Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Dunkirk Evening Observer Newspaper Archive: July 22, 1890 - Page 1

Share Page

Publication: Dunkirk Evening Observer

Location: Dunkirk, New York

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Dunkirk Evening Observer (Newspaper) - July 22, 1890, Dunkirk, New York                               VOL. XX DUNKIRK N. Y. TUESDAY, JULY 22, 1890. NO 124 REPRESENTATIVE lltfeLA' HOUSES CANADA. .g-J: OF DUNKIRK. BCUJia MACHINE lor ruling A ol blanks la the latest audition to he Mechanical Department of 4 LMAKUBB-8 Coal Wood 1 A Awrnne. opposite Nickel All o! Hard ami Sort Cori, LnmhSr. Shingle, and Correspondence for lott TESTIMONY TAKEN BEFORE THE SENATE SPECIAL COMMITTEE. STATEMENT 11Y GKS. N. A. MILKS. OOK IKVINU, Tra- il nf- J> pnetor. No. 16 E. Second street, near liiii- Dunkirk, N. V. Magazines, Mu- nc. Paaphlau.etc..bound in all Btylcs. Ordorf V. ..aptly attended io. All work guaranteed. T l OKCHKH'S'CIUHJKKKY HOUSK, MB Central Vvonui1. WnolMAlc anil retail ilettlor 111 I poru.il and aecbr China. Ulasswure, ____ HOTEL, V Katea, per day. l.ifwy and Boarding 3tal.li: in conniption. Victol llirtrr. 3XT. anil 387 I.Jgn I BAKBEK I Chan. Nuglc. Prop.. Lake Shore National Hunk, ijornei and Third A nno hlock of r..roigu and Domestic Center street, I'l-aetical liorse-thocm. I'xrticular attention interfering bonea, Shooing rouu j. trotting hornfn a ______ l> CNKIKK EVENING OII4KRVKK. Largest In the County. An unequalled advertising ineilium. ItTNKlKK KHOINKEKINO COMI'AJiV. Sollew Popule. ol Engines, Boileri, Hulleye, llangm, etc. 1'atlernB. Machine Work to onler. UNKIUK SIIIHT CO., i03, and M Outer street, Manufacturers oi' the anil "Uiinurk" i-erlect-lilting Shirui. ule in all lowling luriiialimg. UK and dry houses 111 luiiikirk.. i ry go _ r. TOOMEY, I. 434 ami blon Btrcot, i -eater in Flour, Feed. alt. llalcil liny. Plion BUB HOTEl. ana umlnK Suloc.n. Union Depot. acceMtoall triiins ami bun- bonaes. accommodations tor Oom- bonaes. accom ravele h- co., fl anil 99 E. TtiirJ BtreeV riM rurniture. Cabinet Ware unit Picture rramua made to onlcr. Ijl U. MATTESOS CO., Ml Central Ave.. Uexdnto! Kuhmn ami Uonllcmcn OuUlllem U AKE1J. STKAM HEATIN4J CU.. ol Steam Healing Sanitary Plumbing a Spocmltj ,0MB STEAM UICMDBS. Fine Sliirtn. 10u; Collura, te- Cull 4o, Curtains. Kree Ueliv- wy. A Center street. I K. OEHM. B. Third st, cor. ot Buffalo II .ulncturer anU dealer in Fine Boots A Shoes J JOB PK1MT1NO ol every description anil at lifing by Dunkirk Printing Company. 8 and 10 Sccoml St. JH. TAM UPREN Jt SUN, Accident and General Deal- er- in Heal Estate and IXMUM. Particular nOon paia to the cure of properly oollect- IBI fa. S19 Center at., 2nil lloor._______ 1 ONBOK'S PUABMACV. SOP Central Avenue Headquarters for Wall Paper 1'a.nt, Oils, Ac. J. W., 309 Center street, U-inufactnrer anil ilaalor in llai neRS.SaiUHoa, Bi .lies. Collars, Trunks.Whips. liuffalo Kubire. Covers Gloves Mittena ami Sleigh Hmf.-s. 1 r n East Third Btreot nublovableTailor. Gentlemen will Una it to their advantaRe to call on me before purchasing Pa. CART co., SB Lion street. General Leail.Oils.Paintor'e Snvpliea, Oil Cloths, Granite Ware. A special- ty 01 Sherwifc Williams Pa: nt anil Monroe range. R 1OUMO, such as biunk-books, ledgers, and all kmdt ol blanks done at Dunkirk Printing Company, 8 aad 10 S. Second St RVDOLPH MOLDENHACKB, Cor. Third and Buffalo IB Granite, Marble, and Bui. Stoea. Call on me i.cfore R ISLET CO., 7 and B East Front street. Whisky, Wines, Brandies. Liquor Store for Family Use. RliKERT M'KAT, Lion street, near the depot. 