Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Dunkirk Evening Observer Newspaper Archive: May 8, 1890 - Page 1

Share Page

Publication: Dunkirk Evening Observer

Location: Dunkirk, New York

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Dunkirk Evening Observer (Newspaper) - May 8, 1890, Dunkirk, New York                               HOUSE CLEANING Time us with all UK lull n litw portion v mm lw -.mi-' M luiMitir ?t Largo. I I.-an Ultl W.- n larjjf linn-l. .Tin furnish vou nil yu in InrzfT -mall at 4Oc. hiinilioil VOL. XX. HAVE RETTEB Tlmnany Printlnf BMM cnunly for tanrtaf oat II lhi> I" Pine Job Printing. MaUoMtv, DUNKIRK N. Y THURSDAY, MAY 8, 1890. B XEPRESENTATI7E USINESS HOUSEb OF DUNKIRK.. I NEW RULING MACHINE lor rul-n all kiii'is ol blanks it the addition i Mi'chanical Department   -iiw Central Avenue anil rc'tail dealer in I ported an hina. Glassware, 8u.. (J JHAUTAl.yU.V IIOTK1., Kutes, tl clay. f.iTer> ItMHuhiig stnMo in conuection Victor Klder, .f.'. an.l M7 i.iou street. f iITT BARUCK SUOk- Chafe. Nsgle, Prop., O'D'lur bliore NuLlouut U.nik, tenter HII t Third streets. 4 tine atouL ol Koreijf.i ami Domestic igo-ra, I ttKON, O 33fl Ceiitnr Mtreet, boratj-thoors. Harticula to interfering hones. Hlioen kEa lioraes a IVt.NKlUK KVKN1NC OHSEUVKK. Daily '.be -m-ily. An unequalled mlverti-Mn utuintion of road ilKK rorire.li sellow etc. i'uttvnie, V' ..and Work to order. D I- Mi IKK MtiltCT CO., Center nn well" D -iOS an.l Af-t at reel, Alauufoctuiera oi UK "Uuiikirlt" llttinj; on snlc m all leading dr> gomU Inn 1 den in Itiinkirk. F. TOO.MKV. 4.'U and Lion direct. i'-aa-r in KU.ur. feed, -alt. Haled t'ln.t, l. Kit; 1IOTKL and Dmlng saloon, Uni JLJ Depot. access u, all trainband IJL nousea. liuo; lor J. Murphy, Prop. Fj tfund'til K luint street l-nic hmmturc. Cabinet iiiul U noble, ing. 1'icturf: t rallies made Iu order. IO MA'ITKSON CO., l-eu'lc'ra of KtL'tliMin iiinl (jcnUt-uion Oututtci I I AKKI.I. STKAM UK AT LSI; CO.. M.tmiluclurcri4 ol bteam Heating Apparati Su iiLiry I'lumbing a Specialty. OME STEAM l.AU.NDHV. Fine Slurta. rollarb TARIFF DEBATE BEGUN. THE CONGRESSMEN ENTER ANOTHER CONTEST OF WORDS. NO. 72. r. flie for the and Mr. Horn Llliewl.e for tLo A fonrlii'lnn Kiprrled to be Reached by U May s-Mr. McKJuley, tbe cliiin man of tbe ways uni' means cum- mittn-. v ...I'vi j into tin- h. u K fft, w min- utes noon yest, to arrange a great pile of legal loohiru' hooks on his desk. He carelessly glanced" up to- ward the galleries and a look of surprise over his faee he saw the slim crowd there for the opening of such a great event, as the tariff debate usually brings out u large quota who have leisure enough and disposition to take an interest lii all important question of tariir re- vision. The bill granting a pension to Mrs. D. 8. Parnell was first called up, but n was agreed that it should go over. Mr. McKinley moved thai Ihe house go Into committee of the wwlr f or the con- sideration of the tariff bill. Jn making this motion he guid he would endeavor to close general debate Saturday evening Mr .Mills of Texas thought the time ixed as too short. Two years ago the Jemocrats conceded twenty-three days for debate and he remonstrated against the ihort time proposed. Mr. McKinley's motion was agreed to md tlie house went into committee of the whole, Mr. of Illinois in the chair On mi-' granted peaking Mr M 0 Mr. Mr. -McKiuleysaid that in the last politi- al campaign the tariff had been the ab- sorbing quest! jn before the people; audit seemed to him that no extended discussion f this principle was expected or required uder existing conditions, for if any one hing was settled by the political contest f it was that the protection policy is promulgated by the Hepublicau party n its platform, as maintained by the Re- ublicai, partv tlirouKh a long series of ears, should lie secured iu any legislation hteh to IM; hehl by a congress chosen high ad valorem and shut their to the diminished price. The Democrats pursued the shadows: the Republicans enjoyed the substance [Applause.] Mr. McKinley said that under this bill the foreign were accessible as they would be under free trade. But he wanted know if the foreign consumer was any lietter consumer than the Ameri- can consumer. The hill had been opposed because it was an American bill made for American Why should we over the best market of the own market? Yet, with all this croaking, our had increased 35 per cent more than the exports from free trade Great Britain. In 1800, after fourteen years of revenue tariff, the country was in a state of depression. uous protection, we found ourselves in greater prosperity than at any other time. Could any nation furnish such of prosperity Yet men were found to talk about the restraints we put upon trade. The greatest good to the greatest Dumber; tlie largest opportunity for human endeavor were the maxims upon which our protective system rested [An- plause.J v Mr. McKinley was warmly congratu- lated by all the Kepublicans present while cries of "Vote" were head all over the western .siuc of the hull. Mr. Mills of Texas then followed. declared that this was the first bill that had come before the American people with its mask torn off, like a highwayman demanding their purses. [Applause.J To check importation was to check ex- portation. Pig iron was the base of all our iron and steel manufactures. In 1871 prices were rising after a depression, and i showed rose from _tons in 1BTO to tons in That showed conclusively that the Democratic position was in- creased increased the demand for American labor. Then there was another article, hides. Hail gentlemen on the other side ever heard of hides before'- (laughter Hides had up. HIHJ then serenely bobbed down again. .Some times you saw them; some! hue-you did not Why did not the posited under section 4 of the act of .Tune 20, 1874, the amount of United States notes.'' Mr. Plumb moved to amend the amend- ment by inserting a provision that here- after no funds available for the pavineut of the public debt, including such'ius are kept for tbe redemption of tren-mry notes, shall be retained in the treasury in excess of and made a statement iu explanation and advocacy of it. Mr. Sherman opponed Mr. Plumb's amendment. Mr. Reagan criticized the policy of the retention in the treasury of the hundred millions of gold held as a special fund for the redemption of greeubacks Mr. BlairaskedMr Keagan what amount of gold It would be prudent to hold to meet a possible "run" ou the treasury for payment of the of now in circulation. Mr. Reagan replied that there was al- ways an abundance of gold In I ivasury without any special reservation of it After further debate the hill went over until Tuesday to allow Mr. .lone- of Ne- vada to be present. A conference was asked on the bill for a public building at Hudson, N. V. After execulne session the senate-adjourned. GENEHAL FOREIGN NEWS. ntrnl express train ran into the Lehigh J Ilej York passenger traia at the THE TEMPERANCE FIGHT GROWING MORE FORMIDABLE DAILY. FATAL COLLISION. A Young Lady InMaaUy Killed Other, Badly ALLEN-TOWS, Pa., May New Central Tall_________________ Krarte crosMiiK of this dty. The Party Kipeet. to Klect 1 wo of i lie Lehigh Valley passenger and the engine of the New Jersey Central train were thrown on their sides. A young lady passenger in the Lehigh Valley train was killed, and five or six others In- jured, not seriously. The cause of the wreck of the air brakes on the New Jersey Cen- tral train to work. The train shot past the depot, ami crashed inte tjie the Union street crossing. A dozen were in one car of Lehigh Valley train. Emma single, aged of Ithaca, jv i was instantly killed. Joseph Hant- ler of Wilkes-Barre, sustained a concun- SCHOLARS IN REBELLION. this great contest and on this mastering co.mmtt.ee put a duty on hides as high as sue. He interpreted the victory to mean the du'y Why did not the e interpreted tlie nmjority iu the bouse sugar as it had treated menu, he interpreted the incumbency of irpresidency bj the present chief execu- ve to mean that a revision of the tariff a-, demanded by tho people and that that vision should be along the ]me and full of the principle and purpose protection. [Applause.] The bill reported to (he house was a loroiigh answer to tbe demand of the The bill bad uot abolished the in- nial revenue tux, becimse that almlition WHA not ceL-essiu-y tu preserve tbu protec- tion If the committee recom- nn-iidations at- to the internal revenue law should be agiced to, internal taxation woolen ami cot ton goods anil iron goods? j Coffee had been placed ou the free list eighteen yeara ago by a Republican con- gress. Why uot a prohibitory duty on coffee and naturalize it in this country? What did tlie bill do to aid agriculture? j It put sugar on the free list, i Two years ago when the Democrats stood on the floor and declared that the country was on the edge of a dark shadow the republicans hail ridiculed this, and hail said that tbe fiiruj mortgages were i onl> a further evidence of prosperity and wealth. I Laughter.] The Kepublicans must do something more than this in order would be reduced a little more than to tlly farmers. Why did not the Ouo.ooo Tlu- recommendations of tbecoin- committee put a prohibitory duty on raw mittt-e Unit imported articles hear a mark indicntinKthefoiiritr) in which they were i silk> of dodging the question and IT U'ir Cuds, 4c, hml l.ac A W uumimn providing for a bounty? Why did they nianiifactnretWvvaa based ou the practice j not P1" Prohibitory duty on tea and de- ot many countries which copied our best I p the industry of this coun- uruiuls and void them iu competition with the home imide product. The committee also recommended that the government should retain only 1 per cent, instead of 10 per cent of the duty paid on raw mater- ial whitli wasre-exportedinmanufactiired form ThiHKiive the people of the United L-iirtnina." free Ueliv- I States jiraclitally free r.iw material for the i, 2uT Con wr street [LauehterJ The committee found out Hint the wheat production was m danger and had increased the duty 5u per cent. The I'uited .Stiites exported bushels of a year, and last year it imported the startling amount of bushels. [laughter.] Corn was to be protected. The I nited States last of Discipline Makes lumiburilliiH- tlon In a Soldler'n Orphans Si-lmol. CAIILIM.E, Pa., Mays. -Lack of discipline and poor management at Whitehall's Sol- diers' Orphans' school, thus led to a serious rebellion tlie part of the schol- ars last week The school was put in charge of Capt Fin J Thomas on January 1, and in February J W Kline WHS made principal. Discipline grevi lax aud the boys grew impudent. Several serious breaches of oider were committed Secre- tary Thomas .T Stewart and Capt. Ueorjte U. Boyer of this city went to the school a week ago yesterday and evervthing in bad shape. The) selected four ringlead- ers who, after some talk promised to be- have. The promise was kept, so far a.s the four ringleaders were concerned, but Thursday night a youth named Lippey and three other boys inaugurated a revolt during prayers. When a hymn was started they refused to sing. When -dannger Thomas prayed both boys and girls stamped their feet and behaved outrajieously The girls were onh-reil to their rooms, and while they were out the boys bombarded the teachers with heavy ink- Stands, cutting one on the ami in- flicting other injuries That same mj-ht four of the boys fell upon a male teacher and Lipney and'his three companions were locked up. (ioveruor Beaver and Capt. Boyer went to the school Saturday to in- vestigate. They found things worse than ever. The four prisoners were delimit mid encouraged tbe hoy- from their window to acts of iiisnburiliiiiiliiju Inspector sent fur and arrived Stinilu} mori sion of tlie brain aud hcwasseriously hurt aud wan removed to St. Luke's hos- pital at Hethleuem. The other injured were Mary Barbari, an Italian of Wilkes- Karre, face aud hands cut: H. Davis of Jemnngsville, Pa., hip bruised, affected by shoik Charles Heller of Pellston, wrist cut II. Pll9- of Spencer, X Y., finger broken; W. N. Reynolds, chief of the middle dnision of the petisiou bureau, Washington, arm and leg hurt slightly; John Schiery of Decatur, 111., knee and hip hurt Three others were cut and bruised The engineer aud jumped FheiiiHn John Crilly arm hurt from .New York and Buffalo Kxpress. fireman had an The Lehigh Valley train was wa.i kuown aa the to tile Motive of of Tom or Wheat Stored mi Potto Hie Sen of Krapli Frovoml. May 8.-The fight which the Radicals and tbe temperance party are making against the government's bill re- organizing the system of licensing publk houses, their opposition being directed particularly against the proposal to com- pensate publicans for the loss of Iheir licenses by reuon of tbe curtail- ment of the number to be issued, is be- coming mure formidable daily. The gov- ernment ts literally Hooded with protests against tbe measure and every member of of the house of commons, without regard to his politics, has received one or more petitions from his or other source, beseechtug him to vote the offensive clause. The basin of the op- position of the total abstainers lithe pro- vision committing the public authorities to the purchases of the licenses revoked, which plan, they claim, opens the way to collusion the retiring aud the authorities to the end of defraud- ing the treasury. This question, they maintain, is of sufficient importance to justify its submission to popular vote when they hope to elect a number of purely temperance candidates to parlia- ment ou tbe issues rained. Mr w- VVagsUff, British consul at the north shore of the Sea of Took Other People'. Mousy. NMV VOKK, May evening puier says William H. (Juion, the junior partner I there are nearly half a of the ocean .steamship firm of Williams i tons of wheat stored al the virioua Onion, has been discovered in the act of steahug Kill.'KKl worth of bonds over which he was o-l ru-.ti-e with William H. Booth president of the Third Xational bank. At least so ,-is.sert.- his co-iriistee Some years .......J' ii-HiiL-e company of Canadian Insi tl. to do liiisiiiess" in this state, deposited a cerlam iiumher of stx-ill'- itie.s in a s.ite deposit company of this and appoii.ieil liouih and Guion to Mrvr astiustees. Nu oiif the two pos ivejj, or knew the combination to the lock ,if the box Of latu Cuiou has been unsnccensful llnnncially and greatly crumped. A short time ago Booth discovered th.it thirty of the bonds, valued at each, were missing from tlicsafr deposit. Bonth telegraphed to the Can, riian Insurance company, who sent a agent here to make an investigatlot Guion explained that he had become MU denly and i-crnuislj emlwrrassed, mid Ilia it was absuhitely necessary for him t mone> at once. 'In the KlnBs letter Head. tlie young Kn of China, with the ringleaders He could do n who defied him. They and water diet anil on Tin-sdaj InsiiecYor Grier made another visit lie'found the boysiua better frame of mind and re- leased them. There is no complaint as to food, clothing orattendnnce. The trouble may lead to the breaking up of the school. NEWSPAPER MEN IN SESSION. sinalion Prepare for I I- OKU .11, il- K llurd ol Buffalo ManuUi-iui-'-r a net dealer in Fine A 3lioon i rude. This provision disposed of ypar "ported BO.ooO.lWO bushels of corn the DciniH-rutic argument that If the man- "Dl1 bushels, material ulactiirers had free raw they eekly Kftvora flrgr CiasB book OK 1-KINXINO ol e low.-si living rales by v .li-norliitiou nn'l at 8 Hii'i 10 E. second St. could compete in the markets of the Mr Springe-, of Illinois asked if this th red He, A Meeting at Cincinnati the Animal (iul. CIXCISNATI, May A numlwr of the leading newspaper men ol the lotintry were in this city yesterday. They const i- tnte the executive lomniittees of the American Newspaper Puhlisldng a in constant dread of assas 'ison. he fears, lurks i cup and ever> hand, he imagines, isarmet i with a dagger article of food i tn-ledbya courtier before he touches it A month ago a cup of white rose tea, pro vided for the emperor, wa.s tasted bya courtier, the sou of a Manrhu militar t officer; and a few hours afterward the bov died iii dreadful agony and uith all th symptoms ol poisoning. The emperor'i terror was increased a humlreil fold this incident, and he fell sick, probably from sheer fnKht. There are coustan bickeriutrs between the emperor and th downier empress. minority that the bill the revenues was mis- I After further ridiculing the attempt of the KepuUkans to cater to the farmer are- vote by adopting useless duties ou agriiul- I ttiral products, Mr, Mills coucliided his speech A rot-ess taken until s p I Jn the evening session Mr. O'Dcimiel of Micjiiuau lavnred the bill and Mr Stewart of Georgia opposed it Mr. Post of llli- Ihe in.stimt duties were increased favored it and Mr. Kills of Kentucky to a t.tir piotet live poiut. that instant the condemned it. Adjourned. S SON, Kirn I.lle, find Uuneral Iiiiiiinicoe IJeai- i in Ueal and Loans, enliun f> [lie clre of i rcrts pioperIT .imi tloor. i'arltcular I'HAKMACI, "410 Central Aven lor Wall Pa.ul .oils, Ac J. TV., Center street, Manufacturer and dealer ,n ll.lineia.Sad.Ht1! collars. Tmnke.W hivia, liuffaio lEolKii It rtCCovcm Gloves Mittens Sleigh Uobcl 1> SC11OLTES. 17 Eaftt Ttlml utrtict, Gentlemen will advantage to call on me before pin e'Hfwhere. cvur cu., sa Lion street. Painter's ea, MII Clothh, Grai-lc Ware. A S] iicrwiLWilliauiF Monroe I ULINO, :li :i4 blanfc-bookd, ledgers, am blanka done at Dunkirk Printing Company, H ami IU E. Sccomi l tv Cor. Third aud BuffTi'-i in Granite, Marble. I Monc. Call on me :i'lor0 vonr ig and buying I JSLEV CO., JtV 7 anil 9 East Front Whisky, Wmeo, Brandies. Goi.rral Liquor Store lor Family Us ROKiiRr ni'KiiY, Lion street, near toe dcitot. lin.-irliiiK, Sale, Feed and Liver; -uuhng bj me day or on ri'auouaMi 0AM J. Central Avc. (Uj O Blairs) lumirnnce anil Kea] Atent. Ku-f, Life, Accidenl, and Lire PrOQipt attentiun t lical Eaute. i to buymp C. I 75 E. Third our. KxccUior Meat Marki'I. Fresh. Salt im. ileats. La.-.l, sausages, OyslcrB Hu.ilirv. rATCUBS. JEWKLKY. the Aurora Kaiiroail Watch. Keiminup a specialty. trauk K. SUpf, S3 E. Third Merchant Ontral Avenu 1'KOKKSSJOJSAL, I 1. KOI.PU, M. I'liyiician anrt bnisteon Drug store Calls U- left at Lvon's. import..ttfus diminished and the revenues corn-sponiHnjjly dimit.Nhed. He said if tbe bill become a law the revenues of the ni'v.-ruiiieut noiild lie reduced UOO.IhMJ lo x'rf! OOO.tlOO. Mr MrKinlf) then explained the more imiiortjiut provisions of the bill. Mr. McKinley finished his speech at great applause and Mr. Mills took the Iloor in behalf of the minority. The earthenware schedule, he said, had not been changed because the present duties were, if anything, Tbe increase of duty 'on glassware was neces- sary, because of the sharp competition from foreign countries. The proposed in- crease in the duty ou agricultural products would insure the American farmer all of the American market He could not com- pete vv ith the low priced labor of other countries in the markets of the world, but the exUusiou of foreign would insure the distribution at home of the UOO.UW which waa paid for foreign pro- duct-, now. During the twelve years of Canadian re- ciproiuy the United States had bought much more than it had sold. The United States wanted reciprocity with equality, reciprocity that would give her her share in the bargain she made with the other countries of the world. But he said he would not discuss reciprocity. This was a domestic, not a foreign bill. [Applause.] Speaking of the duty ou 1-2 cents n pound on all wool costing under 12 cents, and 5 cents on that costing over la cents cents a said the com- mittee would offer an arnendinendinent IN THK SENATE. WASHINGTON, May 8.-In the senate yes- terday Mr Gibson presented resolutions ot the Mississippi river improvement con- vention, lately held in Vicksburg, aud of the Southern Press association, recently iu session in Charleston, S. C., id favor of the levee system and of the Eads system. House bill to authorize tht secretary of war to deliver to tbe state of Colorado the I flags carried by Colorado regiments during the war of the rebellion was reported and passed; also house bill to amend the act to divide the state of Missouri into two judi- cial t.s lull to extend for three years and to amend "an act to authorize the Fort Worth and DenverCily Railroad company the Indian territory" was taken from the calendar and pa-'Ned. House bill for the issuance of ordnance stores and supplies to the state of Maine, to replace similar stores destroyed by fire on the 7th of January last was reported and passed Mr. Gray moved to proceed to the con- sideration of the bill to transfer the rev- enue marine service to meut. Agreed Mr. Uockrell opposed the bill on the ground that no public interest required its passage; th.it it was only for the interest j of the officers of the revenue marine ser- I vice, who.se rank and salaries would be in- Cockrell was still speaking The Bride Paralyzed. BLTRIIIT, Mich., May Zimmer tion and the National Kilitnml associa- I man, aged is, who married two weeks lion Among those are registered tiled Tuesday H ChlciiKn Her.ild; R. H. Camp, Chronicle-Teh 41 Ou her wedding day shortly after the ceremony, she was taken 111, her lei t side became paralyzed, and she William LaHan, New York Sun; C.' lost the power of speech Physicians were K' H- Woods, called, whom the mo, her said the giri had hit herself ou the head with her list a M. Brennan, New York- 11 W. Maples, Norwalk, Conn; Holiert M! Deu- .1. B, Rawls, Athens. Ala.: K u ver; N Matthews, Crbana III McCabe, Boston; B. B. Serceaiit, Chluigo- Walter Williams, Columbus, Mo tj' Cappeller, Mansfield, O.; C. H Olilham West Virginia, W. H. Barton. Carbondak'- Q. A. Horstlcr, Warsaw, ind.; R M White, Mexico; C. A. Pan tucket- A B. White. Parkershurg, W. Va H Lowrie, Klgin. 111.; C. D Tiller, Fort Wayne, Ind.; Allen Foreman New York The meeting of the Editorial was presided over by Cuailes object of the gathering was to prepare a program for the miuual meeting of the association, which is to be held in Boston the last week in June, unless the date be altered. j The Publishers' association met at the Burnett house for the transaction of ex- executive business. After the meeting of week h.'fore her wedding day Th plunnlitiii was not plausible, and the pliy- othe ter tiimllv foiced tbe woman to ac- Ke that in some trouble with an- 'iiiiin over bridal clothing, the lat- laughttr. The daughter tlie mot her refuses to The coroner will iu her r vv Still, name tbe a.ssailaut. vebtigate. sh, p. the committees of both ass ociations n joint conference was held, the idea bein j to a similate the two organisations Tin- com- mittee of Cincinnati piiblinhers, ol which Sr. Lot is, May are causing a reign o! terror on the Iron Mountain nulioud Sunday night Conductor J. J. Nelson attempted to eject three tramps from in- train and vvas shot in the hand. James is under arrest charged with Imvim: done the shooting. Conductor Hohinii', n was out to lake charge of >u's train, lound a tramp on I up of mid when ordered the M low off, tli--1 amj, fhot him in the breast near the heart. B hmie will die. The tramp, Charles D. unison, has been captured. M. A. McRae is chairman, hu.-, airanged for a dinner at the Queen City cl tendered the visitors. l) to be Mr. hen, at 2 o'clock, the presiding office changing the classification from V> to 13 nounceit that, umlir last Fi-id-iv', L cents, and recommend a duty of 33 mem. the bill woulu be laid aside and thi cent, ad valorem ou the lower grade, ami in, aud 50 per ceut on the higher. Having in- creased the duty ou wool the committee had increased the duty ou manufactures wool acompeu- tion. Tlie important fe.-.ture of the metal schedule was the pro. -sed increase in the duty on tin plate. Kor 24 years tbe price of till plate had been fixed for American Consumers by the foreign producer, aud every dollar of the duty was paid by the consumer. The proposed to give Amu-Scans an opportunity to make enough tin for home consumption. Already the announcement of the intention to do so had crushed out the great foreign combine on tin plate, and it would stay crushed until the political complexion of tbe bouse cbould change and the duty be reduced. Discussing the free list, Mr, McKinley ill that the forty-eight articles made free .iy this bill paid into the treasury last year The eighteen articles taken 'rom the free list would increase the rev- enue Speaking of tbe duty on carpet wools, Mr. McKinley referred to the growth of he carpet industry in the United States, lie said that the price of carpets had gone down while the ad valorem equivalent had none up. But the Democrats saw only the senate would proceed to the consideration of the senate bill authorizing the issue of treasury notes on deposit of silver bullion. I The bill having been read in extenso, Mr. Stewart asked unanimous consent that it be postponed until Tuesday next. i Mr. Vest objected. He did not know, he said, what arrangements bad been made outside of the chamber, nor did he care His judgment was that the silver bill was the most important bill on the calendar; that it ought to be disposed of, and that it hud been unreasonably delayed. 1 Mr. Plumb aud Mr. Teller admitted the force of Mr. Vest's argument, but urged the advisability of waiting for the return of Mr. Jones of Nevada, who was in charge of the bill, and who had left the city with the idea 'hat the mutter would not be taken up Tbe presiding officer put the request of Mr. Stewart for unanimous consent, but Mr. Vest objected, and tlie bill, therefore, was taken tip. Mr. Sherman moved to amend by in-. sertiug a new section repealing all lawm that require money deposited in the treas- ury under section 5222 of the revised statutes, to be held as a special fund for the redemption of national bank notesand covering that money into the treasury; It Suiroi-uted by Gad. C'HK May farmer and his wife, Mr. anil Mrs Kdvvar.is of Lake comiu, Ills., were found in their room at the Ixr (-iiau.i hoiel siittocaied bj The man died shortly afterward and the wo- man caiuiuc iccover. In tue farmer's pocket wi.j, ,i wan ant committing his wife to the Northern Illinni' Insane tisjiam. it is silpp, he ou his way to ti.at in- TROV, K. May 8.-Negotiations have of the A BIG SHIRT COMPANY. In Formed by a Combination In Troy. of Five the wife had turned on the gto._________________ Too Much Mnther-in-Luw. NEW Conn.. May Yan Ltc, tuc Xcw Haven girl, who in 1887 led 1 an Miou Lee, shortly after from Yale, has filed a peti- tion for a divorce, alleging adultery. Yan Phou Lee is t he son of a Chinese noble- man. Mrs. was formerly Klizabeth Maud Jerome, daughter of Mrs. E. Gilbert Jerome, and an heiress. Yan Phou Lee denies the charge made against him, and says it is a case of "too much mother-in- law." Case of Matrimony, PARKHISHI W. Va., May The firms uuii mg in this a well-knownschool Jack- James K. I of her puliils. Tommy is "l6 years'old, while his bride confesses to thirty sum- Murray is the son of a well known preacher. Mrs. Murray says it is a true- love mutch. She will teach school and support her husband. been in progress here for a little more than a week which have terminated in the formation of a company, the articles of in- corporation of which were filed iu the sec- retary of date's office yesterday by one of Phou the attorneys who prepared them. The company is incorporated under the laws of 1848, and it consists of live shirt, collar and cuff concerns in Troy of sufficient itreugth to yive character to the enterprise and to insure its success. The name .selected is the "I'nited Shirt and Collar and the capital stock is Used at The corpora- tion is to exist for litty years, and the di- rectors named for the first Sa-mit4 B. Sanford, James K. P. Pine, l-'rt-derk-k Beirmister, Jr., David C. ward O. House. corporation are James K. P Pine. Kcir- meistel Spicer, Sauford Robinson, Marshall Briggs, and S. A. House's Sons. The United Shirt and Collar company will be the largest concern of the kind in the United States if not in the world, eni- plos'ing the greatest number of hands aud manufacturing goods in excess of any- other company thousands of dollars son county, eloped with and was married :t I'ouieroy, O., to Tommy Murray, England. At the present prices, the owners assert, tbe shipment of grata to British ports would involve heavy IOM despite the fact that vessels are easily ob-' taiuable at rates very little actual cost of carrying, owing to the stug- uation of the shipping trade. Gradually the effects of the great labor agitation now prevalent are becoming manifest in volun- tary or enforced con, essious to their em- ployes on the part of tkr Al- ready the master tailors are weakeniua and a number of striking jour- neymen are returningtoworkon for will, h they struck, the result beil.K that the strike, which promised to become gen- eral, is about over. The flrm of H W Caslon Co., proprietors of one of the largest type founderies in Knglaud Has granted an eight hour day to its employe. at the same pay they formerly received for ten hours lalsir. The German government hug decided to request the other powers to participate in an international telegraph congress to be bed H, to discuss the feasibility of reducing the tekwaphic tolls throuKhont Central Kurope the uniform rate of 10 pfennigs cents) a word. It is reported iu Berlin that the United government contemplates the es- tablishment of a consulate at Why Ut> Nuiipeiulpil. BKRl.ix, May 8.-The Tagblatt says that the recall of HeiT von Kusserow, Prussian minister at Hamburg, is due to his having been the medium of communication be- tween Prince Bismarck and the Ham- burger Nachrichteu. The Hamburger correspondent says that, Imperial couriers have been engaged for the past few days in carrying letters between the emperor and Prince Bismarck. Flnnlaiiden Hive ST PhTKnuBUBB, May 8.-Four Finnish delegates have arrived here for the pur- pose of stating Ihe grievances of their country lo the The Czar positively refused to see them, but the empress ri ceived then, graciously mid promised that their should receive considera- tion MaJ. ZANZIBAR, -May Wlssman U organizing a Wrce for the defense of Kilwa, which place it is expected the i-ebels will attempt to occupy A report Is cur- rent here tlmt a bnltle ia in progress at A Dinner tu Minister Ptielpn. BERLIN, May Hhelpn gave a dinner last night in honor of Minister to Russia Charles Kmory Smith. Tu Tour 1'iillrtl Slutei. BKRLIN, May K.-The Association of Ger- man Ironmasters will send 100 delegates to make a tour of the I'uited Hamburg Strike. BERLIN, May masons and car- penters of Hamburg have struck. Ktteimlve Bakery Sold. BOSTON, May R-The F. A. Kennedy ompuiiy, extensive cracker bakers of Cambridge and Chicago, have sold out heir busine-s. It is presumed the sale las been made to a syndicate and ither bakeries, but nothing aside from the act that the flrm has sold out would ommunicated by a member of the com- Jany, who was interviewed. It is said flrm received for the business. More Striken nl Chicago. CHICAGO, May 8.-The entire force of en, ASS in number, employed at the An- rews Architectural Iron works, at Twenty- second and Fisk streets, have struck for a 0 per cent, increase of wages. About 500 annors employed by W. N. Eisendrath, Landraue Sons, and Meshers Bros, ruck for nine hours and ten hours' pay. Imployes in other tanneries are dlssatis- ed and more trouble is expected. Bed Klver Rlnlnj Rapidly. NEW OBI.KANS, May Times-Dem- crat's special says: Red river has over- owed everything and is backing up into he lakes. The river here is rising from kack-water at the rate of an inch an hour. Many cattle and other animals have been rowned. The largest bridge in the county as swept away yesterday. Special Hosiery Sale This Week, V, Children's Hosiery, far below the usual price. Blsck Hoee, 7c. BHlkriggan Ho.e. 8c. Striped Hose, 8 and Lailiea1 Heavy Mixed How Ladies' Plain Black Hose Seamless. 15c. Strong Ribbed Bo i double heels and toes, 25c. Ladies' Absolutely Fait Black Plain Hoae 24 and very desirable. Ladies' Plain Balbrlggan HOM, 14c.' Superfine Hose. 28c. Ladies' Fancy ScripedHoM. latest fashion regular extra loug, Ladies' Striped Fancy HOM 22e Ladles' Fancy Striped Cotton Hase, 27c. Fine Striped Collon Llose, 17c. Ladies' Sublime Quality Faucy Cotton Hoae. 48c. Menu' Plaiu Light Weight Lisle 26c. Hens' Fine British Hote, double heels and toes, lOc. Mens' Extra Good Quality British Hoae, Ific. Menu' Funcy Striped Hose, Tic. Mena" Solid Color Hose. We.. Mens' Super Stout British Hose. 2.'c. MODS' Ueary Mixed Seamless liuse, 7c., 8c., 9c., 10c., lie. Solid Black Fine Ribbed Cot- ton Hose, all sizes superior quality. 12JC. a pair. Mlsies Black Hoee Maco feet, 13c. to 18c. excellent wear. Boyi Henry Black Hote, DC. Hoys Super Htoul Double Heel and toe all sizes, life. Boys Double Knee Abnolutely Fast Hlack Hose extra strong only 24c. BtainleM. Orcy Mixed Uuse, double beel and toea only 12Jc. Special big line Ladies' Faury Hose, only 15c Choice of 25 Styles Cblldrene Fancy Color Hose, worth from IK to 40c. only lOc. to cloee out eutire lot. SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMEN1 OTODDAIiT A CO., Patent Attornevt, 61f. Till U C., opi. U. 8. Patent Of- fice. FnteDU, Caveatenml Re-IsiueB necnred. Trade Murks All uiiBlncss for moderate Fees. Information, Advice and special rcferencet eent on A MONTH can be made wortinB lor prc. ferred who can furnish a horac and give their whole lme tu the biuinesa. Spare mumeiilsmay be profit- ably employed A (cw vacancies in townt .ind cities. K.K.JOHNSON 1009 Main SL, Richmond, Va. limiting l.eoiinniNll-oet lienr Kourlli 1C. Kouitll i-tl-WM. K on Ireel. Inijuire UKMOVAI-. 
                            

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 130 million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 130 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 11 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication