt to pub- lic notice by of the so- called' wets he let It be under- stood that lie "open minded" OB any form.of with the.proTiso, of course, that the constitution would not therefore bo nullified or weakened, ffie latter written to Talcott W, Powell, general mana; of this newspaper, follows: 'Replying to your telegram un- der no circumstances will I vote la Congress to violate any part of the Eighteenth amendment, but in view of the two to one vote, -a the Couc district presHjnablv favor of wattflca- nhall he efen-mindfld 'oh any fprm within and. helps ebout more effective enforce ment." New Years Greetings This paper mindful of the high responsibilities about to be assumed takes this opportunity to ex- tend of the New Year to its old friends and to the new. With the beginning of the new year, so pregnant with great possibilities and oppor- tunities for us all this paper will be a greater- paper, stronger, more prosperous, better fitted to protect the rights of its citizens, in stronger position to serve its readers, its friends, the community. There has been but b'itie time to make aH the necessary amusements jt has been a gigantic task to look after the many important details that such a change-brings with it As a resole for a day or so some incenwHiencer to our subscribers We ask them to be patient tf the new paper is not delivered at a reaaonahJe tine on the first day of publication notification at the effiee wiH bring a paper by special messenger. As far as hu- manly possible the new' organization is trying to guard against just seen oeeurreaces but they may happen and if they do we promise speed? rectifica- tion, it will be a short time in any event before aft these difficulties are ircned out and the same prompt, efficient service enjoyed by the aid patrons of both papera heretofore win be the experience ef the new. Again our sincere expressions of best wishes for the new year. 5c PER COPY SLOCUMSEES VIDE SUCCESS FOR DAIRYMEN LEGISLATURE TO SwIUk Are Better- TbcMerm New While farm- the bwften ef swfhw RESUME FEUD WITH GOVERNOR CMtnveny Win Saudi Offer Reorfaaizatioa Haas LOOMS League Cooperative Association. IML. thraacaout tho Hew Tortc saHk nave by MU-aelp opaita Jut essaifletei the year la-the htoUry of their RIDGEBURY CHURCH TO BE Met only nave the menberi of iwt assertsUen had a year. O. W. Stoeina. nrsiMent of to revHwtag the jroar. ttw hut the whole industry baa bene- fited from, the of the d- ut cooperative orgaal. atlon. -My New Teafs nMosage to our members Is one of greater op- timlsni than ever." suid Ilr. tooay la eoMmenting upon the made by the farmers through their own ortantcatlon In their industry wlthunt aaslstunee from the goverii- ment. MAY LOSE ON BONUS LOANS MAMB ALBANY. Jan. 6. with at least .a score of major nitUens and the possibility a Uttir fight with Governor Smith, Ntw state's legislature was to get underway at noon yesterday for its IMth session. What had promised to be a set sJon narked by a lack of disputes between the governor and the G. O. P. leaders of the legislature, today gave evidence of furnishing several hones of contention be- tween, the two when it became known that the special leorgnn- iaatkn committee had not taken any action on plans preferred by the. governor for carrying out the details new governmental system. But the hill AUCE STILL LOOKS FORWARD TO A UFE WITH RHINELANDER NEW ROCHELLE, N. Y.. Jan. 6. faith In San- ta Glaus intact, Mrs. Leonard Kip RhineUnder still Jocks forwaru to reconciliation with ber husband wso unsuccess- fully fought for annulment of their marriage on the ground Shu bad deceived him as to her color. "Some day Kip acd I will together said the former Alice Jones, daughter of a negro tut driver, as she dlacDseed the appeal court rul- which upheld tbe legality of her marriage to the young aristocrat. ins gathered on .evidences of intern- Specitl Fill Middletowi Veteran Satf From Prirate Parties So. far, as ean be learned, the first two war veterans in Middle- town to obtain loans on adjusted compensation certificates were 450 each from priv- Place Jaaaary 16 At Moraag Service Hidgeburjr Methodist ch.nrch, one of the county's historic religi- ous edifices, which