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Dunkirk Evening Observer Newspaper Archive: June 16, 1890 - Page 1

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   Dunkirk Evening Observer (Newspaper) - June 16, 1890, Dunkirk, New York                               VOL. XX B UEPRE8ENTATIVE USINESS HOUSES OF DUNKIRK. NBW HOLING MACHINE lor nillng all kinds ol blanks is the latent aiKlilioo In Mofhamral Iicuarirornt ol LKXANDBR'n Coal and Wood Yard.TiW Central Avenue, opposite Nickel All grades ol Hani and Son Coal, Lumber. Shinglel and Free Correspondence lor wholesale lots r solicited. L O1FKOKU, 233 KB Central Ave. Artistic Photorraiilier. Instantaneoun l Haftes a specialty. Sitter. Photograph! need not wait Babies. for sunshine except for JAHBS IBVINO, Via- D prieior, No. B. Second street, near Buf- falo street. Dunkirk. N. T. MugnznifB. Mu- lie. Pamphlets, etc., bound in all ilyles. onion promptly attenileil to. All work guaranteed. nOKUUKK'H UODME, L> sw Central avenue. Wholesale and retail dealer in ported anil Domestic China, Glassware, Ar. I tHACTAUUUA HOTEL, Kates, II ver day. Livery anil Bom.ting Stable in connection. Victor Rider, SW anil 397 Lion street I ,ITV BARBBH SHOP C'lus. Magic, Prop., under Lakx Snore National Bank, corner Center and Third streets. A ftne slock ol Foreign and Domestic Cigars. ION KLIN SON, 388 (Center street. Practical horse-shoere. Particular attention >'lo interfering horses. Shoeing ol road 4 trotting horses a sueoialty. I EVENING OBglSKVBK. Largest Dairy In the Connty. An unequalled advertising medium. DUNKIRK KNOINKKKINO CUMPAJiV. Formerly Sellew A Popple. Manufacturers of Engines. Boilers, Pulleys, Shafting Hangers, etu. Patterns, jrorgingB, Castings, and Machine Work to order. SHIRT CO., 209 and Center street, Manufacturers of the mwell" aud "Dunkirk" perfect fitting Dress Shirts. Ou sale in all leading furnishing, clothing aud ilry goods houses in Dunkirk. DP. TOOMET, 434 and 4.16 Lion street. Dealer m Flour, Feod, -alt, Ualed (lay, Fhos- phaten, etc. Established, 1877. KHtK HOTEL and UmlnK Saloon, Union Depot. Easy access to all trams and bus- iness houses. Best accommodations lor Com- slercial Travelers. John J. Murphy, Prop. EHLBHS CO., and 98 B. Third street. fine furniture. Cabinet Ware ami Up- uolslermg. Picture Frames maile to order. rp D. KATTB8OM CO., 301 Central Ave., Leaders ol Fashion and Gentlemen Outfitters. H AKJUJ. MTKAM HKATINO CO., anulaotnrers of Stoam Heating Apparatus. Sanitary Plumbing a Specialty. STKAJt LAUMDRC. specialties: Fine Shirts, IDc; Collars, to; Cuffs, 4c, and Lace Curtains. Free Deliv- ery. A W. Cumming-s, 207 Center street. K. OEHM, E. Third >t., cor. ol Buffalo Manufacturer and dealer in Fine Boots A Shoes UENHY WEIUCR'S NEW STORE, IDS E Third st. Books, Stationery, Musical In- aud Weekly Papers, %nd everything pertaining to a first Look Store. Kcbooi Kooka a specialty. JOB PRINTING of every description and at lowest living rates by Dunkirk Printing Company, 8 and 10 K. Second St. JtL VAM BVRKN SON, Fire Life, Accident am! General Insuraaoo. Deal- ers in Real Kstate and Loans. Particular attention paid to the cure ol property collect- ing rente lo. 219 Center 2nd floor. Jkf ON ROE'S PHARMACY, aoo Central Avenue Headquarters for Wall Paper Pa.nt .Oils, Ac. JERKINS, J. W., center street, Manufacturer and dealer in Bridles. Collars, TrunkB.Whips, Buffalo Kobes, Horse Covers Uloves Mittens anil Meigh Hobes. 1) 84JHOLTES, I 17 East Third street, Fashionable Tailor, cleullesien will find it to tneir advantage to call on me belore purchasing elsewhere. B. CART CO., 3X8 Lion street. General Supplies. Oil Cloths, Granite Ware. A special- ty of Sherwm Williams Pa.nl and Monroe range. II ULJNU, snob as blank-books, ledgers, and all kinds of blanks done at Dunkirk Printing Company. 