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Dunkirk Evening Observer Newspaper Archive: September 30, 1890 - Page 1

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   Dunkirk Evening Observer (Newspaper) - September 30, 1890, Dunkirk, New York                               VOL. XX DUNKIRK N. Y., TUESDAY. SEPTEMBER .50, 1890. NO. 43. REPRESENTATIVE B USINESS HOUSES OF DUNKIRK. ANEW RULING MACHINE lor ruling all kinds ol blanks is the latest Mdltion to tic Mechanical Department ol OnnkirkiPrinting Company. BB. OUTOKD, 22? nnd 225 Central Aye. Artulic Photographer Instantaneous rhologrnpns ol lialSce a upecialty. Sitters need not wait for sunshine except lor Babies. BOOK 1BVINO. I'fO- pnetor, No. 16 E. Second street, near Buf- falo street, Dunkirk, N. Y. Magazines, Mn- nc, i'ainuhleta, etc., bouml in all styles. Orders promptly attended to. All work guaranteed. OCKCHEK'H CROCKKItY HOUSE, 806 Central Avenue. Wholesale and retail dealer in Iffi ported and .lomestic China, Glassware, Ac. CHACTAUUUA HOTKL, Itates, pur (lay. Urerr anil Hoarding stable in connection. Victor Itider, 335 and SSI Lion street. CITY BARBKK SHOP Chas. Nagle, Prop., Uoder Lake Shore National llnnk, corner Center and Third streets. A line stocK ol Foreign and Domestic Cigars. ____ SON, 838 Center street, Practical ('articular attention ilto Interfering hones. Shoeing of road .1 trotting horses a specialty. 1) UNKIRK KVKSING OIMKICVEU. Largest Daily in the County. An unequalled advertising medium. DUNKIRK KNGINBKKENO COMVANY. Formerly Sellow Manufacturers oJ Engines, Boiler, Pulleys, Shutting Hangers, etc. Patterns, torgnigd, Machine Work to order. T SUIUT CO., ilK, 2U5 and 2U7 if Center Direct. Manufacturers of the and "Dunkirk" luting Drees SliirtB. On sale in all lending luriiUhing, slothing and dry goods houses in Dunkirk. Dr. TOOMJJY, 4S4 and 486 Lion street. Dealer in Flour, Feed, .-alt. Baled Ilay. Phoa- phatca, etc. EstabhWicd. ISn. K'lUE HOTKL and UniiHK saloon, Union Depot Easy access to all trains and biw- inees houses, lieal accommodations lor Com- mercial Travelers. .John J. Murphy, Prop. EHLKKS CO., 97 anil EJ 97 anil E. Tniril street. Fine Furniture, Cabinet Ware anil Up- aolatermg. Picture frames made to order. JT1 U. MATTESON CO., 301 Central Ave., Leaders ol Fashion and Gentlemen Oiilutters. AKKU. STEAM HEATING CO., anulacturcrs ol Steam llcnling Apparatus, sanitary Plumbing a Specialty. a. OME STKAtt LAUNUKV. Our specialties: Fine Shirts, lOo; Collan, Jc-Cuffo, 4o, and Lace Curtuiiia. fr'i'eu A Oumromits, 207 center street. VI K. OEUM, E. Tlnril Bt., cor. o! Buffalo Maniifat.nrer anil dealer in Fine Boots ASIioea rg w 3loro. Scliooi Books a HEN BY WKII.KK'S NEW STOKE, E. Third st- liookd, Stationery, Musical In- .trumeuts.Magaziaei.Uaily uuitV. eeltly Favors, ind pertaining to a Urst closs book JOB PItlNTINO oi every description anil ut lowest living rates by Dunkirk Printing Company, S anil 10 1C. Second St. H. VAN BUKEN SON, Fire. Life, Accident anil General Insurauoe. Deal- ers in Real Estate and Loans, t'ariiciilar attention paid lo the cure ol property ing rents 219 Center St., '2nd floor. BIltCHALL FOUND GUILTY.' but a .nd there ________ I fore must have a very lively imagination now about the color ot the cost. Can you place any reliance upon nuch Mr. Blackstook the njuuner of oou- ducting the kleutlflcation of tbe prisoner In the jnil wan disgraceful, but ful busineKS was done by a detective whoa the orown did not put in the box. Thesi humim hell-hounds ought to be usliaraed Summlu. Up by HU.-k.tock of themM.lvpg he THE PRISONER SENTENCED TO BE HUNG NOV. 14. I The to Hli Doom In H and VkOoncernefl Man- I Am Mot Hurl IU0 MoMBhoi's j the government kept such a man as Mur ray in its employ. He all their wit ,_ i neases to the jail and pointing to Bircball WOODSTOCK, Ont., Sept. 30.-The lust, Bald. at and they identified liad fceen llia McMaster, a telegraph messeii- tiollcct- ONKOE'S FHAKMACY, L 300 Central ATenue aeiulqnarters lor Wall Paper Paint Oils, PKKKTNS, J. W., 209 Center street, Manulaoturcr anil ilsaler in Harness. Sail.'.lcs, Bridles. Collars, Trnnks.Whips, Buaalo Uobes, Uorae Covers Gloves Mittens and Sleigh itob.-.a. f> 8CHOLTKS, I 17 East Thirtl street. Fashionable Tailor. Gentlemen will Una it to tneir advantage to call on me beJore purchasing etaewhore. PB. CAKV CO., 33S Lion street. General Hard ware. Win to Lead.OHs.Painter'B Supplies, Oil Cloths, Granite Ware. A special- ty ofSherwin Williams Paiotaml Monroe range. RULINO, such as blank-books, ledgers, and all kinds of blanks done at Dunkirk Printing Company, 8 and 10 B. Second St. RUDOLPH MOLOENHACER, Cor. Third anil ISnDulo Sis.. Dealer in Granite. Marble, .Flagging and Building Stone. Call on me before buying your side-walk. R ISLET CO., 7 and 9 East Front street. Whisky, Wines, Brandies. Goiieral Liquor Store ior Family Use. UOBEKT M'KAT, Lion street, near tbe depot. Boarding, Sale, Feed and Livery Stable. Stabling by the day or week on reasonable terms. J. OLTTOKD, 301 Central Ave. (Up General Insurance and Real Estate Agent, Fire, Lite, Accident, and Live Stock Insurance. Promp' attention givon Co buying inii selling Real Estate. TiHE "COTTAGK." EDISON'S PHUXOOKAPH OH exhibition FKEE. Finest IHJIUH-S lor med- icinal "Ol.D CHOW" n spi-i-mlty. Imported NVeiss liuer 111 lSutOc'3, Ale, Burton Alt- and I'urtcr, drawn from the wood. Tl C. JONES, 75 E. Third st, cor. Deer. Meat Market. Fresh, Salt and Smoked Meats, Lard, Sausages, Oysters anil Poultry. W ATCHE9, JBWKLKS, Bu the Aurora Railroad Watch. Impairing a specialty. Frank F. Stapl, S3 E. Third St. VT1W. MOCHKK, Merchant Tailor, 316 Central Avenue REWARD! WE will pay the reward lor any case ol L.Ter Complaint, Dyspepsia, Sick Headache Indirection, constipation or Costiveness w cannot core with West's Vegetable Liver Pills when tbe directiouB nitl n0V6r fail i in ye satisfaction. Sugar Coated. Large uoxe containing 30 Pills. SB cento. Beware ol coun tvrteiu. and imitations. The genuine manu iMureu only by JO1IN C. W BST A CO. Sol MoNKOt-'s Fnannacy, T. gcr at Niagara Falls, proved that he de- livered to O'Xoill, clerk of the Imperial hotel, u. tulogram purporting to be from Benwell to Birchall. O'Neill was sup- posed to deliver the message to Birchall Mr. Blnckstock put in the register of the >Iet i opolitan hotel of Now York show- ing the names of "J. K. Birchall and "DoiifjlHHs Ii. Pelly" and -'F. C. all in tho handwriting of the prisoner. This was all the evideuce for tho dclunsB and the addresses of the court counsel were at once entered upon. During his counsel's address the pris- oner listened calmry to all that was said. Mr. JJluckstook opened his address at 10.07 o'clock. He thanked the crown ami tin jury for the Indulgence granted the defense, by an adjournment overSundUy, which, to them, was an inestimable boon. Many of tlie mostenlightened_conntrieH, lie wtid, had abolished capital punish- ment. While they lived under a govern- ment that upheld this it was their duty to obey the statutes of the country But they would not send a man to the gallows without the most convincing evidence which had been sprung upon them by the crown. Tbo slimy net of the press had prejudiced the public mind, but his lord- ship had already told them that they must dngorge their minds of this false im- pression and pass upon the case according to tlic evidence. Some work was done and done well. His honest opinion was thut the only honest detective work done by the newspapein, but while he con- ceited their right to act honorably, the prens had no right to comment as it had on this evidence, nnd try tho case in the public mind before the case had been given to the jury. He pointed out the great preparations made for this case by the crown" nnd the enormous expense incurred to secure a conviction, as contrasted wiih the position of the defense. For and mouths the lawyers for Birchall hud worked and labored to secure a fair trial, without money. To the credit or ihe bar, lie it .said, they had no money to bring wit- ncases from England and but with a lot it for fair play they deemed it their duly to their queen and country to sec lli.it an innocent man had a fair trial. They appealed to (he jury to acquit the prisoner and set. ihe mob uud the press at. Uehance. He reverted to the honor of tho bar and claimed he was doing but his duty in de- fending n man who protested Iiis inno- cence. Did he not think he was innocent, he would not be addressing them now. lie asked for leniency for auy errors which might have been mndeduring the progress of ihe trial. "And (iod he said, "I am con- scious of these mistakes, but I ask you to ceusure me for these errors and not my client." lie asked them not to judge the client for his honesty, for if they did he would have to pass him to their censure. The facts where he did bring out Pelly and Benwell under falso statements, but the prisoner was not ou trial for these misstatcments. nor for the statements he made in several of the ciown witne-ses. Many of them appeared to be respectable people, and he did not intend to impugn their honesty, but he also wished to draw their attention to the frailly of human nvmiiry. HP threw doubt upon the slnte- inents of these witnesses, speaking par- ticularly about H.rclmlr.s farm at Ni- a'.'ani, which, he said, was a myth. The next question was: Did Birchall visit It doe.s appear, he said, he left Buffalo with Benuell Monday morn- ing, and the crown produced evidence to siinw who sold the tickets, but why were not these tickeis produced? Every conduclor bus a punch, and if iK'se tickets were used why are they not rod need. Then the crown alleges Birchall ought a lickec at Eastwood to Hamilton, 'Ut this ticket was not produced nor tho gent who sold it, but tlie assistant was rouglit forward, and when the defense ndeavorod to find what t he agent knew hey gut the cold shoulder. The crcnvu knew w'nat these witnesses eic to swear to, but the defense was de- ied the evidence until produced in court. Mnckstock pointed out that Birchall aad ieuwell about the same size, while lithe crown witnesses who allege they the two meu going toward the swamp wore that one was taller than the other, while ou actual measurement there was iot an inch between them. Then the crown witnesses spoke of one if them as a light-complexioned man. }ther discrepancies were pointed out in .heir evidence as told at the inquest and it this trial. He cautioned the jury about placing reliance upon such testimony. At coroner's inquest Poole swore the man lad a gunning case, but here he swore .here was no gunning case. Duffy swore Sirchall said his name was Smith and .hat he expected to meet his mother in Buffalo. If the prisoner was the man, what under leaven did he tell Duffy his name was Smith for? What did he talk with Duffy .t all for if he was theguiltyman? "Woulc ie not he more likely to hide himself? Is t not just possible this is not the man al all? He then dwelt upon the evidence offered by Aiiss Lockhart, Miss Choate ind others. He did not wish to say these witnesses were dishonest, but it must have mpressed the jury Wjjth the light anc easy manner iu which they went on the etand to sivear the life of a man away. -Many discrepancies were pointed out in their evidence, yet their imagination was lively that they preferred to pledge their oath lo things they knew nothing about than give the prisoner the benefit o any doubt. Alaa, for the frailty of human nature. He analyzed the evidence of those wit nesses who said they saw the men at East wooil that day. Miss Smith was the inos important. She did not at first knov whether it was Dudley or Somerset, am swore at the inquest that he only asfce< the "governor." At the inquest sh iwore that was all he said. Six months later she swore the prisoner told her he had been in the Northwest buying horses, and that was going to Hamilton for his baggage. Do you believe that sort of evideucef At the inquest Miss Cromwell snid nothing about the coat, but now she swciirs the man had a navy-blue coat; why was this? Because Detective Murray has told her a million times that Birufaall left Niagara that morning with Was anything more unfair? This done, the detertivc had clear sailing. He spoke of Hay ward's positive evidence now aur! his uncertain testimony at tho imjucst, and then went ou to speak of pasl mi.s takes whore the crown theoiyon circum stimtial evidence had been accepted and innocent men had hiilTcred death. Mr. Oslar began at, p m. anil spoke for hours. H WHS a pitiless arraignment of the prisoner. Step by Mep lie traced the line of evidence from the time the Birclmll-Bonwell party left Ungland, pr" facing his remarks with the Maieinpnt that a