1: tarding. Sale. Feed and Livery Stable Stating bj the day or week on reasonabl- J. OlFFOBD, 301 Central Ave. (Ui General Insurance and Real Estate t nt. FiM, Life, Accident, and Live Stoct lobunmce. Prompt attention givsn to buying an. i .-lellioc Beal Eitato. n C. I 7ft E. Third cor. l-leeJlior Meat Market. Freeh. Salt am. Su-uked Lard, Sausages, Oysters an< Pi.iltry. tne Aurora Kailroad Watch. Repairing a specialty. Frank F. Stapf. Kt B. Third st. MUCKER, Merchant Tailor. SIS Central ATtnue that tlie Itallw.ly SjHtcm of British Columbia Could be Occupied by American Troops In Ten Condemn! the Coast Defenses of San Francisco and Portland, tion DlSCUHKfld. WASHINGTON, July Hoar, chair- man of the senate committee on relations with Canada, presented to the senate yes- terday the testimony which haH been taken by that committee. This testimony was not accompanied by a report. It la un- derstood that, the committee will make a report of its conclusions at a later period after additional testimony shall have been taken at Buffalo, Detroit and other points. The testimony already takrn comprises some printed It consists of testimony of the military men, railroad ofliclals, prominent business men of the United States nml Canada; nii'ii engaged in the fishing industry northern boundary the United States and Canada. Ceil. Miles' Testimony. The testimony covers all the points of vital interest as to the relations between tie United Stales nml the dependency of Great Britain in North Amenta. The firsf witness examined was Gen. N. A. Miles, in command of the Pacific coast. Gen Miles, commenting upon the defense- less condition of the United States ou the northwc.Htein border, says: "I would simply say that the informa- tion that I have was gathered for myself aud for I tie higher officers of the govern- ment and regarded as confidential, but in staling to you as a body of repre- sentatives of the legislative branch of the government, I should feel it my duty to lay before you any facts that 1 have, and of course will consider myself relieved from any us to secrecy after that. 1 will Mule what is well known in regard to Cunmia. Ciisy to Hrlllttli Columbia. "I believe that the railway system of British Columbia could be occupied by American troops In ten days; in other words that the principal part of British Columbia rould be occupied by American however, through Victoria. That is. on rhe island of Van Couvcr occu- pied llritish forces, a place where the lirilUh government lias expended millions in building dry docks, navy yiirds, and made .some, surveys for fortifications. They have tlieie at this time a fleet of war .ships under the command of a British admiral. I'orllHtid, Ore., Hnfl No Coast "1 think it is fair to say, what every in- telligent man must know, that during that ten days the liiitish fleet could de- stroy every town and city on Puyet. .sound, destroy our railroad system there and oc- cupy our oul lets for that northwestern country. They could also send ships tip the Columbia river and destroy the city of i'orlland and that railroad system. There i.s not a gun or an on Pugct nor a .single artillery soldier. There are a few obsolete guns at the mouth of the Columbia :it Fort Canby, but that is not now occupied by troops. That is the condition of affairs north of the harbor of San Francisco. Not 11 tiuii in Position. of the harbor of San Francisco there is not a gun in position, H round of ammunition, or auingle artillery soldier to defend the harbors and cities of San Diego, Santa Barbara and San Pedro, the terminus of one of the railroads, and from these points a small force could de- si roy I he railroad system in Southern niti." The. following is a concluding seiitejice of the report of a board of officers ap- poiufd to iiiM'-tiijiitc the conditions of lortitlcatiotis of San Francisco