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Dunkirk Evening Observer: Monday, May 26, 1890 - Page 1

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   Dunkirk Evening Observer (Newspaper) - May 26, 1890, Dunkirk, New York                               B REPRESENTATIVE USINESS HOUSES OF DUNKIRK. HsSW RULING MACHINE lor ruling all kkndi ol is the latent addition to M Department of DunkirklPrinting Company J Oii, Lumber, Shingles and Lath. solicited. Correspondence lor wholesale lole U K. 223 and M6 Central Ave. B. Artistic Photographer. Instantaneous Photographs ol Babies a specialty. Sitters aeed not wait lor sunshine except babies. lor H OOK HIMUBBT-.lAHIla 1KVINO. I'TJ- pnclor. No. B. street, near But- street. Dunkirk, N. t. Magazines. Mu ao street. unr, lie, Pampbleu, etc.. boun.l (n all styles. Onlers promptly attended to. All work guaranteed. ltDIWHKB-8 CBOCUJCKY HUUSE, l> 90S Central Avenue. Wholesale and retail dealer in la ported anil Domestic Cblna, Glassware, Ac. IHAUTAIHJUA BOTEL, Uates, ver ilay. l.ivwy aail Hoarding Stable in connection. Victor Rider. JS.1 sntl 337 Lion street. BAKBtCK SUOF ly Unas. Naglo, Prop.. Under Lake Shore National Bank, corner Center au.l Third streets. A sue slock ol Foreign anil Domestic i.igars. __ 1ONKLIN 1 SON, Ste Center street, Practical bone-snoers. Particular alhiDluui paid lo Interfering IIOISPS. Shoeing ul rimil ai j truttiBg horsei a specialty. ____ I EVENING OBSERVER. Largest Daily In theOonnty. An unequalled uieilium. UOMK1HK KN4HMBKKIMU CUMPANV. Formerly Sellew A Popple. Manufacturers ol Engines, Boilers. Pulleys, Shifting Hangers, etc. Patterns. Forgi iigs, Castings, ami Machine Work to order. I HH1KT CO., WK, 2U5 anil 'Ml If Center street, Manulaclurors of th alt. Baled Hay, Phnu- libates. etc. Established. 1877. I HIE HOTEL, anil Dining Saloon, Union fj Depot. Kasy acccrts tu trains anil hua- ineia houses, Best accommodations tor Com- siereial Travelers. John J. Murphy, Prop. EHLBKH 97 and W K. Tlnril street. fine furniture, Cabinet Ware and Up- nolaterinK. Picture Krainon made lo TO U. MATTKSON CO., 301 Central Ave., Leaders ol Fashion anil Gentlemen Outfitters, I I AKKIJ. STEAM HKATINU CO., Uannlacturers of Slemn llenting Apparatus Sanitary Plumbing a Specialty. ITOME STKAM LADNUKY. Our specialties: Fine Shirts, IOc; Collars, Ic' Cuffs, Lace Curtains. Free Deliv ery. A. W. CumnungB, 007 Center street. II 1C. OEHM. K. Third St., cor. of Buffalo anil ilea'er in Fine Boots Shoos ENKV WKliaCK'S NEW STOKE, 108_K. _____ lingloanrsl cl store Schooj Books a HAKD WORDS FOR STANLEY SCATHING EPITHETS APPLIED THE GREAT EXPLORER. TO Xl Third sL Books. Stationery, Musical In- aiidWeekls Pnixirs and everything uertaining to a nrsl cUsa book I OB PMINTINU ol every anil Hi I lowest living rules by Dunkirk 1'rintlng company, 9 anil ID K. Second St. J8. VAN BUKKN SON, Ktrc l.lle, Accident sort General Insuraaoa. lleal- In Real Estate anil Loans. Particular attention ualtl to Ilia eare ol urouerl; ng rente Center 4ml floor. i'.olltict- ONKOE-8 PHARMACY, 300 Central Avenue Headquarters lor Wall Paper Paint .Oils, Ac. J. I 'Mi Center street. Manufacturer and dealer I n liar Bridles, Trunks, V> hips, Buffalo Itobes, igh Kobea. Ol T Olo 1 J DVHOI.TIM, 17 Bail Third stree Tailor, UeaUemen wi Ihoir advantage lo vail on me lielnre purcliaeing t. ill and 1) B. CAHV CO., I'd Linn street. Ueneral Painter's Sapplles, Oil Clutlis, tiranite Ware. A special Williams Paintand Monroe range. H I) LINO, such as Ulank-booka, ledgers, an J all kinds of blanks ilone at Dunkirk Printing Company, 8 anil 10 E. Second BU UUIXILPU MOLUENUArEK, Thtnl anil Buffalo Su., Dealer in Urauite, Marble. and Call un mo R I8I.KV CO.. 7 and 9 Bast Front nlruel. Whisky, Wines, Brandiei. Liquor Store lor Family Use. KOBERT M-KAT. Lion street, near depot. Sale, Feed ami Livery Stable. Stabling by the day or week on reasonable terms._______________________________ SAX J. UWroHD, 301 Central Ave. (Up General Insurance and Heal Bstate Agent. Fire, I.Hc. Accident, ami Live Slock I nsnrauoe. Prompt attention gn an to buying and selling Real estate. (11 C. JONES, I 75 B. Third st, cor. Deer. Kxoelsior Meat Market. Fresh, Salt and Smoked Mests, Lard, Sausages, Oyslcn and Poultry. Peace Organisations and Religions Seel- etles In England Characterise Him