young man left Kngland in Kuhrii ary, full of life and hope, and thai soon after his arrival ho was found foully inur dercd iu Blenheim swamp, lie showed how Birchall was in Oxford county in and became acquainted with the locality in which the body was found. Soon he came to the famous correspond- ence, including the letter written If Beinvcll's father threo days after the niurdi-r. He said that Birchall deliber- ately licil in these letters, that there wa, uo farm, no horse.s, no sale, no stick; all these specious tales were told to induce itenwell to come to Canada, and that the (etter of Keb. 20 was written to induce Col. Benwdll to send out JC.'iOO. He told the jury there was no other possible termina tion to these transact ious except the Blen- heim swamp tragedy. would have you bear in he said, '-two important things. The iclation- ship between the parties and the object of the murder. That letter to Uol. Hen well was not written by a fool. Fancy that man writing that letter for with the knowledge that Benwell was abroad in the country with equal postal facilities. The man who wrote flint letter knew that Benwell was lying still in death and that, his hand would never more put pen to J Then Mr. Osier went into a series of questions, throwing into bold relief the statements in Birchall's letter of Feb. 30 that Benwell had taken counsel with a barrister in London; that he had intro dnced Benwell to several per.-ons. "Where are these peisons5" he asked. Produce one such man tu whom he intro '.luced Benwell. That man's testimony in Hie witness box would set, Birchall free. What does Birchall mean by the firm of Hirchall Ben welly lie means to be able lo get the money, tor cine partner can get letters for the firm from the pustunTcc. lie intended to send a typewritten letter to the father with attached, ami if we sav lie is t.he inurden-r it is not bard to say he intiiided to forge the signaluic And whin a lurid light all this throws on the imitations of thu signature at the Stafford house in Buffalo the Sunday night IK-fore 1 he murder. Where was Hirchnll Feb. IT? Why doesn't he speak? With whom was he in company on that day? If he was not shut up awny from people, where was he? He dnre not" speak. .Mr. Osier declared that lie wo-ild have a right to call for the comic inn the prisoner without any testimony on the journey or in the swnmji fur the nnd the prisoner's false siatenienis concerning his relations with Bun well pointed iriesistably to the prisoner being tbe murderer He saM the journey was undertaken with an object. What was it? .'here was no farm; there was an object o deceive. He said the telegram signed "Hastell" iiusl have been sent just after the train irrivcd at the Fulls from the West. Why lid be sign it If innocent, why ilid he try to deceive? Step by step the lawyer traced tbe journey to the swamp, tie said the evidence showed the time be- ;ween trains allowed for the distance to covered. Speaking of Alice Smith, he said her story was proved by the fact that she said she was not sure whether it Dudley or Ijord Hinilerset she met, for if she bad concocted her story she would ni-tke tilings hitch. It is by such little incidents that we determine the trut h of a story, lie declared. you rather believe her story than lhat of this man who does not dare tell where he be continued, '-that the kill Ing was dune in the swamp by one man, and that man is the prisoner. The cir- cumstances showed the murderer knew the man was a .stranger. A person not a stranger would not have been identified by his face. There wns only one man iu Ontario who knew he w as a stranger, and the cutting of his name from his clothes would destroy his identity." O.sler made a strong point in oppo sitiou to the theory that Benwell was killed and carried there, pointing out that Benwell's cigar stub and eyeglasses were found near the body. It was therefore clear that Benwell was shot from behind and that ns he fell his cigar and eye glasses fell from him. Speaking of the medical testimony, he said: "Oh pitiful cle fenscwhen they can't make a better thcorj than that. The man who shot Benwel gave bim uo warning; he sneaked up from behind. Benwell had confidence iu th man who shot him and walked where his murderer told him. Think of twodrnnkei men like Baker and Caldwell openingtha' man's clothes and cutting his name fron them Mr. Osier said the testimony of tin rain and frost rose up in judgment agains the murderer. He made n strong point in reply to the theory ot the defense that the killing was done later than Monday, and if so could not have been done by the prisoner. He showed by the evidence that there was no rain that week except on Monday night. It was rain that turned to sleet as it fell, and the upturned sleeve of the dead man was tilled ice that took hours to thaw out. He Allowed that blood was be- neath tbe crust of ice and that the tracks referred to had been broken thraugh the crust, showing that the crust made after Benwell's body fell, and therefore couldn't have been made by men carrying the body into the swamp. As to Birchall's boots, which were muddy, and Benwell's boots, which were clean, he said Crosby's evidence showed it was frozeu iu the morning of Feb. ITand thaw- ing iu the afternoon. He a-ked the jury j if they wouldn't rather believe the evi- dence of doctors who saw the body or those for the defeuse who did not. He asked if it were plausible that Birchall borrowed Benwell's keys, pencil and check. He de- voted very little attention to witnesses for the defense. Passing lightly over the evl- _ of the men who swore they wtw in Wsodstock about tke time of the murder. Jt Tvas an extremely able speech and occupiod four houis and tun minutes. Immediately after Osier got hrough Jndiie Mc.Muhon informed the jury that iu order to time he would it once addrnss them. He i mde a er.i careful, able and com- prehensive review of the case, lie.uiniimg iiis at 740. He spoke fur two iiours nnd II i teen minutes and charged lead ag.i.n-t lite prisoner. The central L i-. 'I hat if the jury f nd thai w.is on that ti.iin to' itwood that day, it in conjunction with having n his possession Bc.iwell's kejb and checks -ti oiig pic .uinplive Lvidence that i, not irresponsll Ic f ir the crime. ile of course, that a mtirdi i c.ruin.itteil. If the piisoner md no i ,._ t H, was his de- sitfi i HCT. 111 H vay at all' He a' i i 'ii is, was I he 'n i-i i mi thai the i'laj lie of a DRIVEN FROM HOME. IS THE AMERICAN FARMER OVER- BURDENED WITH TAXATION? .u.ii.i, M, lint the nunlcr was commuted near where the xj-ly lay. HislorKhjp a-sked what was he object of tlie prisoner in slating to all hesi: p-ople tint be had checks and keys to Hcnwcll in his possession. as it not for the purpose of accounting 'or how he got them? If he was setting .h'lt up as a reason why he had that prop- I ly in his possession, then it was a very ogenl reason for believing that he came inprnperly by the kcy.s and checks. If he lad instructions lose'id the heavy baggage o Xew York. From whom did the instruc- io.is coine" lie couldn't have got in- s'rnctiiiis from Hcnwcll. It is well that Bin lull had told several that. Benwell had gone west. Why was the baguage to go east? The 1 went carefully through the points telegrams and covering the ,vcl! known bogus telegram from Biiehall to himself. He said it was the gravest rfjrt ol evidence against Birchall; if it ,vas r, ally in Birch.ill's) ivritiug. He re- ler.ited minr impressively that if tho tele- gram signed Statiord House was in Birchall's writing and also if he wrote ii her telegrams that passed about that ime.it was evidi net- of an exceedingly frave character against him as his actions showed a schcint' lo conceal a crime. On the medical testimony the judge seemed tnlein to the opinion lhat the cireum- cs were mil out of joint with the tl.enry of the crown. Commenting on the evidence of defense, the judge asked ivh, Uicr the body was cairied to the Mliere it w.is found and said it was he theory of the mm n that the murder .vas committed within a feu- teet if where bodv lay. The evi lencL- of. MacQuecn and Millmau md the other cudeuce concerning he wioiig iilent.tic.ition of Benwell, said lie judge, was simply cill'eredto show how fasy h is lor a pel-on to be mistaken. "Ijirchall was not In Woodstock on that date. He admits him- self lie was at tho Kails." fiincluililig, the judge told the jury in effect t liat circiiin.stan where the chain is periect, m ly be made Wronger than the litect evidence- ot a wiUie.s? who swears iniimufc'l (hat if the jury believed llic testimony for the crown was innnpearhuble the (asc was a very strong one against the prisoner He told the jury they iniisl not shrink Irom their duty anil that they must not allow themselves to be lead by public opinion. In thu gravest manner he chaigcd jury to do their whole duty and find a true verdict. Tbe court adjourned at !t but the jury lid noi go out. They remained in their scats and a guard u as set over them. Tin'crush of people was terrific. Out- side it was almost impossible to get igh the throng. Judge .McM.ilmn said quietly that he would come into com t hear tter verdict, if reached nt that time. By the throng in the streets it :'il as if nobody to bed but were anxiously awaiting tbe verlict. Me.Malion came into court at and at once inquired if a verdict had been reached. Th.' foreman of the jury replied in ihe affirmative. The judge sent for the priMiwr and in a short time he was brought in, heavily ironed, and placed in the box. The court was cinwdod to suffocation. When called upon the foreman arose and said the verdict was "Guilty." Mr. Blackstock asked that the jury be polled, and all in turn said ''Guilty." Then judge McMahon addressed the pris- oner, ending tin with the question whether ho had anything to say why sentence should not Ins pronounced upon him. The piisoner was now standing in the dock. All eyes were focusbt'd upon him. He gazed unflinchingly at the judge, and as he spoke his voice was ns firm, his fea- tures as composed, his glances resolute as anytime during the long trial. He said: ''Simply that I am not guilty of tho crime ns charged." Intense silence reigned throughout the court room. People held their breath to henr his words. His voicu had a full round soui.'l, without a tremor in it Se'ilciKe was then pninminced. Judge M ort. on the lull to relieve settlers on Northern Pacific indemnity lands. The conference report on the deficient} appropriation bill w.is presented and ilained hy .Mr. Hale, lie said thai the senate conterrcos hud yielded the French spoliation amendment because ot the per sistency of the but, subject would be taken up at anolhcrscssinn. The report wns agreed to. The conference re- port on the I arid bill was then presented and read al length. After a lengthy debate thu report W.T .aid aside informally without action The concurrent resolution on the final ad- iournment to d.iy was presenled and re ferreil to tlic linance c'linniitti e. At'ler a short excc'Uivu session the senati adjoin ned. SALE OF TROTTING STOCK. Number of Good Animikls Kiioel, at Sintill S'KW YOUK, Sept. hetrottingstoLk of .John II. PlniHs was sold at auction at the Parkville farm. Brooklyn, yesterday. The bay .slalliou Cuyler, sire Kydsick's Hambleton (Jrey Hose, foaled in ISfiS, went to KcJicmer Bach, llambletou and Park ol Wheeling, W. Va., Ecu- .Mr. Hiulte was anything but pleased at the result for the stallion cost him only a shor time ago. Siclclarthu, a brown colt, 4 jcars old, bj Pancoast out of Esprit, went to AV. (j ganger ot Sjnngerfield, N. Y., at SSOO. 'Ihe 6-year oldst.-.llion Parkville, by Klectloncci out of Aurora, which was expected hy Mr Shnlts toscll for at least sold foi C'lyinena, a 7-year-old cliestnu mare, by Pancoast out of Dora, was hough by II. Henry for A short tirn ago Mr. ShulLs bought this mare for Mr. Henry also bought Dutchess, a chest nut mare foaled In 1874 by Mambrin Patchen out Letta, for A mini ber of otlier good horses brought smal prices, frhe amount paid for the firs fourteen horses was an average o To-day's sale will include the stallioi Stanford, a number of brood mares and lot of promising youngsters, broken an unbroken.________ Tlie Cotton Spinning ptantennlul, PwiviDENfE, K. I., Sept. ccle bration of thu 100th anniversary of the in troductiou inlo this country of cntloi spinning by power by Samuel Slater in Ib city of Pawtucket began here yesterday In commemoration of the fact that Saniuo Slater established one of the first, if no the first, buinlayscliool in America, jester day was knonn ns Sunday schoi 1 day, th morning being devoted to Sunday schoo exercises. The parade, consisting of th Sunday schools of this city ana surround ing towns and villages, with music, bar ners and badges, marched to Dunne! park. Thousands of holid.iy-dresscd chil clren were in line. At the park there was music by Carter's baud of Boston, fol- lowed by an introductory address by the chairman.