has been clos- ed since August for and repairs, will be rededicated January wtth special cere- monies. Df. J. J. .Usury, distrtei ot the morning services, after i members of the -church, their guests- will repair to the parish house for refreshments and a social hour. Dr. Henry also will preside at the Fourth Quarterly conference in the afternoon.. .The congrega- tion of Slate Hill chapel will par- ticipate in the evesicg services, at which the sermon will be de- Besides Burglary and Violation Of Soffivaa Law  w has a wife and three children Soath River. N. J He plead- I Mllty before Jnstico Joaes to irrary and illegal prnwemHon a ran, aad waived elimination cbtrft' Htl" Durlandvllle, Jan. Wil- iam Gross, of New Mllford' Is re- ;ovcrtng today from burns and "In- nrifis received early Christmas day when a kitchen stove exploded In he dross home, showering Mrs. dross with live coals and hot water, ettlng-flre to the bourn and doing- image estimated at Mr. and Mrs. dross were both h kitchen at the time of the xploslon, whllo their son was play- wlth his toys In another room. The explosion broke" the windows In the kitchen, knocked piaster from the walls and wrecked the interior of the kitchen and two adjoining rooms, Floor and took flre from the coals, but Mr. and Mrs. Orrtm wore able to control the tmrbre It (mined headway, Mrs. Orow aided In the despite fact that she struck in the back by a alette of the ateve.. Mile Onl Added to Great Loop With Two OthcrGtiej; Dates Are Set Lexington, Ky., Jan. for next season's. trotting meets were set and three cities were added to the Grand Circuit sched- ule at a meeting of the stewards 1 re yesterday. The cities added are Detroit, Grand Rapids, Mich., Goshen, N. Y. There were no rule chanirs. Officers explained charts had br-n discussed, but since the two parents organizations, the Amer- than ever an thinking of the industry and are realizing that these needs can be met only by united action. Mr. Slocum safd. He declared that could be added annually to the.Income of the If they were fully united, finch saving, he said, could be effected through abolishment 'of plant duplications, savings on freight ratei hauling and broker- age charges by efficient zoning ,of supplies, and without raising costs to consumers. Wider "For generations .dairymen thought only In terms of their own individual said Mr. Slo- cum. "Now they are beginning to think In terms of tire whole indus- try. Problems of the industry can not be solved by one group repre- senting only a part of the Indus- try, no matter how successful that particular group may be In its own affairs. Future of the Industry lies Jn the. unity the fanners are seek- ing-.' Cooperative associations are pointing the way to lead the' ln- iward which U was headed." taxation, including gasoline tax reduction, and plane to the tax limits of cities, school leg- islation along 'the lines ot the rriedsnn report of last year, re- niiation, the All-Ameriean canal, revision of the crime qrga ship housing, highways, of the census, labor legislation, imp year tern for governor, Wen- Some of these subjects will be brought op by committee rpports, there having been special commit- tees or commissions appointed to study and report on reorganiza- tion, labor laws, crime Jaws; re- codifkatioh of the village laws and taxation. In addition there is a commission nlinnin? for the ob- servance of the sesqui-centennial of the Revolution. As the members gathered :n 'ie chambers, they found a profusion ot flowers from well wishers. Desks i neach house were covered with baskets and bouquets. The session todav was otirelv _ .Nine hundred quarts of milk spilled Tuesday afternoon near the High View Creamery, when a truck driven by Prank DeLuco. of Middletown. skidded over a four foot embankment and turned over In the garden of the HJgh' hotel Mr. De- Luco escaped injury, but bis fath- er, who accompanied him, receiv- ed a cut on bis band. The truck had jusr been load- ed at tbe creamery with 76 cases of bottled milk. 50 cans of milk and four cans of cream. When about a hundred feet from the creamery, opposite the 0. W. station, the right rear wheel went off the road when DeLuco