as a Gigantic Laud Protest Against the Influx of Foreign Labor. Other Foreign Notes. LONDON, May Persons of a peaceable turn of mind, who have a weak spot in their hearts for arbitration, disarmament and other non-warlike schemes, have had much to grieve thorn lately. In the first place Mr. Stanley, who has been a sort of pet of these gentry, has astounded them by sneering at them in pubic as old gran- nies and fools. Nothing could be more cynical or more cruel than the explorer's sudden and oandld declaration of contempt for the peace contingent. Heretofore he has always allowed himself to be lauded lf> the skies as tbe pioneer of civilization and Christianity, the opener-up ot com- merce, the deliverer of the blacks from the bondage of ignorance, the friend of the missionary, etc.: but now he throws off the mask and stands revealed as the gi- gantic land grabber, pure and simple; the acquirer of territory, by peaceable meth- ods if poxtiible, but If not then by force. At least the religious societies and peace of them as have re- covered their breath Stanley's recent now saying these things .ibout him. They have also found little comfort in the political happening of the week. Every nation is increasing its armament little Denmark has felt compelled to show that she can buy just like her big neighbors, and she has bought her full proportion at least, namely, seventeen 40-culibre steel guns and twenty-four long range pieces of somewhat less capacity. At home things do not look much brighter for those who anticipate the day of uni- versal brotherhood. Right Hon. Ed- ward Stanhope, secretary of state for war, in a speech Saturday night stated that the government was giving very close attention to England's coast defenses, which it proposed to greatly improve, and In fact to perfect. Defense is not exactly war, but It Implies war, and the secre- tary's remarks make it clear that no de- as to the possibility of disarma- ment prevail among those who are respon- sible for the safety of the country. All of which is doubtless regretted by many peo- ple besides the "peace cranks." A PROTEST AGAINST FOREIGN LABOR. was a mass meeting in the East Enoyesterday to protest against the Influx ot foreign labor. A monster mass meeting for the same purpose U arranged to take place iu Hyde park next Sunday. The httlf-stHrvetl, unemployed, ignorant of the subtleties of political economies know only that there are more men than jobs, and knowing of no way to increase the number of jobs, they seek to limit the number of men. Malthus Mill holds his own with the unenlightened, though the learned place him on the shelf. WILL OPPOSE THE USD PURCHASE BILL. The Nationalists are planning to oppose the land purchase bill tooth and nail, de- spite the government's constant applica- tion of closure. There are mauy tricks of filibustering which even closure cannot wholly prevent. 'Die government, how- ever, has hinted that if the opposition is maintained, the sittings will be continued until portentious threat to those who know tbe discomforts of all- summer sessions. A young girl named Hunter waa found dead Saturday morning near Altenberg, and the body had been mutilated as were those of "Jack the Kipper's" victims. There is great excitement iu the neighbor- hood. AN APOLOGY TO MINISTER REID. A special dispatch from Paris says: In the cose of the American lawyer from Georgia who, with his comrades, was clubbed by a policeman on tbe night of Miiy 1, the foreign office has forwarded to Minister Keid a polite apology from M. Conbtans, the minister of the interior, to- gether with an explanation of the diffi- culties encountered by the police on that evening. The Americans failed to take the number of the offending policeman and were unable to identify him, but they are satisfied witb the apology received. AMERICAN AKT STUDENTS. The American art students in Paris met together for the formal opening of their club house on the Boulevard Montpar- naase. The club house includes reading rooms, a library, reception rooms, a res- taurant, gardens for out-door painting, etc. Mr. Reid, the United States Minister, made a brief opening address, after which M. Geronie and the Marquis de Kocham- beau spoke. The speech-making was fol- lowed by students' aongs and recitations by a number of young American