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Angelica Reporter Newspaper Archive: January 3, 1866 - Page 1

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Publication: Angelica Reporter

Location: Angelica, New York

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   Angelica Reporter (Newspaper) - January 3, 1866, Angelica, New York                                 BirfelNESS CARDS.  "" ANGEL & GREEN,  ^jmr^exb&œmselwn^^ AngeliGß^Ällegamj Gò., Y.  Will aUcfid lo'^U businesa cnttusted to thei ehwgo, wijth promptness and dispatch.; .  J. 8. ORKEX.J - , ... ^ _ ^ : [w. iXaEIi.  OfBcc—Corner of Main and Center StrectE  J. H, Eggleston.  \VatcB Maker and Jeweler,and dealer la all kinds of Clocka. Watchcs, and Jewelry Repairing done on short notice and rea-f<ra»ple.terin8._:._ ; :.....j.; __^^^____  ^lNGELICXIKSUBANE OFFICE Arctic Insurance Go.  CAPITAL ---------¿000.000  .ASSETS .... .. - > $CoO.OOO  R. LLOYD, Agent. Angelica, Apri,! 1, 1805. 1144  Dr. C.P Carver.  , QiN.TIS T  -Dentóì rcôîïis'over tlio store of S. N. Ik'iinf It & Co., In SifflOi Davis' Bloct, Angelica. ffs" I hiivo no  parlnir- 13ia:tf  DR. H. B. GOÄTON,  IE) "Cs»^ Q: ^  Friendship. 'ñ, Y. H20  MRS. BULL IRD'S AWBEOTYPE ROOMS,  2nd Door Emi of the Academy,  ..........., .....-anmelloa^jh y.^______________________  rhotographs, Arabpotypes, Carte-dC-Visite, Vignette and Gem ricturcs. ^11 sizes and Btyles tàk&n in Superior manner, in any kind of weaiher. N. B. Also all kinds of Ciiso.s and Pram UlS  Bounties, and Back. Eay, procured by the subscriber.  U. LLOYD, Claim Agent. Angelica, N. Y., 18G4. 14()ltf  r ; . P. M. PISH.  Ri,ACk9MiTi'i—on Corner of Miiin and Olean Btreet, opposite R:ithlnm"s Hotel, where nil kinds of Blackijiiiitlung will b(! done on the shortest notice, and most reasonable terms— nnd liofie ami O.v Shoeing in a superior manner.  ALSO, Manufacturer of Ciirriagos, Buggies, Wagons, &c.; and repairing done on •hort notice—One door south of the Black-iffii tb Shop, on 01:au ^trcc t.  Angelica, N. Y. i:iS.5tf  BAXTER'S  InsíiíMíí flf  .......FRTENDSIIIP, N. Z • .  i ST AB L T S il E-D IN 185 3  StuAonta ffradufttcd in vocal and nstrumcntal mu-•la, and niutticalcompositinn.  JAMF.S DAXTER, Vriiicipal and Proprietor. «a-Sond for a circular 1400:tf  IIORN'ELLSVILLE AGENCY.  .ffitna Insurance Company,  lia h tfoiw, coyy ecticut incorporated 1819- capital $ 1 ,.000,000.  nartfoild lysruakcl: a)mi'ayx llarlT'inL (JoiiuocUciit. IKCORI'VR.-VTEi) 1 S ir.V!, NoOO.tlflO.  rikeisix is^vnaxcf. romva.'s t, lliirU'ord Connecticut^ HtcoRPvUiATEr» 1845—CAriTAi. $400 QUO.  city firp: ixsua. t xcfcnmpau y, ci4iUiir$(i,-)0,(»oo.  ANGEtiCA MaNMl^  I i^T" .........'ill l'y I tSSSSSSSBiOlilBÊli): '  Ci r. lb o. w. oicjuHmr/  "OKroôprîett^^  VOL. XXIX: NO. 28.  _ MOTEL.  GBEENWICH STREET,  (OKESIÍÜAIÍSWESXQFIJROADWAT,) '  Bctivccw CourtlnmU Sti^ccts,JK«w York,  JOnNrATTEÍíf.Jr., Proprietor.  l^'Was t«.  00 to  The pacific IIOTEIì is WCU and widely  known toiho ti-avcllMR public. 7'bé location Is espcclallj- Riiitablo to merchants and businesa men ; It is in clii.so proximity to tho businoi:.i p.Vrt of tlio City—i." on tho hiRlnvaiy of Southern and Western travel—ami udjaceiit to all the principal Railroad and Jt.camboat iicpdts. - -  Tlio ri:cific ha*! liberal accoiunioilatioii for over 30» (jHcst^i ; it la well furnished, and.^ossesscs every modern iniproveniont for tho comlbrt and entertainment of it.s inmates. 71io rooms aro spacious and wciLve.iitilatcd ; provided .with Ras. imd water ; the attendatice is prompt atid rcspectl'ul ; and ,tho table is generously ])rov!ded with every dellc.acy of the B on tbo  sr.tson.* '/'lifi KuliKoribor, tho past fmv __  yrfu-'571Ia?1)i>c"Tniio h-flste, 1« no\v koT« proprietor, and intonds to identify hiniself thoroughly with the IntercBts of his houne. \Vith long cxperienco a« Kotcl-lceóper. hé' IrUSfa, by iil0derate^^ and a «>«*»■( liberal policv, to maintalU tho favorable roi)utatlon of / tho Pacific Uotel. JOHN PAfTEN Jr. - jV Oct. 18. udjug —r---»i«iy> »»■  í^tlié I giv  •i^cnt.  idians,  step-  1 8 6 6.  THE NEW YORK MERCURY.  TWEXTY-EIOnTH YEAR.  Nortli  t settling Dador,  from tho  In commrncing a Xcw Year, which, nnlilro Its In'i-mediate prcdecc.