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Dunkirk Evening Observer Newspaper Archive: July 20, 1921 - Page 1

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Publication: Dunkirk Evening Observer

Location: Dunkirk, New York

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   Dunkirk Evening Observer (Newspaper) - July 20, 1921, Dunkirk, New York                                DUNKIRK EVENING OBSERVER VOL. CV. DCNKJRK, N. Y.. -WEDNESDAY, JULY 20, 1921 mm Witneu, Who Turned States dtnce, Dodaret He Ww the Go Bttwten Who Hud- f ledthi' Money. ALLEGES GAMBLERS TRIED TO DOUBLE CROSS PLAYERS After Games Were Delivered Ac- cording to Agreement, Only a Part'of the Promised Reward Was Forthcoming. Jiily 20.r-Cross examina- tion ot BUI Burns, who turned states evidence on the "Black Sox" trial here started [today.-1 Defense attorneys made a bitter at- tack. testimony of Burns, who (wears he.acted as. in negotiations by means of which the 1919 world series was "sold out" by gamblers by seven mem ben of the Chicago White Sox who are on trial. The picturesque O'Brien, defense counsel wearing his red-neck- tie and a blue.striped silk shirt, start- ed to cross examination. "How much money have you re- ceived" from Ban shouted SINN FIN, Fair toalfht Thursday NO. 2t War Department Tried to Get Out of Calling Him Before Bergdoll Chr. Peters Contends. July Peters ot houeo BergdoU commit- tee today attacked the war depart- mont for what he called lax methods Valera represents eighty per cent ofM" ordering to Washington Major the Irish population and therefore Is Bruce Campbell, named by Mrs. Em- aual fled to represent the nation In ina IJergdoll as tU'e-man who demanded dealing with Craig ropre- from her "to fix higher ups It is Made Known That If Peace Negotations Fail; More Drastic Measures Than Ever Will Be Used TO KILL m By CHARLES MCCANN (United Press, Staff Correspondent.) London, July tha Irish peace .negotiations, quivering in tho eani, "v, today Jt wai authorl- 0btalQ tatfvely that failure of the conferences will be. followed by an unparalleled campaign of military repression-iu Ire- and... 'If'the present effort toward'peace Is power of the gov- ernment will be exerted, to utterly Th3 'court upheld objections of the elate and the question went unanswer- then flashed some pictures crush the Sinn Peln. High offlcialsjn formed the United Press that plan have been prepared which will ylrtua ly turn Ireland Into a vast milltnr In view of-the apparent deadlock, The committee expected to oxa- Brltlsh officials were serious in pro: mine Campbell today, but was forced ceedlng with plans for blotting out the tp postpone tho'meeting because the Sinn Fein. Among these proposals officer had not arrived from Camp 'Pike, Little Rock Ark., last marUuI law m-an Intent.'he denied the charges. "On Bald i nskt BEER REGULATION MAY BE PUT INTO EFFECT Washington, July congress takes action within a few days on the bill to prohibit use of beer as a medicine, rcgula- tlon! covering tho manufacture and use of beer as such will bo Issued and put Into eftoct, David 4- H. Blair, commissioner of intern- al revenue said today. ed. "Ro'pes" oh' purns and yelled "are these pic- tures of Abe Again the state barked objections. "Ropes" again. "Did you get from Ban John- asked O'Brien. said the witness. "Those were my expenses for two months." How much of this went to your wife and.how much to you? "I don't know." Q. Have you had any visible means of support-during the last year other than. Ban Johnson A. Yes, I worked in Mexico. Q. You went to Mexico when you were indicted? A. Yes. Burns said he came back to the Un- ited States in Apriland met Ban John- aon on the border. .Q. AVhat were you doing In Texas while j-ou were getting money from Johnson. A. X was fishing. Q. For what? Witnesses? Burns then told of coming to Chic- ago with Ban Johnson. Q. You knew you were under In- dictment when you came to Chicago? A. Yes. "Ropes" then chided the state's at- torney for talking behind and disturbing the cross-examination, Q. Being under Indictment didn't you, did It Burns? A. No. Burns then admtted Ban Johnson's secretary regstered for him under the name of Williams at a Chicago hotel. Q. Why? iA. To keep away from reporters and publicity. Q. What name are you under now at the hotel! 