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Dunkirk Evening Observer: Thursday, March 6, 1890 - Page 1

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   Dunkirk Evening Observer (Newspaper) - March 6, 1890, Dunkirk, New York                               VOL. XX. DUNKIRK, N. Y., THURSDAY, MARCH 6. 1890. NO. 27. HEP RE SENT A Tl VE USINESS HOUSES OF DUNKIRK. ANEW KVI.IXU MACHINK Inr riilmi; ill Liu-it irf hliinUU the latent nudltiof tnt- Meclmnfitul ol Dunkirk IVmtuig i ornpuny. 4 LKXANOKB-scoi.l and Wood Yard, 791) Ontrnl opposite Nickel i'litu J All KriiileH ol lliinl lind soft Cdiil Luiiibcr. unil l.ath. Free leliv foi wholesale lott I) T. KOI.l'II, M. I I'hytficiAn and Surgeon Ollicc over Lynn's Drug Store. Residence, Central Avenue. Telephone No. {I. Calls may be left at Lyon's, A MiX. M. MANN, rrnrtic.il .'lumber. Gae ami steam Fitter. Speuml attention a.vth In I'iiitnhiiig Kutiiimtcn gi on Ptuml.iny, Oua Filling, Slciuo Healing Hot Air Furnacea. 27 K. Third street. H IC. OirrOKU, gsn and Central Avc Artistic I'holoKruplitii'. Inrttuntuiicoue togritpha liatjiOH a specialty. not wail lur aunhlune except for JjOOK IRVINU, (int-uir, Nu. IK K. Second -tlrect, nimr But- lah.rtreet. iMmkirk, S. Y. Mu- I'nmimlfth, hiMimt in (ill -jU it-w. ur-lern promptly attended to. All work giiurnnteed. HUKCHKK'S CIEOCItKKV IIOl'SK, 'Xm.cutrul lie. Wttoleaalo au-1 retail dealer in Ij-ported and domestic Chum, UUA.S. II. JKI Oiitnil Ave. Uun- er.il IiiMirmiui. l.ilo, AcunU-iit anil flra. Iraruling innure vour lie in tliu old reliable Iteu! Agent. on properly. UlIAUXAUQUA HOTEL.. Uuies, it per day. l.nery anil aoanlmg stalile in (.onnuctlon. Victor llldcr. 33T> and nircet. i lITV HAKUEK SHOI' Vv t hus. Nnxle, I'rup., Ln.tur snore 1'iuti anil I'luiil diieet-. A line stock ol C U-NKUN JB.SON, t enter street, 1'rartical uiTbC-rthiicic.. Particular alu.Mition "f to luterjcrit'g lioiueo. of rotul tr .It! H dpcM-.ially. JL> UMi IKK CVKNIMi vllt-.KKV liK. 1-ai'Kerft in 11 u County. An uiiuitualluil mciliuin. D UMtJUK rnru-eri} COMPANY. SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT OTOUIt ART ft CO., Patent Attorneys, 815 7th T St., Washington, C opp. U. S. Patent Of- Se 'atcnte.uiveiitsannj Ro Issues secured. Crude Marks registered. All Patent business cpnduciod for moderate Tees. Information Advice, and special references scnton request. VA.S'CE, allowed each month. Steady finplovmoutatliomeor traveling. No 8nli.it- Diitiesdelivenngand making collections. Address wilh stamp. IIAFKU A CO., I iqua, Ohio. Iw isli to i mploy a few ladies on aalarv to take charge of my business at their homes. I.lent, very iimcinallng and heallhlul. siu.perweek. given, Uood nay for Wfltimc. Address with st .nip. MRS. MAH- FROM WASHINGTON. MR. DOLPH'S COMMITTEE CON- TINUES ITS DEBATE. ION WALKER, Louisville, Ky. fcrrcd who canlurniih a horse and give their whole ume to the business. Spare moments may be profit- ably tmploycd also. A tew vacancies in towns and utHM II. F. JOHNSON CO., icoy Main Si.. Richmond, Va. Th on SPRING 1890 eu. I iillci-iid, jd.ii.iuiu U'oik to untur. F, D, MATTESON O L Mil ILK bUlltf CO., -.iUi, 'Afcj anil cut. lur nil til, Muniifuciurvn) ol the i c 1 1 uuu "Dunkirk" puileci iHting MuriH. on auk- in :il) airmailing, ufe uii'l drj guoilu huuaes in IJimkirk. U F. TOOMfiV, ami Liuu -aiui in Flour, i- cud, all. I l I. It IK 1IOTKL aiul OUiuifr Sttloun, Union FJ tuny acct-ns lo all truine anil bt iiccouimyilationa lor J. Murptiy, I'rop. EUJLtlW Jl CO.. und M K Tlnri! stn-ct. t iue Kuriuluru. cabinet Ware aail Cp- uitiatcrliig. 1'iolurc t mailc to or-lur. I.' U. MATTEOOH CO., ail Central Ave., Faalnun and lii-ulieuicn Uiitutuirs. I J AKKLI. STKA.U UEATl.Nti CO., ii Minal.iciurcrs ol ntcani tleiitiug i.AUMJIU. tJi't-iiialtits: Fnif shirts, rollnra, Jv; Cutia, 4i Lttt-c Liu-Uiua. DdUv- sry. A i -0" tun lor i i t. Hurt. uf ltuff.tlo W.vr.a ..'ttut-i ilealor lu fine UouLd ft ohoca. I. NKW -STOiiK. Mi K. 1 i'liirtt ,-V. Utnikb. fUUunur) MiiMcui In- .ni'M. L-ukij aua evfisilui'g iifruuuiiig tja Ural emaabonk JOil of every dL'sviiptiuiinnd at li.ni-c rfiU'j Printing Comptiny, 8 aittl lu 1C second jl. JU. HIIUKN A SON, Kin- f.iie, Aciitlval in lien I ami t'ltriicular aiicn'.inti {'aid U' Uio c no ol collect- Uifc leitlb Ac. iitl) r.i..-Jiui iluur. Quarters ior Wall i.ie. Oils, Ac. J. W., J. Cv utur at reel, M.tnulfii.iurci and ik'itlt'i HI H.ti ;k-d, i Trin.kd.nh Ili'tTailo hu llubrs. -C-L'ft. v Bj'i i ftanitarj Plnmhingi mi'i I- tune. Wurkiiuinship guar- 1> a Kaal Third at reel, t ufaiLtmutjlc Tniii-r, Gcnllemen it to jr rull on me tHiforu U. OAKY Jb CO.. :i4i I. street. nrtlwart.i. i.t-'jMl.oils.Piiinior'i-i L Iul lib, l.nn. tc iiru. A Pit Uiinl Moiirot; range. 1 1 t'UNG, siir.li us blank-book IcilKt J.V kimU 01 blanks cliniu .it Dunkirk Printing Company, 8 uiul 1U K. secund >t a, and Rl'DOLI'H UOLDKNHArEK, Lor. Third ami BuHalo Sta., in Gr.tnttts Marbiu, h tugging and Mtuic. Cull on Hit1 tioforu buyini; your 7 9 Prcnit direct. Whisky, Wines, G-Ltral Liquor Store for Family ifst. ROBERT Lion ncitr Che depot. Ikmnli ny, bale, KfOii ami Li %-ory Stable. Stalling by the 'lay or week on reasonable tor "'m Center street. in Musical and Sowing Machines. We mnke a bpetjalty of lirst claw omkesof Pianos ntul FarmiKl Votey Organs. OO. WAIT FOR mm Spring Hat, Saturday, March 1st Call and See Them Or the Uqior Habit. Positively Curad ADMlNISTEIINa Bl. HAWIS' HUE! WCIF tfc II cm to given In a cup of or In ah lutthekiiowledgeoftlieper- son taking It; it Is absolutely harmless and will withou SAM J. 301 Central Ave. Ucnera! Insurance and ICual Estate Arent. Fire, Acrttlfiu, unO Live Stock Insurance. Prompt .utrntion pivsn tobuyiux andsellinirlicjil KHUU! TC. JONES. 75 E. Third 8t. cor. Deer. Meat Mitrkel. Fresh, Salt Smoked Meats, Lard, Sausapes, Oysters Poultry. w W" ATCHES, JEWELKV. AC. Buy the Aurora liailroad Wntoh. a specialty. Frank F. Stnpl. 83 E. Third sL MOCKEK, Merchant Tailor, lit Central Arenne effect a permanent ant! speedy cure, whethei the patient is a moderate drinker or an alcoholic wreck. IT NEVER FAILS, We GUARANTEE a complete cm e in every Instance. 4s page boot E, Addrrasin conlldcnce. EN SPECIFIC CO.. 185 SI. C. C. PENFOLD, MANUFACTURER IMPORTER, 304 MAIN ST., BUFFALO, N. T.I DEALER IN Clocks, Silverware. Leather Oooilt, Eto. ESORA yrtro, OOLD 4 SIL YBR PL A Tina A COMPLETK LINK OF HOLIDAY GOODS Ho Two Nenatiiri Agrre an to What Should be Hone With the Correnpon- Spenkt la Favor of thn nialr Fratherntone- Cate Decided. March senate in wrret ncsxinn yesterday disf-ussed the resolution of Dolpli for the incarceration for contempt of tllfe senate of thu newspaper men who have relused to disclose the source of their executive session news. The debate turned entirely upon the constitutional ques- tion at issue, some of the senators holding that the M'liate had no right to imprison the men for refusing to disclose pro- fessional see-rets. quoted liberally from the debate on the imprison- ment of White and in 1873 for re- fusing to disclose the source where the ob- tained a I'ojiy of a treaty with Oi-eat Britain, then under i-onsiderai ion. White and Rams- dell were imprisoned for some time and were released rnthor in deference to public opinion tliiin out of i-cspect for their constitutional rights. Senator fivarts made a dry speech, and Senator Edmunds and Senator George also spoke at some length on tho consfcitu- tional of the It seemed evi- dent before the senate doors had closed for half un hour that the debate could not be concluded licfore to-day, and one after another Ihe --eiiators skipped away. When tho senate adjourned not more than a dozen were in UicirH-ats. Of those who spoke Bcnator said lost evening that "no two agreed." An effort will be made to bring tho discussion to a close to-day, hut several constitutional lawyers of eminence are anxious to be heard, and tho whole umtte.- may go over to noxt week. MAIN STItEET, Hotel, HOUSE AND SENATE Mr. Harbour on the Illulr FrntlierKtone Seated. WASHINGTON, March the senate yes- terday Mr. Stockbridge presented petitions laid to have sipnatures of adult citi- of the United States, against the passage of the Sunday rent bill. The calendar w as then taken up, and on a vote on the increasing the pen- alou of the widow of Jlaj. CJen. was developed that no quorum was present A call of the senate was ordered, which consumed tho time up to 2 o'clock, when the calendar was laid aside and the consideration of the educational bill was resumed. Mr. Barbour advocated the bill. He spoke of the great interest which of Vir- ginia took in the measure, anil said that it had been favored in the platforms of both political parties in that