lo or- der to secure a better start up a slight Incline, hacked the truck around. Twenty-five cases of bottles were broken and 15 cans of milk a total of 900 quarts. The crash caused those nearby to rush to the scene and upon ar- rival found both men, crawling A Joint installation of the offi- cers of the fourth degree assembly of the Knights ot Columbus, of Middletown, Port Jervis, Monti cello and Coslieii will be held on Sunday afternoon, January IS. in Middletown. They will be install- ed by Ernest Hammer, Master of tbe Second New York District The installation of officers will be followed. by a banquet of which John J. Cullinane Is in charge. The Assembly has also arranged for a card party, at the Knights of Columbus home. January 19, (Hd Fuufiv Meatwes Apk Draw His vors Water Power AibWy By Percy Scott for the benefit of Charily Fund. the Assembly HANKOWTARGET (United Press Staff ALBANY, Jan. 6. Correspond- -The stats enters upon a new chapter in its history "with all the advantages of a carefully prepared program for such an administration of ftj j affairs as will enable it to serve s best interests of all our Governoi Smith asserted in his anuii J message- to tho r D I C I C L K 1 IJ 1 V 1% a W M tho -Mi tee tmek. POULTRY SHOW OPENS -NEW YORK, Jan. 6-The thirty- eighth annual poultry show began yesterday morning at Madison Square Garden. It is estimated that more than ten thousand spe- cimens-will be judged during the. four days of the show, which will come to an end Saturday night Poultry, pigeons, bantams, water fowl and pet stock will be on exhibition. A corps ot approx- imately forty Judges will judge the r'-tsses and award the prizes. The show will be held in the ex- hibition. hall of the Garden and will; require more square feet of floor space than In prev- ious years. Thig expansion was necessary because of the large en- try of stock and the showing of equipment, poultry food and farm- jng materials. for the purpose of organization. Under the ruleis of the assembly no hills can be read tefore Mon- day night, and in the Senate, while several bills were to' be read, they were to be -Warned to where they will repose until active work begins. As a result of the caucuses last night, the houses will organize this way: A. McGin- nies, sneaker; Fred W. Hammond, clerk; Harry Raines, sergeant at arms; Russell G. Dunmore, major- ity leadpr and Maurice Bloch, min- Senates-John Knight, president pro teni; Ernest Payi clerk; Ber- nard Downing, minority leader, and Charles Houghtaling, sergeant at arms. After the organizatio nthe mess- age" .of the governor was to be read bv. both clerks, this -jems; the first time in four years that the governor has not read it hiwlf Members will then draw for their seatsj and adjournment will be taken -until Monday nig' t, when coitfmittee appointments b announced. DINNER The Girls' St. George's Friendly Society of Episcopal Church. Newburgn, Tuesday evening eel ebrated Its 40th anniversary a dinner at the parish house. I------, rr- Citing Asso-' the National Trotting Association were now taking up the advis- ability of altering the Grano" Circuit would not act Tvo had until the r'i" If that a -rovldlng for the, classification of horses according to winnings thin lo tlm- Is favored by some circuit officials. dates follow: Toledo, Ohio, week of July 11; Detroit, week of July 18; Kalaraa too, Mich., week of July 26; Grand Rapids, Mich., week of Aug. 1; North Randall, Ohio, week of Jaly S and 15; Goshen. N. T., (mile week of Aug. 22; Syracuse, N. T., week.of Avf STATE EMPLOYES SALARY HELD UP AS RED TAPE IS UNWOUND ALBANY, Jan. 6. rf I ir the executive department had i A f.f rltA CrdVk the first results of reorganisation of the state government apparent- ly will be that several thousand persons in the employ of state will not draw their checks for ths first two weeks work of the yeat until some time after they are due, January 15. This became known today when it was disclosed that heads of de- partments which became organ- ised, such as the state tax sion and the state comptroller did not certify to the governor and the chairman of the legislative budget committee the fact that they were turning over