'A. Williams. Q. When traveling around the country who paid your A: Johnson. Burns told ot going from New York to Cincinnati. Q. .What did you go for? A. To see the world scries. prison, crushing the country's ecouomi life and putting a tag on every Iris citizen. The' danger, that the plans may bf come operative was shown In the att tude of the various conferees today Premier Craig of Ulster was back in Belfast with General Smuts on hi trail, apparently in an effort to ar range his participation In-some way in further negotiations. Sinn Fein delegates here hesitated to comment on Craig's departure after asserting that Ulster would deiuam recognition in the settlement. Sinn Feiher8 did not know whether Sir James was talking for tho beneffl of Ulsterites or whether he. had the ap- proval of Premier Lloyd-George ot Great ..Britain. If the latter were the case H was certain that the Sinn Feln- withdraw immediately from the. conferences. ;.Meanwhile: .Wesmond Fitzgerald, chief propagandist for the Sinn Fein- era has asserted positively that Ul- ster will not be admitted to the main conference but will have to treat with southern Ireland after peace is arrang- ed .with Great Britain. "The conference thus Fitzger- ald said, "has been on tlio basis of Mr. IJpyd-George's presenting Eng- land's .case and .Mr. de Valera'i glv- ng Sinn Fein's views. "Sinn Fein wants to deal with Bug- Sinn. Fein sections. n I, aumiutij i'Uiei'H, 1 UHK- to be posted In all clt- ed the war department to order Ma les and towns and strong military for- jor Campbell to take the stand T IniVL? the open country. In-his own defense." A telegraphic i Cj. ,D Ensland as wo" order was prepared but not sent when as Ireland to. be reglstored photograph- I called Monday. I supposed It was ed and thumb-printed. All citizens Isent Monday, Im't apparently "this was demand to not the case. 1 today demanded that A IT t tho war department obtain Immediate restrictions on even or-1 confirmation from the cdmhfandant of Camp Pike ot the delivery" ot this br- ier.' wil show their I dinaVy travl action against disloyal d< government employes. to enter or leave Ire- land. drastic penalties for con- sorting with rebels. effort to catch rebels jn tho make-certain that authorities Ket in touch with every one In Ireland, Tagnetg will bo thrown out so that a cordon of troops will sweep through very section, no matter how rugged r wild. "No one gives a damm about the.or- Inary an official said when sked what would happen to the.clv- ians If these plans became cffoctive. "I.don't mean that he said, jut we have got to- make It Impogsi- Is Delayed for a Day Because of Bad Re- main at Norfolk. i we must dostrlct tho civilian pop- lation among whom the rebels move bout. We must make It Impossible in Sinn Fein to move its army." j There will be no reprisals, it was ated, but everything will bo under rict military, control. The .plans will not be carried out un- Mt Is detlnltely.shown that the" Lon- don negotiations are useless. Then the 11 A v i uss. en e conferences full'power of. tho government will Tie nd .with Ulster alone en Irish soil. De used to break tho Sinn Fein, Q. Did you see any of the games? A. No, I didn't want to get mixed up in the large crowds. <3. What -were you doing in Cin- cinnati? A. I .was there on behalf of Attel Eothstein anfl Maharg. The court recessed for lunch. Germany Wants To Be Friendly With The French Chancellor Wirth Tells of Advances Made But Attitude of the French Is Most Disheartening. Syracuse, N. T., July it L. Millor this afternoon named tho slnto motion picture commission, former State Senator trgo H. Cobb of Watcrtown, Mrs. Ell T. Hosmer of Buffalo and Joseph Leveiison of New York. Senator Cobb will bo chairman of tho new commission. His term Is to end December 31, 1325. Mrs. lIonmor'H term Is fixed to end with the year 