ladies. Five hundred art students were present. SATISFIED WITH THK TARIFF BILL. Satisfaction is generally expressed in Paris at the successful passage through the house of representatives of the free art clause in the tariff bill, but some of tbe newspapers complain of the high protec- tive character of the bill generally. In the meantime Mr. Mcline's committee in the chamber of delimits is maturing plans for a general system of protective duties on French manufactures and agricultural products. The agricultural Interests are especially clamorous for are making their powerful influence felt in the chamber. THK OP MONTPELIKR. The celebration of the sixth century of the University of MoDtpelier at Paris was made tbe occasion for great fetes. There was a large gathering of men interested in education from all quarters. Daniel C. Gillmaii, president of Johns Hopkins uni- verisity of Baltimore, and several other prominent American educators were present. The celebration was the nominal occasion for the present tour of President Carnot, which appears to arouse even greater public interest than his visit South. A notable feature of his reception is that Catholic clergy, heretofore nonplussed, as they had received ae orders against such a contingency. They warned the speakers, but were net heeded, and they were powerless to go further. After- ward tbe speakers drove to New Tipperary, and Mr. O'Brien was address the large assemblage there, when he waa In- terfered with by the police and the crowd waa dispersed, clnbs being freely used by the officers. Mr. O'Brien taunted tbe police with cowardice, but suggested to the people that they offer no undue resistance, as he desired to avoid bloodshed. Mr. O'Brien's attitude undoubtedly secured the peace- ful outcome of the affair, as the people took their cue from him implicitly. They resisted just enough to compel the police to use force and many heads were bruised, but no one was seriously injured so far as reported. Troops were held in readiness throughout tbe day to assist the police if necessary, but their services were not called into requisition. During a banquet In the evening at the National school, two explosives were thrown into tbe street, but no one was hurt. EIGHT PERSONS DROWNED HE TERRIBLE FATE THAT BEFELL A PLEASURE PARTY. Kmperor William's Narrow Bseape. BERLIN, May the Emperor William and the Prince of Saxe-Meiuingen were driving at Potsdam yesterday the horses became frightened and swerved, causing the carriage to careen. The em peror sprang from the vehicle and fell upon his right arm. The prince was thrown out of the carriage. Aside from a few bruises neither was injured. The Emperor to Visit the Czar. BERLIN, May Emperor William is expected to visiting the czar at Peterof, Aug. 14, returning about ten days. BOLD WORK OF TRAMPS. A Daring Attempt to Bob a Widow In Corry, Fa. CoRnv, Pa., May was sent to the police yesterday morning at 2 o'clock that a gang of tramps had surrounded the house of Mrs. Mclaughlin, a well to-do widow, living in tbe western part of the city, and attempted to rob her, but, being discovered by the family, fired a volley of shots at the inmates and then disappeared. Chief Potter took with him Officers Bracken and Barton, and soon bad eight of the gang cornered in a baru. They were all desperate characters. After dis- irmuig them the officers started with tbe party for the lockup, which was about a mile away. The chief took four and the other officers two each. But a short distance had been traveled when suddenly, with one accord, the four prisoners m charge of Chief Potter made a desperate attack on him. He fought heroically for some time, but on account of the great odds against him and the darkness all escaped. The others were safely locked up. The officers went back and recaptured one of the other four. When the officers returned to the lockup, much to their surprise, they found the four there had picked the locks to their cell doors, dug u hole two feet square through a solid wall eighteen inches thick above the main door and escaped. On the door they hud written witb chalk in large letters, A Kow 111 the Kentucky Legislature. FRANKFORT, May 26 legislative proceedings in the Kentucky house Satur- day wero murked by the disgraceful con- duct of Representative Cooper of Marion, who