8 and 10 B. Second St. RUDOLPH MOUIKNHAUKR, Cor. Third and Buffalo Healer in Granite, Marble, Flagging and buying Building dtone. Call on your side-w: valk R 19I.EY CO.. 7 and 9 Kast Front street. Whisky, Wines, Brandies. Liquor Store lor Family Use. M-KAV. lX Lion street, near Ihe depot. Boarding, Sale, Feed and Livery Stable. Stabling by the day or week ou reasonable terms. SDTORD, Ml Central Ave. (Up General Insurance and Eeal KstaU Aaeut. Fire, Life, Accident, aud Live Stock Insurance. Prompt attention git en to buying and selling Batate. fit V. JONES, I 7ft E. Third St., cor. Doer. Kxcelsior Meal Market. Fresh, Salt anil S...oked Meats. Lard, Sausages. ann Poultry. ATCUE8, JBWKLKY, the Aurora Bailroad Watch. Keuairing >i specialty. Frank Stapf. S3 K. Third st trM. MOCKKR, Merchant Tailor. 318 Central Avenue RE WARD I WE will pay tue above reward lor any cast ol Liver Complaint, Dyspepsia, Sick ileadacbt Indigestion, wonslipaliutt or Costiveness wi c..unoi cure with West's Vegetable Liver when the directions are strictly complied Hitlj They are purely Vegetable, and never fail fc give satisfaction sugar Coaled. Large containing 30 cents. Beware ol conn tArleila, and inutatious. genuine nsanu Jacuredonlv by JOHN C. Sold by MOHROK-S PHARMACY. D kirk, N. T, GENERAL FOREIGN NEWS. ANOTHER SURPRISE FOR THE KNOW- ING TURFITES. The Favorite In the Grande Prix at Paris Does Not Get a Will- lam's Shrewd London Police Bars Nearly Rescued the Strlk- Point. LONDON, June The result of the Grand Prix de Paris yesterday was ae great a surprise for the sporting world ae the defeat of Surefoot ID the Derby. Fltz- roya, the winner, had been IS to 1 against aud the post almost out of the betting Wanaera, the favorite, did not gain a place. As If to put at rest all rumors of Increas- ing friction between the German and Russian courts, the Emperor William baa scuta special request to the be allowed to command In person during the Russian manoeuvres the Vlborg regiment, of which the emperor ia honorary colonel. Whatever the secret foreign policy of Ger- many may be, the emperor certainly gives every outward Indication of desiring friendliness with France and Russia. Per- who Interest themselves in studying the probabilities of European peace or war are looking with considerable eagerness for some utterance on part of Germany ef Anstro-Hungarian war minister's recent declaration that peace i as not assured. Standing alone, Field Marshal von Bauer'sdeclaration serious, but not so conclusive as to create actual alarm. Continued silence on the part of the other members of the drelbund would, however, generally construed as giving tacit consent to Minister YOU Bauer's gloomy view ef the situation. TUB POLICB AWD SECRETARY MATTHEWS. The feeling of Indignation on the part of the London police at their treatment by the government honrly The latest aud by no the least canse of rrltatlon Is cutting down by Home Secretary of the bills for ex- penses aud over-time of the men. What the secretary's object is In harassing the [oroe can be conjectured. It Is be- lieved by many that the Intention of the government la te> provoke a general strike and thus obtain an excuse for getting rid of a large number of the rank and file ind filling their places with men who can w more absolutely depended upon than he present foree Implicitly to do the work of the government on such occasions as he Trafalgar square meetings, or the re- cent temperance parade, should need arise the future The men have nearly reached the striking point, but hare de- ided to await the publication of the su- perannuation bill before taking final ac- tion. POSTMEN HOLD A MKET1NO. The postmen, who are about as much at odds with Postmaster General Hatkes as the police are with Home Secretary Mat- thews, held an Immense secret meeting yesterday, the outcome of which has not yet been made known, though it was ex- pected that a final decision on the ques- ,ion of a strike was to be settled then. It s generally thought that the postmen are lurtlng their cause by allowing such nn- as Cunningham Graham and Dharles Conybeare to make political cap- ital out of their grievances. Stanley will address the members of the Manchester nthaneum and the geograph- ical society In the Free Trade hall at Man- rhester on Thursday. Both organizations have made extensive preparations for the reception of the distinguished explorer. THR CITT OK PARIS DISASTER. The Board of Trade Inquiry into causes of the disaster to the City of Paris will begin IB Liverpool to-day before the Mard of what are known as the nautical aaMssors, composed of sea captains. This saa ultra rigid Inquiry, which Is seldom made except in cases of fatal marine dla- isters But the ofBcers of the lamaa and luteruational company desire to have the fullest investigation possible made, and are affording every facility for the in- quiry The City of Paris Ie now lying at Liverpool In the same conf'ltlon as when she was towed Into port afteY the accident, except that she has been entirely cleared of debris. Capt. Watklns, First En- gineer Wall, and the five engineers and greasers who were In the engine room at he time of the accident, will testify. To- norrow the City of Paris will be inspected >y the Board of Trade jury, and after that repairs will be begun at once. As there is uo hole through the bottom of the steamer work will progress rapidly, but the In man company will not advertise her to sail before November. MART ANDEIUOH'I COMING MARRIAGE. Every possible effort b being made by .he Anderson and Navarro families to terp the time and place of the traged- enne's wedding from the vulgar. It was given out a few weeks ago that the cere- mony would be performed In Crompton Oratory in July, with much grandeur, with it view to throwing curiosity hunters, who are ihe bane of such occaalons, off .he scent Miss Anderson will, however, be married very quietly to-morrow morn- >ig at the Catholic chapel in Hampstead, only a few of her most intimate Friends wiil be Invited to the ceremony. The only bridesmaids will be her two half sisters, Blanche and Juliet. GGRAl.DINE ULMAR'B FOKKION SUCCESSES. Geruliline Ulmar bade adieu to the Savoy theatre Saturday night. Tho house was almost filled with friends of the popular ,-oung American, and there was more floral tributes on the stage than are often seen at a first night. Miss Ulinar will go this week to Paris to study her part in 'La Cigalc et La with which she open at the Lyric in October with Oudran, the composer of the operetta. She will sail for America to spend the uminei ou next Saturday. A RKSPkCIABLItt DRESSED SCOUNDREL. All American hotel sneak has been ar rested in Ixmdoa wh i gives the names ol Thomas H. McLean aud Baldwin. He it the uioet respectable of scoundrels in ap- pearance, dresses in the height of fashion and wears jewels that genuine. His methods Is to make acquaintances on trans-Atlantic steamers, learn about their valuables, and obtaining rooms near his victims in the best hotels, await opportu- titiee for plunder. Perhaps be is the mau who robbed Major Pond at the Savoy Hotel. The Major left his coat, in the pockets of which were In notes, in his bedroom while he was In his bath During his absenca some one entered bedroom and took from roll, leaving the to do business with. McLean or Baldwin was arrested at the Hotel Metrepole and the police have been anxiously searching for some American who would able to recognize him as a criminal la order that nay get the full benefit of the law. to PAKIB, June Ribot, minister ol foreign aCalra, U about to declare the te- WRONG SORT CALLED PEARL TOPANDARE Made crlr by GEO, A MACBETH i, PITTSBURGH, PA, cognition by of the Brazil pro- visional government, and has intimated to Senor Itajuba, the Brazilian representa tize, that President Carnot is ready to re- ceive him. The Bnuilian government has agreed to submit to arbitration the question of the frontier be ,ween French Guiana and relax tue export duty on rubber, nnd to exempt French subjects from the application of the decree that every one was in the Brazilian territory on the day the republic was proclaimed should be regarded as a citizen of Braall Nluo Dtaths from Cholera. MADRID, June first cases of cholera at Puebla de Kngat manifested themselves a month ago after extensive excavations had been made for the pur pose of paving the streets Nine deaths from the disease have occurred, and on Saturday there were seven fresh cages Two-thirds of the Inhabitants of the town have fled. Seven deaths and seven freak oases are reported at .Voutichelvo, a Til lage near Puebla de Hngat. A Reception to American Riflemen. BUEMKN, June SchuUenfest committee assembled yesterday forenoon and marched to the hotel when the Amer lean riflemen are quartered, conducting them to the Schutzenhof. The greatest entb UHlasm prevailed along the route. In the rifle hall of the Scbutzenhof the visit- ors were entertained at a banquet, after which in the afternoon the shooting con- test began A ball was given in honor of visitors in the evening. The Prix 4e Paris. PAKIH, June The race for the Grande Prix de Paris of francs was run yesterday and resulted in a victory for Baron A. de Schickler's b. c. Fltzroya, Mr. F. Bcheibler's b. c. Fitz Hampton second, and Mr. K. Peck's b. c. Odd Fellow third; time, There were thirteen starters. Wanderr and Le Nord, the favorites, ran unplaced. _ Kmperor William's Movements. BERLIN, June IS.-The Emperor Wil- liam will attend the Austrian manoeuvre- ing at Transylvania and afterwards apeak a week in Hungary. WOOL CONSUMERS TALK. Ask for Reduction of Duty on Wool. BOSTON, June The Wool Consumers association have sent to the senate finance committee at Washington a memorial in which they say: "For the protection of woolen manufacture of the country and for its rescue from a most hampeied and depressed condition we ask for a greater reduction or the total abolition of the duty on wool. t The memorial continues: '-A free selection from many varieties of wool 1s essential for the manufacturer of clothes required by the trade and the exclusion of foreign wool so interferes with the neces- sary supply of raw material as to reduce rather than increase the quantity of American wool used." In conclusion the memorialists say: "As all the wool grown in the world is not wanted, the American grower could hardly be injured by the readjustment of values If, at the worst, his product should fall slightly in price, he would be compensated souu by the larger and more certain demand from the stimulated and increased manufacture. The demand for mutton is rapidly increasing and mutton in afforded in better quality by sheep which produce long wool than by the breeds producing short, fine wool. The half-bred mutton sheep's wool, in the warp, works admirably with the rejected worsted fibres and the Montevideo fleeces In the filling. The Hunted mutton flocks would be stimulated through the impor- tation of free materials. The American consumer of woolens and worsteds would get better fabrics at prices generally lower.? Tfloneantlal Is signed by the executive coma Arthur T. Lymaa, Lowell Manufacturing company; Jesse Hetcalfe, Waksunsk company; William B Weeden, Weybosset mills, (i C Moses, Worumbo Manufacturing company; Charles M. Bench, Broad Brook company; T. Q. Browne, Axsnbet Manufacturing com- pany; Henry C. Wciton, Weston, Whit- man Co. A DISASTROUS TORNADO. Scores of Buildings Wrecked and Great Damage to Crop> In Illinois. ST. Louis, June Rumors are current here that the flourishing little city of Beardstown, in Central Illinois, has been overtaken by a terrible disaster. A tor- nado of tremendous power, accompanied by hail and rain, swept over that section of Illinois Saturday evening, wrecking scores of buildings and doing Immense damage to crops. A telegram received from Virginia said repeated efforts to raise Benrdstown have failed, and In con- sequence the gravest apprehension is felt. At Bluff Springs, midway between Vir- giniaand Beardstown the tornodo did great injury to trees and outbuildings. Hun- dreds of window were broken in farm houses by hail stones. At Frederick, a few miles west of Beardstown, similar damage is reported by wind and hail. Rush ville reports great damage to crops and farm buildings. For the Benefit of Indians. WASHINGTON, June Among the bills passed by the senate Saturday was the senate bill to provide for the reduction of the Round Valley Indian reservation In California. [It provides for allotments of agricultural lands on acre lots to Indians In severally; the allotment of timber and grazing lands for their benefit; the acqul sltiou at appraised rate of laud now held by purchasers the survey of all the re malnder into 640 acre lota, and their sale at public auction, the proceeds to be de- pwited in the treasury and expended an- nually for the benefit of the Indiana.] Also senate bill for the relief of the mis- sion Indians in California. [It provide) for appointment of a commission to arrange a just and satisfactory settlement with the Indians for their lands.} More Bank TroubUi In Albany. ALBANY, June It has been learned that the rumor of trouble in another bank- ing institution was well founded. The ilbany County bank has just changed cashier, the former" one dying. It Is now admitted that at the time of his death, Mr. Templeton owed the bank It Is thought that this may be recovered but yesterday it was learned that the bank hat lost through transactions ol Michael Gilllce, a cattle merchant. Oil lice Is the deposed assemblyman from thlt district The bank trustees claim will get back all but about of this. Nominated lor a Fifth Term. CHICAGO, June 10 the Republican convention of the Fourth district Saturda) George E. Adams was nominated for fifth term In congress on the first ballot. DUNKIRK N. Y MONDVY. 10, 1891 FRIGHTFUL FALL. HUNDREDS OF PEOPLE HURLED FROM A BROKEN BRIDGE. SPORTING MATTERS. GENERAL NEWS Of INTEREST TO THE WORLD OF SPORTS. SchedalM Ihowlag Ihe Starting of the Clubs Brotherhood, Notional Leagne and American Association, Asioftlatlou Chinos Arrange- meats for a Lightweight Fight The following tables show the standing of the clubs in the different leagues: PLATERS' LEAGUE. Per Won. Loot. Cent. Boston......................27 18 Brooklyn................... 27 ID NewYork a U Chicago SOI Pblladtlphla...............a Plttsburg............... U Cleveland............... U Buffalo..................... U RATIONAL LSAOUm. Per Won. Lost. Cent. Cincinnati............. as Philadelphia............88 Brooklyn.................27 Beaton........ 80 New York..............u Cleveland................. u PitUburg................ AMERICAN ASSOCIATION. Per Wen. Lost. Ceat. Athletic....................H Rochester................. st LouisviUs............. 84 St. Louis.................a Toledo is Columbus................ it Syracuse ...............u Brooklyn.................. 18 21 20 Id 13 15 17 It K 81 14 17 u sn 8> .624 15 .480 24 .442 .son ai !aaa Sunday Association Games. At 8t. Leuls- Base hlts-81. Louis 6, Columbus la Lonli 5, Columbus a Batteries-Ramsay and Munyan; Outright and O'Conhor. At Athletic............0 Brooklyn............0 Base alu-AthletU) 10, Brooklyn 10. Errors-Athletic 4, Brooklyn 1. Batterles-Qreen and Hobuuou; Dally and Toy. Umpire- Tool.. At Syracuss- Syracuse.............0 v 0 t 1 Bass hits-Syracuse Is, Rochester t, Errors-SrraciiM a, Rochester 7. and O'Rourke. Calllban and McKeoUKh. At Loui.vUle-LonisvUle-Toledo gams post- poned on account of rain. Billy Mahan and Austin Gibbons to Fight. SAN FKANCIBCO, June Occl- deatal club of this city matched Billy Mahan, the coast ..pion lightweight, against the celebrated J pugilist, Austin Gil.Lons. The pursewill be one of fl.aOu, of which the loser's end and the battle will probably come oft the latter part of July. THE RIVER AND HARBOR BJLL. It Will Likely be Reported to 8on- ato the Middle of This Week. WASHINGTON, June senate com- mittee on commerce, which has been handling the river and harbor bill for a little less than two weeks, will likely re- port it to the senate by the middle of this week. Senator Frye says he expects to have It ready Wednesday. By refusing to give hearings to any but senators and members of the house and ex-senators and ex-members, the committee has simplified its work very materially and hashasteaed the completion ef the bill by several weeks. The bill as it came from the house ap- propriated the Increases thus far made by the senate committee aggre- about Other Increases will be offered in the senate and urged there, and it is likely the bill will go Into confer- ence with an aggregate ef or very little less. It Is currently reported at the Capitol that the speaker of the house has said that be will not allow the bill to go through unless It is scaled down per cent, from the amount appropriated by the house bill, that Is unless the aggregate appro- priation la reduced to about This means that the bill will be in con- ference for a long time, probably a month. Mr. Reed has the appointment of the con- 'errees and he can instruct them at the time of their appointment if they are willing to take Instructions from him. Mr. Frye, the chairman of the committee on commerce, will make an effort to have ;he bill taken up and disposed of before the tariff debate begins so that the long conference will have a chance to be con- cluded before congress takes its summer Original Paokago Dealers Jubilant. TOPEKA, Kan .Tune original wckage liquor dealers are jubilant over he decision of Judge Campbell of the Jnited States circuit court. The decision s against the state in accordance with the recent supreme court -decision. The cases were dismissed. The court asserts that he original package agents had the right o import and sell the liquor and the state had no right to interfere by seizure or otherwise. No attempt to sell packages las been made since the arrests of the Irst lot. The places have been closed, >ut the stocks remain intact and prepara- tions are being made to open this week Application will be made to dissolve the njunction in the district court to-day. Vlotlmlsinf Farmers. CARLISLE, Pa., June farmers of .his valley have recently been very fool- shly victimized by two swindlers to the extent of at least The practice was the first of two confederates to nego- tiate a sale of walnut stumps. He would examine the stumps offered by the farmer and ask him to set them aside until bis partner called for them the next day His accomplice would come along, receive .he stumps and offer in payment a coun- terfeit bank note of big denomination, re- living the countryman's honest money in Mchange. It was owing to the fact that the farmers were In no hurry to break the bank notes they received that the swind- lers worked their game successfully. A BUI to Acquire Loads In Alaska. WASHINGTON, June PayaoB of Illinois Saturday reported to ;he house from the committee on public ands a substitute for the senate bill for the acquisition of lands for town sites and commercial purposes in Alaska. CMBMO Arriving In Largo Number.. HSRXmiUO, Mex., June 16.-Chineeo an coming Into Sonora in large by every vessel landing There have been arrivaU within the last two laloro.tlng Budget of Itesu front th t Ylowery Kingdom. SAN FSANCISCO, June fror Song Kong state that a delicti Ihas been discovered in the accounts of Z iM. Barrada, superintendent of the mone department of the general postofftce ahscouded recently. Advices from Japan state that the stn idents of Tokio have apologized to Rev. D Imbrey, the New Jersey missionary, wh -was attacked and beaten by them som -weeks ago Mr. Imbrey has entirely re the excitement Is subsiding an it 1s believed no more will be heard from then. The foreigners, however, feel ou Taged that the guilty parties have no been punished. They were simply quired to apologize. The Shoz or nativ igMndenteare becoming bolder every da and insults to foreigner! are increasini The settlers coming from Yokohama ai with revolvers, fearing that there may be some show of violence. Thegov seems to be doing all possible with the students as a class, but n incivility offered them as Individ uals because of their desperate character In the meantime the distress amon thousands of the starving people of Toki and other large cities is being ameliorate) to a great extent by the foreigners as wel as by the Japanese n'oblemea. One noble man is feeding a thousand people a da out of his own funds. The price of rice I higher than ever before both In Japan ani Corea, and this li probably only the fore cast of the suffering that Is to follow. Th outlook for the growing crap of rice Is no good, owing to continuous rain. There are many rumors concerning attempts by the Russmuti to take Corea There is some trouble In Corea, but th Japanese officials know nothing definite as to its nature. AH that is surely known is that all of the British men-of-war are lying in the harbors with steam up and under orders to sail at a moment's notice The American naval force is also expect ing orders to sail for Corea. An officer o the British ship Severn said to the United Press representative that he had seen dis patches and orders which would astount the foreigners In Japan. The dispatches from Corea say that th new (Jnited States minister, Augustiu Heard, has arrived there, and that the re- tiring minister, N A. Dinamore, is about to depart. The latter was presented with a testimonial of esteem by the for elgners of the country. The Japanese government has changed the bank note regulations so as to extern tho note Issuing power of the Bank o Japan from to year This was done to raise the money market Neuma Schushi, editor of Malnlch Shlmbun, and for the past ten years a prominent figure in Japanese politics died May 17. He fought bravely imperialism and was pardoned and taken into government service. In 1876 he was sent to America, and upon hia return entered journalism. A MEMORIAL ADDRESS. Service! In Memory of Professor H. Mather of Amhemt, Mass. AMHERST, Mass., June Servii__ were held in the College church yesterday morning in memory of Prof. R N. Mather A commemorative address was delivered by Prof. Henry A. Frink. A very large audience was present, Including mauy non-resident alumni. Rev. A. H. Bradford, D.D., of Mont Clair, N. J., delivered'an address before the Y M. C. A. of Massachusetts at Agricultural college yesterday, his subject was "Half-truths and the Truth, an illus- trated the nermon ou the Mount and Browning's Cleon." The baccalaureate sermon before the graduating class at the MnHeachiisetts Agricultural college wao delivered yester- day by Professor His text was Luke xxii, 32, Thy Brethren." The topic wns "The Duty of the Educated Farmer" The speaker held that it was necessary for the farmers, especially in the present crisis of tho agricultural in- terest, to have all the education and knowledge possible in order to act intelli- gently and effectively In restoring agri- culture to its proper relative positions. Sad Drowning Accident. ROCHESTER, N. Y., June young men from this city, John lllrschmau of 44 Colvin street, a man named Smith and another named Dm-gle took a carryall and drove to the bay yesterday afternoon. They rented a boat on the West side and rowed across the bay to a picnic. They drank quite freely and started back at about 4 o'clock. When about half way over on their return the boat was capsized. Hirschmnn, who was sitting in the middle of the boat went down. The other two men managed to keep afloat until help reached them. All efforts to rescue Hirschman failed and Coroner Kleludelst was notified but was unable to find the body. Youug Hirschman was the only support of his parents, and was the third child whom they have lost by acci- dent within S years. Dligruntled TonneHeo Republicans. NASHVILLE, Tenn., June the Re- publican convention held here Saturday to select delegates to the gubernatorial convention in July, resolutions indorsing President Harrison's administration were voted down, half a dozen counties of the state having refused in indorse the admin- istration, notably Rutherford, the home of President Harrison's brother, Carter B. Harrison, United States marshal. The op- position to the president comes from the rank and file of the party, because of his appointments in the state. Commencement Kxercliei at Hartford. HAIITFORD, Conn., June Ifl. The speakers at the commencement exercises at Trinity college next week are the fol- lowing: Valedictorian, Clifford S. Grhv wold of WethersBeld, Conn.; salutarian, W. H. C Pynchion of Hartford; others are John Williams of Seymour, H H Barber of Washington, T. L. Cheritree of Oak Hill, N. Y., J. S. Little of Wilming- ton, Del., and Uriel H. Spencer of Hart- ford. Commencement Exercises at Rochester. ROCHESTER, June exercises in connection with the annual commence- ment of the University of Rochester began last evening at the First Baptist church. President Hill delivered the uaccaleau- reate sermon to a large congregation. The exercises will continue throughout the week, the public events being held at the Lyceum theater. Struck by a Train and Killed. PHILADELPHIA, June John- son, aged 14, was killed, and George Smith, aged 11, probably fatally Injured, yester- day, by being struck by a Baltimore and Ohio railroad train at Gray's Ferry. The track. They Into a fttrcam Sixty Kxt Below Forty Re- ceive lajurles Which May Prove Fatal. They Auouaalod to Witness tba Per- formance of a Bridge Jumper. CLEVELAND, June 16. Two hundred people were hurled from a broken foot bridge in lieyerles park at 6 o'clock last night and piled in a struggling mass on the sloping sides of a gully, or 'precipitat- ed into the bed of the stream 80 feet below. Forty persons received more or less severe cuts and contusions, some of which may prove fatal The crowd had been drawn to the park by the announcement that a man named Bellur would jump from a' cable stretched from the cliff to the artificial lake, nearly a hundred feet below One of the beat points of observation was from a foot bridge across a gully sixty feet high. This frail structure, sonic seventy feet In length, was packed with women and children. Suddenly, with a loud crash, the overweighted stringers snapped and the 300 occupant, of the structure were pitched head-long into the ravine Men, women and children fought their way out of the heap as best they could, trampling ou ones below and crushing down those who Impeded their progress When the last person had been rescued from the pile it was found that all ten of the victims were able to go to ther homes unasxittted. The others were taken by the ambulance to the hospital or their homes. Some of the ten have in- ternal injuries that may prove fatal. Following is u lint of ths seriously in- lured; JAMES SANDFOKD, 53 years, right leg fractured and internal Injuries, probably fatal RUDOLPH WOODKICK, 28 years, right leg fractured aud internal injuries, probably fatal MBS. RUDOLPH WOODRICK, spine and shoulder hurt. 17 years, ankle frac- tured and arm badly injured rlHHiiA MUNTKK, 15 years, right hip Vactured and internal injurieH ANNA THOMAN, 18 years, right auklu broken MAHI THDMAN, S3 years, back aud head njiireil Unknown one-legged man, leg broken. A STARTLING EXPOSE. Best silk plnsh, handsomely Baby Carnages with heavy lined satin parasol and standard, Star gear spring, tlie finest in the market, worth and for and Special price. GIRLS' PATENT. SOFT SPRING TRICYCLES ONLY SPKCIAL ANNOUNCEMENT Several Toiarkann Charged With Train Bobbery. TKIAHKANA, Ark, June 16.-Some of lie best citizens of Texurkana have lieeu u.estiMl for complicity iti the Spill1 Switch i.iin robbery John S. Williams, one of In- oldest who is a detective of iliniMt niitumal repute, IIHN burn locked ip charged with being Na juleoii Me Daniel, an ex-policeman, Is un- lei ai lest nn a like charge. One RadcluT win, also arrested. These men have liitlicrto been Irreproachable in their life and conduct. Tiu-Hday morning Tom McGraw found a coat near the scene of the robbery. Vhile un liis way to town with it he met X-tectlve Williams, who took the coat, aying it amounted to uothiug. This was fportwl to the who searched (Villmms1 room and found n vest that latched the coat, which led to the ar- _ A Select Party ti- Visit Vorlttotvn. WASHINGTON, June afternoon select party wrll leave the Baltimore and )hio depot f or a visit to Yorktowu, Va., o inspect the monument erected there to ouimcmorate the surrender of Cora wall is t that place. The party Is made up of ongrexsnien from the thirteen original tales and a few invited guests, who will re under the care of C'ol J. K. Peyton, a entleman who has figured in every large vent of this character. Tke Baltimore arty will take a York river steamer at B 'clock aud will be met at West Point by ie Kovc'inmotit steamer Dispatch. To- lorrow moiuing they will be entertained y Mr. fnnUlmnk, the pi-osimt occupant WOUKKlis I WANTKII Mni.anil women fw... SM aloady work oiillll needed. ,1. KIIUKNK milTNKV, Koxhcator.N. V. iKT U0- 615 7th c "I'A1 
                            

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