state. H was of the deepest and profomidi'.t interest to the peo- ple of so much for the sake of education in the last fifteen years as the people of any other state. They had expended about for that purpose and had given to educate the col- ored illiterates which the general govern- ment had put upon thrm, not only as citi- rens, but as creigns. He expressed hi- surprise at tho lack of in- terest in tbe subject taken by the senate, and was astonished at tho opposition of the Southern senators to- the bill. He Imd no constitutional doubts on the sub- ject of this bill, as he did not belong to the hair-splitting class of constitutional lawyers. Mr. Plumb spoke in opposition to the bill, saying that it was clear to him that the peo- ple of the South did not want this money, and it that if money was liestowed where it was not wanted, it would not be wisely expended. Within two years, if this bill went over, every Southern state would say they did not want it. Tin- bill, if passed, would bo the beginning of the control of the educational system of the country by the general government, and ultimately the de- moralization of the great body of the people on the subjr'H of tho common schools. At the conclusion of Mr. Plumb's speech, the senate went into secret session and at p. m. adjourned. IN THK HOUSE. TV'ASHIXOTON, Jlarch 6. Immediately after the reading of the journal the contested election case of Fenthei-stone vs. Cate was taken up, and the oontetw, Mr. Cate, took the floor in his own behalf. He said it was the duty of the monitors not to elect a repre- sentative from the Pir-t district of Arkan- sas, but laying aside nil prejudice or pnrty feeling, determino whom tho people of that diiLrict had chosen to represent them. Mr. Ilouk of Tennessee made a strong pre- ttntation of tho claims of tho contestant. He charged that tho "Arkansas bull-dozing com- ffiunity'' had entered into a conspiracy to prevent the return of Mr. Featherstone to congress. He appealed for a fair chance for the colored people of the South, and said: "Let no man hold a sent upon this floor who was returned by the means of Winchester rine chins and fraudulent bnllnt boxes." He was in favor of a national election law, and he thought the goveinmcnt strong enough tn protect tlu  neased was formerly a school teacher. REPUBLICAN LEAGUE. Lalt at tl.na Adopted. NASHVILLE, Tenn., March the Republic un league convention re-assembled yesterday afternoon it was 3 o'clock. The order of business was the reports of com- mittees, and the first committee to submit its report was the committee on resolutions. The platform as presented was adopted after a heated discussion over an amendment that was finally tabled. It congratulates Presi- dent Harrison upon his eminently wise, loyal and administration, nnd rejoices in the restoration of dignity, 'vigor and statoknianship to the conduct of foreign affairs. On the subject of tariff it says: "We demand the maintenance of the Ar.H-ricnn system of protection to American industry nnd labor, the policy that has been identified with every period of our national prosperity But we pledge onr support to a thorough and equitable revision of the tariff, so as to adapt the protection it affords to changed business and we arraign the Democratic party for the manner in which for years it ban prevented thaacoom- plishinent of this purpose. PROTECTION TO VOTEB8. The platform demands full protection for Republican votes in the South; protests against seating in congress any one unless his- election is untainted, and indorses the present action of congress in carrying out this policy; favors the general provisions of the Intel-state commerce act; condemns com- bines and trusts; approves of liberal and equitable pension laws and the liberal policy of the administration in giving Union veter- ans preference in appointments. LABOK LEGISLATION. The platform continues: "We recognize the dignity of labor and the necessity of proper legislation to protect its interests. We shall unswervingly oppose any attempt to lessen the fruits of toil, or to place honest workmen in competition with paupers and domestic or foreign. The rigid enforcement by this administration of the alien labor con- tract law commands our approbation. The request of wage workers for reasonable hours of labor demands and should receive legisla- tive consideration. "We approve the action ol the various Re- publican legislatures in adopting a system of ballot reform, whereby fraud at the polls is prevented nnd every elector is enabled to vote indeiiendently and intelligently. FAVOR1NO EDUCATION. "We believe education of the masses to be the best preventive of bad government, and we therefore favor federal assistance, where needed, in the work of eliminating illiteracy among our population. The Re- publican party bos always been distinguished for its courage, and always has been prompt in recognizing any display of this quality by its lenders. In line of this policy this con- vention expresses its approbation of Speaker Reed's- action in standing boldly for the prin- ciple of majority rule against the Democratic power in ami o.it of congress." The amendment that crested the only breeze during the two days-'session was of- ferod by Isaac Revet of Washington and is tu follows: "Ar.d we demand that our repi-e- bentativesin congress redeem every pledge made to the people at Chicago in by re- pealing the internal revenue lawn, by revis- ing tlie tariff, by passing the Blair educa- tional bill anil completely restoring silver to the currency of tho country, aud by the lib- eral pensioning of every federal soldier." Cincinnati was chosen as the location of the next convention. Hon. Johu M. Thurs- ton of Nebraska was elected president, A. M. Humphreys of New York, secretary, and Hon. Phineos Lounsbury of Connecticut, treasurer. After passing resolutions thanking the press and citizens of Nashville for their treat- ment, the convention adjourned sine die at 7 o'clock lost night. The I'hll Welch Fund. NEW YORK, March fund raised by the and trfl-ujrers of the late humor- ist, Philip 11. Welch, for the benefit of his and children, has reached the sum of nearly Voluntary subscriptions were received from men and women in all walUs of life and in all parts of the world. The story of Welch's lingering death from cancer, and the knowledge that while suffer- ing great agony he continued to amuse public with his merry quips touched all hearts, and the letters received by the fnnd jommittoe contain many feeling references to this ending of n brilliant though brief .-nreer. The fund will be deposited with a trust company, to be paid over to the family in annual sums, the last payment to be made in 1990. .Mr. Mlnnlck PITTSBURO. March Minnick, a citizen of Bradilock recently confined in Dix- mont asylum for insane, under very peculiar circumstances, was brought before Judge White, m common pleas court yesterday under habeas corpus proceedings for exam- ination as to his insanity by the court. A large number of witnesses, together with tbe accused, testified. The effort to establish Mr. Minmrk's insanity was a failure and he was discharged from custody. The case was first brought to public attention by Roliert J. Cunningham, a representative of The Leader. Owing lo Urn prominence of ttie interested parties the case has excited widespread in- terest. Rxllnt Fi-MUdfl In New Jerftey. TRENTON, N. J., March senate com- mittee, has finished the re-count of the Hud- son countv ballot cast in the senatorial elec- tion on the contest of W. H. Stuhr against the present senator, Edward F. McDonald. The official returns show that Mr. McDonald received votes and Stuhr The re-count gave McDonald which in- cludes "jokers" or fraudulent voters, and Htuhr 1G.8SW. If the committee throw out tho precincts where fraud was detected it will still give McDonald a majority of 1 Cane. LOUISVILLE, March Phelps of the American association telegraphed President Young of the National league, ask- ing him to fix a date for the meeting of the board of arbitration before March 15, to set- tle the Lehane case. Mr. Fhelps said he did not think that Lehane haji signed with New York. If he has signed Mr. Day's contract and the Columbus club should demand it, will certainly be black-listed. Mr. Phelps thinks, however, that the matter will be settled by Lehane going to Columbus. ThrcatenM to Kesieti. COLUMBUS, O., March to the refusal of certain members to act with him in securing a modification of the Owen Sun- day closing law Senator Brown states that he will present his resignation to the gover- nor. If carried out this will greatly em- barrass the Democratic majority in party legislation and the passage of tbe congress- ional redistricting bill. The Chancellor Mot DlMouraced. COLOGNE, March Gazette says that at the coming meeting of the reichstag the government will demand fresh military credits, and will again introduce the anti- Socialist bill which was rejected by the last rekbstag. A RATTLING FIGHT. THE ALBANY CAPITOL BESMEARED WITH RUDDY GORE. Awcmbl.rman Rice Takes the Peace ranker's Part and (he Peaeomakcr's Black Ejes and Hlo.xlr Nosei for to the Rill Pro- posed by the Assembly Committee. ALBANY, March with black and bruised faces, and outsiders with bleeding nows formed a disagreeable scene in the committee room corridors of the capitol yesterrlay afternoon about 5 o'clock. The cause of the free fight which was insti- tuted is briefly told. Arthur Carsey of New York appearel, with his son and five or six railroad men, before the senate labor com inittee to oppose the weekly pay bill. There were also present a reporter of a New York paper named Dunham, Assemblyman Rice a Mr. Buckbee ol East Albany. A con- troversy arose in the committee rooms over the publication of certain articles in the paper represented by Dunham, and after some Imul talk between hi in imd the elder Car- Bey they were all ejected from the committee rooms. Hardly had they reached the corridor be- fore Arthur Carsey inade a remark to Dun- ham. "You're a retorted Dunham. Quick as a flush Carsey sent out a right- hander for Dunham'x face. Dunham dodged and Assemblyman Ruw stepped between the men. Carrey's son, thinking Rice was about to hit his father, jumped forward and sent his fibt with full force in Rice's left eye, pmV ting it in mourning most effectually. Quicker than can be told Homebody else hit young Carsey, drawing blood and blacking both optics, and then a general melee ensued, the men tumbling over one another and ham- mering and choking each other. A squad of orderlies stopped tbe fight. Assemblyman Rice and Mr. Dunham both wear black eyes. The elder Carsey's face was and swollen and his son's eyes were black and his nose bleeding. Mr. Buckbee had very little collar or necktie left, a man named Douglas was catching red fluid in a handkerchief and several other participants were trying to restore damaged hats to origi- nal shape. It was only upon threats of ar- rest that a continuation of the flght was pre- vented. Mr. Dunham said, after the affietf, tbat be had simply told Mr. Carsey thtt he was not speaking the truth. Mr. Carsey said that he did not allow anybody to call him a liar and his son said that ha only went into the fight to protect his father. Assemblyman Rice said that he was simply trying to stop a fight and was not intending to be actually engaged in it. He was pushing the men apart when he was struck. RADICAL CHANGES In Ssxton Bill Proposed b; the AiMfmbly Ameudmiint. ALBANY, .March The assembly judiciary commitew's amendments to the Kaxton ballot reform bill prove to be rather radical. Tbe principal amendments are: Allow ing the certificate of nomination for senator in the Fifth district to Bled with the county dorks of New York and Rich- mond counties; providing tbat when the nomination is for an office to be filled by the votes of the city and county of New York, the county of Kings and the city of Brooklyn; the number of signatures required for the certificate of nomination shall not be less than 300. Posting of the candidates' names is made unnecessary in cities where publication as required by section 10 of the bill is made in two or more daily papers of the city. The nomination of a man is void if he de- clines twelve (instead of ten) days before election. Objections tn certificates of nomination must be filed within three (instead of five) days. Simple ballots in the form of those used on election day and containing the names of all candidates duly certified shall be printed iind in possession of the county rlerk or other officers or boards having the duty of preparing ballots, seven days before election, subject to public inspection. The official Inilloth shall bo printed and in posses- sion of county clerks or other ofllcers at least four days before election, for inspection by candidates. The New York municipal ballot contains names for all public offices to be filled ex- clusively by votes of said city and county or of any district, within it, except candidates for congress and the state senate and assembly. The two ballot clerks shall be chosen from the parties polling at the last election the largest number of on stuta issues. The inspectors of election shall remove the stub from each ballot in plain view of the voter, and without unfolding or discovering the contents of the ballot before depositing it in the ballot box. Nominations for town or village offices shall be filed with town or village clerks five (instead of three) days before election. The net shnll take effect July 1, (in- stead of The senate bill provides that um.ilii iul ballots may be used only when a candidate die'i. The assembly committee amends by allowing unofficial balots to be used also when a man declines o.- becomes in- eligible. Clifton Kacen. NEW YORK, March The races at Clitton yesterday resulted as follows: First race, 1 mile: John Arkins first, Eatontown second. Pegasus third time :51K. Second race, selling, mile: Dead heat between Defendant and Ripley; Harrison third; time, Ripley won the run off in Third race, selling, 1 miles: Gonoud first, Little Jim second, Fannie H. third- time, 1 :58. Fourth race, X mile- Eclipse first; Best Boy second, colt third time, .WJf Fifth race, purse, m le: Khaftan first, Sam Harper, Jr., second. Iceberg third' time, Sixth race, mile: The Sinner first, George Angus second, Lizzie M. third: time To Shnt Down Cnrpet Looms. BOSTON, March The American Wool Reporter says: "The intensity of the depres- sion which prevails in the ingrain carpet making industry has resulted in a concerted effort by manufacturers to devise means of relief. A committee appointed some weeks since by the Manufacturers' association haa received sufficient support to warrant them in advising a stoppage of 14 per cent, of the looms now in operation for nine months. There is every rea-son to balieve the recom- mendations will be put in execution. The first of April is mentioned as the date for shutting down, the time expiring Dec. 81 next Killed by Hurfflars. DETROIT, March Policeman Shoemaker who was shot Tuesday night while in pursuit of burglars, is deud. Tli.rtern suspects are in custody, but yet the police are not in possession of po-.ithe eviueuce against any of thorn. A reward of has been offered tea the conviction of the murderers. FROM THE PRESIDENT. Mr. HarrUon an Lot- tcr to Nafthvllle Convnntlou. NASHVILLE, Tenn., March the na- tional convention of the Republican yesterday telegrams and letters were read from President Harrison, Republican con- gressmen, T. C. Platt of New York aud others. President Harrison's letter was follows: WASHINGTON, Feb II, Ron. John M. Thureton, President of ibu Repub- lic-all Leafriie of the Uultmi States: IIDaAR gives me pleasure to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of tbe JTth, extending, an uahalf of the executive committee or the Re- publican League of United Slates, on Invita- tion to attend the third annual convention of the league, to be held Nashvllh-, Tenn. While I cannotaccept the Invitation, neither can I refrain from expressing my Interest In the success of your propused meeting, and In iinrt useful activity of clubs which will repmipnbKl. Such organizations wholesome and desirable, not osly from a party, but from a public standpoint Thoy Interest young men In public affairs, and compact aiirt organize th. Interest thus excited into controlling political forces. The party to which you lielouz ha> never suffered by an Intelligent discussion of Its history or its principles, and I am sure your organization will continue to furnish courageous and well- appointed ,'hiinplon. wherever Ibe HHU of de- bate optunij, BENJAMIN H TIMBER LAND SEIZED. Th. Claim. Title to Pn- Railroad MONTGOMERY, Ala., March United States marshals, directed by United States Marshal Walker, are confiscating all the timber from the lands originally granted the Mobile and Girard railroad, the title to which the government now claims. Near Andalusia the saw mills of Miller, Parker ft Hodges, John I. Dixon, LinJsoy, Kimmons Bro., H. B, Garrett, B, Mulligan Co., fV. B. Steele and Jones Bros, have been seized by the marshals. Mills near Brewton lire in the same predicament. All rafts flouting down the Escarobia river, the timber composing which was cut from the lands in question, have been seized. Hundreds of mill employes are out of work. The action of the government in stopping the lumber trade over half a million aci-es of the best pine lands in the South, works a serious hardship on Ihe luniliurmen, and Judge Par- dee will Nj aaked to so modify his order as to allow the mills to run until a flnal decision is rendered. Motions for the appointment of a receiver for the lands in question will be heard by March 10. present. Judge Pal-dee in New Orleans Attorney Ueneral Miller will be MR. SCOTT'S BIQ DEAL. The oncreoman a Large Property at Krle. NEW YORK, March An Erie, Pa., special ys: Ex-Congressman Scott has purchased thirty lots in this city fronting on Lake Erie. The price exceeded In addition Mr. Scott has options on a large number o( the other water lots in Erie, which, in the aggregate, places him m absolute control of the largest and most valuable dockage prop- erty on the great lakes in the hands of individual. He proposes to forthwith ex- pend over on the new purchase in the construction of extensive docks. On all shipments he finds himself on an equal footing with other dealers, but inter- state law doesn't apply to shipment within the Mr. Scott's relations with the Pennsylvania railroad and Pennsylvania Coal company will enable him to bring here from his mines near Pittsburg at rock bot- tom rates. It will then be forwarded by water. To Pitteburg this is the most im- jiortant business transaction in years. Young Abraham Lincoln Dead. LOKDON, March 6.-Young Abraham Lin- coln died at o'clock yesterday morning. Young'Llncoln passed away quietly. He was in a coma- tose state during the morning and bis stomach rejected all nourishment. The attending physi- cians, after a care- ful examination, ex- expressiHl the opin- ion that their pa- tient's end was only a matter of a few ABRAHAM LINCOLN, For a time previous to his death be was entirely free from pain. All the members of tbe family were present at the bedside. UpnnnUlon to Mr. Hill. OTTAWA, Maivh John Charlton's bill for the Ixstter observance of the Lord's day is meeting with much opposition, in parlia- ment It ia not likely tbat it will pass the house. The French members say it has a Puritanical odor. The bill prohibits manual labor on Sunday, buying and selling, horse racing, cock or dog fihting, public games in- TORIES PANIC-STRICKEN AT THE VICTORY OF THE LIBERALS IN ST. PANCRAS. A F.rrn.nn.r of the DlMointiM of Par- Maklna; Bniy Effort to Slave Off the Blohard to b. Rewarded for Hla Work for Tb. Tlmee. LONDON, March remit of tbe elec- tion in the North division of Saint Pancru has stricken the Conservatives with dismay for in tne luccess of Gladntonians upoj the Issue of the acceptance of the ParneU commission's report as a vindication of the Parnellites the see the handwriting on tbe wall warning them of inevitable over- throw at the next general elections, go wall seated is this (ear tbat tbe government will now concentrate all it. aoerglM in an affort to stave off anything calculated to a dissolution, in the hope (bat chum may bring up something that will powibly iwenre popular opinion from the track upon which ic is now running. Should the government majority, on Mr. Smith's motion, (all below that shown by the vote on Mr. amendment, however, it ii difficult to see how an appeal to country can long averted. Before the present endi It U expected that Mr. ParneU, Mr. Morley, 8lr William Harcourt, Attorney General Web- ster and other leaden will apeak. SIB RICHARD'S REWARD. The statement is made on excellent author- ity that Lord Esher will resign the portion of master of about Easter and that the place will given to Sir Richard Web- star. The bestowal upon Sir Richard of thia life position, carrying with it a salary of per annum and an n-offlcio Mat on the bench of the court of will of course be regarded in the light of a reward of the questionable service he rendered to the government in the ParneU prowcution, but it mint be admitted that he should ra- ve something handsome to compensate him For the decline in popular estimation which he has sustained through to can- onize the forgers, perjurers, compiratora, spies and other rascals in service of The Times and the government The Berlin government hai decided not to ask the reichstag to a Socialist bill for obvious reasons resultant from recent elections, but will content hlnuelf with merely asking tho legislative body to strengthen and continue operation of bill relating to and kindred offenders, pending observation of character and availabilty to the government needs of the new house. It has been settled tbat the body of Matter Abraham Lincoln shall for prwent be entombed in a vault in London, where it will remain until such time as Minixter and Mrs. Lincoln shall be able to accompany it to America for flnal interment. IN THE COMMONS. Sir Might Ban Bern Proved. LONDON, March house of com- mons yesterday Mr. MacNeill, member (or South Donegal, resumed the debate. If commission, he said, had been Intended ly to elucidate the truth government, by friendly agreement with opposition, would have selected agreeable to both sides. He believed that MM appointment of the commission merely an attempt on the part of the government to up hatred against the He unqualifiedly charged that the government had allowed Pigott to escape, precisely it bad allowed Light Weight Rptlnj und a few special lines which we will sell at surprisingly low while they lanl. Two loin of mena medium weight gnj undershirts and drawers it We and 4to in a full assortment of and Will offer them at ihese prices for a few daja only. Scotch gray only els. Infants and children soft wool Under- wear from 86 els. upwards. Ladies Protect your beautiful com- plexion from the dreaded March by wearing our Improved Styles of Foot Veiling, we have It from lOc a yard to any Price you wish, then its not to to buy Jersey Gloves whim ng them at 19c worth 95. Eilra heavy long Seamless only lOc. Hens Extra Ualf Hose worth 12Jc only 7c. Extra heavy Ualf Uone worth. 15c 'or lOc. Mens Super fine Hose double heels and toes worth 30c only lie. LadiM fait Black fine Ribbod HOM onlySSc. Mlo.cs and CbildrciTtRibbedSlceveleM Vests worth 20c only Misses and Children Vests worth We only 8c Cream Ribbed Vests ill worth 40c for 24c. Children's Fancy cap: only 28n. Fancy bate only 43c. Double Thread mending cotton per ball ooly 8c. Modonnii cotton per ball 8c 9c. Kirby Braid ne Plus 'ertect Jet Black solid heads 12c. ERlFsTORE. to escape, for political Lord Somerset sons. Sir Charles E. Lewis, Conservative mem- ber for North Antrim, commented on Mr. Dillon's going to Australia without testify- ing before the commission. Mr. Sexton Bald tbat Dillon had submitted himself to the commission and Inquired whether they wished to question him before his departure. Sir Clmrlea Lewis admitted that Mr. flex- ton was right, and then proceeded to com- ment on of the league's He accused Henry Campbell, ParneUito member for South Armenagh, of having re- moved league books to places beyond reach of the commission. A lively discussion ensued, in which Measra, Campbell, Sexton, Lawii and others took part. In the course of his remarks Lewis de- clared that every charge made against Parnellites which the commission bad been unable to prove would have been proved without difficulty bad all of books been produced. Professor James Bryoe adjourned the de- bate. He thought that the vaguely hinted views of the judges reduced Uta value of report of the commission as a conclusion to a very low ebb. _ Voon, Ijneoln'a Fnneral. LOITDOK, March body of yonrur Lincoln will be preserved without embalra- ng, puc games n- volving manual labor, tippling, drinking, A be heM at J resi reveling, hunting, fishing, printing, selling newspapers, and excursions. It provides for closing nil courts, postofflces and railways, i'.-ccptiiig ono mail and milk train. Sir John fhump'-on has amended his criminal law bill. Thf amendment effectually suppresses Mor- rnouujin in Canada. She Shot Ihe Burglar. CHARLOTTE, N. C., March Monday morning about 3 o'clock Miss Alice Kinney, 19 years of age, who, with her mother, alone on a farm in Sampson county, was aroused by a burglar in tho adjoining room. She procured a pistol and hid it under her piHow and then feigned sleep. The burglar entered her room, and believing the girl to be asleep began to ransack tbe apartment. Miss Kinney raised herself in bed, took aim atthemanfc head and fired. Instantly the burglar whirled around, and as he did so she again Bred and he then fell to the floor and died in a few minutes. The burglar proved to be Sam Kerns, a negro, who has given trouble. 
                            

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