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Angelica Reporter Newspaper Archive: April 25, 1866 - Page 1

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Publication: Angelica Reporter

Location: Angelica, New York

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   Angelica Reporter (Newspaper) - April 25, 1866, Angelica, New York                                 .Mt ftp f  FUBLISHmO SVKRV WKDaTESDikT.  oTf. & a. W. DICKINSON, Editors and Proprietors.  «KRMSi-«» P»a YEAR, XM ADVASÇK,  la «U «aurea When pâment is doteycd for moro than thnw monUis. Fiffy Conto M^Uoni^ will bo chsrgcd  We hftve « l»rge and completo {tssortmoot of plain aad lta<7 type, and excellent presses, and are prepaid to do handbills, law esses, books circnlant, oards, «od in fact almost all kinds of plain and Unoy print-ing( neat, prompt, and cheap.  ......: „ ' .———  VOL. XXIX: IÍO. 44.  4mELICA. N. T., WEDNESDAY, APBIL 25,1866. WHOLE NO. 1498.  ' iMMiMWNMK rawMdi '  (ATtaajcÄ,x.T.)  TH. EgppMT  Watcb Maker and Jeweler, and dealer__  io aU'kinds of Clocks. Watches, and Jewelry liopiairlng done on short; notice and rea-sonHolc terms.' Angelical Feb. IS, 18G4. 1385tf  ANGELICA INSURANCE OFFICE.  __Ai5DticJtnsurance Co. ,  CAFirAlï ASiiETS  - - - $G50.0Ù0 R. LLOYD, Agknt. Angelica, April 1, 1865. 1444  jSQSBk  Dr. C. P Carver.  D«ÎNTIST  Dental rooms over the store of S. N. Bennett & Co. to Smith Davis* Block, Angelica; aS" I-have no partner. ' 1313 :U  PEMSm^M^^  Bounties, and Back Pay, procured by the sabscriber.  R. LLOYD. Claim Agent. . Angelica,li. Y..1864. _ „ i40ltf  DR. M. B. GORTON,  r!D «O» ^ "O» _Friendship. N. Y. M20  P. M. FISH,  Corner of Main and Olean street, oppo-Bito Rathbun's Hotel, where ikll kinds of Blaekemithing will be done on the shortest notice, and most reasonable terms— and Horse and Ox Shoeing in a superior manner. < ,  ALSO, Manufacturer of Carriages, Buggies,.'Wagons, &c.; and repairing done on short notice—one door south of the Blacksmith Shop, oh Ol?an street. . Angelica, N. Y. 1385tf  "O  BAXTER'S  FJlIENDSniP, N. Y. ^^  (listablisheil in Stndentfl graduat»Ml in vocal and lustrumcntal jnu-sto, and luuBlcal comi^osition,  JAMES BAXTEU, Principal ami Proprietor. JB®-Send for a circular 1100 :tf  Amos R. Smith,  OF Caneadea, would respectfully announce to the afflicted relatives of deceaicd soldiers. that he is a lcg.illy authorized Agent for Allegany and udjoining Coimtiea, to procure Bounties of Deceased Soldiers. Also for the collection of Back Pay and Pensions.  Dated, Canpadea. March 29,18(;5.  FIEE IN^RANCE.  HORNELLSVILLE AGENCY. .®tDa Insurance Company,  hARTFORD, CONNECTICUT Incorporated lU^-Capital $2,250,000.  HARTFORD INSURANCtS COMPANY Hartford, Cohiiecticut. ìncorporated 1810—capitai. $1,000,000.  ìiariforcl doirfiecifcair' " incorporated 1845—c^\pital $600000.  CITY FIRE INSURANCE CONPASY. Capital $250,000.  FfI(Em2[ INSmArNCh-GOn----------------  New York City.  CAriTAi. $1,000,000. .  NORTH AMERICAN INSURAlfCEm., Hartford, Connecticut—Capitol $300,000.  metrTpolitan insurance go.  New York City. Capital—1,000,000. insuranee can bo effected with the sab-6 !i iber in the above old eeiablished Stock~ (Jcmpaniesjon Dwellings, Stores, Chi'xches, Fpciories, Personal Property, Ac., oirterms  Fs fa vdrablriSB'jythBTTT^p'on^  A'ty communications addressed to him at Hmnellsville will meet with prom)'t attention. _ J. (;. MILLISR, Ageuu. March 8, 186.3—pdly -----------------  BUSINESS COLLEGE  And Telegraph Institute !  This is tho moni practical and thorongh Commeifclnl CoIIcgo in-tho Stati-s. It has been establlRbed twelve ycara, and fiaB^ecVired an unparalloled reputation for practical and thorongh in8tn,iiCtion.  PENMANSHIP.  - Wo Can safely say, that no institution in the world bos produced mòie first elasB penmen than the Buffalo CpUege.  BOOK-KEEPINCi.  Every variety of Single and DouUe Entry ia tauRht, from the most simple to the moat compllcaicd. The School is graded ; consisting of Primary. TheoretiéSl and Practical Departmenta. The Practical department is the most porfcct system to bo found in the world.  MATHEMATICS.  Thorough instruction is given in Commercial Arithmetic and the higher mathematics, when desired.  CO.ilMEROIAL LAW.  Pupil» become familiar with the Law cf Partnership, Agency, Contractn, Commercial Paper, &c., &c.  TELEGRAPHING.  This department ia fitted up in the most complete style, apd is in every respect equal. If not superior, to any iBsiitute ia the Urited StsteB,  SCHOLARSHIPS.  Scholarnhip isflued in this College will be good for any longth of time in Forty-eight Colleges, comprla. ing the Chain. For further information address  BRYANT & 8TUATTON, Buffalo, N, Y.  April, 11 18GG:yl.  AQEHTS WAX TED!  N^OW Klil^ID Y I  J. T: H E A D L E Y'S  History of the War,  CIOMPLRTE In TWO VOLUMES. ALHO ISSUED z'coniplot« in ouo volume. Compriflug over 1200 Royal Octavo Pugcs, and 70 One Steel Engravings. Tho best, cheapest, most intcrenting, popular and Aal-uable Uiatory of tho Rebellion published, w hich is itilly attested by the enormous sale it has reached,  . Trast to the I^tore.  IVuBt to tfi^Fotnre:—Thoueh Bloomy and cheerUss,  Prowls tbo dark Past, like a Ghost at thy back. Look not heliind thee; be hopefnl andfearless;  Steer for the right way and keep to the track I Fling off Despair—it has strength iike a giant— Shoulder thy purpose, and|?oWJy defiant, ^ave to tho Right, stand unmoved and nnpllant I Faith and Ows promise the Bravo never lack.  Tmsttolhij IHituro:—Tho Present may fHgbt thee  Scowling so fearfully clow at thy side; ' Face Itxinmoved, and no Frbseot ran blight the«—  n© who stands baldly, each bi^i elitiriiiiidd. Kever a storm trot tho tainted air needs It,  Each has a lesson, and he alone reads It Rightly, who takes it and makes it bis guide'  Tmst to the Future:—It stands like an angel, Waiting to lead tbee, to bless and to cheer; Binglog of Hope, like some blessed Evangel,  Liiriiig Uieis on to a brighter, «aresr Why should the Past or the Present oppress thee I Stamp on their coils, for which arms to cares« thee, 8eerthe<}reatJ^utun3-itanda_vfiarningJto bless thee. Press boldly forward nor yim to a fear. :  Trust to the Future:—-It.willnot decclve thee,  m lliiiU but iiwut it mth alii'Jig," —  NowBegfiilivnig anewVSnd boUtivd mo,'  Oladness and Triumph will follow ere long: Never a night bnt there conieth a morrow. Never agrtef but the hopef\il will borrow Something ot gladness to lighten tho sorrow; Life unto sueh is ft Conauoror's songh  JBisirilaneous ^eHtlin0.  Badioalion aiaS'Conse'rvàtìsm.  Harpei^a Weekly^ ^yjnch has jibun-  r T n IT i ^ li^ t f  ^^ MA'1 4-il Ji- .  O UE AGENTS SAY IT IS  WHOLIÎSVI.K A\'D RET  BY  COOK rORSVTH  ANGELICA:  OF EVERY DESCRIPTION and STYLE.  Both Home-3lade and "Boughten "  Which will be sold Cheaper than nt any other Establishment in tho State.  In addition to our  Complete Assortment  OF  CftfiiliET-WARE  We have oh' hand a Splendid Stock  Looking Glasses,  OVAL PICTURE: FRAMES & MOLDINGS, A OIUMT VARIETY OF STYLES.  isoj tiarre'  rious other Uousehold Fixtures.  S p p i n g 15 & cl S  Several Different Patents.  MATTRESSES,  a large stock and Great Variety..  CALL AND SEE US BEFORE BUYING. .  P. S—The trade can be supplied with Cliairs, Bedsteads, and all other Cabinet Ware, in the white or iinished, on liberal terms.  G. VV.OOOK:, E. A. FOUSYTH.  5Iain Street, one door west of tiio Rathburn Hot«il. ,  1423 Angelica, N Y.  BEST BOOK  THE  THEY EVER SOLD.  Sold only by Subscription. Exclusive territory givffn. School Teachers. Farmery Oiflcers an^ 8ol-diers who havFfclurnedT^om tbe'war, and aro soeF lug proUtablo employment please send for our circu-lar giving full particulais. Addicss  AMEICAN PUBLISHING COMPANY.  118 Asylum Strobt, Hartford, Conn ScnAttroM & Bunn, Agents.  April U, ,18GG:ml.  dantly proven,itself one of the soundest Union Journals of tho Country^ has aii -exeJleiit article under the "above liead,which so nearly expreaseB the sentiment of the Beporter that we present it entire.  "In every political contest in a Constitutional systerii the names of Con-8erva|Î8in and liadiçalism will be applied to the opposing policies, whi e the history of such goverrftents shows that Ihe policy which truly conserves the principle ami spirit of a free system is that which is called Radical ism. In the conflict of opinion ii England before our Revolution, George III. and Dr. Johnson were the stifiest of Tory Conservatives, and saw in the doctrines and policy of Edmund Burke nothingjbut Kadicalisni and the overthrow of the monarchy. But Burke was tho true Con8erv;atire. His policy would have saved the empire upon its own principles.  In tliis country at this moment both Radicalism and Conservatism, as the names of a policy of national reorganization, aro very easily, defined and comprehended. ThuBRadicalism holds that the late Rebel States .should not be suftered to take.part in the government of the union which they have bo •/.oalonsly striven to destroy except after scarQiiing inquiry into their condition, and upon terms wliich shall pievcnt any advantage having been gained by rebclliui». By tlu- tcanVi of the war tlio suffrage of a voter in South Carolina weiglis as much as the vote of two voters in New York. Is that a desirable state of things ? Would any fair-minded voter in South Carolina claim that he ought to have a preference in the Union because, however honestly, he has rebelled against it? Radicalism, theref« r»;, favors an equalization of representation as a condition precedent to the full recognition of the disturbed States, and every citizen of those States who sfncerely^icsit'e^a-^^ationai-ttnity^—aiid peace will favor it also.  Radicalism holds that equal civil rights beroi:e the law should 'be guar-  Cotigh no  More !  DR. STRICKLAND'S  MELLIFLUOUS  Balsam  Cough  1b warranted to be the only prepv ration known to cure coughs, colds, hoarseness, asthma, whooping cough, chronic coughs, consumption, bronchitis and croup. Beins prepared from honey and herbs it la hetUina, Bofloniug. and expectorating, and particuhirly suitable for all affections of the Throat and Lungs, For sale by Druggists «very-  where.  Clire for Piles.  DR. STRICKLAND'S  Pile Remedy  in a RaâTCiilSéiriHte^wlHeh^-^msiKHi tliè Civil Right Bill over the veto by a voto of 33 to 15, Mr. Sumner's proposition obtained 8 votes. These gentlemen of course, support the Radical policy, bnt they do not shiipe it The opinion, of the Union party^irc tc be found, is President Johoson says, in the party platform. Tho policy of ûie Radicala Ì8 to be seen in the m^asurca they adopt; and of thé fofty-two bills which tit the tipio Af the lust veto the^ had presented to the Presj^eni, Ae^iid  itoed'iofi^ " .......: ^ " • ^  In our present political situation Conservatism is the . policy which declares that the %tc rebel States are ina 'condition to resuiîio their, full functions in the Upion, and which de-UQ0nce8_Congre88 for prouming to inquire whether that opinion is well  jfl^nded, Tldcnirg tft^^  is, the fc'preijentalives ^or tlie loyal people who have mainlainoJ tho Got-ernnient~the authority to look behind the credentials ofai^y man who comes from a State still fanting with Rebellion, and asccrtaii the origin and validity of the autlority that issued the credentials,^]^ objecta to tha legislation of Congress while eleven States are unrepresoited, without re-ferrence follFcT^asW thus virtually maiitaining the , monstrous proposition hat a combination of State's, by refusing tojbejrepr may prohibit natioial legislation, tt denies that the U.nifed States ought to protect the equal cteil rights of citizens before the law, and would admit the absetit Stiites to (bngress before requiring their assent to an amendment cqualizng reprcseitation. O^nserva-tism is the policy which, forgetting^ that the United States are bound by every moral obligition to secure the freedom which t/iey have conferred, apparently belieres that freedom will be best maintained and the national peace most truly tatablished by leaving those of everj color who were heroicallj' faithful to the government during the rebellion to the exclusive mercy of those who irougl'.t to destroy it These arc the distinctive poihts of the Conservative policy. Are they agreeable to an honoi-able and intelligent people? And of what" is this policy conforvative? If of the Constitution and Union> it will of course be earnestly supported by their true and tried friends. Is it so supported? Who are the present Coiis^urvallveK? Who shout and sing andfiie canngn and ring bells in jubilant exultation at evci-y measure in suppo.sed accordance with the policy we liavt; deecribed, is composed of the late rebels and of those who juatitied and palliated rebellion, with a few ReCLubJic^is. who oppo.se tim  policy ? Who arc tÎH; Radicals ? The great multitude of tlBse who believed in the war and supported it,whose children and brothers aid friends lie buried in the battle-field it; every rebel State, whose sentiments are now as they have been for five /cars e.\pressed , by the Union press of the country, and whose voice speaks in the vote of Union Legislatures and in the result of the spring election.  It is useless for Conservatism to claim that conciliation is essential to reorgai^ation. Nobody denies it. But, the caTdfnTtl-qtttstif?fl4s^ -not what wtR please tho late insurgents, but what I will secure the Government. If it be said that the Government can not bo  How to Trepare for Itt Approach.  VAVSK«! AK» 9T9ll^OJtIS OP ATTACK.  a coübm or trxatxe»t prxscrlbxpk  Tim EXfEBIKNCE AND CONCLUSIONS OF  ; EABTKHN MISSTONABV.  AK  ^ Dr. Haihlin, for many years a mis-sionary of tho American Board at Con» Btantinople^ hgit^f^^^ tTafi'Mirror au accdiih^^^ ccftsful treatment of the cholera in that city. His practice has extended through three visitation» of this dreaded disease, in 1848, 1855 and 1865. The ¡suggestions are so simple that wo publish them, in tlie hope that they will do^oodT-if Ilve^lioTe^ dome prevalent Tri the U :  ju»t 4c(t us after committing fearful lavagoo, in making ita way »nio Eu. rope, and will jirobably cross tho Atlantic before anather summer has passed.  Having been pravidentially coropell-ed to have a good degree of practical acquaihtance with it, and to see it in all its forms and stagOs during each oLits„invasions of ConstMitinoplc, I wish to make niy friends in Maine  Éixty,--at every movementeif-the b4»w« els. Largo doses will prodtice no injury while tho diarrhoea lastt. When that 10 checked then ia the timo for caution. 1 havo never seen a case of diarrhoia taken in seasmi wliicli waa not thna controlled, bátame cases of advanced diarrhoea, and especially of relapse, paid no heed to it whatever. As soon as tin* tiecemes apparent I liavo always resorted to this course: Preparé a teacup of starch boiled as for-iiiie4n==«taiidiiing-.linaii; .ft&d.at{r in-, to it a teaspoonful of laudanum for an injeotion. Give one-third at each movement of the In ono desperate case, abandónela'as hopeless by it physician,! could not stop'tho diarrliOB t until the seventh injection, which con-  lained-nearly-_ft teaapoonful of land- «OBwSiVtoaUüMteimrtííí lum. The patient recovered, and is in ^n^^Hí^ewí  Doria^ tibe'iiN^t find that any treatméttl' •Qcceaafol ai ttii«r = ^ ^  CoKTioíoK.-*-Tbt Ida* at «iNÉMtiw should be abandoiied;, AM1I*i5Bsb-aries who have be«« imÍKL: dw malignant case», day aHitf fully conVinoed of the iidtl'^ï ness of the "cholera, t^&i" ' attacks which all haire to be attributed to great iog the cohatitution Uiliteio  , -—'' . '/„..«.Ml .L.J .iilir-iî^^^..:^-  .. fciwaWáwr'iPPMi^ii-: I ijiimií/ ' "  [ETtrjr Uw. «al«» • iMhml WilÉ<llüiW> ■crltMd ttento. tOmXl ««mmmn* «M «k» «M tbron«liota the State. «• snA Ml iNaMwlfil.ftMi^ »ieUi« - - -  byth«  jbout tbe Stato. «• «MA WM ' 4» «fUsTthudaf of  päniÄlÄSS- ^^^  ««dl« «Ti^M ft«« Ite »ySA^gW^^S  used prepared chalk in ten-grain doies^ with a few drops of laudanum and camphor to each. But, WJmtevo» ooarao la pursued, it must be followed up or tho patient is lost.  , 2. Mustard PoutTicKs.—^These should be appHi^d to the pit of the stomach, and kepLon . till the is well  reddened.  tiowever well ho may feel, should rigidly  some suggcstiónB which may lelieve  anxiety or be of practicálTísü. -.---------------------------___ . -i  W tíiRlié^proaclí^fclíolcTO  observe  rest. To lie quietly on the back" is one half of the battle. In that position the  anleed by lie Un.t.a States, to every j h« i^mmics,  0,1,/.en. 1 claims that the Govern-, ^ , -i jt cln'tainly cannot be  m.r.t wh.cl._co,nn,a...is the ol^'dience alienating its unwavorini;  ____Has cured thousands of the worst  c,ascs of blind piles, it gives Immediate relief, and eiloots a permanent cure. Try it directly. It is war-tacure—Ear sale by.alLDxuggl8ta«t 00 cents per boUle.  Billiard and Uefreshmeii Salooii.  JAMES  A\GKl.iCA.  w  IRVINE,  NEW YOKK,  nuCTon stricriard's Tonici  DYSPEPSIA.  DR. STUICKLAND'S TONIC Is d concentrated preparation of roots ana herbs,-with antlacids and carmlna-ti^gtbon the Bt<,^nianh and nervous system. It Is a certain remr edy for dyspepsia or iadigesUon, nervousnesg, Jos» of app«Ltitj!_8Ciditx gf the stomach, flatulency and debility. It is not aicohbiiii. tlierefore paiticularlj^ suUetV (or weak, nervous and dyspeptic persona- For sale bv all Druggists everywhere at $1 pCr bottle, jan' ly-nCO  of every citizen shall afford him protection, and that the freedom which the people of the United States have conferred the people of the United shall maintain. Is that a perilous claim? Is any other course consistent with national safety or honor ?  Once more: Radicalism asserts that, as the national welfare and permanent union can be established only upon justice, there should be no unreasonable political disfranchisement of any paii of the people. It denies that (•litnplexioli, <tr v.'eight, or height; are ivasonalile p(»li{ical qnaliiicationa, and it refers to ttie history of ihe country to show that they have not always been so regarded even in some of the late slave States, and remembers that both President Johnson and his pre-cessor v eie friends of impartial suff-rager llohliiifi this faitli, Radicalism  CONSTITUTION WATER.  The astonishing success which has attended this invaluable niedidne proves TtToTjO the most perfect remedy ever discovered. >'o langusge can convey an adequate idea: of the immediate and almost miraculous change wWpb it occasions to the debilitated and shattered system. In Jaeb, it stands unrivalled as a remedy ior tho permai.ent euro of Diabetes, Impotency. Loss of Muscular Energy, Physical ProstraAon, Indigestion, Jion-UoguUtion luiammation or Ulceration of the Bladder and I Kidneys, Disease of the Prostrate (ilaJid, Stone In OULD ieauectfully annouiico that he ! the Bladder, Calculus, Gravel, or Brlckdust Deposit, L —ii.» rkiJ «f andaU Diseaifo or Affections of tho BUddc.r and  «ho ntil nf Ralthnrlar and aU Diseaifo or Affections of tho Bladaer ana  UftS taken the Old btanu OI Ualtnnziar , Dropsical Swellings esisUng in men.  oa the Corner of Park and Wain St.. where I „„jjjg^ 'ojcmijr^n.  he proposes to miaister to the comfort, of a who may favor him with their patronag;«.— HIh Billiard Rooms and Tablea wJU always l)e kept In prime order. Refrefilimcnt» in g teat variety.  Oysters, Glamn, Lobsters, Sat'dinea,  fies Feet, Pickted Tripe, Eggs, Pies. Gheene i •¿"«'¿íy« and dangerous mtlsdies/|wra tfav retitlt: - VT..- i'u^r-. | «monUiafter monthpi^ --—i  Cakes, Fruits. Nuts, Candies, Choic® Brands of Segars,' XXX Ale, -nd every thing pertaining tea  FiEST ——--------,  will be serTcd w srrwi, "on demand." No effort will he «pared to render the establish-, jnaijt, DBStBViNo of the Public favor. ;  \ng elica. Aprili 31864.- 3  ECÈV^^D ■ OVES 5TU! V1»-£>ì*" vari- , tÌMofciit off. and pipe top-Just receited  For those Biseasei peboliar to Females Constitution Water ia a Sovereign Remedy.  Tliess Irregularities aro Uie CMsp of fr^ufntljr gi«!t the »» ■ ' retau: effon  by alienating Us unwavoring friends. If conciliation contemplates the filling of actional offices in the South by known rebels to the disregard and exclusion of Union men, thereby rewarding rebellion and discrediting loyalty—if it proposes to leave freemen of the United States to the Blaçk Codés of Mississippi and Carolina, xtnd to recognizc the fatal spirit of caste which has been qMur curse—then conciliation is simply a name for ignominy, and Conservatism may see its fate in that of Se.ces.sion.  Radicalism has a siuglo vindictive feeling toward the late rebel States, but it does not propose to forget that there has been a rebellion. It has the sincerest wish,' as it had the most undonbting expectation, of working with the. President to secure for the nnmitry wl'^t the country Tiad  , being made to assist nature, the diOctil^ bMOiaes 1 chronic, the patient grwlaaUr IM» apprtile,  I the bowels are consUpated. aigbt «flMi^  rand Consumption »MUr endfUiHr^at^........  For sale by aU Dra«^; Ffk%  w. u.avuuk* Co.* rf«s«Maa& .  CeaM JUpHita. Xa^M OMT atet^ Mpf »«»• • JaiL SMlawKaii.  urges that while we may honestly differ as to the wisest meaiis-oi-securing political equality, yet that »11 our rfforts should constantly tend, with due re.'jpect for the proper subordinate functions of the States in our constitutional system, to protect those equal rights of man with whose assertion our Government began, and in consequence of whose denial, that iiovernment has just escaped the most appalling fate.  This is Radicalism. Is it unfair? Is it unconstitutional ? Ia it anarchical or revolutionary? It denies no man's rights. It deprives no man of power or pi'ivilege. It claims for the National Government nothing which is not inseparable from the idea of such a Government. Doe.s it demand any ^iflg that every prudent and patriiitié'^innn ought not to be willing to concede? The. views of ^fr. ^j'hatjtjcns Stevens and of Mr. Sumner, sincerely entertained and ingeniously defended as thejr^ire, are not* the Radical policy. Mr. St«i^en« holds that the distui^bed which; the land should bo confiscated, M that oi Ireland has been three times oyer without jgiying Ireland peace. Does any bq^y siippijse. that pven tha Houne, jvhïch jrespects Steven's aturdy Sdelity to his own convictions, weea with niin, or that the .Jiational party holda his viewa? Mr. Sttmner holda . that equal auffrago should bj^ i[,c;quircd of the absent States «a a coMltiw) 6f. reprôMatàtidn, and  fairly won by the war, and that is, the equal right of every citizen before the Taw and the full resumption^by-tlie  late in.snrgent States of their functions in the Union only upon honorable and reasonable conditions as Congress might require. All reasonable men who support that policy will not iighily denounce those who differ with them. They Will strive long for the harmony of those with whom during the war they have sympathized and acted. They will concede minor points of method, and bear patiently with imr patient rhctoric leveled at theniselves But they^ will also bear steadily in mind tho words of Andrew Johnson wlien ho accepted tlie nomination which had placed'him where he is: "While society is in this disordered state and we are seeking security, let us fix th(? foundation« of the Govern rnent on principles of etenial justice which will endure for all time." The Radical policy was nevermore tersely expressed ; and it will unquestionably bti maintained, for it Is founded ip thp plainest comuion sense and the pro-foundest conviction of the loyal Ameri; can people.  _ T.he Secr^tarxoTlhQ Treasury, havj ing been notified by thb ^racf^" sul at Appipwall of tho appearanpe of a cattlo (liseMtir resenibling the European Hinderpest, at Panama, has inr atructed all customa officers,to admit no cattle into port without first bein^ aatiafied that thisy aitfireotroioFdiafasr.  cry fiimily should be prepared to treat it without waiting for a physician. It does its work so expeditiousfy _that^ while you are waiting for the doctor, it is done.  2. Ifypii prepare for it, it wiH^^ come. I think there is no disease which may bo avoided with so ihuich certainty as the cholera. But providential circuiustances, oi the thought-lesd indiscretions of some member of ù household, may invito thci attack, and the challenge will never be refueed.. It will probably be made in the night, your physician has been called in another direction, and you must treat the case yourself or it will be fatal.  cause and symptoms.  3. Causes of Attack.—J have personally investigated at least a hundred cases, and not less than three-fourths could bo traced directly to improper diat, or to intoxicating drinks or to both united. Of the remainder, suppressed perspiration wouldjCbmpriso a large number. A strong, healthy, tem-jierato laboring man had a Bcvero attack of cholera, and after the danger had passed 1 wits CAirious to ascertain the cause. He had been cautious and prudent in his diet. He used notliing jntpxicating. His residence was in a good iocaiity,. B^^^  hard labor and very profuse perspiration he had lain down to take bia customary nap near an open window, through which a ven/ re/reahing breeze urn blowing. Another cause is drinking largely of cold water when hot and thirsty. Great fatigue, great anx iety, fright, fear, all figure among inciting causes. If ono can avoid all these, he is safe &om the cholera as from being swept ^ay by a comet  4. Symitums of an Amck.^While cholera is nrevalont in a place almost every one experiences moro or less disturbance Trf^digestiotn lt^ia-doubt less in part imaginary. Every one notices the slightest variation of feeling, and this give« an importance to mere trifles. There are often a sliglit nausea, or transient pains, or runibling sounds, when no attack follows. No one is entirely free from those. But when diarrhoea commences, though painless and slight, it is in reality the skirmishing party of tho advä-ncihg column. It will have at first no single character of Asiatic'cholera. But do out bo deceived. It is the cholera^ ncvertheloss. Wait a little,—giveJ;t time to get hold, say to yourself, "I feel perfectly well, it will soon pass off;" and- in a short time you vvill re peiit of your folly in vain. I^ have seen many a one commit suicide in this way.  Sometimes, though rarely, the attack commencea with> vomiting. But in whatever way it commences it is sure to hold on. In a very few hours the patient may sink into the collapse. The hands and feet become cold and purplish, thn conntcnance. at flirst nervous and anxious, becomes gloomy and pathetic, although a mental rest-lessness and^raging-Uhirat-torment the^ sufferer while thp powers of life are ebbing. The intellect remains clear, but all the, social, and moral feelings seern wonderfully to coUaps^ with the  physical powersr^ TliO patient known  he is to die, but cares not a snap ubout it. . ,  In some cases, though rarely, the diarrhoea continues for a day or two, and tbo foolish person keeps about, then suddenly sinkg, splits for the physiwan, and before lie arrives "dies as the fool 4«etb."  course of treatment.  1. In Stoppino the Incipient Diarr uoEA.—The mixture which I used in 1648 with great success, and again in 1855, has during the epidemic been used by thousands, and'although the attacks have been mòre , sudden and violpnfc, it has fully establislipd its rep utation for efficiency and perfect safety . It consists of equal parts, by measure, of laudanum and spirits of camphor, two tincture of rhubafrb. Thirty drops for adult, pn a lump oi sugar, will often check tho diarrhqja. But to prevent its return, pàre shflpld always be  taken tpcfihtiniRelhc-^edtc^^  four h9^rs ij^ dii^inishiug dpses; twen-ty-Gfp, twenty, fifteen, ten,^niné, when pateful diet is all .ihat will be needed. In case the fiftt does .«pt atay the  you ariieyoiTBre hit.  When attacks come in the form of a diarrhoea theso directions will enable  every ono to meet it successfullyi "  4. But when the attack is moro vio-Irtnt, and there is vomiting and purg= ing, perhaps also- cramps iind colic pains,the following mixturé is far niOre effective, and should always be resorted to. - The missionaries—-Messrs. Long, Trowbridge and^ashburn—-have used it in very many cases and with wonderful aucc^ss. It consists of equal parts^f laudanum, tincture of capsicum, . tincture of ginger, and tincture ofcardaraon seed. Dose, thlHy to forty drops, or half Ü teaspoonful in a littlo water, to be increased according to the urgency of the case. In case the first dose should be ejected, the second, which should stand ready, should bo given immediately after the spasm of vomiting has ceased. During this late cholera siege no one of us failed of controlling tho vomiting and also the pyrging by, at most,,. thO third dose. W^ have, however, invariably made us^ of large mustard poultices of strong pure mus.tard, applied to the stomach, bowels, calves of tho leg4 feet, &c., as the oase seemed to require,  TBBATMENT or COLLAPSE.  GoiAAP8B.---$fiis~ IS-simply-advanced stage of the, disease, it in-d icatesl ho graduaHFailing^fnai l"the powers of life. It is diflicult to say when a case has become hopeless. At a certain point the body of tho patient begins to emit a peculiar odor, which I call the death odor, for. when that has become decided and unmis* takable, I have never known the pa* tient to recover.. I ' have repeatedly worked upon such cases for hours with no permj|neut result. ^ But the blue color, the cold extremitieSi the deeply sunken cyé, the vanishing ^ " thafr-Hto  rctaUiiuiriM .  mtïîi-frSMMiioi-irr; _ BsTlssd atkttttM, Mi« läm  cxâF.m  Â!f ACT In rtUtfvatotiM mv^ m U Mnm ■ i»ran»enl«oni^ ■•:-T  PMwd Febrntij TM (ft«aM»< JTtisr«*. f  4HMI AuttiMv. *» emttt «tJVOmm :  8B0TI0N 1. In additioii i» tli*____  ibat tfae Sopcrvimn of tb« tmral fiwü „ ■Tlt6-ftn now by tkw rfq«lt«41« Hé _  «rvlMroftreiytowalB thU ¡rtaML irMrii-lMa local ichool fVind belongtag to —irni, jftrtL before enterine ñpoa'tbt  cate « bnnd wUlttw» or »«r* lafl««««! ìmmUm in doabl« the inonnt of «U MhotI maMa laaia or McarftlM belongiBgtojttaob t««», mC iMMife by law if under the control wr ia ttM «iilii» ti  accordance with the nqifimatali. «f. twenty of obapter one bnadred áad m law« of eighteen buBdred a§4 _  specified.  11. Tbl« act shall tabe -ffi-nt 1—iimitf Stat«or Mbw Tori. :■! .j i.-'o  Offic« erthtSecrttatyofmafe. (  I have «oai|iarsdtlM •Batsla this oIHm, a •UM la a consct inuMorlal 4 ors«ld«ri(iaallaw. .. .  an^tlM piaesafy éjib Jp^gH ìm  Hi tSMortpt uJidhai wiaar hw^fcS  LAWS or mew rowt-^mr mrnmm.  •hdlia  nBYery law uhImb adlffemt therein  u«>reltt. ahaU' «mmw»» mm the «tote, on.aad not betora là»  uàëdây áttík toiii~¿aaáa(¿ a« ìi^^  ------ StSaawSlWW'  .WÄiSBS  anAtn aU procMdtBM. btftm «bf «■bh^abivm board, in which H sbattbeUMHMj ht wmmm^tZ. fertheiwto, HutUtbnM asoatlHi «AeriaaaiMtwifeé  aawloa ------- • - -  »¿•SÄ  tttuob bm mmê m  aawloa Ui «klcb^U baeanwB leak 'aiaiilSrT BeTiaed Biatalae. ntáUm» Jtim^^^  GKa.m  AN ACT to provide for Mbaa* the question, '«ball to tevlae the CoBatitutlM  mani»  PaiMdiliirAliliM. nêPicfUiftKiSiatê^Nm TfrA, mwrf* 8tnaUMdAmmify,Í9mmítm/mtmiit äfOTioM J. AtibeftBBnUlMli«aiabaÍMÍ this «Ulte on the Tneada^ »axtafk« ibBlapl llaa* day of Kovcmber, eirttM« baadiad «ai flslp da, there shall be provided for tile poU tioa district, and bept tbereat by tbd bMpBalwaaf élection of such district, » In>x «MM-bed'-Diafsa Uon.'Viu-siMSlai tha reception of bidlBlBi Iratv  elacttoB tor nembera of tbe lagiiditiit^ > wg ñá» Bttnebpoll a ballot either wrfttea or mIbM,«» partly written ec partly, print*«, «• «Uéb.jM be inscribed the worda "Por • edetiailea * »> viae thetionatitatioB akd aaMftdtb* wa^" ar iba words "Agaiaft B eonveattoBto tftiM Um «iMIl* tutlon aadaiiieadthe aama," Hadi ba|Brt ifeaH be'indoraed'WnveBUon,'* aai Ml b* Mblipi by aaldinsMcto]» of eleetioa, «eâbbell I* âiaee. ited In said ballot box. The poU UM tt* SbU election ahaU be iiNpand mmI ll*|)t ' phallbe a colaaiB tbonia eealelaiag a aM flgnre for each v«bHr wbo abatt «m af ballots, wbich colBHB sball U itrnm 'mL ^ tion." All lbeproviaioaaoftteaQt ta^lM <*A» act iMpeoUBf elecUoBs bUmt iàm Ibt arillli» and town offlMr%''j>«M»dl AjprU aftbt ilfbapa Im» dred and forty'two» and alt uiwt «aMMaMf Oi  pulse, alo ho|)eless.  Tio~Bîgnïr  Scores of such cases in the recent epidemic have recovei^ed. In addition to the sccond mixtiire, brandy (a tablespoonful every half hour,J bo^ ties of hot water surrounding the patient, especially tbo extremities, sjniy)j8inf and_£riction,_ will often in an hour or two work wonders.  TniRST.^In. these, and in all tidvan-ced cases, thirst creates intense aufler* ing. The sufferer craves water, aiid^aa euro as ho gratifies the pravihg Uie worst symptoms returns, and ho falls victinrto- the-transieiit gratification; Tho only safe way is to have a faithful friend or attcndiint \vho will hot heed his entreaties. The suffering may ' be, however, safely alioviatp^ and rendered endurable. Frequent giargling the throat and washing out the mouth will bring some relief. A spoonful of gum arabic water or of camomilo tea, may frequentlly be given to wet tho throat. Lyndenham'a White Decoction may also be give% both as a beverage and nourislimenti in small quantities, fre-  ot, aadilt thaiiroilsioaBorib« aal «aiMíl: «Aa  rnnr ifTi nrt fnr iirrrtiiln1ti|tirrriniiii inniilb Iba aliliaaa  snfllpMb aai lOlfHl U-alaa» «Ml bO  ring front thirst will ceaae. In a large majiirity of i cases it haa not 1)è?n înt«wê tor more than twcntyitour houra.  Dtrf.—'Rice water, arrowroot, Lyn-denham'a White Decoptionf pruat ^ate^i^ camomile tea,_aro. tho _ beat m» ticles for a day or two after the attack is'^ontrolled. Oambmilo ia vary Tala able in r^toring tho to^ of tho atom ach.  , The Tvphoid Fks'Eb,—A typhoid aUte forafe%vdays will follow all acvens cases. There ta notbng alarming tn this. It has very rarely proved fatal. The greatest danger ia.!Iroffi_drinkini too freely. 1 When the patient aeemet to be sinking, a' littlO brandy an<i water or arrowroot and brandy have revived him. In îhia terriblo viaitation of tho cholera, we have considérée  who sball be e«UU«d to (be rigbtor to prevoot fraadaHiit HBtlBg^" «aawt . teentb, eigbteea bandjvd aad iRt.alaa» __ UtoprovislQaB.ofib« acteatliUM «Aa aal l» aa> cértain by proper proofs tbe «Klanw «1M» ahaH b* entlUed to tbé^ righi 6f sBffhigft.n jpaaai M^ thirteentb, *igbtoen> bBidnid aad ••  fta Ifet  proeeediÉga andar tua - -  I 1 TbesevTeUiy «t ital» MlIìMMMII after tbe asaambUngof tbaa»»tìiiliiiim III ttii year elghteea bnndred aad etirtjMWWMseail ' tbereto tbe resali of the eltetioa barala^ fi*ei*4 for. ..  I 9, T^la aetaball taka«4M«Ipjii^il^. aTATBOVUBWTOBB. ì  oaieeoftbaa««^tai7««fatale, f i  bave eo!lnpsii«dtha .......... ailb «hamgbiil  on fila in ttta ofltoe, aad «ebwe*r Mtm «HI tbe sante 1« a eorrcct trassei^a «aanifteai umà^ttàm wbol*.él!aal«o(ii^l|nr.. . ' ¿i ''> - '  anothea Telegeaph. oohtaiìt^—-la the United State« Sellate, ob l^ AUi, Senator Shcrman introdoMd % charterin^ tho Nationa) 'JWaiMfà Company, with a capital of tea mIÌimi of dollàra, granting to Qeorge B« tcr, £i. M. Keya, Qeorgt |L Wi^kar, Frederick PcvDtice, JameaT< ShwiWHt RnshH SloM.A.H. lUìfkUàà^ J. M. Jonea'Henry L. Bwme^ Edwkg^  oureelvea perfectly .armed and equipped, with a band-bag containing fnix ture No. mi:|t^re S, (for vomit ing, &c.,) a few pounds of pounded mustdrd, a bottle of brandy, a paper of camomile llowera,-land a pa|i«r "Ol" Gum Arabic.  I lay no. plaim to origi||)%ifty in ooii^ men4j^g tt»>a couw« of tipAtmeni havi^^opted it from ablo^nd e:xppriehced phyaip|afia. Hair^ i^g peen the only jioctor « nany pQor'faniilipa living near | Mf» tried Tanqna^rcmedica rocommcuded diarrhoea, Tiwhtinue to give in» but I hat« foui  ing ilo0©t«--thirty-five. forty, forty^ve, to be at all compared with tl^  i knjamin S. Si&lth, Robert S. Hemiin, and JoiiaUuA.8.1 their aaaociata« and ««mcmmmC right to coQBtrae;te1egrapk'1kMi efir any and all the poat loilaa wiif M may hereafler be tatohlMml li m United Sutra and T«rrit«fi|t. r fi» fi^ cent consolidation^, nopoly of the great Um wÜI aiimoíatecapitel  TiotoulyaaáahnwWH M'liw better aoooaàodato  Faumo A«aT.--*fliaw .«IIìK men and women «iMavrtìK^ Mif  out of f^ppw»: tl^ iM t»'^«**  tade and langoor; «o ■¡»lifijNy, ergr» indigieatk»», bihty éo perfora aij datiea of life. WImX^Ii Simply becaaaa da bnahieaa eontÊMêmPii,' Ac.,' Irte Ihn KTOilaíijL' Uae that celebri^' ~ well. Sold ^ fiata ai^^lfOM^  Irialwias"6ì caoekcp»^ " waa maki  Äf   

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