Dunkirk Evening Observer, June 28, 1890

Dunkirk Evening Observer

June 28, 1890

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Issue date: Saturday, June 28, 1890

Pages available: 4

Previous edition: Friday, June 27, 1890

Next edition: Monday, June 30, 1890

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Dunkirk Evening Observer (Newspaper) - June 28, 1890, Dunkirk, New York VOT,. XXDUNKIRK N. Y SATURDAY. JUNE ‘-'S. 1800. no nr* B REPRESENTATIVE USINESS HOUSES OF DUNKIRK. Mira,- Kin IMI MAC HINE for ruling A    th.- to* Mechanical Department of Dunkirk Tri nil md ornpaoy. Central A*®uU*,'i| " Lumiier, Stun*!** an't rn, OM of III A W Midi Lumlier, *mn|f*'»    \"^Uale    Iou r.r^    COITeap.*.i ieuc« fur whole**!* Nickel Soft OoaI, Cath. Free dolttrH Solicited. Ave. m u rn VKI I It! I. tCl an*! Central  ... P bob israeli* of B*W«e * •PW“H! need n< t wait for (•alite*. k uu nil I ne Sitter* eic^pl for Irving, Ituf- H411K It! NI) KHY—•! AM*.* pneU.rNo.WK- *£co»*»    Ma. tai., street, Dunkirk, N. T. I**K    lw •ic. Pamphlet*, eu-.jlwund •« •» l, a ran teed. bromoil v attended to. Allo *rk g    __ promptly att* H CIVLHKK H OMK KKKV HOUSE. _ .tdh (antral Avenue. Wholesale and retail dealar in I - (Marted and '•ooieetio China, GI***ware, Af- CHAUTA,m'^ i.„.rr ..cl    »■>*“    EST1 ssr, and 3S7 Lion atreet. • VITE HAItllKll SHOP Ii    Chan.    Napi*. Prop.. Under Cake Shore NaUoual    \ Center and Third atreet**. A tine ak** Foiriyn and Home*tic Cigar*. j ION KCI N ti WIN, Ii    33*    Center street,    . Practical liome-aluera. Part*©* I a r a tie DJ-'''** »*to mUirfennp hoise*. shoeing of ru* trotting home* a a penalty. I) (JNK IKK KV ENI NI* OltlKKV EK. Largest Daily in th* Cornily. An unequal le< I a* I Tertial ag medium UC NU I KH KNO I NIE KMIEC* CHIM PAN k. I-• innerly Mellow A Popple. Mauufa* lurer*1 of Engine*, Bollent, Pulleys, Shafting Hauser*, etc. Pattern*. Vorgiuga. CnaUuga, and Machine W»»rk loonier. rn the I vUNKI HK hHlKT OU, AB.    and 1/ ‘>uter street, Ma nu far lurer* of Cromwell    7?"*    1^    ba.I ml^ur n I ‘ag, wafer caused by the bree** from the aouad A DESIGNATE STRUGGLE. YALE SCORES HER FIFTH SUCCESSIVE VICTORY OVER HARVARD. Barnard’* Prautlr Kfforti to Regain Nu p Ternary Are Baffled by Vale'* Sturdy Oarsman -A Nip-and-Turk Rare from Start to ti ii lull — A Rattling Eight at the Pelican Club In london. New London, June 28.—The Yale Mar van! eight oared Im nit race wa* rowed last evening over a four mile at might a way course ou the Thame* river Iiet wee ti f tales Ferry and Winthrop Poiut, aud wan won by Yale by SH length* in 21:29. TLI* waa the fifteenth annual race between (bene universities, and it was Yale’s fifth sue censive victory. Yale has won nine and Harvard six of the fifteen race*. The race wa* a remarkably close aud exciting one for the first three mi lea, neither crew being able to gain a dechdv* lead. Mar yard waa ahead twice for brief (leriods, but Yale quickly recovered by spurting. Yale * staying qualities finally prevailed, and duriug the last mile the blue* gained slowly but surely on their competitors. After {Mooting the third mile flag Harvard’s stroke *eemed to bine nome of its effectiveucsn The shell rolled somewhat, aud three or four swerve* by the couswain helped to retard tile crimson* Yale kept Up the long, steady swing with alucist fault lea* precision to the finish, aud the men did not show any *ign of exhaustion aa they rested on their oars after crossing the line. Th* Harvard boys, on the other haud, showed plainly the effects of their hard but unavailing struggle The loser’s time wa* 21 mins. 40 secs. The crowd of spectators was the largest seen here on a rimier occasion for many years. All I'ong the course from start to finish were scattered scores of large sail and steam yacht*, large excursion steamers like the Hit* ale Island, City of Worcester. Elmirly and others and coontie** small yacht* and open boat* of every description crowded to th* utmost capacity. On the weitl Imuk wa* the moving observation train of thirty four cars; at the navy yard, opposite the two-mile flag, the large wharf and iuau-of war Yautic, aud sloping (tank at the finish were black with people. The coml it ions were excellent, there being a slight ripple on the lire** Shirt*. On *ale in ail iea*iu»K ■ clouting *iit! dry goods house* rn Dunkirk. nr. TOOM KT, 4.14 and m Lion street Healer in Flour, Feed, -alt. Baled Hay. Ph«*»-pbates, etc. festal*! tidied, 1877. 3 Kl K HOTK1 j Ile pot sn*! inurns JBHHP , feaay access to all tram* an*! bus Sal«M>n, I* ni<»n i a for Coifc- iue*s house*. It* st accommodations aer*'tai Traveler*. Joint J Murphy, I cop I'ULCKH A WL »7 aud IM K. Third street Fin* Furniture, Cabinet Ware *n«l Up-nolstertug. Picture Frames made to order. ^ O. SI ATTENDN A Ct!, All Central Ave., Leaders of Fashion and lien tie men Outfitter* HTC A X It K A IT NO DU, ll A It Kl. I anutacturer* of Steam Heating Apparalua Sanitary Plumbing a Specialty. Ll OME NTEAX LAl/NDKV. Our • penalties: Fine Shirt*. loo; Cellar*. to: Cuffs, ic, and Lace Curtain*. Free Deliv wry A W. Cummings. *»7 Center street II K. UkU.fi. E. Third st., oor. of Buffalo Manufacturer aud «U**‘i*rin I :u* Boot* A Sh«*e* HENRY WRULER’M new STORK. 1W K. Thin! st Books. Stationery, Musical Instrument*. Magazine*,Daily audtteeklv Paper*, and «v«rythii a pertain!ag to a first class book store Achoo*Books a specialty. J OB PRINTING of evory description and at lowest living rate* by Dunkirk Priming Company, • sn*) bl K. Second St. JU. TAN BUREN A NON, Fire Life, Accident and General Insurant*. Dealers in Beal Estate and Loans. Particular attention paid to the . are of property collecting reuU An. 118 Center st., Iud floor. iy^ONKOK’8 PM A KM ACV, SOO Central avenue Headquarters for Wall Paper Pa*at , Oils, Ac. PCHHINA, J. W„ Center street. Manufacturer ami dealer in Harness H«.|.lies. Bridles, to!law. Trunks,X hip*. Buffalo U**i»es, Horse Covers Gloves Mittens an.t .sleigh Holies. I) ac HOLT KH. I ,    17    feast Third street Fashionable Tailor. Gentlemen will Hint it to their advantage to cation me lictor* purchasing •lee where. PU. CARV A OO., ,    SSS Lion street General Hardware,White Lead,Oils Painter’s Supplies, CNI Cloths, Gran tie Ware. A e|*»cial-ty of Hherwts Williams Pant and Monroe range. ULI NG, such as blank-book*, ledgers, sod all kinds of blanks done at Dunkirk Printing Company, 8 and IO E. Second HL K Rudolph moi.hem* %u kb, Cor. Third ami Buffalo Ma, Dealer in Granite, Marble. Flagging MMMI your side-walk IMI.EV and It A UU, 7 and » feast Front street. Whisky, Wines, brandies. General Liquor Store for Family Us*. A 8:5U Yale pushed off from the float and paddled to the starting point, liar vanl getting into their boat and following as soon as Yale came in sight. Both crew* backed up to the line in a business like maimer aud were given the word “go” without delay Harvard made much the lietter start, sending the bow of their shell to the front, aud by a pretty piece of rowing gained nearly a length, Yale’* Imiw taring opposite the Harvard coxswain Hazard kept this lead to the quarter, where^^de’s powerful and ma chine like stroke changed matters very decidedly Yale’* boff! lietran to move up aud by a magnificent exhibition of rowing the shells were again ou even terms, half a length before reaching the half mile flag Some idea of this de*(»eratestruggle may lie ha*! from the fact that the bow of Yale’* (ton! gamed on Harvard at the rate of one luau for each four strokes*. This wa* kept up until Yale’s shell was half a length in front. Yale held thisa*lvantage to the three quarter, where Harvard succeeded in reducing it to one fourth length These positions were maintained to the mile flag Just after passing that flag Harvard increased her stroke and again pushed their shell lip even with Yale. Here another splendid exhibition of rowing was given by both crews. it was difficult to tell which crew waa ahead so evenly were they matched, but as they passed the 1^ mile point Harvard Kpparentiy had a slight advantage Nearing the uavy yard Yale struck a strip of ■limo*ber water under the lee ami by au other spurt again took the lead passing the 2 mile flag with a lead of half alength. Harvard tried hard to respond to Yale’* spurt, but its effort resulted iu giviug a slight roil to their ls*at causing the coxswain to swerve a trifle. Harvard hail evidently made their greatest effort and fading to bold her position dropjied gradually behind until at the end of the third mile Yale was one length ahead. Here both crews were pulling 38 stokes, ami uolhiug was gaiued or lo»t during the next half mile At 3^ miles Yale liegati to show clear water, ami grail aalii pill led away from their rivals. As Yale cross**! the finish line the crew Mtop|Msl rowing ami waived their hands at their frantic classmate*. In f he Harvard ls*al uu rn liers I, 8 ami 5 fell forward, evidently having used their last pound of force. Water was dashed into their faces ami they amin recovered their wind aud paddled sadly away Duriug the Inst two miles the race was pulled amid a continuous tooting of whist lea and tajomiug of can ti*>n.    _ Tbs Lot nm Ilia-Harvard Race. New I/«*nI**>n, <\»nu., June 28 — The Columbia Harvard freahmen race was rowed iu the dark and proved to lie a rather unsatisfactory affair. The river wa*crowded with craft, but little attention was paid to the race. When near the finish a steamer cr**-»ved Harvard’s bow interfering greatly with the oanmieu. The rata* was won by Columbia Time, 1U 34 WALLACE WASN’T IN IT. A Neat Robert m kav. Lion street, nesr Hie depot Boarding, Hale. Feed aud Livery HUhlc Stabling by the day or week on rvasoi.abb term. ^•AM J. GIFFORD, JOI Central Ave. U| O suun*). General Insurance and Real festal* Agent. Fire, Life, Accident, ami Live Stock insurance, rroiupt attention given to buying and Belling Real Estate. TU. JONEN. ,    75 K. Third sc, oor. I leer. Excelsior Meal Market. Fresh, Halt and .smoked MexU, Lard, Sausage*, oyster* and Poultry- the w \N J ATU HEM, JKWKLKV, A1 . "Buy Hie Aurora Railroad Watch Repairing a specialty. I rank F. supt, si K. 'Hunt at 7 It. MOURER, Merchant Tailor. 116 Central Avenue $600 REWARD! W E will pay the above reward for any case of Liver Complaint, Dv*pepsia, Sick Headache indigestion, chou patten or Coativeneas wt cannot cure with West’s Vegetable Liver Pills. when the dirccUuos ar*1 strictly comptie*! auh They are purely Vegetable, am! never fail U give satisfaction. Sugarcoated. Large Ixtles, containing 30 Pills, J& cents. Beware of conn tor felts, ami imitation*. The genuine tnanu Uncured ouly by JOHN C. MT EST A Lo. Hold by MONRO*’* Pit ak* act. O kirk, N V bing In the eighteenth round Dixon fought Wallace all around the ring. hit ting him aa he plaaaed Wallace finally reached his corner liefor* the round was finished and dropped hi* bauds Dixon mad* a feint at Aim, but Wallace mad*ne attempt ti deCMXl himself For a aecond or two he leam^fcteavily against the rope* completely wiuded ami severely punished, aud theu gave up the fight. Dixon ap pea re* I hi lie r+ fresh aa when he euterod the ring, and wan loudly cheered a* the referee auuotiuced his victory. ON    THE    DIAMOND. Results of yesterday'* Games In th* Three League*-Turf Note*. PLAY EK*' I.LAUT*. At Buffalo Buffalo...............2    I 0 I U I    U    U    ®-    I Philadelphia ......2    I ti I 3 U    U    0    •—    7 Base bit* Buffalo 6, Phi I-^^.ph la 6. Errors Buffalo I, Philadelphia 6. Ba ti cries Haddock and Clark; Knell and Milligan. Umpires Fergus*rn    aud Holbert. At Cleveland— Cleveland............(I    0 0    I    I 2 I 0 0— 6 Brooklyn............0    0U3S00U*— I Bane bits - Cleveland IO, Brooklyn ll. Error** Cleveland I, Brooklin 2. Batteries -O'Brien and Sutcliffe; Suwders and Dally. Cm pries Matthews and Leach. At Pittsburg - Pittsburg............0    0 0    5    0 8 1 0 I—IC New York............U    I I    2    I I 0 2 U~fe Base bbs Pittsburg 12. New York ll. Error* Pittsburg 6, New York I. batteries Staley and (Juma; frau* aud Bro wu. Urn pi rss—Knight and Jones At Chicago Chicago..............0    *0    0    00000—2 Boston ..............0    0 0    0    0 U 0 U 0- 0 Ba** hits- Chicago 4. Boston 4. Errors —Chicago I, Raton 2. Batteries King ami Farrell; Hadbourne aud Kelly. Umpires—tiara** aud Gaffney. NATION Al. I.KAUCX. At Cincinnati— Cincinnati ..........I    0 I 0 0 0    I    I    0-4 New York. ..........8    000220 10-8 Base* hits -Cincinnati 8. New York 18. Err*irs—Cincinnati 3. New York ti. Batteries Duryea and Keenan; Welch and M urphy. Umpire McQuaid. At Pittsburg— Pittsburg.............0    00000    8    02-6 Bos!ou...........,,..0    0 0 1 0 0    1    0    6—7 Base hits Pittsburg 0, Boston 0. Error* Pittsburg &, Boston 1. Bater!** - Hecker aud Berger; Get zeta and Bennett. Umpire Zac bari aa. At Cleveland— Cleveland............2    000200    I    2-7 Philadelphia........8    U U U U 0    0    0    0-8 Base hits Cleveland 12. Philadelphia M. Errors Cleveland 2. Philadelphia 4 Batteries Beat iii aud Zimmer; Vickery and Clements. Umpire Power*. At Chicago Chicago..............0    I 0 0 I 0    0    0    0- 2 Brooklin ...........0    0 ll 4 0 0    U    3    •- 7 Base hit*    ('hicago 8. Brooklyn • Error* Chicago 2, Br«*oklyn 1. Batterie* Hutchinson and Kit fridge; Terry anil Clark. Umpire Lynch. A M ICUI* AN AtHMM-l ATION. At HL I/OU is St. I yoni*.............I    I 3 2 0 U    0    I    O- 8 Louisville...........ti    04801    OI    o-fi Base lilts    St. DiUi* 8. louisville ll. Emirs Si. I ann* 2. I am my ill* & Batterie* Ramsey and Miinyau: Uoodale Meakin ami Hi an Umpire Kerins. At Toh*!** T«*led*>...............(I    0    0    1    0    4    0    0    0-5 Cohnnhns............4    0    1    0    0    2    *    0    •— 8 Base hits Toledo 6, Columbus 13. Err*irs T»»le*i**3. Coluiubus I. Batterie* Cush mail ami Sage; K nails* and O'Connor. Umpire Emalie. At Syracuse — Bv nu-use ............0    I    I    0    «    0    0    0    0- 8 Br*K»klyo ...........0    0    0    0    1    0    2    4    0-7 Base hits -Hyracoae 12, Br*M*klyu ll. Error* Syrs* use 2, Brtstklyn ll Batteries Morrison and O’Hourke; Matti-nn*re and Toy. Umpire lk*e«*oher. NKW VOHS KT ATK I.CAUL'K. At t hie* nit a Oneonta, 4; Troy, 2. At Albany All*any. 3; Jobnstown-Glovers-ville, H. Flyers at Slieepshcad. New York, June 2* The racing at Shee{**h*’H«l Bay yesterday resulted as follow*: First race, I mike:    I/ong*treet first. St ride a way aecond, Erie third, time, 1:41 4-5. Second race. Futurity course, about ^ mile: Conrad first. I a*(innto second, Tourist third; time, 1:10. Third rare, IU miles: Dudish first. Ada alalite second, Folsom third; time, 1:58. Fourth race, \ mile: Little Jim first. Sorrento aecond. tiny (»ra y third: t inie, 2:10 Fifth rail*, DK miles: SGiektnn first. Her Highness second, Prat lier I lord: tim*, 2:27. Sixth ra**e, the Spring Un rf stakes, I mile:    Mads tone first. Admiral second. Vengeur third; time, 1:42 2 5. Trotting at Hartford. H ARTFt*itn, Conn.. J*:ne 28. Results of yestenlay’s ra*’es follow: Sjiecial race lief ween Harry Wilkea aud Rosalind Wilkes. Harry won iu two straight heats; time, 2:19 aud 2:16. 2 23 cla*s: and ('loan Victory for American Bantam. I a >X HON, June 28.— About a thousand privileged peraons assembled at the I*eli-cau club last night to witness the fight between th* bantam weights, George Dtxou of America aud Nunc Wallace of England Both men apl***red in flue condition and the lief ting, which was 6 to 4 in favor of Dixon, was spirited Among those present were Lord lams dale and Col. North, the nitrate king. both of whom backed Dixon heavily. Iu the first round Wallace did all the ieadiug, but failed to land with auy effect. In the second round Dixon forced the fighting and Wallace, in ducking to avoid a hot right hander, touched Dixon's leg*. Cries of foul were rat se*I aud Dixon’s seconds demanded a decision from th* referee. Th* claim wa* not allowed, aa the iufraotiou of th* rules on the part of Wallace was obviously accidental. Wallace flagged noticeably in the third rewnd aud was forced hard by Dixon in the fourth Wallace held hi a owu iu the fifth, sixth aud seventh rouuds. and man kged to keep Dixon away from him in the Aghth and uiuth. Up to this time, although the fighting had been fast, the hitting wax not heavy, but iu the tenth round Dixon landed on Wallace’s cheek and knocked him down. Wallace waa bleeding freely when carried to his corner, and at the end of every snbeequeut rouud waa noticeably weaker than at iu hegiu- |/iirliiu vt*r.................... ...4 I I I J. K .......................... ...I 3 « tm 2 blanche ..................... ...3 2 3 3 G. It. H ....................... 2 4 4 2 < ’liH-e ........................ ... dis. Time, JHI*1*. 2:18*4, I* 1%. 2: -I 2:3U class, trotting: Scuik‘**len..................... ....3 I I I Prince A ..................... ....I I t 3 Jewell........................ «» 3 4 2 Ulrich........................ ...4 4 S 4 I .ad) (militia*................ ....§ dis. Best time. 2:21*4. < lii«'»K*> Ka« e«. CHICAGO, June 28 - First race yesterday, If mile:    Kingman    first,    Donallo    second, Rose Howard second; time, 1:15>^. Second race. I mile:    Flyaway    first. Princess Limo second, Amelia third; time, 1:42%. Third race, I 1-16 miles: Louglight first. Prince Fort anat us second, Blarneystone, Jr., third; time, 1:49 Fourth race. IH miles:    Duke    of    High land* first. Birthday second, Hoax third; time, 1:58 Fifth race. I mile aud 7U yards: Catalpa first, H*»rnpi(»e second, Outbound third; time, 1:4554- Judgments frow th* Court of Claim*. Washington, June 28 — Th* epoaker laid before the house yesterday a letter from the secretary of the treasury transmitting a list of the judgment* tendered bv the court of claims amounting to 1137,-854, which have been presented to the treasury department for {»aymeat and ask-ng that the appropriation necesaary for their payment be made. CONGRESSIONAL NKWS. WEEKLY REVIEW OF TRADE. DEBATE ON THE NATIONAL ELECTION BILL RESUMED. A Threatened Strike Averted. STD*KT, N. S. W., .Iuue 28—A couiprt> mise has beeu effected lief ween the dock laborers of this port aud the master*, thus averting a threatened sink*. A Conference Committee oa the Hiller Hill Appointed from the House-The Senate Cease* the Bill for the Admission of Wyoming Territory — Idaho Conin Nest. Washington, .June 28.—In the house yesterday the delude on the national election bill was resumed. Mr. Flower of New York attributed the agitation for a reformed bai bit to the fnt-fryings, blocks of five, etc., of the last election, and he said that in view of these the Republican party hail chosen a most inappropriate tune to enact this law. He •poke of the pros|*ective ex|»en*es tinder new local election laws, ami said that a single election iii New York, now would coe! ll JMMXX! for Im Hot s alone He thought the {teople who would subject themselves to this burden could tie as safely relic*! iip**u to conduct fair elect iou* aa could irresponsible federal officials, In conclusum Mr. Flower said that the Immediate effect of the law would tie moat harmful to the whole country, but that ultimately the people would drive from power the party that sought to profit by it. Mr Sniyser of Ohio said the measure waa conservative and not radical. The cost of executing it had (teen exaggerated, but fair election* were well worth any cost The South hail tieen let alone for fifteen years to work out it* own destiny, lie did not know whether it wan any nearer the kingdom, but he protested against it seeking to work out thesaJva ti*iii of the North on the same line. Mr. Vaux of Pennsylvania said that the iill virtually overturn**! the const it ut ion a-I destroyed our form of government. *e constitutional meaning of the phrase “time, pla*-e ami manner” was that the power of congress was limited to prescrib mg the form of * boosing representatives, ami that when the election itaclf Itegan its authority ceased. The “manner of bolding” aud “the holding” of the election w’ere entirely distinct and separate, and the power of congreas ceased with the former. These supervisor*, responsible to nolswly, might carry their authority to the election of senators, going to the legislative assembly of a *»tats ami declaring it* mein liers disqualified. Criticising the language of the committee re|s*rt with reference to the words “make or alter” in the constitution. Mr. Vain brought down the house with the remark that there was in surgery “an alteration which sometimes make one thing but does not make the animal.” (Laughter J Mr. Vaux said that this bill wrouUl drag the circuit court judges into the dirt and filth of partisan {aditio*. He as-urtsl the Republicans that the Democrats of I he North would see that Maiue was i»u*« of tlie first places where the law should la* carried out, no matter what the cost He warned the other side that as our forefathers had separated from Great Britain liecause they did not believe In taxation without representation, so the time might come when legislation depriving the (teople of representation would drive them to another revolt for the same principle. (1a>u*1 applause oil the Democratic side '1’he remarks! of Mr. Vaux were listened to with great attention and at intervals, aud at their conclusion, they were loudly applauded. Mr. Kennedy of Ohio said That It was idle to say that the majority had ruled in this country. All pretense that Grover Cleveland was elected president by a majority was subject to the further statement that laige immU-rs of qualified voters were not j*erniitte«l to cast their votes against him. He charged that at least thirty of the Southern mem liers were here because the blacks were counted in the census of 1**0 When the ap(>ortbiliment was made under th* n**v census that provision of the «‘onstit ution which required a reduction of representation in the case of states which permitted the rights of citizens to vote to lie uulawfully abridged, should lie put into execution in the Southern states The conference rejmrt on the legislative appropriation bill was present e«l ami discussed; the house acceded to the amendment increasing the salariesof commissioner ami assistant commissioner of the land office aud another conference was ordered on the amendments relating blin creases of salaries of senate employes. The house at 540 p. in., adjourned. IN TM E SENATE. WASHINGTON. June 28. —After routine business yesterday the senate resume*! consideration of the bill to admit Wyoming territory. Mr. Morgan favored the bu batt lute providing an enabling act for Wyoming. Idaho, Arizona ami New Mexico. He spoke at leugtIi of the resources of New’ Mexico ami Arizona. To pass t his general bill was the ouly way to eliminate from the question the element of fsditical con siderationa Mr. Morgan denounced the implied bargain limier which Wyoming was to vote for a Republican candidate in the next presidential election in return for the action of congress iu admitting the territory. Speaking of the Wyoming constitution, Mr. Morgan said that in rat ify-ihg it congress would confirm woman suffrage lf a worn*!) then could vote and hold office iii Wyoming she could lie elected to the senate or the Ii fuse Mr. Payne suggested that the presence of women senators ni ght have a good effect on the senate, particularly (luring executive sessions. Mr. Morgau said that this brought up a more serious view of t lie matter. Ills objection to woman suffrage was the Immoral influence of the ballot upon women. Mr. Spinier called attention bi the fact that in the state of New Jersey women had the right to vote until NR, Mr Morgau said thai there was a prop erty qualification in the New Jersey hill of rights of 1865, bul it made no reference to sex. Mr. Payue said that the moat remark able community of strong minded women was to lie found in Wyoming and he was bound to say that the men were the m*»*t weak minded, effeminate set that could lie found in the United States. He thought it likely, therefore, that the women would unite with the Democrats to elect a Dem ocratic senator ami the men with the Re publicans, to elect a Republican senator aud he hoped both senators would lie women. Mr. Platt spoke briefly in defense of the bill, and the question wa* then taken on lh* omnibus bill, offered as a substitute. Bud it was rejected by a party vote—18 to 29 Mr. Jones* of Arkansas moved an enabling act for Wyoming alone Rejected, 18 bi 29 The bill was then passed by a party vote— 29 to 18 A fter an executive semiou the senate at 5:28 p. DI adjourned Fending Legislation Baa a etagnatlng Effect oa Uhs!nasa. Nfw York, June    — R G Dun St Ca.’* weekly review of trade saya: “The prolonged uncertainties regarding legislation which have l*eeu by no mean* diminished during the pas; week and the continuance of gobi export* have an un favorable effect upon bual nee*. While the volume of trade as indicated by special rejiort.s by (milk exchanges at interior cities and by railroad earnings, continues larger thau in the same month of auy previous year, the pr**sjiect for the future is rendered Ie*** satisfactory by industrial hesitation and by doubt in regard to the monetary outlook. The movement of gold to Germany is tindersbs*! to Ie connected with o|*erations of 1st likers in placing heavy South American bmus, but could hardly occur even nuder the s(ieoial circumstances if there were not, ou the part of foreign capitalists, some realizing or less investment thau usual in American securities. Industrial hesitation results from the delay of legislation and Increased uncertainty regarding the outcome. Wool is distinctly weaker in the interior aud at eastern markets, and a disposition is shown to meet the needs of manufacturers. Hut the latter buy sparingly and many knit g«ss1s and flannel works ara shutting down, cassimere works are liadly supplied with orders ami while makers of dress gin sis and worsteds are iu lief ter {Nisi ti on, their outlook is not entirely satisfactory It is felt that the greater part of a year will now lie required to clear the markets of supplies of foreign g«*ods under present duties, even if the proposed tariff should lie adopted. This uncertainty also effects estimates of the future demand for iron, ami s<* continued additions of new furnaces weakens that market. I.nrge transactions in structural iron and rails have dosed, but without strengthening prices. In the lioot and sh*H* business, while higher prices are asked and obtained, confidetiue as to th* future seems lees strong ami the cotton manufacture Amis the material too high for gorals at present price* “Tho general level of price Is lower, In part because of reaction from the many sjNK’ulations which the prospect of unlimited silver coinage engendered. The defeat of that measure in th^pmss leaves Borne doubt whether any agreement he tween the two houses will lie found practicable, and this bas a chilling influence on many speculations, but at the same time lessens the anxiety felt at some mon etery centres. *'lousiness at other cities is well maintained for the season and the exceedingly confident tone hitherto prevailing doe* not at all abate. If there are possibilities of disappointment they tic not seem to lie realize*! as yet “In all The re|*orts, whether from North or Soot h, I here is a rn lie wort hy a buenos of complaint atmid collection*, and money markets are fully supplied. “Gold exerts have caused no change in call rates here, but the lianks have but a small reserve for mid summer. The treasury has taken iu only E8Nl,UU0 more than it has taken out, ami the merchandise exerts here are larger, showing for the month thus far an increase of 3 |ier cent, over last year. Nevertheless the excess of imports over ex porta for the month will lie heavy, probably far exisssliug that of May, which was over fl5,UUO,UOO. The |Contiuued depression in stocks and the •failure thus far to settle railroad wars tem! bi discourage foreign investments, upon whom the uncertainty about silver legislation hImi has some influence. “Failures during the last seven days numlier for the United States 178, for Canalla 24, total 2G2, compared with 199 last week. For the corresponding week of last year the figures were 184 in the United States ami 18 in Canada.” rr**f**»»«r Jotiiedon Acquit ted. Wil.Kkk-BARRE, Pa., June 28.—Professor S. A. Johnston, formerly principal of the Dallas high school, was yesterday acquitted by a jury on the charge of debauching his pupil* I,ast Noveintier Johnson liecame Involved in a difficulty with Thomas Gar raglsan. and later Garraghan was arrested for slander. The latter then annouueed his intention of breaking up the Dallas school and obtained affidavits from some of the pupil* to the effect that Johnson ha*! t*eeii guilty of indecent exposure to young girl- who attended his school, and hail at other times attempted to deliauch some of the Iwiys under his care. Johnson was dismissed by the school board ami arrested for t hesi^alleged crimes. A Is*ut fifty witnessos testified during the trial, which lasted thrsedaya,andthe testimony was revolting in the extreme. The testi-nionyof the witnesses was so contradictory, however, that the jury rendered a verdict of not guilty, ami placed the costs, amounting to #450, upon Garraghan. Rate (iii ting to tie Htoppeil. New York, June 28.—A meeting of the trunk line pre-ideiits was held yesterday at the association's offices. The recent reduction in eastbound rates was discussed. It wa* agree*! that rate cutting should lie stopped and it was resolved to request the Centra) Traffic assi si ati on—a union of Western railroads- to agree upon a schedule restoring the old rates, which schedule would probably lie adopted by the trunk line president*. The following roads were represented at the meeting: Pennsylvania. New York Central. Baltimore and Ohio. New York, I/ake Erie and Western, Grand Trunk, West Shore, I^e-high Valley, New Jeasej Central, Philadelphia ami Reading and Delaware, I/ackuwaniia ami Western. Brit intl ('Mpital Looking for Investment. New York. June 28.—A company of British capitalists has lieen formed to acquire from the representatives of the late John Roach the ship building yards and engine works at (’bester, Pa., and the Morgan Iron Works in this city. The new corporation is to lie known as Roach’s ship Building and Engineering company (limited), amt it has lieeti incorporated in (Heat Britain under the companies act. The capital is to be £601),OOO. Busine** NiiMfiended. New York, June 28— A general strike of the Hebrew’ siis{sn*ler makers took place yesterday. They demand ten hours’ work a day, the emplo meut of union men only ami the non-employment of apprentices A lieut 500 rn* ti are out throughout the city. The manufacturers will probably snsjiend business unless they can serine new hand*. A Town Wiped Out by Fir*. Denver, Colo., June 28—The Times’ Carbon, Wye., sjiecial say* the business portion of that tow ii was burned yesterday morning. I Amu flub (JOU, with small insurance. A drunken man bad been put to sleep in a room in th* hotel where the fire started. THEIR DOOM SEALED. NO HOPE OF RESCUING THE ENTOMBED MINERS ALIVE. Another snit Greater Disaster Imminent. A Fierce Fire Kagtug Im,* the Mouth of the Hill Farm Mine—A Mighty Magazi ne Pregnant With Death—Hope Against Ho|ie Blasted. Dunbar, Pa., June 28—There I* no longer any hope and faith iu the indua trious rescuers has lieen abandoned The entombed miners cannot lie rescued uow. A furious fire has sealed their fate, and if their dead Isidtes escape the hungry flames the pilfering rat* that lufest the mines will have gnawed them beyond recognition Deatjt never came to men in a more revolting form and affliction never fell heavier on the bereaved. This has been au awful, yet even a greater disaster threaten*. A fire, fierce a* a whirlwind, is raging for 2,000 feet down into the yaw u iug mouth of the Hill Farm mine Deadly gas generated back of the burning mine, aud the ponderous hill iuto which the Hill Farm, the Ferguson and the Mahou-iug pits are driven is a mighty magazine fairly pregnant with death. The lightest stroke of a miner’* pick would explode it, and the effect of such au explosion would Ii* awful to ooutemplate. The rescuing party has withdrawn from the face of the Mahoning pit. A strong guard has lieen placed at the mouth of the Ferguson mines to keep out the impatient, restless miners, who would rescue fhe unfortunates on their own account. The flame* at the Hill Farm mise* ara hot enough to drive away invaders. Fire started in the mouth of the Hill Farm pit shortly after % o’clock last night. It followed promptly after the drill entered the burning mine For two hours before the flames burst out huge billows of smoke, black, dense aud deadly, rolled over each other into the air and drifted upward, forming a ponderous monument of mourning to the dead inside. A rumbling, rushing sound like a sw iftly moving train through a tunnel preceded the flames Secretary Wairborn, Sii{s*rintcndeut Hill ami the United Press rejiorter were at the pit mouth awaiting the outbreak. To the ex|s’i’ts the smoke indicated ap proaching fire, amt for half an hour liefor* ifs arrival ifs coming could la* heard. I/ottg liefore the fire reached the pit mouth it could be seen licking up the ti inliers in the mine, un*! the steady stream of water which rippled down the slo|*e seemed only to insjiire amt encourage to wilder efforts the angry fiend. It whs indeed an awful sight, and when, with a brilliant flash, the column of smoke was ignited the heavens seemed aflame. Fantastic figures of fire darted hither and thither, chasing each other to the clouds ami burning a huge hole through the gl«**»m of night. The surrounding country was lighted up, guiding the excited, nervous crowds to the scene. Those who had I teen watching at the Mahoning mine hurried nv**r Hie hill to file fire. The peo pie of Dunbar who could see the reddened heavens from the village rushisl aUiut in confusion fearful that another calamity ha<l occurred. The families of the entomlssl millers who have waited aud watched until their grief had become deadened aroused ami their suffering and distress came to them anew’ NeiglilMirs gathered into each stricken home, ami while they comforted the living they prayed for the dead, and while they watched the fire they seemed mentally to bury their loved ones. The heading iii the Hill Farm mine wa* not accompanied with accident. Jam** Barnhill, a practical miner, guided the drill, ami when he touched the objective point he secured a green bagful of the air ami then the rescuing party was ordered out of the pit. Iiis|H*ct«»rs Keighley, Black and Evans then examined the face of the mine, after which they left the place to consult. They decided that any attempt to break through the dividing wail might be accompanied by accident. The suspension of work just when the unfortunate miners were almost within reach has lieen a gn at disap|N*iutmerit here and has still further enraged the people. The false reports sent out daily by the mine inspectors had led them to hope against themselves and when th* fire started last night the feeling was intensely hitter against those w’ho they would hold responsible for the delay. A party is tieing made up to go down In the mine. It is almost certain death for the volunteers and there is great excite meut.    _ DROPPED FROM THE CLOUDS Narrow K»ca|»e from Death of a Female Aeronaut. Cleveland, June 28.—a young woman of this city na me* I Hull, but who la professionally known as Estella Izcroy, Thursday evening attempted to make her first lialloon ascension and imrachuete jump at Beyerles park. The experiment almost resulted in a tragedy. When the balloon ba*l lieen inflated, an employe named Ed French, who was in the linsket, was forgotten and the great globe was permitted to sh«M*t upward. French, who was not prepared for the ascetiuion, attempted to leave the basket, and in doing so tss ame entangled in the ropes and for a time hung bead downward. Finally h* succeeded in releasing himself after turning two somersaults amt suffering a fall of thirty feet, struck the earth on his face and was seriously injured. French, in his struggles, had loosened the fastenings which attached the para chute to the car so that when an altitude of IOO feet ha*I been attained they suddenly gave way and the big umbrella, carrying the aeronaut with it, commenced it* downward rush to the ground. As the pHrachtite did not open until some dis tame had l*een traversed the speed was terrific and the lookers on became greatly excited. The branches of a tree fortunately broke the force ef the fall and Miss I/eroy reached terra firma without having sustained injury. She will attempt another ascension. Cleveland's Derision Set Aside. New York, June 28.—The report of Grover (Tcvelfiud a* referee in the suit of Phillips vs. Tenner has beeu set aside by Judge Coxe of the United States circuit court. The court holds that Vernier is entitled to commission uj*on certain stock transactions. The referee decided against Vernier. Panic on a Ferry Boat. Cincinnati, June 28.—Th# tow host Sa* Lion collided with the Newport ferry boat at ll:H0 yesterday morning A panic wa* created among the fifty passengers, many of whom were women They wen pacified, however, sad although th* ferry boat was badly crippled it managed to reach th* I shore ERIE STORE Ladies |« hi icy J* I Hit lit*] t*t tv Blouse Waints, only 48o. L«klits I1 anoy Cream »JVraey Blouse Waists, only 50c. Lai lit s^ Forney I1 ant Black Jerney Blouse Waists, Dilly' 55©. Ladies' Fancy Colors Kine Flannelette Blouse Waists. $l .25 Ladies’ Very fine Blouse Waists, only 75c. Ladies1 Fancy Flannelette Blouse Waists,only 55c. Boy s1 extra quality Flannelette Blouse Waists, only 48c. Hard wood Croquet Sets, nicely {whited, ei^lit halls and eight mallets, only 95c. Best Mexican Hammocks, heavy' Braided edges, full fourteen feet, worth $1.35, only 95c. Very strong Picnic and Lunch Baskets, only 9c., 14c., 18c. and 20c. Harden Sets -Hoe, Kake and Shovel, only 22c. Adjustable Hammock Ropes, 12*Jc. each. All kiln Im Mosquito Petting, only be. Ladies1 hest Summer Corsets, only $1.00. ERIE STORE. SPECIAL A N NOU NCEM EN 'I SloDiiAKT A I O., I’nttiit I Attorneys, *15 711* HL, Washington, ll t , nm* I *. l'al« nl**f it****. 1'tttentM, ( avt’MlM anti lit* (anim*** ms*tired. Tnt*!*- Mark* rt‘Ki**U rt**l All Patent litiHinvm •*«in*It for inixlfr.it*1 EffK. Inforninti«»na A«lvif«* hii*I m|h*4'iaI referent;** sent on reqiifnt. i’/’ilMI Im HO A MONTI! »an »*• m-nlc JfJ.ftf 18 'LANUTO wl>lltlllK,.„ ut. Person* k,rr terre*! who ran tut nisi* a horse amt give their whulc tune to the business. Spare moment* nay be profit* ably employed also. A lew vacancies in towns md cities. B. K. JOHNSON A CJO., iouj Main St., Richmond, Va. K. K- I/Von anti o. Monroe, of Dunkirk, an*! K. ||. KdnuitiUM of Fredonia, tmvr* Just recured the naif of Hr. It. MacFarland’* Indian Cill*. A speedy nihI positive cure lo au k Mini Nervous Headache, Female Weakws*, Indigestion, ConHtipation' an*! Rheum* rn We will refund th** price of the first tn I Host that fail* lo benefit purchaser. Ho ot let prejudice Hand in your light, hut no id once and pun'haMr a Inn, one Is toifili lent U‘ leat the merit of Una valuable discovery r’ lty «laya treatment for one dollar. Fifty pill iii ea« li l»ox. Price one dollar |*er box. No e genuine without the above cut on ear h box. Beware of worthiest* imitationa. CARL SCHAUER 59 East Third St., rb Hmm just received a full line of ne sins OVERCOATS AND IB Ft {ii a1 to any in the city, and at prices that will J my you to see him he foie purchasing. mWe have the largest assortment of Patent Leather Shoes in plain and light-colored tops, hand and machine sewed.‘VV e carry a complete line of NK1-TLKTON’S Fine Shoes. lf you want a nice-fitting and stylish shoe, try a pair of this make. Von will like them. Our GENTS’ $3.00 Calf Shoe in Button and Congress, in broad, medium or narrow toe, is the hest shoe for tin! money that has ever been offered to any trade. Come and examine them for yourself and he convinced. SULLIVAN & SON, 213 Centre Street PATENTS! Caveat**, ami Trade Mark* obtained, aud all Patent biiMineaa conducted for Moderate Fees. (lur (libre im opposite ll 8. Patent Ollie*. W* have no Mil* ngi*uciea. all biiHlneMM direct,hence ■ an tranaact patent liUMtneaa Iii leu** time aud at I .eat* Cont Lim ii I bo***- remote from Washington. HemI model, drawing, or photo, with de* crip lion. W e (id vine if patentable or not, free of charge Oui fee not due till patent ta Recured A book, "How to Obtain Patent*," with ref-erencea to actual c-UaiiIn iu your State,county or town, rent free. Aitdreaa C. A. SNOW Ai CO., Opposite Palest < JKI ce, Waaklugtos, D. U. PHY -CjoODp A^D jZAF^PCT?. iDAMJUIIMi ANDERSON AMERICAN BLOCK. Maili Street, Buffalo, ...    .    N.    Y. SECOND TO NONE. Our motto im:    ’'Second to None.” We wish to Im* second to none in your service. Try uh and Hee. We wish to itu|ire8H upon our out of town friends, in view of the proposed changes in the tariff' and tin* probable increase in the cost of nearly all kinds of dry goods, that the month of June will he tub mouth for them to shop.    Prices were never lower than they are fit present in our st Lyre. If the proposed tariff bill passes, prices must go up. We are offering splendid bar gaitiH in sateens and ginghams and summer wash fabrics of all kinds. The balance of our spring stock of cloaks are selling cheap. We ipiote the following bargains iii underwear; Gentlemen's bine mixed ahirtM and drawer* in medium weights, st f#0c. per suit. Gentlemen’s Balbriggan underwear 50c. per suit. Gentlemen’s blue angola Militia anti drawers at 25c. each, 40c. goods. Ladies’ Jersey vest* as low as 10c each. Ladies’ balbriggan vent* with (act trimming, only 15c., worth 25c. Good grade Jersey vesta at 25c. ,eaeh White aud black lisle thread Jersey vests at 75c. each. Milk vests, all colors, 75c. each. Linen prices will he considerably ad ▼anced lf the tariff is changed. Oui prices are much below even ctirreu prices, and we are welling flue cloths, napkins, D’Oyleys, towels, etc , at rare bargains    - New styles in parasols. New style* in gloves. New styles in hosiery. lleadquartenpin Buffalo for ^Carpets. Rugs, Draping and tipholstering;fabrics. Adam Meldrom and Aodeisoo AMERICAN Bl/OCK, MAIN STitKET, BUFFALO, N Y. CC. PENFOLD Manufacturer and Importer, 304 MAIN ST., BUFFALO, N. V. DEALER IN Diamonds,    Watched arid Jewelry, Cbs ka^Silverware, Leather Goods, etc KS ii RA VINH, GOLD 4 BIL VSR PLA TIN A COMPLETE MNE OF :«!4 MAIN STK KET, BUFFALO, N. Y.Go toM onroe’s for Curtains and tixturos ®rikAlVIP CHIMNEYS break? WPOM^ SOPT ; THE PICHT ONES PEARL TOP AND ARE bf DEO. A. MACBETH k OO.. PITTSBURGH. PA. ;

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