1024. Mr. Levaneon will be secretary of tho commission serving until December 31, 192Z. The commission ae named by aa-a mirprlse, nono 9: the three chosen having, been men- tioned before. .1 Norfolk, Va., July bombing tests scheduled for today off Ilamp- :on Roads were postponed duo to un- settled weather. Word of the postpone- ment was Hashed to the army and mvy pianos just as they were prepar- ng to bomb tho fornier German bat- tleship Ostfrlosland. "Prevailing weather makes the tost Impracticable today." tho message from the commandant bf the air forcca stated. Carpenter, Enraged at Decision at dustrial Commissioner Denying Him Compensation, Did His Best to make Threat Good. Buffalo. July K. Reyn- olds, 40, Buffalo, enraged at Deputy Commissioner Charles K. Blatchly o ho Btuto industrial commission, for noi aJlowlnsr him compensation under tho vorkmen'fl compensation law, shot ut lio cummlnslonoi- thrao times today In he equity term of tho supremo court. Anthony Addarlo, 40, who waa los- fyine at tho time of tlio shooting was truck by a otray'bullet'In tho base f tho skull and probably fatally oundcd. Tho commissioner nt tbo biiglnnlns f tho Bhots, dodged behind a bench nd unharmed. Imd testified earlier In tho ly that ho had hurt himself while orklng on u job aa carpenter's helper. Is clnlm was not allowed by Isslonor lilatchly. As Reynolds left tiio turned nd shouted to the commissioner, "You nil bettor poy mo that money or I'll t you." ccmmluloner. thought nothing moro or the throat und Adda'rlo war stand to testify on ho was. alleged .to. received whin working on a, Job... Reynolds, meanwhile, had and opened: fire'.ohBlatchly With Hi automatic revolver. Tho lirri above tho commissioner's head and dropped Judge's bench. P. A. Sullivan, a. lawyer, who was sit- tine; In the rear oE tho court room. Jumped up ami jrrabbo.fl Reynolds' arm as tho fhot was fired. Reyn- olds' aim was broken nnd the shot Addarlo. Tho third shot went Into Blatchly during Hie excitement ran down, tho tlsio and helped disarm Reynolds. was taken to police head, quartcrs aria n llvo Inch hunting was also round hidden In his Io Ig held upon an open olmrge until Iddarlo'i are determined. W SEMINT At Jap Ambassador Takes'Position It Could Not Come Up for Dis- cussion at Harding Con- ference. Cleveland, July By CARL D. GROAT Berlin, July Joseph Wlrth of Germany in an interview will the United Press today appealed fo: FOB DEATH OF IE New York, July F. COch- enour today brought suit for against Ills landlord, George H. Jack- son, alleging, that the landlord's fail .ure to heat apartment last. Feb- ruary caused the death of. the "plain- tiff's son, William.. Jackeon's answer to the suit simply states that he could not be -held re- sponsible for supplying hfnt to his ten- MERT JOHNSON FINED FOR RECKLESS DftlVING Mert Johnson of Cassailaga who was trrested In connection with a collision en the State Road last Sunday niglit for reckless pleaded guilty to the.charge before Justice of the Peace L. G. Mqnrpe this afternoon at Fre- dqnia and was fined <25. He was also given a sentence In the county Jail for six months, which was suspended on condition that he refrain In tie fu- ture from reckless driving and that he 'pay for the damage done in Sun- tho friendship of .France. "Wo earnestly doslre a .friendly un derstandlng he said "These are not mere words, but are our real feelings. "We ore ready to 'rebuild France In any way Eho'daslres. She can write her-own ticket. "The frlendcy echo which this cabi- net's policies awoke at first through- out the worH, including Franco, con- vinced us we were on' the right track'. Kojv, however, France'd attitude on the division of Silesia comes to rne aa a slap In the face. I ask myself whether Franco'really wants to como to on un- derstanding with ua." The clmncellor -showed deep concern over the French attitude, declaring It has a great bearing on whether his government stands or falls; "1 did not inks the chancellorship nerely for the honor' of the he said. "'I formed the government to fulfill tho allied ultimatum honestly and