___________ William Fatal Fall. ROCHESTER, N. Y., Sept. Filting, an employe at the Powei'3 hotel, fell from the fifth floor of the building to the bottom of the baggage elevator well alxmt p. m. yesterday. Iiis head was crushed by the fall and hu died instantly. THE iSHRIGLEY ENTANGLED, A Diver ii Mauser from her The propeller Jumes Shriglcy eared from Dunkirk yesterday for the west, for another load of lumber. She tailed to leave porl just after twelve 'clock wiih hur tow, the barges John hetiiian and Guiding Blur. The pros oiler lay across Ihe L ol the ock. and the barges lengthwise of the on llie outside, When tkcShriglcy .arlcd thu tow-line of the Sherman, run lo the Shriglcy'a stern, slack- ned and dropped, inlu the water. This was n buven-inuh hawser. The hrigley picked il up wiih her wlicol, it urouud the wheel scvcial mes, gol two turns of it wedged iu ghlly in between Ihe hub and the bear igH, and got eo entangled lhat the en- iuu slopped bhorl. The boat was ulkd in by liaud to Ihu dock, utul a ispalch was sent to Conlcy lirolheis of Buttnlo.for a diver to come p iiud relieve her, U is a common ao ident. In answer to the divt-r uuo up on the Iwo o'clock train last ight, and Ihe.job was (hushed Ihis loruicg. Tlic work wns doro under Ihe charge f Jerry McCarthy of the firm named, 'he diver was Charles Bovce. Lie went Ho ihe water al ten minutes past four, 'he job was not a difficult one, as the ork lay just below the surface. He tayed under an hour and a half or more In time, coming up only for breakfast r to give iiu account of rogress. The two had rcakftiht at half pasl eight, when the yhcel was practically freed, lie went nder ngain at leu and cleared out the emuftntg. It wns curious and interesting to vatch him. He put on, over his ordin- ry dollies, a rubber suit, all in one iece, which he entered through a slit n the breast, afterward laced up. There vas a rubber breastplate which covered he upper part.of tlie body. The hands vcrc left nnkcd, the wrisls of Ihe rub or garment lining light around the rm. An oil suit went on, and Ihen a nit of canvas clothes, intended to pre- ent dialing of the rubber. Around his col and ankles felt was wound. Seventy ve pounds of lend were hung on his ark, and seventy-five more on his reast. This was lo keep him down. shoes were put ou his feet; local Im Useful, Attractive and Orna- mental Merchandise. Perforated plates, 5c.; fancy mugs, cups and saucers, 25c.; silk finish fast black fleeced hose, only hand mir- rors, 5c.; fancy hone, handle tooth brushes, 9c.; novelty shop- ping bags, J 5c.; students' useful book, 4 So.; misses1 and dies' fancy llannel and velvet oajis, and fancy live bird's feathers, wings, latest styles French and Buck- men liat frames, lie.; rich perfumery and complexion face powders, hair nets, pure wash working iioss, stamped covers, tray cloths and towels, ladies1 now nightgowns, fancy face veiling, market baskets, SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT O'HJDOAKT CO., I'atciitAtUiTOeis, 7lh II. C., U. h, Palehl Of- Hoc. J'alentB, Caveats nnil Ite-ltiBiien secureil JjRY 'U I'railc All Patent liiiKineM GT v i for moderate Fees. Information, Advice ;iml special references sent uu OOD3 AjN AMMJEIDRIM ANDSiON icnt tor Kvery IKIX guat- r Xurtlu'r parliculfirs A. iturheu wishes fu iiiitionl.rc lo llic puhhc in general, p.itrmin in pdrlir.- ulnr, that lie han tmichiincil the building fur- AMERICAN 39G-.10-2 Main Ktivt-t, Buffalo, N. Y. ]iuiclu'iM'il ilic building iH'i'ly (K'.cupH'd liy Jt. II. Multi-tl, fin Llm-il ami liUa tilled U up in (lie help of Mr. W, A. Mun- ih In do hi-riiiK. Im piihl na( run a hlinrcof llu: Juluro. Rot poet f till A. iiUHilKK. SAI.EsSTKN'WANTICl) to hoLl our ruriUfH of choice NurHcry wUtrk. l-'.-ttl c, nil just opened bcr-t hptjcialiier-, bi-st Ujriiifi, RtcMuIy work, pay wuukiy. Mro icc what we julvertisn. (Tina house is Itutts We 
                            

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