and the en- trance to the Golden Gate. From the defective character of the carriages and emplacements upon and in which the existing aimainent of this har- bor is mounted, it iw not possible to fire a gun with a service charge: nor could this state of affairs be remedied in the course of a month." Kritluli Fortification ut Ksqnimnnlt. The report contains an account of the British fortification tit Esqtiimault, where it i.s reported that Great Britain is now concentrating war vessels with a view to possible contingencies in Behring sea. A great mtewlter of witnesses discuss in all Its relations the question of subsidies to steamers from the Pacific coast to China, notably the lines which have been subsi- dized by Great Britain in connection with the Canada Pacific railroad and which constitute n continuous subsidized line from China to Liverpool over the Canada Pacific. The general policy and effect ol the Cannon Pacific railroad upon the United States railroads is discussed by the friends and opponents that system One of the curious features of thetesti uiony is a consideration of the possible transfer of a portion of the fisheries in terest from the Atlantic to the North Pacific coast. Salmon luiltmtry on the Puclfle The testimony gives the latent informa tion as to the salmon industry on the Pa ciflc coast and the coal production along the northern frontiers and in the north- western states. The testimony is an im- portant contribution to many subjects cuunected with the tariff, and will be likely to be found of use in the tariff de- bate. The very important lumber ques lion which is so much discussed is fully considered in the testimony. Nearly question connected with the tariff its effect ed by the relations between the L'uited States and Canada is treated on both sides. The managers of the Uuitet States transcontinental railway systems forth at length their the competition o[ the Canada road, which is made possible by the fact that those road are not subject to the operations of the interstate commerce law. A great man; different remedies, for the evils of whici Ihe United States roads complain, nr Inimical to American Ralln-ays. Most of the American railway manager maintain that the Canadian Pacific is in imical to American railway interests many of them suggest that the long an short haul and the pooling relations L. the interstate commerce law should be re country when they shall all disappear. "WAnton DeHtritctloii of There is abundant evidence to show that seals are destroyed ii.i the most wanton manner by shooting, irrespective of the season, which ought to be regarded as close, and even when the seuls are in the breeding season. The testimony contains fu.i ii.formation j as to the wool growing interests and the woolen manufacturing industry on the Pacific coast and along the northwestern border. The relations of I he fishery ijues-1 tion on tlie Atlantic and Pacific coa.nl aru set forth. Fond Finn Oininmeil by Seals. One of the fishermen of the north western coast said it requires over pound of food fish per day to supply the seals and that it may become neiessm-y on the coast j to get rid of the seals in order to preserve he food fish for mankind. Some of the shermen predict, that, with Ihe existing lethodx of hunting mills, there will not c any in Bcliriug in live years' irnc. The testimony contains u vast deal f detailed information as to the discourse niE WOULD OF SPORTS. ABOLITION OF SUPERIOR COURTS. Project U The In OPENING DAY OF THE DULUTH. REGATTA AT RE WARD I WB will par the above reward for any ot lava Complaint, Dyspepsia, Sick Headache Couatipatiuu or Coativeuttea etuaot cure with VVeat'b Vegetable Lirer Pills, when the directioi -s art' strictly