sincerely. "How I tried la shown by tho ftict that we havo paid Bums demanded long before the were fixed and by the fact that wo met the ultimatum that Germany disarm. "Wo have disarmed the eastern for- tresses and dissolved the self-defense organizations; we are now practically an unarmed folk." Tho Entente must reckon, Wijth said, with the possibility that Uila cab- inet, which is striving to meet Ita obli- gations, will be, overthrown If Ger- many's Silcslan lands are lost and If the occupied Rhino cities are not re- leased soon. "This Is not a club for tho le oald, "but a straight fact. I nek my- self It I could appear Before tho Relch- itag this fall and say 'I've emptied your lockets and have nothing in return to show you.' "The Reichstag would never pass ur finance program and without tha tho WIrth-Rathcnau cabinet would b inablo to exist" ot a black serge coat and a straw hat on tho dock of tho 'ittsburgh Coal Company near Main Avenue, led Cleveland pollcs to be- love that the owner F. N.. Dcrltobllo, f 4042 Prospect Avenue, ommitted suicide. A note found In the pocket ot the coat bid good-bye to the writer's wife, saying It was his intention to end all and asked that his atorney W. J. Bul- lion of the Ellicott Square Building, Buffalo, be notified. Coast guards dragged tfie fiver In the vicinity ot the place where the coat and hat were found, but failed to flnd the body. The name Blrkoblle appeared in tho hat band ot the hat. By LLOYD ALLEN United Frctig Stuff Correspondent) (Copyright 1921, by tho United Press) London, July Tup and Shantung settlements are accomplished facts and there Is no need for a con- ference, of the powers In connection with tho proposed Washington disarm- ament parley to revise them, Baron hl, Jupant-'Ko ambassador to Great Britain, declared today In an intor- vlow. Tho ambassador dlscusuod tbo llnk- ff of the "Pacific question" with tlio conference on disarmament. Stating that bo was oxprcsfllng bin personal opinion, ho declared that many things which mjglit be considered un- der the general topic of "Pacific qutiw- tton'.' already Imvo been settled by tbo Versailles treaty. Ho reiterated Japan's lienrty willing, ness to dlflcuns limitation of. armi Pblice Now Have Weapon To Quell Mob Disturbances New Tear Gas Tried in Philadelphia With Marked Success, Two Hun- dred Policemen Being Put Out. rhlladulphla, July "gnu bomb1' .squads, duty will bo to quell riots and mobs, capture motor bandits and rout criminals who barri cndo themselves In by tho use or gns bombo, will bo formed Im- mediately In tho Philadelphia imllco department, It was announced today. Kilablishmont of this now fomi ot police protection will lie the result of a tost of a new gas.made at tho pollco farm yesterday. The 'osln wero super- vised by Malor Stephen DcLand, who developed tlio gns. Superintendent of Pollco Mills wit- nessed tho tealo and wna very enthus- iastic. Tlirco different tests were dispersing: a mob, another capturing a motor bandit and tho third routing a barricaded -A mob" of two hundred policemen was scattered when this bombs explod- ed In Its midst and tlio "rioters" to weeping, choking1 and -snorting. A. "bandit" In a speeding automobile forced to stop a policeman on a motorcycle tossed n gas bomb Into his machine. If ho had not stopped he would hnvo lost control ot the car. In the third tost two "criminals" whof mrrlcadert themselves In a vacant IOUBO, wero captured when tlio gna jomba wero used. Tboro worn no 111 cltootu on "victims" vho Inhaled the The bombs ore inches long and wolgh seven, luncen. They ozplodo will) a nolso ilmllar to a firecracker. BETS HE KISSES "What In tlio 'Pacific ho nskod. "What IB to be discussed? "That Is tho whole thing In a nut- rtliell. Matters that possibly might bo brought up na part of tho 'Pacific ques- tion' already havo bcon dcc.lt with In tho Versailles treaty. "It is clear that such matters (is Shantung, Yap, New Guinea and so 'orth, If raised, might result in a gen- eral conference on malters that havo the status of cccompllshod facts." THOUSAND (URLS On a Hike From New York to San Along to See Him Do It. day's accident. He was represented burn. by L. J. Kil- Explaining FarmiVt MlHlng Duoki. Near Mountain View there Is a creek that pinnies Into a hole and disap- pears. It reappcnri on the other side ot Blue mouBUln, Screnl jnn no fanner who lived tie point the creek diMppmfi into a flock of ducki. found them on the other vllle. Police in Meadvllle, Corry and Erie were requested to be on the lookout for the machine containing Randolph and his captors. CONFINING THAT DESTROYED .ASPHALT PLANT N. J., July were being dug around the Warnsr- Qulnla'n asphalt plant .here today as a ireeautlon against possible spread of Ire which practicality destroyed the big plant here late Monday and yester- Sharon, Pa., July ransom bubble was threatened with destruction, today as police sped over the road to Franklin and Meadvllle in an effort to apprehend Thomas M. Randolph, 32, and his supposed kid- nappers." Randolph, a Sharon stationery store owner, was seen by an old ac- day. quaintance less than ten miles from A heavy rain late lore yesterday, end more than fifteen bring the fire under hours after his supposed abduction. At that time he driving his auto- mobile ;and wai accompanied by a wo- man and a man. Just before dawn today the police received a tip that .Randolph had phoned to his wife here from a hotel In Franklin. Tbli Information' later was confirmed and the Franklin police were notified to detain Randolph but when they arrlted at On hotel he had left and then ohaie becan. Chief LudidomM of the A heavy rain late yesterday helped the fire under control. The loss was estimated at i tie trial CARS COLLIDE Forestvllle, July Ford tonr- Ing car owned by Harold Crowell ot village and an automobile owned by 0, B. Morse ot tho town ot Sher- idan, came In collision Sunday even- Ingon the Bennett state road, near the Hall Clothier farm. Both machine! were going about eight miles in hour. 'Crowell's ear wai pushed into a ditch by. the larger car. No one was In- le Ford'nai badly damaied towed to a local NAVY PERFECTS STAR SHELL The nmtos.vidor doclarcrl It was bis opinion that a practical solution of all Succets Marks Its Use as a Substl- Problems would be postriblo without In- tute for Searchlight to Locate terferlng "with matters of principle al- Enemy at Sea. experiments to develop the use of "star shells" ns a substitute for searchlights In search- Ing for enemy craft ore being con- ducted by the Navy department .with what some officers describe as con- siderable success. A "Cashless" powder Is being used In propelling the shells from the guns. Chevy Jim The shells light up the sea for a wide' f area and officers explain that, If they can be projected without a betraying flash from the ship firing them, they will be a far .advance over the search- light, as the beams from 'the latter be- tray the exact location of the ship projecting them. It le said that experiments have now readied the point where "star shells" that: will Illuminate for several min- utes n great area of the sea far dis- tant from the firing ship have been perfected, and along with rtein, a powder which shows no flame or .flash when the "star shells" are projected from the ship. Tor guns of three In- ches or smaller, the new system Is said !o work almost perfectly, but In the arge giing It Is understood that all of the flash of discharge has not yet teen eliminated. Bring Out Hoardad Qold. widespread destitu- tion caused by unemployment litre Is bringing out the fold hoarded by aany persona In prospwoni There hai been a most fti- create In tbt nnmbtir W nrcrcini and lialf-loTCKlgni ti drculntloo In the Ijmt few weeks. Previously It was bfl rare occaitoei aorerclpi or was tendertd. National Open Tournament today when he tourued Ina 69 for 18 holes of otinslstent golf. .George Duncan, British star playing with Barnes made 72 Duncan made marvellous approach shots and a spectacular putt from a- bunker but several short putts ran up his score. Barnes score Is within'one of tho re- cord 68 set by Bobby Jones of. At- lanta, In practice here recently. Peter O'Hara Wcsttfeld, N, J., made the second best score ot 71. Bobby Jones the Atlanta boy star, had considerable difficulty and had" to a 77. Tho Duncan-Barnes match ottered the most spectacular golf of tho tourn- ament thus Jar. Barnes sunk a 25 foot put for a birdie two on tho sixteenth hole. On tho eighteenth he laid his. long iron shot down within three feet of tho pin holing out for a birdie 3. The scores. Barnes (out) 435, 454, In 454, 344, Duncan (out) 653, In 344, 315- 34-72 Now York, July SO.-CIri, between Now York and San Francisco had bet- ter look out, Hugh and Malcolm Hnr- ilyman, two Brltlsbcr0 who havo for- saken the old country for Greenwich Village, are on their way hiking It out [o 'tho Pacific coast Intent on watch- ing tho antics of a "titled" poet who has bet thorn Hint he will klos ono thou- damsels rnrouto or pay forfeit ot His name withheld. They wero eyed from apartment windows. Tousled curlcy watched them furtively from behind half closed shut- ters. "Vcu bet I'll kiss 'cm nil said tljo titled ono aa lio Wow a finger kleii at a negro washerwoman. "They can't refueo my Irish smile." The llardy- mnn brothers punched him playfully In tho solar plexus. They djn't believe walk Is Juet going to pay for two automobllra." they Bald. According to the terms of the hot MIL 1922 Washington, July United States government considers Itself 'under obligations to foreign debtor nations to dofer Interest payments on their debts" Secretary of the Treas- ury Mellon today told the senate fin- nee committee. Mellon said ho accepted as a bind- ing obligation an understanding roachod hi 1910 In negotiations be- tween an American treasury repre- sentative named Rathbono and a British representative named Black- ed that the interest would be defer- red until 1922 at least. Former Secre- tary of tho Treasury Houston said such an understanding or promise ex- Mellon said, and he took HOUB- n's statement as binding. Mellon himself had no discussioo with other governments regarding ex- tho trio may ueo any mode ot travel except railroads, provided that they pay no money for transportation. tension or deferment of Interest ha "DEAD" MAN RETURNS HOME Suppoied Victim of Railway Accident Olvet Hli Relatives Very Happy Surprise. Toungstown, O. Silliness was turned Into rejoicing when W. J. Mills, who was Identified us having been killed by a train near Williamson, W. Va., last April, walked Into tbe home of Ills daughter, Mrs. Ida Mnlonc, Pnrkernburg, W. and, gave her nnd his two sons a surprise that they will long remember. Instead of grieving over (lie passing of their father, whom they believed Dover, N. J., July a bandit battle here early today, thieves wore wounSed and a third es- caped. Ono hundred shots were fired. Entrenched la the roadway behind riot gun police awaited tho Broach in an automobile. Word ha4 jeon tolnphoncd along road that fi .rlo of hold-up men were coming Iti ho direction of Dover from Nctconjt where thoy had looted a garage ans stolen a truck. As the truck was killed, they are Impplly explaining t'r'ler0'1 tho mqn fjlaUtr Not About, m tliel'r c tliclr coun- try there It a cow w.overy Inhabitant. can by replying that aver has a gout, but they don't.do modi talking on .the Mb- how they were mistaken when they Identified another for hlm'ln n morguo In Williamson. Hills explained that he had been visiting friends In Youiigstown, and Hint be was so deeply the steel city, Its environment and suburbs that he forgot to write. Thd family Is trying to decide what disposition to make of tho body of the nan who was burled In the family plot near but they opentvJ fire and i run the gauntlet. A fusllflde of shots poured Into the truck and It iialtcd before It .had-gone a hundred yardet .The man at th4 wheel, Michael MoDonouffh( was ncajr death from seven wounds, Wdrrctf: Smith was hit throo times. The thirl man escaped, loot consisted of at _ tires and Inner tubes token from garage ot Fred rjlrchzo at Notconf, for nnat our havt tf in tin olISUKVlStt H will   

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