during the debate on the general comnidii school bill attempted to drag Speukur pro Cox from the speaker's stand Members yelled to the sergeant-at arms to throw Cooper out. After a scrim- mage order was restored. Cooper will be arraigned before the house to-day and either be censured or expelled. A Tornado lu Indiana, CRAWFORUSVILLK, Ind., May tor- nado passed through the northern part of this county late Saturday afternoon doing considerable damage. At New Richmond several houses were blown down; also a large 'Hardware store was moved from its foundation. Tbe roof of the new Metho- dist church was blown off. Considerable damage was also done at the towns of Wiugute and Linden. Trying to Arrange a Fight. SAN FRANCISCO, May Ross Jackson of the Occidt-ntal club luw tele- graphed Mnlduou, Kd t-'ntith'strainer, and Capt. CUOK ol Boston offering to hang up a ptirif of rt.txKI for i IwtHeen Smith and Ut-oivf (lodfrcy, the colored heavy weight, the light to tut.L- (jhtue at the club in July. A hyht bt'tuiiu these two men would, no doubt, be ono of the best ever witnessed herd. A Fatal Railroad Wreck. PAULA, Kau., May southbound freight train on the M. K. T. railroad from Paola to Varyuns was wrecked near hear yebteiV.HV morning by a switch being raised too by the workmen who re- paired it Tlu> and six cars were derailed and demolished, and Engineer Caskev and Fitennin Downes so badly in- jured thut they died a tew hours after- ward. ___________________ Great DHIIIHKI tir iliuli Water. May Dii -A special to The Times frotn Ferry, O says: Yes- terday afternoon at the false work for the channel span of the Union bridge across tbe Ohio river and 800 tons of the work was carried away by the high water and driftwood. The span it 5OO feet. The loss is and work will be delayed three months. Threatened With Tar and Feathers. WINTHBOP, Me., May excitement has been caused at Monmouth by the findiug on the door of a young mar ried lady of a warning threatening he] with tar and feathers and a ride on a rai If she did not leave town. The motive foi ;he warning is unknown. The matter has been placed in the hands of an attorney. n Overcrowded Row Boat Capsizes Within Twenty Feet of the Shore. Heartrending Crtei of the Helplew Vic- In Their Desperate Struggle for Child Camel the Arcldent. FALL RIVER, Mass., May of the addest accidents which hnve occurred ere for years took place on Wtit uppa lake esterday afternoon. Twelve persons, viz.: iamuel Wittles and wife. Henry Wittles, Willie Wittles, Samuel Witties, Jr., na Buckley, Willie Buckley, Frederick int'kley, Willie Turner, John Buckley, Edwin Wittles and George Hammer hired boat and went out rowing. There was strong wind and the water was ruffled. 'he boat was a common thirteen-foot flat tottom one. The seating capacity was Lght, which was too small to accommo- ate so mauy people. The party tried to rork their way toward shore, just north f the pumping station. This was diffl- ult as the water was rough, the wind trong and the rowers inexperienced. When the boat was within twenty feet f the shore one of the children rocked the it. The men cautioned the child to re- main quiet but the child was unmindful f this advice. Suddenly the boat capsized, leartreuding cries rent the air which were heard by Fireman Bullock of the umping station and Jtimes Latterly, but bey were unable to render assistance. >lr Turner was the only one lu the party ho could swim. The women struggled m tie water. Three or four parties on shore cried to hem to cling to the boat, but their failing trength was unequal to the task, and women and children sank out of night. everal of the party bad struck out for bore on their own hunk, and succeeded in reaching it in an axhausteil condition. The following were ilrtmued, their bod- es being recovered later in the day: SAMUEL Wirri.KS, aged SO. MRS. WITTLKS, aged 45. HAKKV WITTLBS, aged 10. SAMUEL WITTLKS, Jit., aged 18. LEVINA Bu( KI.EY, aged 35. FRED BUCKLEY, nged s WILLIE BUCKLHY, aged 8. WILLIR TURNER, aged W ATCHCS. JKWRLRV, the Aurora Uaiiroad Walrh. Repairing a ipeclalty. rf.9U.Pl. gTB. Third sL W M. MU4JKKK, Merchant Tailor, .116 Central Avenue largely royalist or imperialist, are now taking part cNdmlly in the courtesies ex- tended to the Dead of the state. They have hitherto opposed tbe government bitterly on account of its secularization of the schools. NtW TIPPERARY. RE WARD I W B will pay the above lor any oast ol Liver Complaint, Dyspepsia, Sick Headache, Indigestion, or we cannot cure with West's Vegetable Urn Fills, when the  lock in Lucas, six miles east of this city, bout 3 o'clock yesterday morning. The ilock was occupied by a hardware and general merchandise store. The block took ire from the stroke and was entirely con- umed, together with two dwellings ad- oining. There is no (Ire apparatus in the illuge and the citizens turned out with but could do nothing toward ex- inguishing the flames. When they saw hey could do nothing their efforts were directed toward saving the contents >f the building. While removing the goods, about fifty pounds of dynamite which was kept in the store exploded with iisastrous.efTect. The bodies of John Smith and Jeremiah loues were mangled and mutilated beyond ecognitiou. About twenty-five persons n all were more or less injured. The tilled are: JOHN SMITH, aged about 54, leaves wife ,nd family. JEKKMIAH JONES, aged SO, leaves wife ind family. Seriously injured: HAKNA, cut on forehead F. R. llrssELL, severe cut over left eye JONH i.AOHPit, leg sevettly bruised by falling from a ladder. F. MJfcKS, badly hurt, struck by flying >ricks. Ot the remaining persons injured none are considered to be seriously hurt. Physicians were quickly summoned who attended the injured. The report of he explosion was heard five miles distant ind the shock was so great that nearly all .ha windows in the village were broken. The flre department of this city was called upon for assistance and the flre apparatus was put on a special train, hut before they could start word reai lied them that the Ire was tinder control. Ruin came down n tornmts vthlch put the lire out. The oss is estimated at from to A- HEAVY EARTHQUAKE SHOCK. The Town of Oloversvllle, N. Y., Badly Shaken Up. ALBANY, May 36.-A special to The Pres and Knickerbocker from Gloversville, N. Y., says that at 7 o'clock yesterday niorn- ug the city was visited by tt severe shock of earthquake. Large buildings were shaken, people were thrown out of chairs and out of bed. Glass was shattered. The earthquake was preceded by a loud, rumbling sound. At the same time the Ire alarm bells rang out, and the whole city turned out, the excitement being in- tense A small dwelling was bnrned [later in the morning, when the excite ment bad subsided, the fire bells again sounded and a large brick building in the rear of the opera house was discovered to be in flames It wtis occupied by Julius Cook as a laundry, and was entirely tie stroyed. Another slight shock of earth' quake was felt about noon. The shock was the most severe ever felt m this viciu ity. ___________________ A Railroad to Alaska. BUFFALO, May Ottawa dispatch says: The project for a railway to Alaskc is about ter take definite shape. Applica tion will be made to parliament at tin next session for the passage or an act in corporating the Vancouver, Northern am Alaska Railway and Navigation company with power to build a railway from Van couver, or some other point on Burrard Inlet, on the banks ol the Fruzer i iver, by way of Seymour Creek Valley, Pembertoi Meadows, Chilcoton Plains and the head waters of the Frazer river, to n point on the Parsnip or Peace river, witli branche in a northeasterly direction to the Skeene and Sitken rivers to the boundary Alaska. ___________________ An Indian Rebellion Feared. WINNIPEG, Man., May Indians of Northern British Columbia are in a ter rible state of excitement and are liable to break out in rebellion over the burning o their burying grounds. Canadian Indian 6ury their dead by hanging them in trees. The Si wash tribe had 300 of thei ancestors hung up in mis manner, an f the committee, sayx, tlwae tactics have jecotue knowu to othci's who have aniend- uents which they tleaire to see adopted, ind now every man who applies to the 'ommittce for a hearing asserts that his mrtlcular claim has received the sanction if Mr McKmley. These assurances are jeconiiiiK so general now that the mein- lers of the committee ore beginning to ouk upon them witb suspicion and, as a a great many worthy applicants ur hearings may have some slight lu- uslice doue them. The committee will ive very few hearings before reporting .lie bill. __________________ Tritmpw Set Fire to a Town. AlBUQUKHQUE. N. M., May disas- rons fire set by tramps has destroyed house in the city of Coolidge, N. M the railroad fating house and the lepot buildings. The tramps had been ottering about town for several days and were infuriated because citizens hod made ireparations to drive them out. For three lays they had held control of the town. Tribute was levied on the stores, the de- nnuds being emphasized by a show of weapons. Finally the residents were Irheu to waye war in self defense. Their resistance enraged tbe tramps and iuretal- Fition inflammables were scattered about he houses and set on flre. Before the ishes of the town were cool a Losse of cit- zeiii on horse hack were jn pursuit of the rumps, and lynchiugs are probable Tbe 'eader of the tramps is believed to be Black Hubs, a half-breed of hard charac- ter. A Front-End Collision. DES MOIXES, la., May I rains Nos 2 and S on the Chicago and Northwestern road had a front-end col- lision anil were wrecked near Logan, Har- rison county. I'Mri'inan Kern hod a leg cut off and probably die. Mail Clerk Kern was badly bruised. His car was wrecked. was seri- ously cut and brntecd and the cor was wrecked ind both engines were completely The trains were both under headway when the collision occurred. No. :i was late and No. 3 had side-tracked, but pulled out and met No. 2 about a quarter of a mile from town. The responsibility for the accident has not been fixed. A Hotly Contested Ocean Race. NEW YOHK, May Anchor line iteamer City of Rome, the Cunard steamer Aurania, and the Onion line steamer which left Queenstown respec- tively at 2 and p. m., May 18th, weve sighted off Fire Island yest'rday at 1.10, S.SUaud p. m. respectively. Al lowing 5 hours between Queenstown time the voyage was made by the City of Rome in Tilnys, 5 hours, 4 minutes; by the Au tania in 7 days, 6 hours, 26 minutes, anii by the Alaska in 7 days, 8 hours, 40 mia tites. There was much betting on the re- sult both iu Ijondou and here. of Yesterday's Association Games. Schedules ef the Standing of the Dif- ferent Muldoon Askctl to Train Sullivan for His Fig-tot With Sporting Matters, The following tables show the standing if the clubs in the different PLATKK8' LEA6UI. Per Won. Lost. Cent. Joston...................... ID la Irooklvn.................. M 11 ,M3 [ewVork.................. U 11 .6411 hlcago U 11 OK u .aw levelaud................. B Ituilmrg................... a 14 ulTalu T 13 J60 NATIONAL LEAGUE. Won. hlladelphla.............. U A Flglit In th." Steerage. NEW YORK, May '36 the City o: Rome was coming into the harbor a fighi occurred iu the steerage between JamesF Curran, a cattle tender, and two firemen named Brennan and Jones. Curran cut his antagonists severely with a knife. Hi was arrested on the arrival of tbe Bteamei at her wharf. He claims that he was at- tacked by a number of the firemen am used the knife in defense of his life. information could be obtained on board o t he vessel. rooklyu................ u ew Yurk 14 hicago..............__ 12 iuciunatl 18 ostou.................. ia levelaud................. a 'ItUburg............. 8 Lost. 10 10 11 IU 11 16 II! 18 AMERICAN ASSOCIATION. Won. thletlc.................... IS xtchehter IB 16 t. Louis............... u oluiubnx................ 14 oledo..................... n yrarnse................. 13 Irooklyu................ 6 Lost. It IU U 14 15 18 U Per Cent. .400 .609 .6W .441 .444 .400 Per Cent. .704 .048 .6M .600 ,488 .4M .444 Avnday Oamee. At Syracuse- yracuse .........0 020080KO 2-B outeville ......0 0 3 4 0 0 1 tt kits -Syracuse 90, Louisville 16. Syrai uss 7, Louisville 'i. Ballerina Keefe, Brims and Duly: Ebret lid Ryan. At Philadelphia 0011202 t. Ixmls.............0 Bane 12, St. Louis8. U, St. Louis 2. Batteries and Robinson; Whitrork nd Muuyan. irmpli-e O'Uea. At Brooklyn (first Brooklyn............0 1101000 0-8 'nhlmbus .........i! 4 0 0 0 2 2 8 IS 4, Columbus Errors -Brooklyn Columbus 5. Mattltnoi-e and Toy; Easton and and Emslle. Second Brooklyn..........0 00009180-1 'ollirobUH Basr hitN-Brooklyn 5, Columbus 11. Errors Brooklyn 2, Columbus B. ButlerivM- Mrrullougb and Toy; Wldner .nd O'Connor. Uiuplres Kimuim and Eiuslle. At Koobeitei- garue post- Minud; rain. _________ A Pedestrian Flule. CIIICAOO, May 26. The seventy-two lour KO-ax you-please race at the Second regiinent armory closed Saturday night. 'lie ulTiiir 1ms proven a failure, the crowds wiug mnull and the managers losing uoney. Hut four of the starters finished, and Uox won, covering 281 miles. Campana was ten mile? behind him. Knifledrum third money and Hegelmau fourth. 1'be latter mid Hart could no doubt have uu one and two in the race, but finding he crowds small and no money guaran- teed they did not exert themselves. During he evening Hart and Smith of Denver walked two niilea, Hart winning by Un Bet In _________ Bicyclist! Caught In a Thunderstorm. CllAWFoKlraviLl.K, Ind., May ay Van Wagoner of Newport, R. I., and Van Sicklen and Pnrett of Chicago, rode a 100-mile bicycle race on the course north f here, on which Whittttker made re- ord two years ago, The roads wen leavy from recent rains, and worse still, he riders were caught In a big thunder- torni incite II rut fifty miles and came In with their shoes full of water. Many vis- ting cyclers were here to witness the vent. At the end of the flrst fifty miles Van Sii klen dropped. The race was won by Van Wagoner in twelve hours. Sullivan -Will Boon Talk Business. SAN FRANCISCO, May of the California Athletic club said Sullivan would tight Jackson In the Call "ornia club and nowhere else, and pro- duced a telegram from Jackson Burnett, Sullivan's manager, which reads: "Presl- lent Fulda: Can't help newspaper re- >orts. I have permission from Sullivan as lit) manager to inform you he will be to talk buainc-fw after the Misslaelppl affair." _____ A Tame Scrapping Match. NEW HAVEN, Conn., MayM.-Early yea- terday morning Dan Walker of this city and Ed McDonald ot Waterbury fougbJ six rounds with two-ounce gloves in a baru at Alliugtou, six miles from here for the gale receipts, amounting to 180 The aftair was rather tame, Walker having little trouble in pounding his man so that the sponge was thrown up at the end ol tue sixth round. WORKKKN WANTKU. Mm, anil womi-ii agenU Big pay. SU'inly work (luttlt No experience >l. KIKIKNK WHITNEY, ureer) mau, ItochcBU'r, N. V. 8TODDAK1' CO., ratoiil Allorneys, 7Ui St. Washington, II U S. I'ubintor- ce. T'avcaut IHKHON liociirutl. Marks registered. All I'alanl Inimiicha for nioilcrata FPCH. liifornmtion. .avice and special referuDt'Cb mint on >nd .avice IT, IUI A MONTH c.111 he m.ulc 10 I'eiwim rred who can furnish a IHHSC anil Ktvc their whole me to the busmttis. Siweinumemtimay bcpiohi- >ly employed also. A few vacancies in towns id cities. F. JOHNSON icoj Main t., Richmond, V.i JWk OAhH will ltu> the on tin- Ciirncr til Fionl buftn' Htrci-lH. ot liO by Ift) feet. I illHo H law hliriir} of ver ilOuViliMiiL'H loi for II. Micunrd, llttnklrk, N. V. HKMOVAI.. Dr. Gun. 1C. nini'kliinn hint rciimri'd his I'llli'c lul VCHIilcilPU to No DIIVC hlrcft. OFKIUK HotlltK- It) ft. 111. till noon I p. 111. 11 4 p. 111. Sunday forenoon HIM! weekday eveningw ppoiittment. lil ylAA Will liny 4'.SI Dove nil.....I con- coal and wood lioune, ImudHomn vcrundii ltd vtBLibtlle, hni'k HIOOII and icruen iloore ninl windows, utonn HiiHlu-n und ntsidc hlindfl; liaikilMonu'ly papcrtd, ni-wly uiuted niHiile und out. witter anil tnnk in itchen and li ilnnil for Wlxlllu, ew sldewalkH, fruit trceii, Burden and hoi-lii'tl bargain. It to Look Like PIKht. ST. Loi'lH, May Lewis, the arrived here Saturday even JDg.t lie says that just before be left Chicago Muldoon showed him a telegram reading: "Will yon (Muldoon) come to New York uud uui in almpti for the Jack'-cu ligl.i'' i.-, Mul doon left f, Yo.lr. Tuw i.s the first evidence th.it re vill Le a fight. A Oasollno Stote Uipludes. O Mny W explosion stove s.'t Gru to thu building in the re.tr of E. T. Welch's olesale hiure. flames cjulokly spread to the m-iin building Itself, and from there to the large on either side of it. Although the firemen worked bravely the water supply was In- adequate to I he demand. Fortunately there wax no wind si in ing. A number of buildings were 1 The loss on the buildings U tSO.OOO with light Insur ance; on the goods stored in the buildings also about well Insured. Christian Scientists' Convention. BUFFALO, May Christian Scien tists will pass through here to-day in ful force for the convention ID New York, party consisting of delegations from Chicago, Detroit, Cleveland, Toronto, Mil waukee and Erie, will be joined here by a party from Lockport and a large delega- tion from Buffalo, leaving here at Da. m on a special train with Mr. Harry Gregle- stine, oity ticket agent of the Lackawanna, in charge, reaching New York m. Every preparation baa been to the comfort of the party. Ladles' and Misses' corsets and waists, Madam Lorp latest improved corsets, Dr. Warner's health corsets, Warner's Coralinc corsets, Madam Morris Short hip corn-Is, Schilling's coiled wire spring corsets, Madam MeiJee's easy fitting corsets, Unniuon Bfoae Fivn.