complied with. Tbej an purely Vegetable, nnd never Jail to fiTCMtiuaetlon. Sugur Coated. Large boxes, containing 30 Pills. cents. Beware ol coun- tottta. aad imitations. The genuine maun- jMOnd only by JoHN c. WKS f a CO. Sold by JtOHKOK's Pharmacy, Uuulcirk, V, T. WITNESS T'JE HACKS. Guutlaur and McKiiy Win ihe Double Scull Contest by About Four Lengths. Haitian LOMPH lliH Oars Temporarily. Other at the Brighton Jtftuch mill Gultciiluirg J'layM-K {'lub Secm-CH u New Pitcher. Di'i.TTll, Minn., July regatta ;'ostcrduy proved a success and was wit- nessed by thousands of people from all put Is of the ronntry who early iu the af- ternoon bex m lo move to the scene of the .NeuT were sky .ind air and iMtier more  ie n! hers in the following order: Mlnlicsol.i, nnd St. J'aul. Uvvillg to (In: t judge's' hojit ran too close up lo the slieiis in the junior four- j onred race and cotm-rlled tlic St. Paul Opposition to tho Said to from Buffalo. XKIV VnliK, July The committee of I the judicial y comtnil tee appointed to ex- amine into ,iud report upon the reorgani- zation of the superior courts oQ he state of Xew York ,md the city met for the sixth and probably the last time, at noon yesterday iu the lau olHces of ex-Surro- gate Daniel Hollins. The probabilities are that the recomni'iidations in regard to the abolition of tho superior courts and their into a branch of the supi cine com t, will meetwith hearty ap- probui ion. Among other things the com- I iniUee had to do was to examine a pro- posed constitutioualamciidment iu regard to the superior cut rt aud all the city courts. The contemplated abolition of the su- perior courts has not been allowed to go without vigorous opposition. The oppo- sition basin no small degree come from Buffalo, and among Uiose present at the menting was lawyer Edeluert Moot of that city, who had been deputed by the BufTalo bar to oppose the abolition of the superiour courts. Attorney General Tabor was also present for the same purpose. At the conclusion of the meeting the committ.ee held an executive -session and forniul tied their final pbins, which will be presented lo Ihi. convention which will meet iu Albany on Aim. next. THE DEBATE CN THE TARIFF COM- MENCED IN THE SENATE. VERDICT Offleprs IN THE TIOGA CASE. of ihe (iniHtten Oil Company Clmrged IVIIh Murder. CHICAGO. July coroner's jury investigating tlie Tioga explosion rend- dereil ,i venlict yesterday altcrnoon, rec- omiiieiidliig that ,1. Bright BufTalo, president of the fienesee Oil company, W. II Bright of Phil.idclplua, vice president, The. suljject of annexation, of which so nnch him been said, is incidentally re- erred to by a number of wit.ne.sses, and he advantages und disadvantages which t is assumed would result from a union f the two countries aie explained by iu- ividimls. There aru Canadians as well s Americans. The committee itself nakes no statement upon thissubjoit, uor oes it communicate any conclusion of uy kind in connection with the testi- uony. Additional Testimony to be Takrn. The conclusions, as has already been tated, are reserved for a subsequent >eriod after additional testimony shall ave been taken. An appendix to the estimony contains a great deal of infor- natiou about the 0 nuinioii of Canada rom official Canadian and other sources, vlnch is luirdly to be found iu any other ompilation. Iu one portion of tho ap- lendix the present exciting race question n Canada between the French and Miglish-speaking portions of the Domin- on is fully explained. Full information us to the trade and commerce and t he po- iticnl and phvsical material and rel.uions of the Dominion of Canada .ire contained j n the appendix rtfld throughout the tes- j imony. and F. Bellord of this city, secre- crcw to back water, iivhiymg tm'-v the company, be held H-couds just .-illc, the turn, mid the fact! 'o_r the innnler of the twenty-four victims of t lie Tloga, on the ground that they will- fully violated the law and m so doing caused tho death of rJic men. The jury .ilso censured the Union Steam- boat to which the Tioga be- longed. I or carelessness in receiving freight that might well be dangerous, without lir.st inspecting tiie cases. They also recommended that the city oil this city have his duties .so enlarged as to enable him to appichend persons shipping explosive oils ugain.st the laws of the irec-i'ightliM of a mile' I States. The coroner will at once Catlin's t ime notify the state's aWorney of the finding I l lie I .urlines and I he Diilnths fouled, tin- judges ilccided lliat the race' must be rowed over again. I The junior double race was a grand and was won by .six bo.it lengths by the Catlin club of Chicago, Ihe Minnesota represonlatues being second The last half ot the turn was no race at all. As the Cnillns were icn lengths in the lead pulling very little lifo while Kight of tin- was so tired that he could not leater his oars. The Lnrliues stopped lowim from the finish. Tlic great profe.s-ional double proved as llni1 cl grand jury will _ ...1....1... _....... grand as Minnesota has ever witnessed. Jt was wlieti the four great professional crews of the country got into pinion fort he two-mile .struggle, in ui'iiiing crew was to get ihe sei oiul ciew XiaO nnd the third (iaudaur and were nearest the .shore. Teeuifr and llosmer next, Ilanlau and next, and ll.innn and Ten Kyck last. Jt took some lime lor them to gut n 411 oper start, Teemer's i reu- muchtotho aniiiscuH-nt of the croud taking water live limes in finticip.it ion of the piMol .shot. When the shot was linalh 11 red all be asked to return agamst the ii.irtirs Then rcijiiisitions will be made upon the governors of Pennsylvania and New York for (he arrest and delivery of thu men lo the stateol Illinois for trial. ON THE DIAMOND. At I 1 (I 0 0 Hurley Bufllnton and Mailman. Al I 'ievi'land 1 1 DO Brooklyn.....U I) 0 0 II 0 n. n..r. o l :i-n in 020- S 6 and Carroll; H. n. 0- 4 !l and SutciifTu; 'Wt.v and Kln-dow. AI Hullalo-- Ullftalo........1 0 0 0 0 Xew York ..II fl U 1 3 04 0 3 then oars in the water as if they were une man. In an instant FIREMAN ROADHOUSE CONFESSES. 'lie Snys Ho Killed Engineer Vim Dervun- dcr In of Lynching. TOI.KIIO, O., July A special to The Commercial from Van Wert, O., says Fireman Kimdhoiise hi.st night confessed at. Van Wert of murdering Engineer Van Dervander. He said that Van Dervauder had been qunricling with him all along the trip, and among other things accused Ihe powerful stroke of Gniidnur and Mo- lllm of him for drunkenness. Kay told, and thev forged ahead of hen Van Wert the 'IVi'iiuT.ind now a qinrtev now e'Wncur riislied at Kondhouse with a a half, and now a lull length. J'Yom thu llu fix him. With lialteries-Haddock and Mack; Ewing and At n. n. K. Imimi.....0 n 1 0 0 0 8 1 0- 4 II 1 Boston.........ii i n o (i n fi o (i-i ;i i Bull.-He -llaldn-ln and Bco lo: Kadbmirne tlld -Murphy. National At rievela id it. H. K. Cleveland.....1 II 0 n 1 0 0 1 2-5 11 (1 RrKtim.....a a 0 II 0 0 I! 2 (I 3 lint I cries- Heuliii und Zimmer; and Bennett. At n. n. K1 r, 3 0 2 1 3 21 4 Plttslinrc n 0 2 II 1 1 0 3- 7 II 4 and Shrivcrj Heard and Decker. At ii. n. E. o i r i 2 o n o i NcwYoik .....0 (I 1 0 1 I) II 0 and Kittredge; Rusie and Tltiekley. At u. II. r.. Clnrhimui ___n 4430208 XI r> n 0 :i 1 1 II 0 0-11 8 5 Mulhine and HarrinK- ton; Terry, Lovett and Clink. Amei'lean Asxoclation. At Philadelphia u. E. Athletic ......2 101 (lOOn 0-472 St. n 5 n (i n n ,1 s IB z -Seward and Hninscy ami Wells. At Sj rucust'- K. n. n. II 5 0 00 1 0 W .'i Toledo...... II 3 1 0 0 1 0 0 n- 4 ti I! and Bi IKKS; Ou-iliman.niid Sage. At Rochester u. H. K. RochcMcr. .n :i a o n o 3 4 13 7 Columbus. I) 0 1 I) 0 0 0 1 n 7 7 and Euston and O'Connor. At it. n. E. Loui-vilk-.. ".1 0 n 1 4 :i 15 (i Brookljn.......' n I) il 'i o S .1 (1- I 8 8 t'n'nrenn-1 T'ilz: Goodall and Ryan. ___ ___ SUIC'DC AT tb An UnU'.iov. gi llhiiKelf Into II Millars; Canal. BFFFAI.O. .Inlv 'S.-About N o'clock last night nu unknown niiiti while walking across the over the Hamburg was notned to sud- stop nnd hesitate, then, in if a .sud- den determination seized him, he mounted the iron railing and phmgud into the slimy water Lieut. Bitrry of ihe Second precinct, on being notififd. in company with Oflicers Lynch and Kcogli, secured a boat and soon rccovcicd Hie body and Coroner Ken- ncy wns notified. Tlit> remains were those of a man about years old, five feet eight inches black mustache and hair cut close. Unu I unit tooth was gore. He wore a good suit of black, frock coat, new boots, and wa- generally well The body wus taken to the morgue for identification. start I lie si niggle n.ismosl exciting. Thc cr  m lied, threats being made- to thai effect %ery freely LAWLESSNESS llHttlc IN VIRGINIA. ant tufM'ii Aimed Mob 1'olirH In 1'ocationtHK. WASlUNGTdN'. July special fron Lynchbnrg Lo The Tost sais: Pocahontns has another excitement The town was thrown into a i xi itcmi'iil, Sunda1 evening when a party or mi n from Mi Dowell county, W. Va., rode into the placi and bc-gau firing their guns piomiscuous ly in the strectb. The town sergeant summoned a possi and attempted to arrest them, when th invaders opened fire on them, wounding several of the sergeant's force. After (juite a battle the officers sue ceeded in airesting two of the mob an lodged them iu .jail. Thc rest of them escaped by riding over the state Hue. Later iu the evening the rumor was cur rent that an attempt would be made t rescue the prisoners, and much excite ment prevailed. The report became si positive that the mayor ordered out th military, to bo re.idv at, a moment's uotiie. to an early hour yesterday morning no such attempt hind been made but the people are uneasy and every ap proach to tlie. town i.s guarded. Striking Fuilillevs to Return to Work. PITTSIIDKO, July committee of employes, representing the striking ptid- tilers of Jones ifeljaughlin's American iron of reciprocity state their cases nt length. Works, and a committee of that firm held Some very curiousi information w given as a conference yesterday afternoon. A tothejlBtureof the seal fisheries. Most special agreement was reached satisfactory to both sides, and the puddlers will return to work Thursday. Five hundred men pealed. The advocates and the opponent of the fishermen engaged in the food fish- Ing on the North Atlantic coast insist that the seals are very destructive of food were affected by the strike. A Mew Pltcbor for Itunalo. PHILADELPHIA, July Cunningham was released last ton of the PLn -is' league. Ciuiniugham is a and will sign with the Buffalo IMayeib' team, repoiting for duty at once. Sau mill jiiirned. OnovtLLE, Cnl., July The sawmill, sash and door factory of Springer Co. at Bush Creek were destroyed by fire on Saturday Thc null is a complete loss. Machinery, lumber and manufactured materials aud lumbermen's cabins were destroyed. Loss, Outbuildings by Firo. July The outbuildings of the Alnany orphan asylum were burned yesterday. Loss small. MoKlnley Tariff Hill. j PAIIIS, July t he chamber of depu ties yesterday M. Kibot, minister of foi eign attairs-, replying to a question by M Dnpuy, said that l''rance had been ii negotiation with the other European nn tious- elide.ivoi iinj; to arrange lor con certed action ii'i.iiiis1 thu eil'ectsof the Me Kiuley tarilf bill iu America. The nation seemed averse toentermgiutoaiiy positiv engagements ou thc subject, and M. Ktbo feared that further action at presen might defeat the purpose iu view. M Dupuy responded that he hoped M. Kibo would strenuously endeavor to secure moderate administration of the bill. I any case, however, tne French custom committee would now know excu to adopt.__________________ Hart Ills Pocket Picked of XKWBURC, N. Y., July 122. Yesterda afternoon W. H. Perry of Cold Springs ha his pocket picked Ho caugh Edwin Kelly of Xew York in the act an after a short cluse captured him. Kell was committed to await the action of tl i grand jury. Steamship All-Kills YcHtortluy. XFAV YOUK. J. Arrived, Atirania an Cilj of Rome li u I IM ;i Nurmandi fiom HRMV, .wi.xt el .XI, a from Ulasf and the Hull and I'lcn1 L  per cent, to about fX) per cent, was: "1 biipposo it was to make the poor consumer pay twice 01 much lor liis as the wealthy con- >umer would have to pay for his." Mr. tToorhees iilso quoted from the statement if Mr. P. 11 Worrill of New York bufore .he. .same committee, who, when asked the for a large increase of duty on cot- ton, said nothing but prohibition. It Is lot protection. He also read an extract presented by Mr. Worrell from the anmial eport for 18S8) of the tieasurer of the Arlington mills, mmiufacturers of cotton warps, mohair and men's dross goods, to he effect that for the last twenty years the average division of dividends had been a little over'90 per cent., and that the profits of the lust, year were three times as great as those of the preceding year. Mr. Voorhues spoke of the, magnificent diamond presented by Andrew Carnegie o Stanley's bride. The farmers of the United Slates, he said, had paid for that ten thousand times over In the last twenty years by paying an average :luty of over 88 per cent, on every article of iron and steel that they used, and by paying increased rates ol railroad freight made necessary by the high duties on bteel and iron rails and rolling stock, for the farmer, at last, paid for all. If the pending bill became law they would have an Increase of duty to pay on iron and steel from 38.24 per cent, to 1S.17 per cent. Mr. Voorhees passed on to the discussion of the proposed increase of 120 per cent.on tin plate in order to protect an infant in- dustry us yet unborn. Tin plates, he said, had the first right to bo on the free list; and he would al the proper time move to put it there. With sugar on the free list, Mr. Voor hees said an annual of was abolished, but other schedules in- creased duties lo the amount of But if the bounty ol 2 cents pound on the sugar produced in Ihe United States should result (us its friends urged it would) in the production of all the sugar consumed here, then, according to the last statistics, the American people would find themselves paying an annual sugar tax of under the BATHING HATS, BATHING SUITS, BATHING SHOES, BATHINGiTBUNKS, SHIRTS AND TIGHTS. BOYS' NICKEL MOUNTED SAFETY BICYCLES, ONLY Worth A great saving by getting Bicycles of us. The best in the market for the price. Best braided edge Mexican IJammocks, Hammock Spread- ers and Extension Ropes, Croquet Sets, Window Screens and Screen Doors, Shoo Fly Kites, Rolling Hoops, Foot Balls, Indian Clubs, Picnic Baskets, Mosquito Netting.Fau- cy Glassware, Sprinkling Cans, 
                            

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 130 million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 130 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 11 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication