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Dunkirk Evening Observer Newspaper Archive: May 21, 1890 - Page 1

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   Dunkirk Evening Observer (Newspaper) - May 21, 1890, Dunkirk, New York                               VOL. XX DUNKIRK >T. Y WEDNESDAY. MAY 21, 1890. REPRESENTATIVE USINESS HOUSES OF DUNKIRK. ____MACHINE for ruling blanks the Istot to OepartnMnt of DanklrklPrintlng UXAMDKB-acoal and Wood opposite Nickel Plate All of Hard and Soft Coal, Imoer. Bhingln and lath. Free Comapondenee for wholesale lou D B. as and WO Central Are. CONGRESSIONAL MLN'GS.' THB REGALIS ITSELF WITH A CHANGE OF DIET. M.asure to Subjeot Im- perted Llqners to the Provisions of on Bill In tbe Pro- Mado. Pbotorrspher. Instantaneous fMognphe of BaBles a ipecislty. Sitter. aeed aoi wait lor sunshine except for HINDEBT-JAHKS IBVINU, fro- If pnelor. No. M 8. Second street, near Buf- MIostieeL Dunkirk. M. T. Magazines, Mn Pamphlets, in all slylea. Onlrrr tromfOf atteeded io. All work guaranteed. May 81.-Tbe senate yes- after routine business, took up the Mil reported from committee emtjeeting imported liquors Uio of the of the several states The Mil tkat "no state shall be held be limited er restrained in its power to prohibit, regulate, control or tax the sale, keeping for sale er the transportation am article ef oommeros er otherwise to be delivered within its ewo limits of any fer- mented, distilled er ether intoxicating liquids er liquors bjr reason of the fact public serv- ices of Mr. Kelley were made by Senators Cameron, Morrill, Heagan, Sherman, Hamptou, Hawley and Daniel At eonclusion ef the eulogies, as a further mark of respect, the senate adjourned. IN THE HOVE. WASHINGTON, May ai.-The house went Committee of the whole en the tariff oiU, Mr. Grosvenor of Ohio In chair. Mr. Hemlerion of North Carolina offered an amendment abolishing the minimum punishment prescribed for violation of internal revenue laws. Rejected Mr. towles of North Carolina offered an Qm. MBIUIUUB to the amendment repealing tlm tobacco tax Rejected. Mr. Hayres of Texas offered an amend- ment providing that iron and steel cotton ties or hoops for baling or other purposes not thinner than No 20, wire gauge shall be admitted free of duty. Mr. Breckeuridgu of Arkansas favored the amendment. Mr. Mlaiichiird of Louisiana spoke in op- position to the GENEKAL FORKIGN M1WS. I position to the cotton tie dutv that the sane have been imported into that the life nf t, y' .___ me me or a cotton tie was one year BDBUHKK'S OBOCIUBT UODSK. Sttt Central 1 venae. Wtaoleeeleand retail dealer in 1 iporwil ami Cbiaa. eiasewaie, Ac. t IBAOTAUUVA HOTKL, X per day. Livery anil Bosr.ll.ig Stable In connection Viator Klilcr, and BS7 I.iou street. I 1CTW BAHBKH SHOP wseb a Mate from beyond its whether there shall or shall not have paid thereon any tax, duty, impost or ex- United Mr. Wilson ef Iowa, who had Introduced the bill in the 8nt instance and bad after- wards reported U back, addressed the sen- >tton tie was one year, so that the- duty was a yearly tax, and the Uleafastoel rail ten years, and the fluty on rails was paid over again every ten yearn He regarded the bill as a dirsct blow at the cotton-growing inter- tUNKIJM SON. Ms hone-shoers. Particular attention horses. .Shooing ol trotting boreee a specialty. rV EVENING OB9EKVKR. In Itic County. Aa unequalled sdvertimiig moaium. OOMPANY. PomerlrSellew A Popple. nrersoJ fengines, Boilerx, Pulleys, ofaclnrersoJ etoT Patterns. ne Work to order. rvDNKIRK 8HIKT CO, K08. 209 and 'Ml ij Ucnter sti-MI, Manufacturers ol Hie "Cronwell" and "Dunkirk" perfect a tlmg IK lurnmli Dunkirk, and "Dunkirk On sate in all Ie., oMbing and dry houses DF. TOUMJST, and iM Lion street, Uealer in Flour, reed, salt. Baled llaj, Phos- Established. 1871. EBUC HUTEl. and Ulnlng Saloon, Union Depot Easy aeons to all trains and bus- nouses. Best aceommoilatlons for Com- Trawlers. J. Hnrphy, Prop. Hutiia vo., Maud 99 B. TbirJ utreeL fine rurnilnre. Cabinet Ware ami Up- MMetegrtng. Piotare Pranwe made to onler. C1 B. A CO., Central Fashion and OenUemen Outntuirs. I I AJUCLI. 8TKAM HKATING CO.. Hanutavlnren ol ateam Healing Apparatus ______Sanitary Plumbing Specialty. LJ OBU tJTBAM LAUMUKT. Oni Fine Shirts, lOc; tlollara. E. Third si., oor. of Buffalo alanuntotnrer and dealer In Fine Boots Slioea USajJMT WK1UR-8 NBW STOKB. 105 B. Third st. Books. Stationery, Musical In stranMnu.Hiufasines.Dallj aud Weekly Pa pore, ead ererythipK pertaining to a Om cltss book JOB PBlMTIKaoleTerydescrlptK lowMtllrlng rates by Dunkirk Printing Compaur, 8 and 10 E. Second St ion snd at JSL VAH BDKEN SON, Life, AeeMnt and General Insurato. Deal- en In Benl Estate and Loons. Particular attentton paid to Ike oare ot property collect- lag So. Center at. ar a PHAKHAGT, 900 Avenue aMadqnarlen JOT Wall Paper Paint JMKINB, J. W, Center street. f> aOHOLTE8, f, IT East Third street, nuhioaahle Tailor. Gentlemen will find il to IketradTantage to call on me before pnrfliasi.DR It was a response to suggestion con- tained In that decision that congress could permit the exercise of the restraining power of a state: and It was for the pur- pose of giving that permission that this Bill had been Introduced and reported. The eflett of It would be to have each state In the Union to determine for itself what Its pallet should be in rtgard to traffic in intoxicating liquers. Under that de- cision, of supreme the state at Iowa could net prevent citizens of ether states or the subjects of Great Brit- ain, France or Germany sending intoxicat- ing HquoN into Iowa and having them sold there in the original packages by At present tine original were being erganixod in his Mate. package might be a pint or a bait Bint ef whisky or a keg or a bottle of beer. It was to put a stop to such prac- Mce and to recognise la every state Ihe power to regulate own Internal police (hut the bill wiw reported. Mr. Vest said taut MM a member of tne judiciary committee lie had uot been able to with the majority in reporting thu bill, because it would sweep away the exclusive jurisdiction of the United States over interstate eommierce The supreme oourt had that the power of oon- gress over interstate commerce was an ex- clusive power and could not be delegated. Mr. Vest sent to the clerk's desk and had read of the judiciary committee in the last oenf rest laying down the prin- for which he contended, Mr. lugalls and Mr Edmunds called for the reading of minority and it was read, dissenting from tho views of the majority, signed by Messrs. Wilson of Iowa, IngalU, Edmunds and Hoar. Mr. Gray agreed with Mr. Vest's argu- ment, but he asked whether the difficulty eiJSld not be got over by nn affirmative declaration of cougms that Intoxicating spirits were uot an article of interstate commerce. Mr. Vest did not think If that were done as to one article of com- for one state congress would asked to do It as to other articles for other states. Mr Edmunds suggested the case of a prohibiting the entrance of lepers, the transportation of whom (an of all other pastengew) wag a question, of interstate commerce. Mr. Vest said that that did not touch the case at all, because the supreme oourt bad decided that the commercial clause of the coiiHlitutibn never was intended and never could be intended to take away from states llieir reserved police power to pro tcct the livei and health of their own citl zeus. Mr. McPherson asked Mr. Vest whethe the right to Import an article implied the right to sell it Mr. Ve-it replied in the affirmative, and quoted from the decision of Mr. Justice Matthevis of the supreme court in the case of Wurd vs Maryland to I hat effect. Mr. Hoar argued m or of the bill. If the bill were not within the legislative power of congress, then there was no more miserable nation, on the face of the earth than the United States. Mr. Hiscock asked Mr. Hoar if a state desired to exclude, not liquors, but manu- factures of wool, it was within the power of congress to delegate the states the power to do per cent. 105 Mr. Htcwart of Georgia said that if the amendment were not voted down the col- ored laborers of thu South would know who their friends were. Mr. Hare of Texas ai'Rued that the higfc duty proposed practically amounted an export fax. Air Bayue of Pennsylvania said that it was in the interest of the laborers of all sections that duties should be imposed no U give employment tbe people of the United States, rather than tha people of othor countries. Mr. Claikeof Alabama spoke in favor the amendment, and Mr. Wheeler of Alabama against it. Mr. Bunows of Michigan thought that If the cotton tie industry was established in this coiiutiy, the Southern planter would noon purchase his ties cheaper than he did now Mr. McKiulcy of Ohio said that the bill only proposed to treat cotton ties precisely as it treated hoop iron Mr. Sayres amendment was rejected 96 to Mr. Breckenridge of offered acl nmcudtuout to mske the dutyon cotton ties 45 per cent, ad valorem. Lost. Mr. McKeuua moved to amend the sugar schedule no as to provide as follows: All sugars not above No. 13, Dutch standard color, shall pay duty on thsir polariscope tent as follows: All sugars not above No. Id, Dutch standard, in color, all tank bot- toms, syrups of rune Juiue or beet juice, meluda, concentrated melada, concrete and concentrate.) molasses, testing by polariseope not above 75 degrees, shall pay adutytil 9401) cent per pound, and for every additional degree or fraction of a de- gree shown by t he polariscopic test they shall pay 300 of a cent per pound add! tionnl All sugars abnve No. 18, Dutch standard, in color shall be classified by the Dutch standard of color aud pay duty as follows: All sugar above No. 13 and above No. 10, Uuteli standard, l.TM-lotHents per pound. All sugar above No. and not above No. Dutch standard, 1.99-100 cents pei pound. All sugars above No. 20 Dutch standard, 2.UI-100 cents per pound' Molasses testing not above 56 degrees bj- the polsriscope shall pay a duty of 2 ceuu per gallon, Molasses testiajj; above 5fi de- grees shall pay a duty of 4 gallon. THB RESULTS OF GEN. SIMMONS' MISSION SEVERELY CRITICIZED. Government Aoomed of riiiyjitg th. .f Papa at the Ei- Chiiroh of paring for th. Great Clergyman gent to rrlnon. _May_21._Tb. result, ef tke VlitlOHO Axing the status of Catholic nlmrch iu Malta and raising the rank of that we to that ef an filled tlia clergr and laity ot the twtaMi.lied c-hurch with indignation.. The more outipoken of tho protesting churchmen acrnsw thu government of playing into the ef pope at the expense of the chnrck ef England in order secure the co-npora- tten of the Vatican in Ireland, but i his view of motives which auluitcd the accepted out- Protestant alliance is on the warpath against tho t'evsrnraent, wholly but still very largely on au-onul ef Gen. Simmons' mlnkion. The ot the alliance are te a great extent ('onuer- vatlves In politics, yet there is among them an almost unanimous feiiling in fa- vor ef forming an alliance wiih tlm t'lad- stoulan party, and a meeting ot the body been called for next Fnduy to form- ally discuss the question and consider tha feasibility of such aoti.n. FOR UHIHII'KA preparations are nwking for coming exhibition in aid of the t und for tke survivors ef ths famous memorable charge against the flus- at Baluklavs, OB Or t SB, 1N54, was one the mokt daring uuvaliy on- slaughts on record and at f.lie same time INCREASED SAFEGUARDS AEn1in! Improper Commitment of Al- Irgod Ai.ius-r, action has recent Iy taken by t he ..ute in lunacy, lucking to increased safe- guards against tbe improper commitment I o and detention in asylums of this state it persona alleged to be insane In accordance with the power granted by law, the commission recently adopted i new form of certificate to be used in the commitment of the insane to custody, and have also prescribed a form of certificate of qualification which must be possessed physicians desiring to be- come examiners in lunacy coses. For the mke of alwolute uniformity, accuracy and the greatest convenience, the are to ho supplied solely from the offlee ot the joinmission, und a distribution of the two forms w, I be about June to ntendrats of asylums and hospital, for NO 83 negotiations fs aet generally side of churoh circles the most disastrous the atUi king party. Lord Tennyson hoi, spoken Hie stirring verses ot "The L'liargenF the Light Brigade" into a phonograph which Col. Oeuraud Mill furnish at one of the most prominent Jiriti-.h .admiralty tins dei ided to moroase the, strength nt the Xoilh Aini-ri- oan squadrun iy tbe addition ol four ter pedo boats Ths ves- els HIV now heiiiK made ready and are expected to jnin the fleet about tha middle of June A CLEROYMAJI SFXT To PHIvfr.; Dr. Selorf, a Lutheran nun ef i-aiir siderable in hau sentenced to a long term ot imprison- ment for criminally assaulting j. 'vomiB woman who was a member ot his congre- gation. Strong wore made by his friends te secure his acquittal in consider- ation of hih calMngand his Imhertublame- less life, Ihe evidence against him ivxs Redirect and overwhelming tluit nothing could aave him from conviction. It Is that the murri'ige ef Henry M. Stanley to Miss Dorothy Ten- nant will take place in Weal miintsr Ab- bey in July. Heavy Damages Agaltint it May wealthy widow named Knight has recovered fB.llOfl dam- ages in a suit against Dr. Louis formerly musicHl critic of tho London World, for the seduction tier diyighter. Tho offense was ooiumttted in V" leinsHiie, county clerks and superln- indent.s of tlm poor. WAR TO THE KNIFE. Attack Upon a Georgia Onnvr, Ga., May81.-G. Odom openly de- r-lai-ed lie woold not appear before Justice Aspmwull in a cose in which he had been The justice heard the con- lemptuouH remark and asked Odom to Mthdiaw it. Odom refused and Aspin- I .ill drew hJH pistol and told Oilom if he Id not recall hismsulting words he would Kill him. Odom leaped at the justice, got his ol uway from him and shot him in lead. Atter being wounded the jusw.v. pulled out, lua knile iiutl ntublird Odom '.WILO near the heart At this jioint friends nterfm-ed and stopped the fightera, Both Jien Hfttfrwnrd lett lor their homes for inrhestprs to .shoot Ihe thing out friends, however, prevented tlie o a liiiis.li Train Arrives at IlllValo. Jil'lFAio, Way 21. Citizen George r ram is Train, knowu as "Round-the- W orld or the "Great American who expects to complete his now famous exploit in the imprece- uited time of sixty-six days, passed thiouKb Buffalo yesterday morning on hta west Io Tacoiua, Wash, Mxty-two ia5s out from thai was seen by who New York Cen- truin 5 as it pulled into the depot :l.i o cloi k, u. ni an hoi.r behind time modern Fogg" still Doskiug in the gloumy recesses of bunk indpliijing with K pirtt) 4-year-old girl mined Myrtle who m an orphan and traveling alone to friends iu C'olfax Ia. 1 he citizen decorated her M ith a coral i at Ihe DEATH BTJELECTRiciff; ROaErt M. ARQUMENT AGAINST ELEATR90UTION. Rtrangly Condemns Prvocss Cruel and lit- Igatlon Is Delaying Pending Bieeu- Court Itaeerves D.ol- llou and Adjourns Till Friday. WASHINGTON, May application for a writ of error la case of Kemmler, under sentence of by eli-ctricity, was heard in the supreme court of tbe United States yesterday. Roger M. Sherman, counsel tor Kemmler, who made the ap- plication, appeared for condemned murderer. He based argument on the fourteenth amendment to the federal con- ititution, which provides that: "No state make or enforce any law which shall abridge privileges er of of the United States; nor shall any state any person ef life, lib- erty or property without due ef which provides that cruel and unmual punishments shall not Ut inflicted. Mr. Sherman explained the elrcunv stnncesin which tbe writ ef error brought. contended tbatthe infliction of death by electricity was cruel and unusual and therefore wltheut due proem Mr. Sherman held that electrical law gave the warden no discretion in the ain- ter of tbe application of electrical r'nt. He was obliged to continue tbaour- icnt until criminal dead. KKUMLER WOOLD BE TOttTCIIKD. Mr. Shei-tiian gave a number of liltMMM of the infliction of death by electricity to thowtbat d> from Arabia, us hildieu aboard themtiii In- hiis nil the lie looked hale cents per PCX OABf US Lroe street. General Hardware, White anppues. Oil Oniaite Wan. A upecial- Monroerange. sooto blank-books, ledgers, an J all kinds of blanks done at Dunkirk Printing Company, 8 end 10 E. Second SL IkUOOLPa MOLDBNHAUEH, IV Cor. Third anil Buffalo Si Dealer in Granite, Marble >'mi BnUdut Stone. Call on me' RUXBT CO, 7 and i Bad Front .Uxol. Whissy, Wines, Braouteii. tUMral Lfainor 8tore lor Family Use. Uom rtwet, the depot 8ft.y- J. Centi.l Ave. Gwjeral Insurance snu Real HBtiii Af env. B. Third st, cor. Ueei. t_r MeM Fresh. Salt and Sausages, Oyatern snd in r tOVtOM. JBWBLRT. AC. ;Buy UM Aurora Bailroad Watck. BcuiUnnf a sueclalty. rank Sttpl. Third st. W H. SKMIMCK, Merchant Tailor, is nentni A venae RE WARD I wiUparUM Mr. Hoar replied that he did not go quite that far; but question involved was on the boundary lines between two conflict- ing police power of the state and the exclusive power of congress over interstate commerce. Mr. Hteoock assumed that the presence of tbe bill was due to the fact that unless it became a law the state would be limited or restrained in its power over the sub- ject, iie accepted very doubtfully the proposition that had the consti- tutional power to delegate to any state the power to prohibit the importation or within its borders of wheat or butter or other of the farm or factory' He did not say that he would vote against the bill; bethought it might be wise to pass it and leave it to the supreme court to pass upon it. Mr. Hengan said that whatever might be his wish to nee promoted in the land, he was not willing to lay hand on the constitution and tear it down. Mr. remarked upon it as I a very curious and Interesting circumstance that a condition of things hud been where, according to debate and according to the judgment of the su- preme court, the states had no power to >eal with the subjoct, andcongreL had no iwer to deal with it. H The result was that there was in everv mnn in an inherent individual personal right to carrv inw another state what that state might consider injurious U) its safety, Mil it, and that congress "had no power to stop it, and that tiie states Inot step it unless the congress gave them that power. He did not believe in the centralization of power. He be- lieved in its set rogation and separation iu every respect. Speaking of the Importation of intoxi- cating into a state, Mr. claimed that once they got there they were (whether in the hands ef not) the subject of state laws and that was what tbe supreme court ef the United would come to within the next twenty years. After further discussion the bill went over without action aud the senate pro- ceeded to consideration of resolutions Mr. McKennii's amendment was opposed ay Mr Cannon of Illinois, who charged a few Califonuuiis with controlling the pro- ductlou of sugar in the Sandwich Islands ami with seeking free sugar on that ac- count. Mr. Price of Louisiana favored the amendment. Mr. McKinley opposed it, mid it was rejectod, 115 to 184, eleven Republicans voting for il. Mr. Stewart of Vermont offered an amendment extend iny the bounty to maple sugar. Lost, 51 to B5. On motion of Mr. McKinley amendments were adopt- making certain reilui tlona in the duty ou granite mid other biiildinKstones Also placing on the tree list Hsh, the product of American fisheries, and fresh or frozen flsh, ciuight in fresh waters, except salmon. Mr. Mt-Kinley ottered a loug amend- ment, the substance of which was to im- pose a tax of 5 cents a gallon upon alcohol used in the man n fact ure of vinegar, and putting that manufacture under the su- perintendence of the commissioner of in- ternal revenue Mr. Sawyer of New York offered a substitute for the amendment having for its object the taking away from the manufacturers of white wine vinegar all right todisl.il alcohol, lint giving them where the ladies took supper with Engel. During- the meal Engel drugged Miss Knight's wiue, and after had iftired entered her room. Engel was formerly Miss Knight's music teacher. of Jrlfthmen In Knglitiul. LONDON, May m Parnell, bpeakln at a meeting of Nationalist leaders, urge that iiama of every Irishman in Eu> land be placed upon the voting register! visw of the fact that a general election I possible at any moment. Resolution were adopted looking to tho formation an election fund, under the of Mr. Parnell, and the arrangement measures for complete registration Irishmen in England. j i iittirj tuil hearty, his brown skin was only by it light pnjuma aud his feet by A lough seamen indeed is the iiusen, fora inun ot his years, He Is til uid his hair is us while as snow. A Young Bmvory. Hor SPKistis, May Sl.-Thrcemiles from this out horseback riding, Flor- liot fiom a Winchester passed the buck part ol her body, behind Jers. The wounded bravely ill Ihe.sitddle, and puttinga whip 10 her horM rode at lull speed three-quar- lersol amile toa farmei s house, where she fell exhausted iler right ana is hel should and she can h ight rdlj spe na is par- k She IM power to itrirtion buy alcohol imcli-r re- Fiom (io'clock until 9 the house, with >nt in any of excitement, was u ini.en.se, confusion, it being out of jowei oi tl.e rhmr to u-slore order enough to fiennit of any im-mlvi- heard. Mr. Lintl of Miniusota a fierce at- tack upon the binding In in e t rust. Mr. Hill of Illinois wsis nnotlier Repub- ican who was dissatistled some fea of bill. JTr Taylor of Illinois, Republican ob- ected vigorously to the increase of duties ipori hemp and tlax. Mr. Sawyers substitute WHS o 1U4, and the amendment was accepted Mr. Cannon of Illinois offered an amend ment providing that paintings in oil or water colors anil statuary uot otherwise >rovided for, shall a duty of 30 per ad valorem. Keje ears A Murderer Ills Guilt. GLENS FALLS, X. Wood, who was suspected of tl.e minder of Leandrr Pasco, has confessed his guilt. He says that he has no accomplice m.the crime. He secreted himself beside n path in the woods, and when Pastio walked past be shot him in the back. The Wood and Pasoo families have long been at feud with one another. Silk Mill. by the Sheriff. AUBBRN, N. May a.-The Logan Silk mills were closed last night by the sheriff on judgments aggregating Sir.uoO About 500 bands are thrown out of em- ploymet. The failure is attributed to unsettled condition of the silk market te tariff legislation. Cloning- the Pool Boons. BUFFALO, May crusade was lor jiars citj clerk. She is well know m Memphi, and Washington. The would- be assassin is Htjll at Inrge. The Jciwe Gang. MADI.SOV, Wis Maj Sl.-Three of the James gang arc now under arrest at Jefferson, m this state, aud utti, ers horn .Missouri ure ID the city with their returu to Missouri Ihen.unesol the prisoners are suid be 1. M. Ollu-ei, alias William llurlow, T W Deny .ind (Jeorge fcicott. All were heavily ti und, iiij- revohers and inchesters "id a kit ot burglars tools. The men moke j-ul in JJouglus county, Missouri, ne nun. ,iK0. ii is said they will held tot murder. a man would not Instantly Lllled by the application provided for un- er tbe New York law. A reslat- aiice was greater than ohms. It might easily be ohrntt. Kemmler would simply be tortured if the ourreat contemplated were applied. timately die, but In iiterim would be tortured. He might be cremated on surface, or he might be carbonized. The wet sponges, to be used as part ef the eleo- ti-ical apparatus, had to kspt wetdur- lug the passage of the current. Bow was this to be donef it was intended te a man play a hoss on the oponge during the passage of current, but this was abandoned because during the kurnlng of some electrical works had M- ceived shouks while playing water on th. flames, the water furnishing current. Now It was intended to have water drop u some way, on the sponges. He would like to know how It was to be done with- out danger. Mr. Sherman, in conclusion, referred to the fact that Judge Wallace, whom he called u humane, eminent and learned judge, well aware of the unsettled condi- tion of several uuettlons involved In the case, had held by thu granting of a writ of Habeas corpus to Kemmler, under circum- stances of exceptional delicacy and hu- manity, that at least a proper case was presented for judicial conaiderattai. B. confidently believed that he would not ceive the unmerited rebuke of a by the court that there was no serious fed- aiiesuon in the argument submitted to htm. AITOHNKY GENERAL TABOR'S ARODMB1IT. heavy, pans, lOc. Bird cage hooks, 4c. Iron shelf brackets, 10 and 18c. per Mir. Cup- board door catches, 6c. Large AK bit brlv ces, 18c. Large monkey wrenches, 23c. Lemon squeezers, lOc. Handy viws, 18c. Knife trays, lOc. Toilet pails and slop' jars, 38c. Japan trays, 14-inch, lOc. 10-quart dust pans, lOc, Fancy lunch baskets, 23c. Chiles fancy rolling hoops, 28c. Iron axel express wagons, 95c., Chair Mats, 10 and 12c. Bird wges, 45, 60, ERIE; STORE. ANNOUNCEMENT TODDABT A CO.. Patent 7th St. Washington, it. C..OBU. yTWfonto" flee. Vawnu, Caveat. esonred. Trade registered. All Patent condncied for moderate Fees. InfomaUon. Advice and special references tent on raquxt. cmn VI aw a working prf fenred who can turnjnh a borst and give their lime to thebuilncis. SpareBMnentamay Iwproai- abhr employed aim. A few vacancies la toons ItfRicfiiond. V. frOR SAI.E.-Two building MxM, OB 1' "ti-eot Fourth street. Inqulra at 79 K. Fourth street. CASH win buy tbe property nn the corner of Front and Swan Lot no by ISO teet. 1 aleo have a law library ol uvei- volinntiH for Hale cheep lor cash. H. tthtward, Dunkirk, N. Y. -JUST CtaMd FINEST and RAREST ROSES. tal traea. New befondlditwrZI tree, to nloe MH! M an 1 wUl Mil then. oSMp! Wk. do I MTilll REMOVAL Dr. ceo. E. Blackham IMS and residence to No. Dove street. 1p.m. Sunday forenoon snrt weekday by uppolulment, Will buy ven clothes Hfit, eoal and woml house, and vestibule, back sloop ,__ screen doors ami onlslilo blinds; pancrud painted inelde'aiid J kitchen and hydrant tor lawn. Lot WxMo, new mdewalks, fruit ITCM, garden and hot-bed: A uargain. varmndab i-koose. and VANDBRMKOU.N'H QRBBN BOOM Cor. Eagle and HeTenth Bti. We frequent raqncMi by mail for mnpUt of Mw Such request! we an md c hiet a gi.art of Cold. Ifci'UMMM., Mich .May Var- oe, enijilojetl as a 'sorter' at the Michi- :au gold mini', quit work Saturday, and to him- marled foi hnglaud. A ivanuiit secured aud his trunks pcneu A quail bottle idled with ;uld huudrwl pouiidn ol very ith ioek uere found, ebtiiuated to be lortliiu least Varcoe is iu jail, that he was not thu only ;n mine. It 13 thought thou- tuiiK ot uoli.na have bci.ii stolen. Luwjer ileniolili Dead. YOHK, May at G. Rey- iolds, the lawyer who was shot in hU i'lice in Wall street a few days ago by Vllihoiise btepnume, died in the hos- ulul .u'sierday btephanie, when he ap- le.iix-il m the coroner s o.'lice, broken o.vn eompletoly. The news of Reynold's with was a shuck to him. ouny man us rtt ommitte-d to tbe city Hitiiuiit bull, UUlu'l I'ay Coi- His Biography. PHILVDH.ITII- ,IHJ Harrison Vlltn Noith U-ikma has been .sued for ie ol b., I he American Bio- rupliii.iil Publisiiiiig company. Gen. Uleu some jears ago agreed to pay one of the books published by the corn- any, containing his portrait and biogra- hy. The general failed to keep the agree- lent, hcuLe the suit. Indignant TOPEKA, Kan., Mu.y Ul temperance ouieu of this city have become indignant over the effects of ie 'Loi package" decision that they ive bunded together strong, to en- the .state law, despite the supreme nil's uctision. It is expected a raid will e made upon the original muls" 10 d'iy. A Temporal-) Stay Granted. NLW .May 31.-Judge O'ISrien has A temporary stay iu the case of -Ahlerman Barker, with an order te ow cause why it should not be made ruiauent. The order is returuahjMtay lIcKennan I'm ,m May __ _ M. Kenaan denies tne charge of the I Trade-, council that he was asleeo l 'I council that he was asleep tin; 1-ench whi.ii the labor mpiirtatioii cases were on trial. torn to pieces and drifted do-n n L.I.LWVU uunn offered by Mr Cameron in respect to the Railroad tracks memory of the late Representative win anasuo- lain O. 9i Pennsylvania. Will- Kemarlu DDT.OUR .BREAK? PE A defined. f" in wmiest. me police department has er to tils turf e-vrlismges to up, and the turf commissioners are letting scarce, very few of these gambling resorts being open. Attorney General Tabor In opening mm sue ik s. i referred si J Sherman, and stated that Judge WaT M. McKeogh, who luce hud granted the writ of habeas eoroua because he was willing to do all that was proper iu order to give Kemmler a chano. or life. Mr Tabor appeared a. oouMel for Warden Durston of Auburn prison In opposing the granting of writ of er- ror. Mr. Tabor's argument consisted princi- pally of copious references to decisions eonceining the fourteenth amendment. He laid much stress on an opinion deliv- ered by Justice Miller of the United supreme court, containing statement that there exists some strange misconcep- lion of the scope of tbe fourteenth amend- ment. Quoting from the decision he read. "In fsct it would seem from the charm ter of many of the before us and the arguments made In them, that the clause under consideration Is looked upon as a means of bringing to the test of the decision of this court the abstract of every unsuccessful litigant In a state court ol the justice of the decision against him and of the of the legislation on which such a decision may be founded." DELAYING PETOWO KECUTION8. The fourteenth amendment, he claimed was uot applicable in this case There were several provisions of the federal con- stitution that were not applicable to the states. The laws for the execution ef criminals were regulated by the themselves. For Jwo tbe contro- versy over the execution of Kemmler had been going on. Five men were held ter murder in the state, but could not be ex- ecuted because of the litigation. state of New York, he said, wanted to know where it stood as to the execution of criminals. As for the eighth clause concerning cruel and unusual punishment that provision was tbe same in the consti- tution of the state of New York It was in the federal constitution. The testimony in the New York court of appeals was referred to by Mr. Tabor, and extracts from the opinions of the judges of the court on the case were also read. In conclusion he B luted that in view ef what these judges had said it would seem to be an entirely unnesessary, if not Im- proper proceeding upon the part of the supreme court to read and examine a thousand pages of testimony for sim- ple purpose of discovering whether all of state courts were not all wrong In re- gard to the admitted question of fact. He thought that the motion for a writ of error should be summarily dismissed. Mr. Sherman made a brief additional statement after Mr. Tabor had fin- ished. The court reserved its decision Mid ad- journed until Friday. A Victory for the Trotting Association. BUFFALO, May 91.-Judge Corlett yet terday handed down a decision on Na- tional Trotting association case which argued before him last April. The titleof the oase is tbe Standard Stock Farm Frank Noble and George Robens the National Trotting association, P. P John- son of Lexington, Ky.; M. J. Bulkier of Hartford, Conn., and John L. Mitchell of Milwaukee. The applied for an order adjudging the guilt? ef contempt of oourt. application Judge Corlett baa denU4, making a Tin. ROOMS TO RENT In the Inqulre.ol Jacob Wirtnn or frank Hay. CARL SCHAUER 59 East Third St., Has just received a full Hoe of gnat Equal to any in the city, and at prices that will pay you to see him befoi e purchasing. rOUR SPRING AND 8CM- MBR LINK OF Odd Tks uil Slippm Dove ,'tre.t-a eon- beg to Mk in regard to taaiplti wanted. State whether edgtap, iDMrtiomor what width and tome idea of the nrioa. We have a atook of that ii Moond to none iatJMWftB. try and raperjor to any In BuflUa, The money value wn offer if ttapiy unparalled. There are from 1-4 ofu inch to ie inchee widej In cambric, jaconet, nainraok and moalin. Hatched in different of edging and intertfon of all of material All over embroideries IB variety. in the different widtlu from is inches to 00 Inches. Special of oambrto at fcTlOc, 12 i.8c. i5C( .nj-jj otiji per yard. ADAM, UCLDBOM A ANDBBKM, New for coming in daily. The mnilin on. derwear stock complete, also tha linen Hock, the cotton stock and the white stock. By "eon. plete" we mean they have all the new styles in season's new the variety that the best purchaaing facilities ID the oewtrv can bring-together. Winter cteclu are offering great bargains. There never WM a time when you could ben more adrantageonilj. the Charge. 21. United States DRY GOODS, ud Driptrin. An Treasurer Dl.appears. May 21. -Patrick Hynes, J Brban carried away. Urn. w port. .N. Y., treasurer of the Ancient "i.ici of Hibernians, has disappeared. after coulehmng to an emh belonging to the order. WK UAVE THEM IN PAT- BNT LEATHER BRIGHT DONQOLA, WITH FANCY COLORED OOZE TRIM- MINGS. WE ALSO HAVE A BEAUTIFUL PATENT LEA- THER SUPPER, WITH A LARGE BUCKLE, FOR STREET WEAR. SULLIVAN SON, 213 Centre Street, BUMS. 396-402 MAMJT HTRBBT. BUFFALO. H. f. C.C.PEN FOLD MuulMtanrMMl Importer, HAW m, mnrrALo, Watcbec and Jewelry, Mlverware, Leather 864 MAIN STKatBT, Go to Monroe's for Curtains and Fixtures. IN SPA PERI iWSPAPERI   

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