-li wove corsets, Thompson's glove fatting Ferris corsets and waists for ladies and children; Warner's cold wave summer ejrsets. We make a specialty of handling all parts of chil- dren's carriages, such as parasols, rods, springs, brakes, wheels and handles. The new things which arts attracting considerable attention is hammocks, croquet sets, the latest and neatest things in lunch and card tables, very cheap. Everybody is buying their step ladders of us, be- cause we're selling them for 75, 88, 9Hc. and Large servicable express wagons 95c. Children's painted two wheel carts with iron tire, 20c. Ladies' cool summer vents, 25c. Gentlemen's ties, 17c. Lunch and picnic baskets, 10 and He. :i PECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT AITIVK M AN for cnrli sei lion, Halary to J lo lornll> ic- rt'Hcnl ti Mul'i'CHtllil N. 1. (Jomimuy U-il lo supply (iixiilB, CloUiiug, hi.....a, ewclry, lo ronnuniurM Hi i-or-l. Almui duly ol tact, Salary lo enroll mi'inlii'iv I'lirollcil, pnul in.) Ui'- erenccH (rriMiil, rHlctl) l.iu-k Hox tiltl, N. Y. "JUST RECEIVED: A Carload of Ibe FINEST and RAREST ROSES. s, Wcepinu Hoses, Slmihfl, (Jllmhere, Fruit and ornamen- tal trcvH. Never before did you H no nice and Inivv aa an. I will H.'ll ihum very cheap. Why do I them clieapv Because It will hajp, to improve the city and make U MMinte tint! after somu time there wilrbe no city or town in whole Cbaut. County butter provided One trees than Dunkirk. Call nl VANDKKMEUUCN'H URKKN UOU8B Cor. Hts. AMICIIICAN DI.OCK. Main Street, Buffalo, N. Y. SECOND TO NONE. Our motto in: '-Second to Noiif." Wo wisli to In- second to none in your service. Try us and ROOMS TO RENT In the Morrhunta Uanitjluihltng. Jacob Wirtner or Frunk Maj-. CARL SCHAUER 59 East Third St., Has just received a full line of Equal to any in city, and at prices that will pay you to see him befoi e. purchasing. TOUR SPRING AND SUM- MEB UNE OF Ozfori He: u. Slipper; WEliHAVE THEM IN PAT- ENT LEATHER BRIGUT UONGOLA, WITU FANCY COt.OHED OOZE TRIM- MINGS. WE ALSO HAVE A BEAUTIFUL PATENT LEA- THER SLIPPER, WITH A LARGE BUCKLE, FOR STREET WEAR. SULLIVAN SON, 213 Centre Street wish to impress upon our out of town frieiidn, in of the' pngpd changes in the tariff and probahlo increase in Ibe cost of all kinds of dry goodt, Uial .lie month of June will be Itmm nontli for them lo shop. PricM were never lower tlmn they are ireseiit in our store. If proposed tariff bill miml go arc offering splendid bar-; in silicons and gingbftma Mid -4 innmor wauli fabrics or all The balance of our spring itooK >f clunks arc nulling cheap. We quote the following n iinilcrwi'tii: Gentlemen's blue mixed and rawern In medium at We. par suit. Gentlemen's Balbriggan uuderwoar, iOc. per suit. Gentlemen's blue angola aod drawers at 25c. each, 40c. Ladies' Jersey vests as low at IOc. each. Ladies' btilbriggan vests witb lace trimming, only I5c., worth 8Sc. Good gra le Jersey vests at 28c. foacb. White and black iislc thread JetMf vests at 75c. each. Silk vests, all colors, 75c. each. Linen prices will be considerable ad- raoced If the tariff IB changed. Oar prices are much below even prices, and we are selling floe napkins. D'Oyleys, lowvls. etc.. at jargains New styles in parasols. Mew styles in gloves. New ttylcH in hosiery. in Buffalo for Rugs, Draping and upholstering (abrioi> 1 Adan ilUm aid MIBRICAN BLOCK. 300-409 MAIS BUFFALO. K. C.C. PENFOLD Manufacturer and Importer, MAIN ST., HVtVMIO, M. T. DEAI.KK ni Diamonds, Watchqft: and Jewelry, Clocks, Silverware, Leather KNUR A riKO. tJOLU 81L VfR FLA Tilt A COMPI.BTB LINK OW 3O4 MAIN 8TKKET, Opposite Iroquois Hotel. Go to Monroe's for Curtains and IN SPA PERI JEWSPAPER!   

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