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Dunkirk Evening Observer Newspaper Archive: November 13, 1890 - Page 1

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Publication: Dunkirk Evening Observer

Location: Dunkirk, New York

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   Dunkirk Evening Observer (Newspaper) - November 13, 1890, Dunkirk, New York                               VOL. XX. REPRESENTATIVE CJSINBSS HOUSES OF DUNKIRK. NEW RCI4NG MACHINE for ruling Ulankil U th8 latMlwIUltiOD he Mocban nul Department at nnnng Company. B.1 sued not tables. and 225 Central Ave. -ipner Innantaneoni of Babies a specialty. Sltteri wait for annnhme except for IBVISO. Pro- 1 pnutor. So. IB E. Second street, near Bul- aloaireet, Dunkirk. N. T. Mapumei, Mu- ic. etc., bound m all stylus. Unlen mDiptiv .itten.ieil to. AJ1 work guaranteed. BHHCBEK'S CROCKER V HOUSK, 3W Central Arenue. svnoicaalij ind retail dealer in Imported anil loineunc China. UUuuiware, I HOTICI, Kates, per day. L.iTei-7 ami Boarding Stable IK connection. Victor Rider, SB and 337 Lion ulreet. DUNKIRK. N. Y... THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 1890. WASHINGTON GOSSIP. management of the paper to-day Jrtth Richard WeiBhtonaa editor. Samuel Maddox is the president of the new com- URAMATIC SCENE AT THE TREA3- pany; Joim C- Poor  originate.! iii.-.ci staircase in the quarters of the married men. All the adult inmates were rescue i by meanu of ladders amid great excitement. A numbernf children suffer- ing with measles were wrapped in andjaken to places of shelter. When the fire was discovered, and tba signal for "flra parade" was sounded on tne bugles, the troops assembled promptly wit splendid discipline, and worked with I OB PRINTING ol every description and at v lowest living rzlea by Company. S and 10 K. second St. t H. X'AN BCTRKN a SON, Pire. Lile, Acciiient and General lusuracja. Deal- art m Kcal Udtate and Luang, i'ariicular ilteiition paiU to tne ol collect- or renU in. il'J (Jcnter St.. 2nd door. PHARMACY, 300 Central Avenue Will Paper Pa.nt Oils, Ac. PSHKJLN3, J. W., Ceuter street, and ilvaler in Jn.llt-s. collars. Trunks, Buffalo Uobea Hurse Covers ttob--s 17 Kast Third street, ailor. Uentlemen will and it tc Uicir ailvaatage to call on me before purchaam elaewbere. H. CAKY CO.. It i Lion streeL General Hardware. Wbite Leail.Olla.PaioUir' ouppliea. oil Cloths, Granite Ware. A special ty 01 Sherwiz. VV.Uiams Pa. at and Monroe range. t> C jiich us blank-books, ledgers, an ilMwf ulaukB done at aKirk Printing- d anil 10 B. aocuaU at. and buying RUUOLl-a .tlULDKNUADER, Cor. Third and Buffalo Su.. in Gnimte, Marble. Pihgx Uuiulmi; Stone. Call on me iwioru your sitft-walk. 11 i fV CO.. T and 9 Bast Front street. Whisky, Wines. Brandies. rxl Liquor store for Use. ROBERT McKAY, Lion street, near the depot. Boiirding, Sale, Feed and Livery Stable. -Ui. hng by the day or week on reasonable terms. J. GLTFOKD, 30] Central AVS. (Up O General Ituurauce and Real Batftte Agt-nu Fire, l.ifc. Accident, anil Live Stock usurauce. attention inv sn to buvinjc ind tiling Kttiiie. 1C. JONfcB. 75 S. Third BI., uor. Deer, ileav Markel. Fresh, and Ho'ulu? AC. Buy the Aurora BaUroatl WaUih. laity. Third at. a apeciiltv. Prank F. Stapl. Si E. TSm Tailor, US Central Avenue HEALTH IS WEALTH! DB. K. C. NKXVB BBAIB a. guaranteea apcetflc for Nervoui ria, Convulnoni, Fi Neuralgia, Headache, Nervous caused by the one ot alcohol or tabacco, follnesa. Mental Depression, Softening ol the Brain resulting m insanity and leadi misery, decay and death. Premature Old Bamnneas, Loee ot power in either iex. In- volnntary Losses ana caamw br of the brain, lelf-abiue ox orer-inttnlgence. EacliboxcontauuaiieaioiiUu treatment. tLOt a hex. or boxes for to.de tent by mail prepaid on receipt of price. WK GDARANTKK SO. BUXKS To cure any case. With each order receive by as for six boxes, accompanied with w will Mnd the purcnuer our writtm gnarante to rerand the money il the treatment doei no effect n can.GaaranUes maed only by MOB BOC'9 PMAJUtACT. goto ACCUt. JOO s.T. Ceatn that Mr. Raymond would in making the svstem for which he absolutely perfect if he could wipe om an inequality which was known and recognized over the whole country as far as Vancouver. Pnor to Mr. Elaine's speech arguments bad been made on both sides of the ones tiou. Those who addressed themselves to the question were: Ex-Sen.itor O D Conger of Port Huron, representing th.' interests of Port Huron; J. K McCain mon, represent ng the railroad.; W. A. Day. representing the Canadian Panne: A If re.! Russell the Interests of ths A. Raymond of the Trunk and Canadian Pan tic railroads Canada, a Daniel Mahone of the OUeiisbur-'T Watertown. Several present. Col. James a Hosmer, late secretarv o Legntiou in Central Auienca, and consu general at Guatemala, is in Washington He left Guatemala on Sept. In regar. to the revolution in Honduras. Col Hos mer.said: "in all of the ,evun republics there is a spirit lhat 'jronds mischief. Th feeling is strained now, and if the keeps much longer a may follow. It us my opinion that the state of disquietude is from abroa-1. I don't country which now state department hi these people. ppropnations this country Chnrch extension and educational soeietiesdo their work here, but in foreign fields these Items hnve to be met from the general missionary appropriation. The demand for enlargement of the appropriations for foreign minsions was urgent Rev. M. L. Carll of Ohio warned the convention lest while they were making weak efforta in foreign lands immigrants from abroad flock to onr shores and cor- rupt our faith. Bishop Andrews urged even larger appropriations for foreign missions. Bishop Bowman also argued in favor of enlarged appropriations for foreign work particularly m Africa. South America! China, Germany, Switzerland and Scan- dinavia. Bishop Thobun of Indiana addressed an evening meeting and a reception was given at the Bromfleld street chnrch in honorof Bishop Mallaliu. together LiFecrively acrordiug to rhe manuel. lie officers were delighted with the intelligence nnd willingness dis- played under the emergency, and cheered the men on in their heroic efforts to ir-iin control of rhe flames. Tho archbishop of Canterbury, Cardi- nal Maiming, four dukes and many peers commoners and college professors have signed a memorial to the lord mayor ask- ing him in convene a meeting at the -Mansion hon.se to discuss I he subject of tliepersociiti, nut the Jews in Russia, llie lord mayor has accordingly called such a meetins fur Nov. 24. The Bi-insh cabinet deferred the open- ng of parliament until the 25th inst. in for Scotland, could speak in 1. BOARD OF SUPERVISORS, at tlw Adjourned Seulun. Tuesday afternoon the following was offered which was adopted. Resolved, That the treasurer of Chau- tauqua county be instructed to carefully examine all returns of unpaid school taxes and ascertain if the returns show the land to be described as the same is described on the assessment roll of the town where the laud is located; and if found defective the treasurer is directed to return the papers for amendment to comply with this resolution, and to ad- vance no money on said returned achoul tax Hat until the same is so amended. The matter of the account of Dr. H. R. Rogers of Dunkirk for treating an indigent patient on the order of an overseer of the poor, which caused much discussion at the first session, was again presented and an hour's debate followed. Super- intendent of Poor Hurlbert was in favor of the superintendentsjpaying the bill, but could not speak for the other super- intendents. He could compromise with Dr. Rogers on All the an pervisors recognized the justness of the doctor's account, but a portion wanted the board to direct the superintendents to pay it.while others thought the super- intendents should bear the sibility alone without direction of the board. Each town has a phy sician for the poor but in this case, ai though the poor physician waa at home, he was not called. A portion of the board thought the overseer and the poor physician should bear the cost of the account. Finally after several motions the following action was taken: Mr. Nixon moved that it be the senti- ment of this board that the account of Dr. Bogers should be paid. Mr. Woodward amended that if thu NO. 81. CLOSED ITS DOORS. The North River Bank of New York to gnnpend Temporarily. NEW YORK, Nov. the announcement made early yesterday that t North River bank had tided ov- general explosion encourage. mean from thii is ever through its labored to harmon- 'Hie aim of this jfoverii nient IIHS been to keep clown all difficul- ties Him ,o conserve our own interests by :ti s i he Central American states to keep the peace. My om.imn is that the quickest way to end the of that re- gion is to build rhe intercontinental rail- road advocated by tne pan-American con- gress. It will bring the people together aud modernize them. Mich an enterprise would be the greatest boon the Central American., could acquire and would doubi ess give a stability to their institu- tion that, under tile present conditions seems hopeless." The rem.Uns of the late Mai Gen Crook arrived in Washington yesterday morning from Chicago, accompanied by ols. Cori m and Stanton. f A and Mr Webb Hayes, who were met "at he depot by Gca. Scholiel.l. The re- mains were placed in a hearse and con- veyed t., Arlington cemetery where they were interred. There were no religious ceremonies at the i emerery. these having performed in Chicago. Dr. Ford, the president of the Philadel- hia board of health, recently wrote to urg. Gen. H.-iniilton .-islrng what could done by the zovernment in the matter f rheseg-ebtratiou of lepers found from line to time in this country. Dr Hamil- on replied as follows: "I have no doubt hat if the of health so desire, con- "ress can induced to pass a law pro- '.dmc for no institution wherein rhese unfortunate case- can be treated Humanely for, but it to en; this and require to be done to. of the anee T. mon at Atlanta, esterday and were accorded a" eeption by the president and Mrs assisted by Mrs. Dimmick arty, numbering about seventy-flve were forwards jomed by .some fifty elegatw. from this city, and left on a traia via the Piedmont Air line and expect to arrive at Atlanta early tuis A syndicate composed of local business has bouaht a controlling interest in He Evemn, Critic of thU city and will __ 1C p. m. and posted a nonce saying: bank has suspended temporarily." All efforts ro obtain furrherraformation were futile. The doors were locked and admittance denied to all. There were a number of depositorscongregjited in front of the entrance to the bank, and rhey were much exercised over the sudden suspen- sion. It is, believed that the reports of its embarr.Ts-tnent Tuesday caused many to withdraw then- accounts, and that the drum so heuvy that the directors de- cided to suspend until the affairs of th8 institution could be investigated and its exact condition The news did not reach Wall street in time to have any ertect on the market. It H now anuunced that the closing of the bank was ordered by the bank exam- iners, who are now in charge ot that in- nstigating its affairs. stitution nnd i Allegftil Cnjiiat Dincrimlimtliin. XEW YORK. Nov. 13-The interstate railroad commission yesterday begun the henring of a compUint made by Jacob Snamberg against the Delaware 'Lacka- w-Hiiim and Western Railroad company and the Xew York. Chicago and St. Louis Hailroad company, charging them with making discrimiu.-ition on freight m favor "f a tirra of .shippers named Schwartz hilds Co. The parties are engaged in snipping live stock from Chicago to Yi.rk. and Slmmberg alleges m his com- piamt that the railroad companies hare unjustly discriminated in freight charges between his shipments and those of the firm named. A largennmberof witnesses have been and remain to be examined. What Mr. Gould Said. NEW YORK, Xov. 13.-Mr. W. B. Somer- ville of the Western Union telegraph who is in the confidence of Mr. Jay said yesterday that Mr. Gould told him that he had never made the assertion that Will- am and John D. Rockefeller were con- cerned with him in a scheme to secure control of the Union Pacific Railroad company, nor had Mr. Gould adversely criticised Mr. Charles Francis Adams' management of the property. All he had said was that auv man taking a stroll hrongh Wall street could hear that people were not satisfied with his (Adams) management of the road. parliament before Christmas. A leading supporter of tin- government stated yes- terday i hat be understood the ministers would be content- if they got through the introduced three of their princi- pal bill, and opened the committte of supply, so that after Christmas they could pro. eeil wirb the estimates without interruption upon the spenker leaving the chair. He .idded that the ministers miglit endeavor to pass several suppli which are now nearl readv. If the government cannot get on with out the Irish land purchase bill, which i one of their principal measures and whic is greatly aisli ced by m..ny Consprvative they will, it introduce t budget-a highly favorable and takin theu apneal to the countrv Fo the Liher Is. no 'ison could I than chat of the election of occurred m tin and in the warn! months, when so man- superintendent regard the account of Dr. Rogers as just and legal it is the sentiment of this board that they pay the same. The amendment was orig- inal motion as amended waa carried. If anyone can determine the status of the account he is better off than most of those who heard the debate. The clerk read a notice from Edward Wemple, comptroller of the state, stat- ing that the sum of (in addition to assessed in October) is de- manded from this county for compen Official Canvww by the County Board. The board of supervisors took a recess atlUiDon Wednesday morning to act as a board of canvassers to canvass the election returns. For court of appeals votat were cast of which Earl received Mason 985; Geraw 103; blank 230. For supreme court votes were cast, of which Haight received blank 513. For congress votes were cast of which Hooker received Smith Rogers 986; blank 323. For county judgs, Fisher 5.468; Van Duseu Sackett 815- blank 117. For county treasurer, total: Soofled 7.0B7, Lascelles Skellie 984- blank 223, For special surrogate, total Reade Edson Clark 925- blank 285. For superintendent of the poor, total Howard Cutting Bui-rut 943; blank 3S6. For justice of sessions, total Casler Warner Wilson 925- blank 227. For coroners, total Starring 7.- 431; Van Uuseu Blood Ehlers Ormes Martin 916; Pemberton 916; blank 877. Assembly -First district, total: 4.887- Gifltord 2.179; McGinnls KnowN ton 399; blank 73. Assembly, second district, total Woortbury Reade Williams blank 127. School commissioner, flrat district total Hill Strong 581; Tem- ple 284; blank 50. School Commissioner, second district. line of the Celebrated P. Centemeri Kid Glovea in all the latest for Street and Opera wear. Newest things in Men's Hosiery, buspenders, Shirts, Gloves and Underwear. Finest line of Yarns and Yepbyrs, Crochet Threads, Stationery and Notions. Men's Leather and Buckskin Gloves. Ladies' Muslin Underwear, Corset Covers and Aprons. New Applique Flowers, Table Scarfs and Lambriquens. something especially new. We will offer this week at a Special Big Drive 50 dozen ladies' extra quality Black Woolen and Cotton Hose at 25c, m sizes from 8 to 10. ERIE STORE." Ask to see our Ladies' and Children's Combination Suits the 8th directed 188C, _. i full tide of the hay harves Fatal Accident Near Schenectady. AMfcTKRDAM, N Y., Nov. 1.3.-A buggy ontaimug two young women, named Kate aud Kate Sauerborn, was truck by an express train at Christer's rowing, near Schenectady, at o'clock esterday morning. Miss Sauerborn was nstantly killed and Miss Brown badly injured. Miss Brown was taken to a ospital at Albany. The remains of Miss lauierborn were taken to Schenectady. Both women lived in Schenectady. An Attachment for NEW YOBK, Nov. attachment in avor of John T. Walker, Son Co., th. Uk merchants who assigned Tuesday, nd agaiust John and Joseph Nighten- ale on a claim for was served laborers work both earlier and later than the polling hours, and far away from the! and places of voting. For a stron- labor vote the late autumn and wmte- seasons are by far the best. Joseph Cham berlam of whose opinions nothing posi uve will heard until the begmnmo- o the session, i, sai-i to he resolved to utmost to seen re the passHge of the lam purchase lull. As to the representano, o Birmingham he ,s likely to gam bis pom, over the Tones; but he cannot survive in public life without their aid, and he is be Iieve i to be interested ia deferring the general election as long aa possible The Liber.-il journals comment 'on thi release of the convict, Patrick Delany as the payment of a reward by the eovern ment for his testimony before the P.trneli commission. Delnny, it is said, will be assisted by the government to emigrate to South Africa. Advices from Buenos Ayres represent a senou' condition of affairs at the capital and that another attempt at revolution is apprehended, the depo-ed President Cel- man having many sunporters in the provinces who wi-h him restored Madrid advices srate rha- rhr- cabinet i considering the frame of a reciprncitv treaty, to be submitted to the United States, and in i he en-1 more espe-lallv to relieve the demvssed mdns ries nf Several worK'iieu were cremated during the burning of a match factory at Tassel yesterday. Small In a PontnflRce. ROCHESTER. X. Y. Kl.-Fire start- ed yesterday morning at 4 o'clock ar the village of Hemlock Lake in a bnildinir owned by Robert Hoar and occupied by Jerome B. Patterson's store and the post- office. The stock u.-i-, dpi-troved, but the postoffice was saved. There was, about insurance nn rhe bmldini; Dr Wu-ker's office. ,d-o in buildinz was dainaut-d An adjuining drug store was 1 lie Woman's Christian temperance Union building with the fur- niture was also Total loss is about To BNJOY (food health, aim always laye abundant sleep; this can generally Oe secured by management, unless yon which case Dr. Bull s Baby Syrup will greatly assist. used Old Saul a Catarrh Cure for influenza and waa cured. Three Fishermen Drowned. GLOUCESTER, Mass., Xov. 13.-William Hastings, John Whalen and Thomas Wadsworth were drowned in rough weather in Ipswich bay, Monday night. They were on a spnrling trip and left their schoonerjin a dory. The boat been found, but there is no trace of the men. Wadsworth belonged in Merideu, t-onn.; Hastings was a Scotchman and leaves a widow and five children. Whalen belonged in California, Henry Haremeyer u Bacalvcr BBOOKLTS, Nov. 13.-Henry O. Have- meyer filed his bonds yesterday afternoon as receiver for tae sugar trust His sure- ties are Charles H. Senff of Whitestoae. and Theodore A. Eavemeyer. Telegraphic News on 2nd pnge.) aation of the stenographers of judicial district. The board that the sum be taken from the contin- gent fund. MATVILLE, N. Y., NOT. 13. L8pecial.] The matter of the accounts of the snhool commissioners was taken up on Wednesday afternoon. It was tabled after discussion. Mr. Woodward moved to reconsider J. Hewes's resolution (first session) relative to printing of session laws. He moved to direct Assemblyman Qifford to secure the repeal of the law requiring publication of these lawa.and that other Assemblyman and Senator be asked to co-operate with him. Dr. Williams offered the following, which was adopted: Resolved, That in case there should be a repeal of the present laws requiring the printing of the session laws.and that 8BId members of assembly be requested board may order such a number of the session laws of the atate as it desires and that the bill therefor be paid for by the several towns ordering said books. The Starr dog tax bill next came up for action. A. majority and minority report was made, the former favoring the bill. The majority report was adopted and the bill become a law. (The provisions cf the bill were published at t session of the board.) A communication from Busti was read asking that owners of sheep killed by dogs may receive the actual value of the sheep. Filed and ordered printed. All the doglaws affecting this county were ordered printed in the Journal o'f Proceedings. A resolution of Mr. Knowlton was ado pted. requiring an audit of the Treasurer's accounts on Jannarv 1, 1891, up to that date, and that a proper trans- fer may then be made from the outgoing "o the incoming Treasurer. Mr. Coffin, Mr. Bookstaver, Mr. How- ard, committee on county treasurer's ac- counts, reported that they found the )alance on hand in the county treasury Nov. 1, 1889, wag received since then total Disbursements leaving a ba- ance of Mr. Love, Mr. Warren and Mr, How- ard, the committee on accounts of the ommissioners of the U. S. deposit und, reported a cash balance of in the Fredonia National and ikinner, Minton Go's banks on the latof October, 1890, to the credit of the und. The commissioners received dur- ng the year They sent 424.89 to the comptroller; the balance in fees, exchange, etc. total Holcomb Falvay Freeman 803. School Commissioner, third district total Flags Weeden 738 Hall 193. For each office quite a large numbe: of incorrect ballots were cast. The Concert the Schubert the au- The Schubert Quartette of Chicago who opened Young Men's lecture course last year, gave a second enter tainment in this city on Wednesday nigbt, at the Union Hall, under the apices of the Epworth League of Methodist church. They had an dience which fllled the hall, their first performance having beea of a kind to draw music lovers a second time. They gave one of the most delightful concerts ever given here. The hall is of a size well adaped to enjoyment of such mu- sic; the sound is carried forward, none being swallowed up; and the audience seemed appreciative and inspiring. The League is to be praised for having had the enterprise to give, in this sea- son when bo many church entertain- ments are in progress, an entertainment of su ch value. The Quartette sang with probably bet- ter effect than even ou their flrst ap- pearance. This beinc their second concert here, their performance needs no long cnticism Such flne vocal mu- sic as theirs is always a delight. Their voices were so full, so iiweet, from 48c to a Suit. Always Ahead, A Series of Tests to deter- inine the keeping qualities of leading baking powders, made at the request of the New England Dr.Davenport, Massa- chusetts State Analyst, and pub- lished June 27th, 1890, shows Cleveland's Dry Q-oods and Carpets. Superior Baking Powder hig-hest in keeping: qualities, highest in leavening power. A-MEniCAN BLOCK. 396-'402 Main Street, BUFF4LO. N. Y. well balanced ami harmonious that the effect was like thot voice, or an organ. that of a Mr. Lott. the big basso, made bimaulf a favorite again, and Mr. Tyley, the baritone, ahould also be especially spoken of. In arrangement of the programme last night, MX. lolt had no solo. Mr. was encored for his solo. Tyley Mr. Battle, M. L. Hinman, President of the Water Board, has received advices from ie Stearns Manufacturing Company of rie that work is progressing on the oiler for the waterworks here, and that hen boiler material for which they are ailing comes.itwill be fin ished rapidly. Byron Fenner, C. P. Ingersoll and rvine E. Jones of Westfleld, have or- ganized a stock company named the raggists' National Co-operative nion, for the purpose of buying, selling nd manufacturing druga and druggists' aterials. The capital stock ia the flrat tenor, also had a solo, and wag encored, but did not respond. Of the selections by the Quartette, "The Village Blacksmith" and "The Sweet By and the latter an encore were especially beautiful. The trio by Miss Bald win, Messrs.Stone and lott, was very sweet. The nnal number, a quar- tette, Kuecken's "Hie thee. Shallop also deserved high praise, it was so well balanced and harmoniously sung. The Quartette were assisted by Miss Genie M. Baldwin as a vocalist, who sang two solos. She had a rather light soprano voice, evidently highly trained, particularly good in softer which were very delicate and sweet. Miss Geogiella Lay also assisted as pianist. She had two solos, showing skill. Her accompaniments were very sympathetic. There were twelve numbers on the programme. The Quartette had three encores, Mr. Tyley one, Mr. Battle one. the trio one, and Miss Baldwin two. The Jamestown Blectric I4ffbt Plant. The Board of Public Works of James- _ town has purchased in behalf of the city Sthe'fSgjl1 f We have the largest assort' rnent of Patent Leather Shoes in plain and light-colored topa, hand and machine sewed. We carry a complete line of NET- TLETON'S Fine Shoes. If you want a nice-fitting and shoe, try a pair of this make. You will like them Our GENTS' Calf Shoe in Button and Congress, m broad, medium or narrow toe, is the best shoe for the money that has ever been of- fered to any trade. Come and examine them for yourself and be convinced. SULLIVAN SON, 213 Centre Street SPKCIAL ANNOUNCEMENT CH. MORGAN after an eiperiescB of twenty Bye years is now prepared to trim Referent mav be obtained from Frank May or W. a. Ahell All ordetB may be left at Mm. Johnson'n bnkcrv Patent Attorneya, 615 7th S ain Patent., rks registered- All Patent n, C., opp. rj. a Patent ot- veato and Sc Is.tei Mourei AdH ntomatm. Advice and special references sent on Burbee wishes to announce to the Patrons m partic- that he has purchased tfco building tor- crfy occupied by B. H. Mnltett, if East Third fltted it up in ttrst-claM order ular. AS TO THE FASHIONS. Some ore born, ftutuonobla, achieve fashion, and others haea fathion thrust upon quoth Charles Lamb, when tailor brought him a new eoa't With, a velvet collar and laid him body wart vtltet eotlan rww." It is right to be in fashion if you can. It is almost as easy as to be o.it of fashion, unless you are indifferent like our friend iamb, who, as a genius, could afford to aeso. From us you cau learn about newest fashions in dry goods, in all that pertains to ladies' wear, such as dress goods, cloaks, etc.; in Rentlemen's hosiery, underwear, neckwear, etc.; and in carpets, draperies and in- terior house decorations. The newest Pall and Winter styles are ready in all departments. A won> derful lot of attractions and bargains on every hand. If you want a dress, here arc fashion- able fabrics from the world's centres of fashion, choice goods and bargains in- numerable. If you want a cloak, if ?ou want a carpet, if you want dry goods of any Hnd, or a book (we musn't forget the come to us and see the fashions you can't come, write, and learn what is fashionable in wearing apparel, :n house furnishings and in literature. Don't wait to have fashion thrust upon you. You can achieve fashion by trading? here, and achieve it reasonably. We solicit correspondence about any- thing in our line of business. Samples are sent freely, querie. au.wcred stantly. Contrary u, Uie rule, you will find shoppinu with us through tlie mails a great success. ADAM, MELDRUM ANDERSON, DRY GOODS AND CASPETS, BLOCK. BUPFAI-O, a site of land near the bostlanding bridge on Steele street on which to erect au electric light plant. Consideration Specifications have been pre- pared by the board for a plant capable of running 175 candle power arc lights. At first but 130 lamps will be put in. These will be so scattered about the cily as to furnish light to all sec- tions.even extending beyond the present gas lamps in many directions. To do this will require about twenty-four miles of line which will coat 9330 O. A. BFBBKE. ___ _ tfl omenta mnv be IDLE MONEY nines oi line wmcn will coat 9330 ner J j. i i mile. A building costing about SOT as to yield ten per will be erected at once. The plant will Per annum- Capital can be completed and lights burning by the Withdrawn at anv time. early spring. Miss Emily Ohaae of Sherman, who I died at Rochester recently, has left her Send for prospectus. property to a charitable New York. institution in York Stock Trust, 6 WAU. 8TKEET. NEW TOKK. EODEEICK H. SMITH, Manager. CHAMBERS FRASER, TAILORS. Room No. 6, German Ins. B'l'g. BUFFALO, N. Y. C.C. PENFOLD Manufacturer and Importer, MAIH SI, BOVFAtO. N. T. DBALBU or Diamonds, Watches and Jewelry, CloctaJSilvenrorc, Leather etc BNGB.A riXG, GOLD f 31L Ytn PLA TTA A COMPLETE LOTS Of MA1K STREBT, BUFFALO, N. Y. Go to Monroe's for Curtains and Fixtures IN SPA PERI   

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