<i.sors, finds our whole great country blest with "happy Pence and wide content," the proprietors of the- Ueproscntatiyc American Literary Paper bcij leavo to announce a glorious new intellcc-ijiourlsh-tiial banouet of r  UomuiH-^, Wit and Humor, ®  Ilome-Storios, I'oetry,  Tales of Adyenturc.5, Essays,  Pictures, r.itorary Notices,  Fashion Articles, Gossip,  Curiolis and iiitere.'ilinf; news, \ ivacious feminine (•orrespomicncp, foreign letters, instruct-  ivti t'tiiforiais, literature for the lic rc  little ones, tall;s aA)ont art, new boolis, and tho drama, etc.  In fact, the Xcw York Mercnry forlSUfi will be .oo'complctc and cxhaustivi> in all the departments of i ^ choice readinf,', that tlioso who siib.'ifribe forit will ' i taao no other city iiaper the year through, to all it ,r iJoono "will seem to be, - '  ressos  vyîi, re  n Couiitj ut week.  from thff the new  Xolono, but ill! iirc.s.s-liihds cititomo.'' and will prove to every homo—N'ortli, South, Ka.<;t, and West—a weekly viaitor dispensing the useful and the beautiful alike.  THE BEST WRITERS  IN-  AMERICA AND EUROPE  will be reg\ilar coiitribntora to this long-e.stabhshed anil peerles literary mirror ot the world. Among tho host ol grcat names added to its stalT for tho .Now Year, ni.ay be mentioned:  W Gilmore Siiiiins, M Earlie [f'ousin  fiov. .1 H Inraham , May Carreiton],  L'Lercc I'liau,........ . ........ .OJiye Loj^ui, ;.....  J II Robinson M- E Kraddon,  E Z C Juilion, Harriet E Prescott  Ocorpe Martial, and nnnjorons ntlic-r celelfritics, who are now pro-paring literary ^'oins for the same columns.  Now is the time ta subscribe for  THE NEW YORK MERCURY»  as it will coiiinu iife the .New Year of 18GG, witha luagnilicent postlinmous novel from the pen of the  LATE 1M;0K. J. II. INURAIIAJI, Author of " the l.iaiieing Feather," Prince of the Hons,, (it David." "I.alUte, the I'inite," ctc., etc.. fw-btK««»^ iwouderfui .puivcr_m_ilction.^havQ never been, surpas.scd by any living writer », entitled  liOETIMEE  THE BAXKnurr'.S HEIRE-SS. A JKJAif, U< I.M.V.M. J  A!hi'. :i liririi iiit'la'c, ¡ii;i-ir.ilvd. tVoin ilie ¡■'■ii of liiiiiiei, I'ufi'uU, ii;ii1 a rhaniii!!:,' porin, brnuti-liilly ilhisiriili il, iiiini tlie piu ot llii'J,i!e (icorp.* Arnold.  eph oifCD  Daniel  n.d editor Train to ics ofthe  ments  bittcmes» Hi mrcts n prcscnt rt of tlio  liisjan,  ni'g lady (r aiiO so fiinate in er of the he ami ^rnaTkcd ho a»id he ionng jng con-BrciTTu^  jfa.vilitta.V fu!k lvsuraixch co.,  NVw Yurk City. «CoRPOPATKU 1821 —CAPITAI, $200,000.  . north am fr wan ¡n-^rn ance co.. IlarUord, Coiiueclicut—Cupitol S30(",0()0.  NEW ENGLAND INSURANCE CO,, Hartford Connecticut—Capital S-¿0(),000. i usurance Civn bo eiVectod witb tlìc subii Mibor in the above old Crlablisbed Stock (/'(•mpanic.s.on DweUiu;iS, Stores, ChiTcbes. Factories. Persomi) Property, ou terms na favorable asothor repponsibli' inst üuticns. A'iy communications ¡uiilrcsscd (o him at llitinellsville will meet with prom)-t ulton-tion, J. C. MILLER, Agent.  March 18(1:5—pdly  Till' New Ycrk  O'l'sV rüli'-' 'Il i.- 'i.. SII.-il at :  all'I l>i i i'iiü' i!-'li'-Tl. n.:i.;! ri  -----frrïTi nt tt-lv:illi  tin : t'ST: en] jiariy n ho M il copv Irce. CaiiM.ht  Mercury, wiili its forty colutiui.s .'.! I'Kiil'-r, ^^ ill I'.miiTHie to I't I--i c,j[i_*. aiii! -'iM liv all neusmeii in \nU'ric:i.  Tins are:  4s'J 00' a-vc-a  ■n] ir..;, l:'.: nine i-i.jili s. '^o. Tlie < ii.s V. ill n ci'ive ¡U» .ulililional X monlLis' bubiLi ijilion.s ren-ivcil. vaiisi-niu-rs musi send twenty ceiits I'.vii'a )r ea!'iv 'STilr-rript-ÌDTi, to pay the American pnst-  Suliscrilier's shoulil 1.0 (.aiefnl to wrile jilaiiily thenilinr i.r lUeir post-ollice, conn'y, and State. Specimen cojiies seni frec lo ali ai>plie;uil.s. Aildress,  CAULinVET.L & "WIIITXEY,  Proprii tors of tbe New York-Mcrcury, No?, .ib Ann Stiect.aml 113 l'"nlton Street,  New York City.-Per. 20, lSfi5:.')\v. __  "'¿fif'  ^ ^ A ßciisiblo writer for the Saturday«  lüteiesting í bavetlie hon- spccfable Wsa  ii;«., w'ìiittcd'ai]choeö'^in a .vtnT piquant  ilion waged by ^ o |>cup»ü nipùnst tho prop-anthoritics of'thc g'ov-T^T-*' Slatos has been fit the Traiteli States are in jvery StiUoin whicìithe re--d; and that, as far as j, tiio conrts of the United \ been re.storod, post-ofHce& ji, and Bteps taken to put iL_uperatioip-4ho~rcTGn«o  Míssissi  l'or tlio  iiiliâï  AT  country. As the result of 3 in.stituted by the cxecu-a view of inducing a retire functionis of the States ■1 in the ii:qniry of the -rth Carolina, AI fAlitbama. juouisunu and Tennesseo, have rocognizcd their respedive State governments and are yieldng obedi-micc- to - the ^aw  the United States with inçie willingness and greater promptitiXle tiian under the circumstances coild reasonably have been anticipated.  