to the new department chiefs the unexpected of their appropriations. Section 6 of the general law z ng up the and M; Atlanta, Ctat a. week ot i the step being taken. The state finance law also re- quires the new department chiefs to certify to the same officials an itemized statement showing how the transferred balance be ex- pended. But because the first step was not taken this could not be done, and the governor and fin- ance chiefs are unable to thpir annroval to trm comptroller wh'ch mutt also he done. Tt a to m-epare the payroll of some of the tment" owing to tbo fact the rolls checked hv t'if civil scTJce comwisfiion and the office tbr The truck was hauled back on the" road and taken to a nearby garage, where tt was found that it was only slightly damaged. The "rest of the milk was sent later In the day by another truck owned by DeLuco. The creamery is owned by the Progressive Grocery Stores, Inc. of New York and the milk is taken daily to New York by Mr. DeLuco to their headquarters for distribution to retail stores. J. Spencer Weed, formerly of Mid- dletown, Is.president of the com- pany owning the creamery. EXPRESS CO. EMPLOYES ARE SEEKING INCREASE First Hearing Held in New York City American Express company employes residing In Middietown are awaiting with Interest the report of a board of arbitrators in regard to a demand for a 12 per cent wage Increase. The board is now .hearing evidence in the case In New York City. Lewis Gwyn, vice-president of the company, appeared before the boar' yesterday to oppose the increase. He stated that the company is not In a position to grant the increase because of in- juries suffered during tlie war through government control, monev inflation and unprofitable contracts. A Bellinger, president of the Order of Railway Expressmen. presented data on the cost of liv- ing In justification of the men's demand. It n's reference to [korganization the guverament, j whicfcywent into operation last I Saturday, the governor said: If C L- i i> "This very is now an U. S. Warships Among Vessels outer form, an instrument, a tool Anchored Off Chinese City for Iwith to make our govern- Protection of Nationals to the public will and more efficient in the con- duct of its affairs. The real test HANKOW. Jan. 5 States gunboats chored off this today were an turbulent city a -ailing the possible necessity u; going into action to protect Amer I of its effectiveness will not be the perfection of its i) i; iTtMt iijsi cause it is well organized, x lean property from Chinese mobs reorganized government must e anti-foreignism already has be able to safeguard tbe nealtlb, living, working and business con- taken form in violence against Britishers and the British conces- sion. United States property had not been affected nor had the Japa- "cse and French concessions been violated today because of the anti- British flare Monday with up which began clash between na- tives and British sailors and ma- rines from tbe gunboats Magnolia, These three swuug with Woolstan and Bee. Trltish vessels also th ourrent of tbe Yangtze river today, their guns and landing par- ditions of al! thg peoi-.Sc. and io care adequately for the unfor- tunates who can not care for them selves.'' Then after showing that, the to- tal esHjrratttl (lie chief t-xfca tive takes up" taxation and sug- gests that the state will be' a position to make reductions to onr taxpayers very much alo'rig the lines adopted at the last -.session' ties ready to act for tbe protec- j the Legislature. These Auc- tion of British itions consisted of a 25 per .cent British women and cb.'ldren to- rebate on the income tax payments day were order :d by officials to land holding the direct strte- tax FAMILY NEARLY SVFFOCATED BY OIL STOVE SMOKE FAIR OAKS. Jan. farri- ily of Harvey York" narrowly es- caped asphyxiation by fume? from an oil stove last week wher, the Btove smoke filled he diir- Mr. York was rnvas.ered by the smell smoke aad quickly car- ing the night. rier Hie oil stove froii the house. The stove had been left burning :o plants from freezing. the concession, and subur- ban Britishers were summoned to come inside the concessions so that their protection might be fa- cilitated. Local British officials, exasp.r- ated by the spirit of the Chinese, said tlie attitude of the nationalist troops din- ing the early disorders had been tantamount to a declaration ol ar. But the situation scemrd to be quieter today with Cantonese troops guarding the British con- fo the municipal banks. to one and one-half mills Stressing the fact that taxation should be .equitably ;he governor recommends that thf legislature adopt recommendations 01 the special taxation orvniii .v. which has studied the foi several years, are uh'y to itoprove of Takir o up ths subjec' of the re- crganuation ;f the today where Chi: ist PEKING, Jan. 5 The Unit ed States dcstrcycr Ford was pro- ceeding to tr; of the f-rces -vere the cliy while it. '-a city of on the Yangtze river, fifty iriles south- T.--t of Nf buildins j the governor refers to his appear- ance before the special revising the laws and MS recom- (Continued on I'ago Three) MANflEKlG COMMISSIONER OF JURORS JOB LOST AS BLAST DESTROYS BARQUE Craft Sinks Off Baltimore; 32 Appointment for Five Years BALTIMORE, January G. And Paying Likely Three men missing after an ex- plosion and fire which destroyed and sank the French barque Rich eleu in Curtis bay were given up as dead by authorities vesttirflay To Be Made Soon One of tbe questions which now agitating tbe minds of a con- Thirty-twd Injured, 29 of whom siderable number of the-people-of were deck hands, were being; Orange county just at present is treated at hospitals. I (fle nf stniointrnfitir Ten French naval cadets on a Commissioner of Jurors, the Boa.-c of Supervisors having re- boat saved their lives by fleeing when Captain Jules Coren order- ed the vessel the explosion. Cause of the abandoned after explosion Is not checks ean drawn. Uwallv the mil the fivil not larnr thnn .Tnnusry 8. but the frst had not reach- ed wt. today. today it dewloped that only straightened nut within ten days. FEDERATION OF WOMEN'S CLUBS HOLDS SESSION The regular monthly meeting of the Federation of Women's Clubs wai held Tuesday after- noon, at the Parish house. Dr. Shelley gave ft talk on the Toxin-Antitoxin campaign. The Federation endorsed the campaign. The program meeting was In charge of associate members, .Mrs. William Herman, chairman. Mrs. Albert Green gave four reci- tations and Herbert H. Teller three selections, "Hear Me, Ye Wind and Handel: 'The Kevin; and JosaablM ilcOIU. known. Tbe ship was being load- ed with pitch when the explosion occurred late yesterday. Firemen battled the flames for six hours, rescuing the injured men from the hold until the ship turned ov- er and sank a little before mid- night. WAUKILL CIVIC CLVB IN SESSION TUESDAY The Wallkill Civic Club held Its regular monthly meeting, Tues- day afternoon, at the home of Mrs. Ralph Smith, of Mechanics- towi. There were eight members present. Miss Louise Dunning gave a report of her Christmas Held work. Tbe town of Wall- kill's quota was They have reached and gone over the quota A report of th? Convention of the League of Women Voters at Syra- cuse was given. The club ad- journed to ftbnurr. meet some time In cently taken action providing for j such an official. There are a number of app'icants for the po- sition from various sections oi the county, and the question now in the minds of the people, and especially In the minds of the ap- plicants, is. who will Ret the ap- pointment. The law provides that the ap- pointment shall be made by uiu Justice of the Supreme. Court re- siding ,'n the county, the county judge, and the county clerk. II Is expected that within a few days Justice Seeger, County Judge WiSRins "ml County Clerk Wi'- Ham B. Ponoyar will meet and decide who is to fill the position The appointment will bo for period of five years, and the sal- J ary paid Is based on the popuki- 1 tlon of the county .in which appointment is made. In the cnsa of Orange county being fl.ROO. Each panel of jurors will hn drawn In tini-McnHy the sanv> n cor J? at present, but thow who support the new commis- sioner plan claim that It will TO- J suit In an nnnnal saving to thi county of K IB axcesa ot officials salary.   

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