Tlio proposed amendn^nt for tho Constitution,providing for flic abolition of Slavery forever within the limits of the countrj', has been ratified ty. each one of tliése States, with tl» exception of Mississippi, from whidi no official information has been rccci\''cd, and in  TT ï^ O TP TP Je Í^ íi^l of tliem measurtw bave been  The Great C;  OK  emm m'  Slifiiclhinroun Jitiadinfl.  'T is all a mistaííc that people wen;  Lied to believe,that there was no more  EPl^ípí ié  ANGELICA;  You can find- as much, if not moro, than yon ever could before.  COOK ^ FORSYTH*  Are now prepared to Manulacture 'f^abInet^WaTe, in all its^rarrcfacs, and" to sell at  VICHOLES A JLE AND RETAIL.  They also keep constantly on hand  Looking Glasses,  OVAL PICTURE FRAMES & MOLDINGS, Which they can supply to their customers at a.s low prices as can be got at any other establishraent;  We invite the people of Angelica and vicinityj to give us a call, and see or themselves, before purchasing elsewhere.^  P. S —The trade can be supplied with Chairs, Bedsteads, and all other Cabinet Ware, in the white or finished, on liberal terms.  G.W.COOK,  Main Street, one door wc.st of the Ratbbum Hotel.  U23 Angelica, N. Y.  Amos R, Smith,  OP Caneadea, would respectfully announce to the afflicted relatives of deceased eol-diers, that he ia a legally authorize^ Agent for ÁllegaÍai¿aod-a¿i|óiníng CnnntieMo^pro'  cure Eotìntiea of fieoeassdi-Soldiera.. Also for the collQ^ction;of Back Pay and PcnsiooB. Dated, Caneadea, March '¿D,1865.  E^X^ÁiiáQYiÑIiÍüYiSÍií^  ties of cut ofT,and pipo top—Just received A. LOCKH ART  VXD IVAVV  Al'l'ROVEP r.Y THE GOVERNMENT, aranti.d snjierior to any other I'istol oí the Idiid. Abo l>oi'ke.| and Bi.lt Ucvolvc.rs. Snld liy tlie Trade (,'enerally. Dcserijitivi! ("ireiilars fnrni.shed on appU-eatiou. K. KK.MINGTON .s: .SONS, Ihon, N. Y.  . Slanul'aetnii.r's of iMn^kut», (';\r1jines, lîevolvcrs, RUlu Barrels, ect.  Jtv^ \n iunu.sing .story is told of a lady wlio tried to siiuigglo ii clock aciit iiv- i-auatla bordiu-—She g^vc tlif rl.)cl;,s(']k'r [Kirticular directions to ti.K the iilann ¡uiparatus ,so that i( would not fslrike, luit (lie X'aiiiiuck, being ^'jiiicliiiiig-^ui.-iLwiig^^kjjItlic alxu'm-tu^ makt; it. ^t1•ik(í at the moment he knew the lady wmild aii'ivo a1 the Custom llous(\ The la<ly fastened the time piece .sccniely tn lior iii)n])..i,aiid started 1)11 li.T liomeu'ai-(l joiirney. Avi'iviiig at the Custom House, the oilicer found ixjlhiiig contraijand among her elleets, and Wits passing to the ne.xt traveler, wluMi a loii'l whr-r- ! U'as heard under the lady'.s skirts. The strange noise was kept up for the full space of a iniiiule; but, to the lady it.seemed an lif)tir, .and slie bt.-eame ti'omnlous and ( xeited.. The Custom : Houseoflicor, not daring tn lay hands on a woman, "save in the wa}' of kindness," obtained an iron rod, with which he felt aniuiid tlui eiiii'iline for the concealed clock, and finally succeeded in briiig-incr it down.  adopted or are now pending to confer upon the freedmen tl»e privileges which are essential to their comfort, protection and security. In Florida înd Texas the people are making <»nsiderable progress in restoring their Stxte gov-ornments and no donbt is eniertained that they, will, at. an early jicriod, be in a condition to resume all tlieir practical lelations with the Federal Government. In that portion oi the Union lat(>iy in rebellion thé aspect of affairs is more j)romising, in view of all the circumstances, than could well have been expected. The people throughout th'c ('nilrê Smith wiTree an-andiWe ,dc= sire to. renew their allegiance to the Government, and to repair lee devastations oi war by a prompt ar^d clieerful return to peaceful pursuits. An abiding fajth is entertained that their actions will conform to their professions, and that in acknovvleding the suprema-of the Constitution and the laws of the United States, their loyalty wll be unreserveildly ¡^iven to the Government, whose lenieney thoy cannot fail to appreciate,and wIkîSo fostering eare will soon restore them to a condition of prosperity.  It is true that in some of the Stales tho demor;ili/Jiig effects of the war are to be seen in occasional disorders, but these are local in character, not fre-t] lUiuUji- X MiG^m-eiH-ei- and—are^^i>idly^v<inian-'s-rigdits Iccture-r  F. S. OTiS'S  NEW, NOYEL & MOST SERYICEABLE  LADIES' HOOP SKIRT,  NOW IN THE MARKET.  T11 IS SK1 ll'l" ciOin])ines_thr<'c of tlic t^rc.itest unmnoninrniw^^ of Ifcxjp  akirts, for wliicli letters jratcnt of tbo Utied ItStes have been tinuitcil.  Bt. It hiis II beautiful Piitent Pad, wliidi doubly prottM't.s tlio ends of tlie bustlo springs, consistint; of licavy fjatin Jeans, nciitly bound with kid.  lind. A superior paotnt clasp used in join-inji tlio s|nings together.  ;!ril. Tiio spring,s are fastened together by -im;ans'(iftiiis— ....................- ............. ...........  P»A-TEiSJT  whicli pos.scssr8 Superior Strength ami tHnisli  over all otlier fustcnings heretofore. knowTl or usctil'  Tlie couiliiiiiition of inventions as iipplied to tliiiii tlie Floral ^íUirt, givea' it tho advantage oyer all othera, in  miurability and style,  ont-'wcaring any two common skirts. ; _ ^ OiilerH syli.oited.., Skirt« vHl. bo dcUverfd alioard of any freight in N. y, city free of charge on iecclpt the moDOf. -Mtmufacturea excluaivelf hy 4h»,  Pickpockets at Corry -A Heavy Loss.  On Wednesflay afternoon a gang of pickpockets operated very successfully at Corry, one of their victims losin.i? a diniond breastpin valued at ^500. Tlie transaction uccm-ed—nn—tlie eastern  (lisappeaving as the authority ofthe civil power is e.xtcnded and sustained. I'evplexing qncstioiis were naturally to be cx 11Í1Cted .liiQin. tka.gre.at^aiid sml(iei± change in the relations between the two races, but systems are gradually deve1o])ing themselves under which the freedmen will receive the protection to which he is justly entitled, and by means of his labor make himself a useful and independent member of the couunnnity in which he lias his home. From all the infoi'mation in my possession, iind from that wliich 1 have recently derived from the most reliable authority, I am induced to cherish the belief that personal animosity is surely and rapidly merging itstdf into a spirit of nationality, and th;it representation eonnecteil with a properly adjusted system of taxation will resultin a hannoni-ous restoration of the relations of the Slates to the national Union. The ih> port of Carl Siiniis is licrewith transmitted, as retpiested by the Senate. No report frem, the lion. John Cov«de has been received by tho President. The attention of the Senate is invited to the accompanying report of Lieut-(ieu..G,nuit, who recently made a tour of inspection through -several of the  bound train on the A, Si G. W. R. R. The loser of the pin was Samuel Tryon of 51 Sfarliet street, New York. He was surrounded by a trio of the light tingiired fraternity who were apparently struii-jiliiii!: to ^et a seat, and while crowding against Mr. Trj'on d(!xterousiy relievtid him of his pin, and the disappeared. Mr. T. did not discover his loss till after the train started. On arriving at Jamestown he telegraphed the Chief of Police at Corry, oflering a reward of $500 for the recovery of his property. It was a gift frorn a near relative, and more highly prized for its associations thai its intriuiiic.value,. . __________________________  ner.  Did you over meet any of my 'cchoe^l ^hat elegant lie called "good society" is full of them. They are the most graceful dancers at the Apollinea, tho. very best bouquet holders at the opera. They-never shock your darling prejudices. Oh, dear, niil^and tlicy niHist iipon agreeing with you in every  which nearly drives you crazy. They are of your nvind so entirely altogether that you, with your wildest propositions, can no -tpore startle them than you can kill an alligator with bird shot. 1Í you sht)uld tell them that you Avere about to make a throo inontha' journuy tu thoy would only  express a polite wish that the climate might agree %vith you I They assent -etenially -to cvcryttihig -yoirBay,-thcy fret your nerves and wear out your temper to that degree where it would give you unspeakable deliglit to Üing the tongs at their heads.  Good society has a pet. name for her masculine echo. Do you know what it is ? Whithersoever the echo in pantaloons goeth, he ia that most excruciatingly tiresome of all wretches, a .nice young man." My gentleman friend, as you value your earthlj' good name, never let your acquaintances speak of you as that VemarkabJe-for-nothing-in-particularest of all mankind —a. nice young man. Anything but t ha t. RatlTe Í- e ve ^^^^ le t them c alf yó^íí a Brigadier-General, if thej'will. Rather be a dog and bay the .moon. For a nice young man is the hollowest of all echoes.  The nice young man has his feminine counterpart. Did you ever think what a dead weight of inane mediocrity drags itself behind the expression, "an amiable young lady ?" If not, just do it now. Do people call you an amiable young lady ? It means that your Vvdiele martiil .existence has so far been very much like blanc mange without any sartce. Nota grain of spice; not a bit of either sweet or sour; not a drOp of the red wine of life in you. It means that you haven't an honest, decided opinion of yout'own about any subject in the world. That you are only a reilection in a lool^ng-glass of tho tastes, manners, and fashiona of those around you; a mere walking dressmaker's show figure, nothing more. It means that there is nothing bright and keen and glad in your nature,but that yon are dead and dull and commonplace to the lieart'fi core. Re a scnid, a hoyden, a flirt, if you will but for heaven's sake don't be an amiable young lady. I'd rather be called a  My echo is the person who "hasn't an cnemjMii the world." No wonder. Neither has a dead oak log.  So much for good society's echoes.  l>oro,(K]r.) Monitor,  Ü, Mrs. Heady, who  par-  MOW ARRIVING-^ATiit. i^f«, firoo<&,,aO(l a large assortmen of Ladies Shoes «od Gmters at A* LCKHART4C0'S  PAKULB COOK, AND COAL StO^fiS QQtzliibiliooit A. XOCKilABTS.  Fuiki) Oysteus.—Select the largest oysters for ^frying. Tnkt; them rrat of their liquor with a fork, and endeavor in doing so to rinse ofl" all the particles of shell which ma}- adhere to them. Dry them between napkins; h^ve ready some grated crakers, seasoned with cayenne pepper and salt. Reat the y.olk^.pnly,nf .some,, c^iiS» .•'\';?d_tp each eggadtl half a table spoonful of thick cream. Drop the oysters, one at a time, first in the egg then in the cracker crumbs,' and fry them, in plenty pf hot-, -batter, or butter aiid- lard mixed, till they arc of a light brown on both «ides. Serve them hot  mreokipm, m vi  FOR SÂLSTBY A.mimlc€C(..«l»BBOU).  fiA If mfmit ^iiwtallr.  WAY.N. Y. Oct 18,«Sill.  tST" An Editor and his wife were walkiugi out in tlie bright moonlight one eventng.^ Like all cditqPa wives, aim was Wan ex<jeedmgly "poctic jii-taref and said to her mdte, "noticc that morn; how bright and calm and beau-Vii^t••CoaUin't tliiuk.oif noticing U," tirtomed the editor, "for anything lesB tliw^the usual rates—a dollar and iilf ecntefor twelve line»"  of the States whoso inhabitants ticipatcd in the rebellion.  (Signed,) ANDREW JOHNSON.  Washington, Dec. 18th, 1865.  jgST" Dressing skins with the fur on ¡0 a simplo proe.p«« (!arefuliy avoid getting blood or dirt upon the fur before . and while skinning the animal. Then stretch the skin tightly upon a board, and scrape with a dull knife lui-tilyou removTR all the flesh, ^iix two quarts of milk, a teaspoonful of salt and half an ounce of oil of vitrol. Warm this mixture to somewhat more than blood heat, but not scalding, and soak the skin in it 40 minutes, stirring and squeexing it in tire Avrirnr lir|iiid. Press out tho liquid and let the skin dry a Rhort time, and. then commence' rubbing the flesh side, with all your strength acroiss the smooth' edge of a boaid. Continue this work until.the pelt is entirely dry.  Another process is to cover the flesh side of the skins when first taken off, witii powdered alumand salt in equal  to four days, and then bo washed off in warm soap suds, partially dried, and afterward rubbed until thoroughly tioft. Th rubbing dry you may use powderccT chalk, and afterward .'sprinkle with powdered alum and fold up for a few days^_wli£iii-the skin will Jje thorougldy cured and very soft.  For making glove leather, tlie hair must be first removal by lime o^^ ley npoin'^ thc fl(ish side, then thorougldy wash in sqap sud.s, and afterward Boak  There is another still worse. It is the literary echo, the puny Po1Iy-wants-sn-gar imitator of some leading writer. If a would-be .aspirant after literary hon ors hasn't wit enough to find a style of his own, lie- may take it for an infal'i-ble sign that he- at last has no divine calling to be an author. And if some highfalutui critic tells him that such and such a passage is worthy a Tennyson or a Carlyle, or some other great light in literature, let hifn know it for a dead certainty. An ape isn't a genius dior a parrot an original thinker.  Tho faculty oi inutation is a most useful one. It teaches a young gentle-m:in to smoke and swear, snd a yoitng lady to make "tatting" and to wear waterfalls, Rut I donbt if it ever made an author. j  iSome time ago, a very bad Englisli nobleman, Ryrijn by . name introduced to the reading public a style of poetry, h.alf reckless, and wholly wicked.— From that day to this, long haired youths in turn-down collars, with all that bad English nobleman's immorali-his geniuii, have nn-  From tlic OvcaslKvo  A fic\y days since Tives in Uiifon county^^ Kenluclsy, soTd hör It^nd, and received some eight hundred or a thousand dollairs in cash. A day or two after fiha received tho money, a,stranger called lato in the evening and desired to get logings for the hight. The lady declined, but the stranger insisted, and Mrs. Ileady consented to let him remain over night. At tho usual hour of retiring, the atrangeriprocceded nidstairs^o bed. Lato in the night lie was aroused by •fhtrHnjrof-^lrc-lTOnBt^^ that threp or foiir persona %vere trying to break into the houge, ami - elie be-lievod they were robbcr8,wh(> had come there for the purpose of robbing* ho of her money.- Tho stranger arose,seized his pistol, t6ld her to go down ,stairs omi oj^jcii the »iooc -«vhqij ho told her, and to get behind the door »o oho opened it, and that he would defend Jicj^. ..Phvcji)^^  see by the light of the door wlien any one entered—he gave the word—the lady opened the door, and in ruohod a man who no sooner placed his foot on the door-sill than ho fell dead by a bullet from the strangers pistol. A second man rushed in and fell dead by a second shot. The third appeared and was severely wounded by tho third shot, and turned and ran off, leaving a trace of blood behind Iiim. The men who bad been killed were blackcd, and when the black had been washed off thoir faces, Mrs. Heady recognised with horror her own soihindaw as one of the men, and the Other was a. near neighbor and friend. It.was believed that the mounted man wsis her own son. We did not learn the names of the partie.3 killed, nor that of the Jkanger who so providentially appear-ed to save the old lady, her money and perhaps her life.  Execution of Wilson the Murderer.  Henry Wilson, the notorious burglar and murderer,wa8 executed at Geneseo, N. Y., at 2 o'clock this afternoon. He was conyicted of tho murder of Henry Dc.vdo at Portage, on the 16th day of May. He went to the gallows with the samo callous spirit that he had shown since his conviction, and smiled with contempt iipon the act iii which bo was the most proTninent. He denied that ho killed Dcvoe,but admitted that he knew who was the guilty party. "He refused to entertain any clergymen or receive spiritual advice. Sheriff Case had caused his photograph to be taken as he was on his way from the jail to the gallows, against lii.'i protest. For this he told the Sheriff as he stood with tho rope about his neck, he wtwld "take ^lis (the Sherifl's) picture damn qiiick if he had the power," Ho died like a brute, without evoking sym-  confessed that he did not bear his true name, and refused to disclose it or tell his history even to his counsel. He did however, confess that he killed Hon, Burr Burton at^Byracuae in May lasfT .-»Iso that he killed a Mrs. Lewis at Lancaster, Erie county, N. Y., about one year ago. He hinted at maiJy othr er crimes, but disclosed no particulars. He gave his body to his counBcl, who sold it to a surgeon at Nunda, N. Y.  two dollars pick atfítvm tjt á»rá¡fm*  •)i««iiicM Cani« MAt'cSMcéliiif Ms VIT» EN»tifir« jwr'KMvMi.  Kntton VMt for llMXUliMl.  Muttoa 18^ tlic l)c«)t moat vo dk« ^mI^ -in best, as being the bcatthieiBt-rbett« aib being tho roost delicioas, if ,ir«li looked. Wq do not mean the woolly,' greasy mutton of tlic Merinos and Sm* onies, nor the coarse, stringy, -^lloiry, " though Tory ccont'>mical mutton olf tiM. Lcicesters, Cotswolds, and other loojjf wool sheep. When we say mutton i« the mdst delicious of domestic meato, wu have the flesh of the middle wool in mind—that ia,. of South-downs, par excelienci!y and Cheviots, Hatnpshii«* downs, Shropshire-downs, and otheni . of their kindred in a less degree. Mat-ton is made more economically, and ii used np more advantageously, than pork or beef^ 'K f^l-nicr can seldoa have fresh beiif unless lie has eo larg« a nutnber of hands th at tliey can consume a quarter before it will spoil. More grain is requiretl to make « pound of pork than a pound of mutton i ' It is more healthful food > than pork; fat mnti.on will keeptlonger,and an ordinary size family can dispose of a small sheep before the mutton will «poil^-'evoft^ i«~<}«ite~-warm-- weallwrr; -Besides, if a farmer is.on friendly terms with his neighbors, he can easily sell or ¡end one or two quarters. By » system of exchanging fresh meats,' several fatriilies may be supplied with that of most excellent quality at all seasons of the year, at a very cheap  rate,......Miittoii.is, more and  will consequently give a laborer nioro strength than pork ; people of atudiotrs habits, and children in particular, will feel better, accomplish niore, and be more healthy when they eat mutton than if they cat much pork or even beef.  Convenienco is an important cocsid^— oration at a,ll times, on the farm or elsewhere. When fresh mutton is Wanted, one man can dress a sheep or a lambjn a_.few minutes; while radcli  longcrltim©4S — reqairedi^^buiciie beef or a hog. Nothing ia lost by making mutton, and it costs compara* tively nothing. The wool will usually. coverall the cost of keeping during • year, and often that of fatting too. Taking this view, which is a fair one, no one can fail to perceive that mutton is the cheapest meat that can be raised, iSmall faiii lea can. salt and dry one or both hind quarters, or cook a quarter and eat it cold. A quarter of lamb after it has been cooked, may be kept ten or twelve days,-and^-still lie -good. . Farmers should learn to prepare their own meat, and not sell their animals to ^ bntcliers, wlio sell them~thDr-meat for  their own tables at exorbitaut prices» Furthermore, a great many people who,have only a garden or small farm, can often fatten a few sheep during the winter, and thus liave better meat« at a much cheaper rate than if they purchase M.-^AgricnUurist,  E^rygood farmer knows that any domestic animal is a good clock-that it knows almost to a minute when tfia feeding time has arrived. If it hat  ty, and none of ceasingly dosed the world with spasri)-odic eflusions of Byronic trash.  AVithin the last half century, a matter of twenty yeas ago, it may have been, somebody I know not who, but a person who would better have had hi s funeral preached before he did it, wrote a sentimental, moony novel; I wonder how many two-penny scribblers since that day, have echoed "doAvn the corriders of time" this sentimental and moony way of novel writing ?  Don't wrile feeble echoes ^ If you have a thing to say in your own way say it; the world will be glad to hear it; If you haven't keep still. If your fricM)^ lelis you thatymi háv^^ oaricture equal to Dickens, don't feel  flatíereíl.: t4.mr-itJip  The Cattle Plague Increasing in England.  The London times mys: "There -can no Inriger be a doubt about the formidable growth of the cattle plague during tho present month. During that brief period it has been so rapidly and fatally disseminated that tlie prospect hahvbGcome very different fiom what it was a few weeks ago. When the commissioners issued thoir report at the end of October, it was obvious to .argue as it was argued that^ the. ravageii„of___the. plague, as then ascertained, constituted, upon the whole, a slighter infliction than would bo created by the suspension of all the cattle trafiic of the coini^ry. In the four months comprised tween the fittit outbreak of the dis-  ease and the report of tho coinmis sioners the total number; of cases barely exceeded fourteen tjiousand, white the deaths, from plagué and pole axe tógether, were only about twelve thousand.  This gave a mortality of only seven hundred a week upon an aggregate stock of horned cattle estimated at seven millions, and it was asked accordingly wliethersii^ justify the application of such a remedy as was proposed. . The question arose faij ly enough but of the facts as they then^ appeared and as hopds were entertained that we had seen the worst of.the plag.?ic,,,ai,any on, the sweeping measures of precaution proposed by tho conmiissipiicrs foimdlTo^greiiirTavor. ^Btit~ttie"^Hpect of things has beeii seriously changed by the returns of the month now expiring. These four weeks have already doubled the losse.s of the preceding four months. The attacks have risen from 14,000 to upwards of 27,000 ,ivt):<l tl)tg.,d,eMhSi-destr^ included.^ tp, upwards, of 21,000/ TíeTweeír and the lltti ,of the month the number of cafjes increased by fifty per cent Li_.tho . ensuing .week thin quite so bad, but there was a further iijcrease s'tilL At present it may be assumed that the deaths, instead of 700 a  Bisgnlarity ofPeedinf.  1 ucuuroi*  cy at the appointed perbd, it will not fret till that period arrives, after which itbecomcs very restless iand uneasy till its food comes,-Henco this fretting may be entirely avoided by strict punct* uality in feeding, but it cannot be otherwise. The very moment the animal begins to worry, that moment it begins to lose its flesh; but the rate of tliis loss has never been ascertained -it is certainly worthy of an investiga« tion-and can only l^ determined by trying the two modes, punctuality and irregularity, side by side^ under simi-,, -lar circnms^nces, and with the same amount of- food, for some weeks or months together,  There is one precaution to lie ob* served in connection with regular feeding, where some judgment is needed. Aidrauls eat m^ or fi'oity-than li» datnp audi warm weather. —Hence, if the same amount by weight is given at every feeding, they will not have enough when thé weath* er ts'cold, wd^ will be" when it is-wârm and-  evils mus^ be avoided, wlnle a little attention and oT»8ervation will enable the farmer to do it.—JtaralA^ain.  several days in a paste madti of brains then rub dry,'and cure by smoking moderately for a week ¡i> a cool place. This will give the fi^e soft durable Indian moccasin leather. ^  If anybody says that you have a sense of the beautiful as fine as Mrs. Browning, don't let your sense of the beautiful fly away witIi your common sense. Above all and before itll, never echo the "fine old English, authors," Charle.s Lamb say: "In the cataliDgne of book« wiiieti'aVe tto'bbd]«, f all those volumes which,no gentlomap's library should be without." He is right, ^ _ -  Bo yoiurseir ir kiiid organized you to. love music and poetry; love them with a single-hearted  enthusiasm, but never drag up any j ^vg-gk^ are at least four times that num-pseudo-enthusiasm to echo the dcvo- h)er, and if winter does not tell in. our tion of another, if ilio has not. Keep, f^vgr, the losseaimay bo 5,000. or 6000 everinore alive within_^ou the brave, I before Christmas." brigl]t spirit which^ltaresio bcTionest:^  Dbowxeo^—l^e Chautanqiia^^^l^^ A man hy the ttamc of TTiomaR liatney a xor turned soldier, formerly of the 49th rogiroeiit, was drowned »(«r tx)ng diaatanq^  lake. He w«»skatltig tap tho Iiak<^ ntt W to an alt hole, ^ and wafe ^drowned. Hhi body wis rteOTwed bj grappliog tfons,  , The Art of QoiReUiaf.  Sensible husband: "HowIs it that we never quarrel, Mrs. Xantippe? Well 1 will tell you, One person can't make a quarrel. Now, if I am in a quafiel«'. some humor,~and break out, mj .«ifi» remains cool and collected» and don^i say a word. If my wife is peevia^ and displays more temper- than is becoming to one of her beautiful »ex, I her husband, remains as umnovod M the.,mfmumcnt,,.or else. ,chea( myidf... into the belief that I am listi^ing for the moment to some heavenly soaf*  mw  astonishing, if yoti leave a oaarirf^ alone, ho\v very soon it dies ontî xlMiini our secrete, madam; and I shoold ad»; vise you, and all Xantippes to follow  it," . . ■  gr Webster'« new Standard Dictioúary give» tlie following definitions :  I)»jiocRAT—One w:ho ia in favor of utuperml tuffrage. • -  OoppKRnEAB^A Nartìtem »ympotkmr with stml^rimvm.  Jackson, Mich., got drunk and atac* gered upon a bed whereon laj tiilkh fant son. Bis whole weight reeted «p* on ihe babe, anditsoon capired;"!!» ' wròtched man, who is a réspeot^ilt ' wcll-ta do citizen, made a tow emir to touch liquor again.  "Massa C., doyon know in dc samc building whar^^òttoi irf - "Oh yes,»^ I replicdr'ietj wi^* «aosh,»said Sambo. tlesit head ofany nun I eber At thia remarla a big, fàt, evXfy lounging OH « «cttee, tpoÌMi "Whatuc^ i» man fòt wìd ^  n^liea lit fol ^^ f   

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