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Angelica Reporter Newspaper Archive: April 26, 1843 - Page 1

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   Angelica Reporter (Newspaper) - April 26, 1843, Angelica, New York                                 ------^  PURDY & HORTON.  .<12 per annum, pnyable within iU y«ar fca'-t the expiration of the year. ' aUc^ntinucl uHtif alt'amBrages-siire at <he option of the puWishers. ' ^ jmcnts inserted at the usual rates. Itlcrá r..l'lref!seil to thocilitorsinust come to ¡:iáure attention.  J 0 B PTTN ting (led on 8lii>rt notice, and on reasonable  ffStheDei''»''''''^^'*"- Revkwi  PRID13,  li onthéatínals of my race, .  , characters of flame,  libh^timc shail dim not nor erase,  my "'  ,>'firc winch bnTny vflars pre^^  inilinly smouldering lies,  HI flaih ovit to a metcor'i Waze,  iTÍonS^llw-skt«a. --  nfed as the angry ocean's swell, ......  My soui within me boil3,  [a a chained monarch in his cell,  )r lion in the toils....... _  Í we^Uhj tr pride, to lofiy slate, iKo wore I'll hend the knee. It fortune's minions, meanly great, [shall crouch like slaves to me,  r„, uo" Wiiu'fJ'fermca-we rjr coftmaftd, lAnd {jave me strength toUisc, ball plant his sceptre in my hand, lllls lightning in my eyes, jail with the thorny crown of fame  Í My aehing temples bind, liid name 'hy a mighty name, -  «A monarch of the mind." L heaven's l)right palaxy shall greet  King! byccleslial choice!  nd earth's tan thousand tongues repC.^  lie thunders of my voice.  ans ni heH.urn, the jieartless fair [who proudly eye? me iioW, tiall weep to see some other share Godhead of-my brow.  ¡)all weep to Sí-e «one lovelier star  Snatched to my soul's ftinbrace,  ^^'eíTd Avilh inc Fame's Oery car, And'spiun the toiliidi of spaced ' "  liO'igh srundl-g praises riUcll the sai!,-And (lattery smoolii tliy rest, íri íí yet may pierce the mail Of tliat unfeeling breast.  (■une, oh my soul! thy loveliest strain—  ExuUtt-ith song and glee! For scorn hath snapped each earlhlier > T).TÍn And set the immortal free.  linds destined !o a glnriot!,? shape.....  Mu^t fust aftliction feel; Ifine issues Irom the trodden grape, Iron's biistered into steel.  I giishes from aíTcctiims'bniised^  ^ml steadfast Faith, unkindly used, Hardens to stubborn pride.  Govifí^E» ffcb  V QL. VI.—NO; 4Ù ] ANGELICA, ALLEGANY TO. NTr-T,  nviîCLi: KO. CCÖ.  say lieM a-been able to Iinve sold il far enough to pay inc all I lent him, and taken up that tleuced note himself; but as it is, it must all corhe out of my Utile farm, and tJven-r shan't have^^ hands, will ^be left, Sally ; and this heart will Be ieft; you needn't be afraid while I have the one, but shall alwayjs be able to^et a comfbrtable living, and the love of the other will lasrlil^1hat hw cold in death, and these hands are folded over it in the eleep of ihi^grave. However, 3ally, you have beauty'and inerit enough to get a better husband. If you repent your bargain, I give ,y6u back your word, and^hough 1 shall always love yoti, to my dying day, not one word of coin plaint shall ever pass my lips,'  ' William, 1 have known you a long tinC; and j never Iv.'-.art! j^y-u rpc;.!; su^ unkindly 'befviie,' responded Sally.—-' When you pressed me to be your wife, and I owned I loved you, and gave yor.  and was now nhedding a pUver lustre over the beautiful scene—his countcnance inflnmed, and his Ups IrembUng with  ailger.  ' So,-so, Mr. William/ imit{«rè<l-.4fe-5 ' you dofi't think much of tlio Sqtjire's principles, it I'll máke you  think something uf the Squire's power befitre rm'd#ifi with \ou ; and you, too, ÄS IVíTtlapTiTr;y  Katlin by all odds, would you ? But I'll have you, in despite of your ilcljcacy ; and then you may come back, with your love and sentiment, to be the wife oí the clown. A pretty Collin and G»lqe, 'pon honor.' Thus grumbling to hiin^lf, the Sqtiire pursued his way to his own house ; and sending for his cnaehmau, he gave him  ' I 'beyed the order to the letter, sir/  * You did, with a vengeance,' muttered he in a totve of *di8appointmcnt,v Then; perceiving th.it some oi'the inmsjftes of the  höttse UHîFC drawing near ihejspül, bßiAg-JMuío nndXuiiii,Av^here  their adminisfralion, they went fo slecp in the tempie of PJiasiphtr, thus namcd from Pasipììainp.m, (it "oommuttientive lo ali." Strallo mentions a cayern sacred to  consult sleeping lirifists, Aristides is i^oid lo have ddivercd his opinion whn'si fd&l asleep in the teinple of ii'isculapius. It would 1)0 endless to quote all the an-Thoilrieti uii Ihis »uLjoct. MiukTil  attractcd by the noise,, he spoke ia a tone to Tpm, handing, him at the" time, a bank note from his pockct-bookv.^ be divided between him and Dinah, on the ^Spndilioii'TtlM "ihey""?^^ ojjeu llVeir  !ijf)s to any one about the evci\ts of the nigh^ Such a promise, was easily made, but ndt soeasily complied with ; and not many wcekii went by, before the ludicrous mistake ofi^Tom's became the common theme of conversation and ,laughlcr, rn lhat| Chapel.iin, re'inoviBd The; tancerou'^ breast part of the Coutltry. of a lady in her magnetic sleep, durins:  On a pleasant Evening tbout t wo inontlisl which shecontinued her conversation un-  ' cons  petisers, however, onlstrip the ancients itv the wonder? ilioy relate in regard lo somnambulent'f;icui(ies developed by magnetism. In 1829, Cloquet, a very di^lin-gui«tlied Parisian surgeon, assisted by Dr.  ^r^Wh! tomg men! ieimtisk m Í  and conscíTOce to warn, attd hc«rto to ft«! ^ and hands lo labor, and tonguea ta ipctlr. And the objeets of bénevoTeot eÄrt un around you. Can you fold your arms do nothing ? H¿ve the miseriet of men no power lo^iiiove you ? His th« aoI««n  It To rÍNifíf ipur heart« tm! nniiè your «Bergiès? f^ii hail givto,OttJÍlÉ^úir. er to dtí good,lU wÜ« .will,, one day, say to you, if you have neglected ttf ' db It —"iîiasinuc h as ye Jiave done it not untto one of the leaüt oí these my brethren^ ye liave done it not to me."  In elosing. let mo ask yoti to look ìiÌ! 5 respqnsibiiil ies in . connection with  young men of this nation occupy in coil-  iiection wiih its future dcitiny !—a degti-iiy in vrhich is wrapped up, I might almost say ilie desüny of.the world. How RoOn Will they Tc(;üin¥l  U'liat mighty energies are concentrated ill the generation of young men who oró moving on tiiis hkh and fenrfiil defitinv P  falsehood in my heart, and I only wanted j leave on horseback early in tJie morning, to get a husband that could make a lady of Go novv and send Dinah up with supper.'  I have told*you,' he eoncluded, ' and obey | ranible down to . the tristing-place, a lo the letter. 'The Three Swans,Vabotii servant in livery rode up to them, and my promise, do you suppose there Was a fifteen miles on the niain road. Í shall respectfully touching his hat, inquired if "' ' '' * '' ' .,11 1 . , • .1 ^ ■ he addressed himselflo William Thornton.  On%eing answered in the affirmative, he handed him a letter. It was from Mr. Wilding—fither of the dissolute young Wilding, and rar^thus:  New York, Oclober 2, 18— Sir—1 have the satisfaction to announce  lady  me, so that I need have nothing to do?— Do you think so mean of me, William, as to believe it was your snug farm, and the new house that you had built,and the dairy house, and your cattle, that made me love you ? If you do, you knoW little of my heart. When I looked aroinid,lind saw everything so pleasant and prosperous iboutyou, I was glad in my soul; but it  Up wjtn supper  * Dinah has gon<? down into the v ilUge, sir,' answered Tom, grinning, * to rig herself out Tor a Gufiee ball they^e going to have there to-nlorrow night.'  * Well, go along, with yourself, sir, and _ ____________________  have supper prepared.' ^ that" the' Lnl'mished invktion of  It was on the evenin?; of the fuHowin-'your iate friend, Mr. Scliemely, has been  day, that a earriage was standing near,the spot where the lovers were to liavc their was on yotir account as much as on my ! party,sheltered from observation by a little I hu^ndred and tü eiUy 'dol^  , the I thipket, that interposed bet^^en it and the j uaVe dedivcted three huhdred dollars, (that  twilight hour came down upon the valley, 1 path we have mentioned. The moon was 1 being hajf the amount of Mr. Schemelf s lo make everything look misty and dim,! ridjng high in the heavens, and bad been ° ^ -  antt i:''o"ght sad feelings along with it,! pouring down the silent jnfluencc of hor that il William's house was to be biirnt jbeauly, over the tranquiLa^^^ dOWiiflud CWllle w^ every branch arid leaf into  sheriff vvas io peizo Ifis fttrmj and he was Bilvery bcnuly : but at this moment a Io be thrown into prisoq, that I would cloud, borne along thmugh the azure love him still, with a truth that time could! heavens, by the scarce felt breeze, passed not aller, nor absence divide. And why lover its face, and spread a temporary  The faculty of seeing throiigli (he c losed eyelids, was fully Pubstanciated in the presence of a eo.mmission of investigation appointed by the Academy ohnedicine of Paris, and in the presence of fificcn persons. They found a somnambulist, oflhc name of Ponl, to airnppcar.Wce fist asleep. On being requesled io rise and approach the window, lie complied Tmmcdiately.— Mis eyes,were then covered in such manner as not to awaken him ; and a pack of cards having becn sluifiled by several per-  .............________________J.................be recognl2ed (hem without the  sold,'recently, under my dlrôclion lo W'atches were then  ingenious mechanist of this cjl v,,for. seven! named the hour and  .. ^ fenrfiirdefitiny P  Whose counsclk arc soon to guide this nation ? liy whom are its morals and man-no r s a Md princi pies to be Íormed and fixed ? Is it to rise ih morality, intelligence  _________________^ iuul virtue ?"~óF4s ittoJte overwhelmí^^;;;  :onscions of the ofefation^ wiiich laitcd«^y -»gnoraiico and cráá: ..welve mirmtes. . . ^«ntl crime .«^—bf disf^^^^^  laws, ami by contempt of Divine aüthori-i The young men of this nation are  did I love you, William ? Was il because aflairs went on so smoothly with you, and  darkness on the earth.  ' Who the deuce is the woman, thai-  L X _U E MISTA K E .  liV \VII.UAM LEGGF.tT.  -Haply for I am-ldack,  lhavc met those soft parts of conversation It diamberers have : Or, for I tim declined I thè vaie of years : yet Hiafsi not much.  ISItakspcarc.  ! was in that beautiful season of the when the extreme heats of summer passed away and the delicious dsys lore delicious evenings of autumn sudceeded ; when the air is filled music, ano the fanning breeze bears |h and fragrancè on its wings ; and ithe darJcened hue of field, and forest, jh still unfaded and lovely in their pure, whispers that, like things earthly, aro hiistening to decay—it was in I ft season, not many years ago, and in a imtic country place, that tlie incidents following tale occurred. Twilight commenced her melancholy reign, in Iley of the Catskill mountains, though lingering glory of the sunken sun was fglowing, like a flood of molten gold ^their summits, .when two persons, a fig man and woman, issuing from the low of the woods, by a little path, Mthfimselves oh the fallen trunk of a 1, beside  a stream thai rippled at their The female^ appenred to bo abnnt My-years old, and was arrayed in the  nost common-charaetcYi St lets oi r-iir *  iry maidens.—------------------  .she possessed, in a hiiih degree, tlie llcribaUe chnrm with which the ro«y fks and laughing eyes of woman are ays accompanied, when those roses [bestowed by health and exercise, and llaughing expression is nrompted by pcence. One of our own iTweetest fs, has beautifully and tnily said, thui  -Woman's eye, ■ court ®r cottage, wheresoe'cr her home, atlra he'art-spell, too'lToVy and too liigh >he o'erprais'd ev'n ty her worshiper, Por sy. the young inan seemed four or five rt ol^er; and though dressed in  you Wore smart clothes, end rode a fine master thinks will còme along here, I horse, and rode so well ? I can lay my | wonder,' said Tom,—for it was lie who hand here, and answer, no. Was it j wag trudging to and fro near (he spot, and because you beat village playing ball and such things ?  so foolish. No, I'll tell you why it was. [against nothin' he'll git in some cursed Vou was a good son, lengthening_QUt your hobble yet---hush {-—thepe's some old father's and mother's days by your obedicnceand kindness to to ihem ; and you W'as cohsfaht at meeting on Sabbaths, aind always had something for the plate ; and more than all, you went about doing good, without letting people know who it was that did it ; and it was by mere .chance, I may say, that ! found out 'twas you that fielpetrmy own cousin Harry out of his trouble, and paid the debt yourself. 'Twas for these things that I loved you, William j and here's my handif j'ou choose to take it ; it's one that will hold by you through good and through evil report, and leave you only When death unlocks its grasp.'  Tears stood in the eyes of both these riistic lovers; and when the pious and aifectionate girl had finished speaking, she Was folded lo as manly and true a bosom us ever Was light cd-by the ftamc of lovcv Imprinting ' a pure kiss, sweet and long,' upon ht'f cheek, W^illiani arose from hi? seat.  ' Sally,' said he, ' I never doubled your truth,but I have observed Squire Wilding, since h^'Citme up here last spring, has put himself often in your way, and seems to admire yon verj much, I don't like to be unctiaritable ; but I'm thinkiiig Parson Goodman wouldn't often have him to listen lo his sermons,if il wasn't on your account. I liad made up my mind lo speak to you about il ; for, thinks I, it vvilt not ¿how my love much, it I stand between her and such a fortune.'  cMy:,  •ars : from which 1  note, ;.r-;iih your endorsiement, which I he» Cl'j^Jr!«^-to you) and the balanrc I havl ü-Vf-^lcd to (jc déposfíeíí, su  your order, in the bank of C-  tihjcet- to Having  one  corain';'' and so ea-ying he glided behind a tree.' '  A firrep - WikS iiearilytrrjTpm path, and presently a ii;male in a while dress, made 'her appearance. She had just reached the tree, and was paSsing quickly by, when Tom ,rui.hed out, and seizing her, bore her in his arms-to the carriage. She shrieked and endeavored to get loose, but was too firmly held.— ''Gad,' said Tom, 'you've pretty good lungs of your own. Miss; and an't very bad off in the way of muscle ; biO, ye see, there's no kind of use in makii.g* such a thundering noise, for go you shall, and there's an end of it—so iliere! "(slamming to Ihe carri.vge door) you may ¿crecch now, as long as you please. My maxim is to 'bey orders, if I break owners^' So saying, the coachman mounted the box, and dVovf. off vit fullspoed.  been informed that (he endoriemenl was an act of mere friendship on your part, 1 cannot consent that you should lose any larger ^nm.  1 have lately hcard'of a very disgraceful aliair, in which my son was concerned, while spending the warm weather in your section 5 and can only express my pleasure that his dislionorabje inlenvion^s were overruled. The ridicule which lias been attached lo him\in conseqiience of the just termination of his base design, I am much in hopes-w41hhave a salutary influence on the rest of his life; shoijild that be the case, we all shpuld have great occasion to bless.. Tnr4msTAKE.  SOMNAMBULISM.  This si iTgular aberration from our na' tural habits may be considered an iterme-diate state between sleeping and being a-wake. This infraction of physioh^gic laws may, therefore, be looked upon as a morbid eondition. Physicians have given it various denominations, founded on its phenpmna, wcli-vnf^afio, nodi-sergium, nocti-ambiilatio, somnm vigilans, vlgiliti sqmmns. Somnambulism was well known by the ancients; and Aristotle tells us. "thereare individuals who rise in their sleep, and walk about, seeing as clearly as those that arc awake."  Dingenes Laurtus, states that Theon/he rhi.lii.-n'ihcr \\a3 sk-rp WBlkcr. ir.ilcn We will now rcqtjesl our renders to ^l^^'t ufi^i,": on road j and pnrvucd hii.  allow thiîrasplves to be transported for a brief space of time, to an obscure inn, known as ' The Three Swans,' twelve or fifteen miles on the roadlo New York.— It was about nine o'clock in the evening-ofthe same day, that a carriage, drivin  journey uiilil hu wan awakeived by. (rip ping on a stone. Felix Plater ft-li asleep while playing on the hi!c ; and- wasoidy startled from his slumbers by (he (all f)C tiurilistTUKient^ There is n(r(Tmibt bii*  minute, (hough the hands were repeatedly altered. A book was (hen presen(ed to him, (it happened (0 he a collcction'lftf operas,,):jand lie read Contdr et ins.tead of Orsior ci Po'lvx, TrngpJic Lyrique. A V^l'l'nc of JIo.ra.ce.was Jhcn su tn.  him, but n-fit knowing Latin, he returned it, saying, "Ihi^ ^g pomo eluncli book." The celebrated Dc. Brousajq hiid before the same samnambulist a klter he had drawn from his |tocke( ; and to iiis iitler surprise, he read the jirst lines ; the doctor then wrote a few Words on a paper in very small eharacfers, which the somnambulist alsorrcad with (he utmost facility. But what ; Was still more sina;ular, when leKers or books were applied (0 his breast, or between the shoulders, he alsr perused them wi(h equal accuracy and ease. Jn one instance, the queen , of clubs: vyas presented to his back ; affer a moment's hesitation, he said, "this is a club, the nine ;" he was informed that he was ir; tn error, v.^cn h<? rce.n i^rcd himself. and snîi?, "-no, lis Ibé queen." A ten of spades was then applied, vvben he hastily exchimed,'At any rate, (his i« not a court card ; it is (he ten of spades.'  The many as(nte (ricks plaved by nni-raal ma£»ne(isers, and frequently detcoicd. naiurally induced most persons to donbl (ho veracity of (hese experiments; hut when we find (hey were witnessed by sevcnty-eiiiht mcdionl men. most of ihcm decidedly hostile to magnetism, and sixty-three intelligent individuals not bclongin? to (he profession, and in every respect disinterested, what are we (0 s.iy ? Perhaps exclaim with Hamlet,'  There arc more thi.igs I;i heaven and earth, Horatio,  ! lîian are dreamt of .in 3'oiir pliilo-inpliy.  RF.SPOXilBILITIES OF VOUXG MEN'.  J,p( me (lien, young men, invoke your self-reTi.'inre, votir coiirnire. your bcnevo-  ^y . ^ .................  called on lo answer these questions to God, to their country, and tothe world—to thia generation of men, and to all the generations thi>t shall succeed it to the end of lime. It is a.tremendous responsibility i but they cannot escape it. It will meet them every where. It will go with them to (he grave, and follow them to thq Judgment. Let them, (hen, gird themselves la Iheir work, with minds cultivaled and enlarged—with hearts expanded and pur?— with principles of human conduct drawn trom ihc deep founlnin of Div>he Iritthj and whh a faith that shall look up to the God of the universe, reverence hi« name, trust his Providence, listen to his voice, and obey his will.— irwi. Slade.  ineiit .Fudge, Sir Allen Park, once ?aid at a public meeting in this ciiy ; "We live in (he midst of blessings, till we are utterly insensible of their greatness, an<} of s I lie source from which- Ihey flow. , Wd speak of our civilization, our parts, our ireedom, our laws, and forget entirely !iow large a share of all is due to Christi-aniiy. Blot Christianity otit of the page of man s history, and what would hia laws have been : what his civilization ? Christianity is mixed up with our very beingf and otir daily life ; there is not a familiar object around us which does hot'jvear a diilerent aspect, because the ChHsiian hope is On i(; not a law which doca not owe itstruth and gentleness to ehri^tiani-(y, not a custom wlijeh cannot be / traced «i iill ils iiol^ and heahhful parts to IhS Gospel." ^ /  had been awaiting its arrival rushed to the door of the vehicle,and endeavored to open it, began to speak in a soothing tone lo ¡(5 inmate :  ' i\fii.(,re<;s of my soul!' he cried, as lie ' You, mean kindly, W'ill, I know you ium'tled at the,door, ' forgive the rashness do,' returned the maiden, also rising.— ' of whijh I have been guilly, and beVievo "-ihit lask you as a favor, never to mention :that nolhii'g but the_ ardent passion that  if he meant i burns  ot me same iiiiy, iiKJi a vai 1 i.ij^c, nn>»u^; ^ that, in somnambulists, the intelleciual; lencc, your eiicrgv, yonr industry, and rapidly past the aforementioned inn, and [ functions are not only aeViye,bnt^^ in aid ofthe  turning into the stable yard, stop])ed ill th<}| ly mor^ dcvelope^^^^^ which you arc more imTne-  rear of thQ^building,; while Wilding, who |<]tjals-are awake. Persons in ibis slate ¡«liatbly engaged, but in every jnod work ; ' '' have been known to wrile and correct in every work which can reach, by its  verses, and solve diificult problems, which benelicenl infiucnee, yrnr fellow men. (hey could not have done at olher limes, j Wliiil responsibilities rest upon you!— In their actions aiid^.locorn.qtion'/t are; Vv'hose, let me ask, are, the^c minds and more cautious, and frequently -more ifex- jkear's, and bodies that you pf^sicss—^^(liCsc  Icroti?,-than when awake, . Tlicy luue energies thr^t make you mi:s ? Arc they becri''knowii to saddle and bridle horses, yours?. No! They are .the property of after having dressed themselves ; put oniano^er. " Ye arc not your own."' And  wilhin my bosom, conldliavc caused 'too's ^nd spurs,-ah^^^ the destiluie, (he  and I'm by no means sure of i me to have given you a mnr.cnt'.s pnin. - hnmg, nnd bnc-î.  ':rnili«  _lhi  wrei  1 wouldn't liave him—no ! not if his ¡Curse the latch !'-—said ¡¡o in an under pennies were all dollars. Wlud ! Is'po^oitonc ' INfy liík— because he comes carriage and horses  dogs, he thinks he's agoing ...........................  young women's heads. Now, merit m;ikcs ' f:)rced o|).en the iinyichüiig door ; and (he the man ; and fi.r my part, if 1 -.vas obli-ied inmate ofthf. carriage, anxious to escape,  no, and had 'snrin-ing quicklv otit, l?livek Dinah, in her  are  in-lht  rgaj i.r^ rAileep-waJker^^^^^ ? ''^'"^.It*'»''b.^ctjircn, (he..r:lill;  in -v.iiilcr, conijdaiíiüd; lïf i^ì in licav-^n.—  I here with a dashing' open this infi-rnal door) —at yciiu'mercy , and asked for a irlass of brandy ; hut ex-; That Father is en'j::u;ed in the great work  ses, and servants, ar.rt -_;tiv hnn T — f')v(uiie—every thing .■ ' pi-trsscd vinhnit nnnt^r, <Vn-beinir nflered' (heir igiiorance and  's atroinc lo (urn all (he 1 At f!:i's crisis, Tom, by a violent jerk, glass of waler. 'i'lic celebrated sett of-gullf and misery, anil makiii;; them pure.  to have a husband, whetlier or .................... ^ . .  1.0 choose betwixt the two, IVl lake Jack ball dress,. \vas enfuiJcd in ijic arms of Katlin, that lost his leg and eye "board the i WiliUng.  Chesapeake, by all odds, (liou-h he Ins to! ' Wliy, master !' roared she, ' an t you «rpuort himself and his okFmonier, by ashamed of yourself! h;t me go ! let me I , .1 • T-. , jj- I black, you i^haii I play sMcli  pranks wi'" mc !-you is a pretty white man. an't you ?-but I will g,. ri-lildown to York, and tell old masier of you—(hat's what 1 will !'  Don't  making mats, and such things, mention hi^ name to mc any more.'  . .........' Well, Sally, I'm very willing to obli:;c  homespun eotlon. clothing, nxucli used, you in that, as in ev.erylliiiig you ask; hrmm of middling deijree, in our 1 for I always find you have gooii reason< ihtain districts, was handsome—if we ¡for what you say, and I don't think much  '^solttm the manly and independent I of his principles myself.' ^ssion, which honesty and toil bestow ! 'Principles ! he has no principles.— n their followers. He held the hand But come, William, it's lime fur me lo be i» fair companion within his own, and;at home ; I'll meet you here (o-morrow »conversing whh her, in that low andjevening, as I told you.'  Tremblers, lu the Ccvenuc's inoiinlains, iobedient and h."ijq)y. And innv is (hi used to rove abont in (heir sleep ; and al- i work to be accomplished ? I'y miracles? (hpu.gh badly ac(jiiainte<l witli (lie French i No. I!y (he insirument.diiy (if men-language,-expressed thcinvelvei cl^n;ly, | menWho work for (lie power He Rives and pill up j)raycrs iu'that tongue, instead 'hem ; and gi\ cs tliem for (lie purpose oi of (Ire Laiiii Pi/i'er aud wtri.clivthcy i iliat work: and if (hey do use (ha(  had l-ccn ta\»gh{. "A slngiTlar phenome-i pi>\vcr for ijuat piirposc, they refuse'o ex-non, in some cases, of (his afiection, ¡<j oc;ito (he ('fir-t tl^at Ho has committed to that of walking aliont u iiliont groping, j them--M'rlnally jdeny his proprieforship. whether the eyelids arc closed or open.-- and in eHoct, tiiese faculties nre our  Soirihambiili'^m has bc-eu known tt» he he-: ow :>; .this power i.-i our own ; (he i-ub-reditaryv Horsitns inentinnv llir.ro lirn-' ^t.)^H•e wi- lutve h our own 5 and wc hold  Tue E.N-n Ckrtai.v.—A New paper has jnst made iîd appoarnnce iti New York City, called rhe -Vial of Wrath and Junk fhitt'c of l^siruction." It contains a iargc number of prints, and amongst '»thers, the descripdon of the Beast of Daniel, with seven heads and ten horns, ogeiher with a chranologicul calculation IS reasonable as Miller's and quito as "ancirul. It is as follows :  The beast had sbven heads, and ten Iw r4J3 on eae4i^ea4,-Hvhid» makes-sevenfyr 'lorns, anstvering to (ho seventy weeks of i)ani( l. Nuiv Ihe (ail of this beast w»«  fi et l>ivgv vvhich Is the number of tho^ least. Multiply this by seven, and- it nilkc Î 1 0(52, wliieh- y.a9 the ayS of the •vorld when (lie first Anti-Christian Pupo i)egaM In reign Now tie up (he beast'ti ail iri(o three kno(s, and it vvilTjihorten it to G14 ftjet 4 inchca ;- -Bihich- heingjïiilk tiplied by three, the number of knots,gives exactly—tho year in whieh the-«■«rid wifl bn hiirnt up. But there is a-loiher remarkable coincidence. Aíortir» [.utlier wore hoots v;ith nails iñ the soles : jii^l nails in both boots, which being inul'iplied by the seven heads, gives 1841. Torow in ihe two boots, which correspond .•o MjHer and Hiuics, and it gJve^ ISiih.....  Thkv'h, i.auoh at sjr.—Ani what if 'bey do ? —Fs that « reason you should bo laughed out rif yoíjr prjncipje^^ i!.'".orve to lin iaiighod at for your foUy ?  "' 'Wiidi'iUi, pc'rificd by a--îoiri>!iiniMiî, di were afíeeted with it at tiie nnr.^^ch e« respoiisiblr to no berns in (iie  comply wuVthe wcneh's lequest and^li.. ' .,:Hno period. Willis knew a wh()!e Lm-' wln.je universe, for the use, or the abnse  lymodulaJed tone, which is taught byj 5 ' Pll'walk with you as f.r as the l in.i," jthe s<.fi mud of (he f? , ' ;'.  iiUelf,whileshesatlistcning,'nnthing;replied he; and enierin- (he footpath dis'.u4 c.mmnnu.v|iç.d itse.l o ' OP wp might say, ' with greedy ear, through the woods, they wvresoonlqst (ojand that he gave her a b.i^^u.  nióm'oiitiu'n. • , ,.  'Tom, von rascal,' roared his master,o as , soon iv he reenyered. lil^ pow^^^^^  lot her io—and it is even tbup.-ht, JVoiu S-y »x.'ioject to it., It is ,1101 rally : t^  the f|n?('k hiekward mfivemCHt that sii-o ; iinoviii I bal (he subject of (he Freiioh 4i'a-, made, till, unable any longer (0 retiiin her ^ nvuio piece called "Liv Som^iambide'' u as' i'^,  'nilibriam, slic, falling, seate<l hci-scl 1 f Siiulunfjcl.  (lu'tn. The common idiM  ^f eliarity bestowed  ¡eq  tli.at (lie snflt-ritig Oojeet,. cef's from me uli.it is «í/í/e—mino obsfihi'elv"—mine (o  Who will laugh nt you for obeying (ho ilict.'iíí's of your own rorisc'ence 1 Ñí> one who r'-gards the diciates of hi.? No one u hose- opinion should have any-weiebi with you.  What will thny huçîi at Î At your -ïingiilarity, in adhcriug lo unfashionablo  virine.  At yniif vnlparity, iri rorusing to li«» mnn'di.'d 1 y ihe seductions of refined and n)n(ii>h ^vico ? • Let thcnfi~laugh. Wo, • lin o th^ni thnt lairgh now ; forlhey shall  m iKo and 'ament.  "Thev 'il laugh at mc," said ten (hong- -md promning voong men nnd<:|.love1y oiaid'.'n.'?, when first oriliccd. to wander iVum ihr- st/b.T pfiThs of virtuous living.— ri:rv iiave rcroüod rrom (ho (emptalion-It ioifl no parîicnlar fascinations for them. '' riie g-.y .T.«emhty—(ho deceptive fheatrf» —ilio niaddcning.ga^G—the,flowing bowl —it was not (liecc (hátlured them at ibo nutzet. "They wiiHaughntmo !" Thi«  say.  iroiiringhis discWFs^.  ihrougl  si}?h^ - . ,  Not rtany minufes"elapsed alier these  You know, Sally,' it wa^ thus the  • i he.íi'.cnlty of cohvcrsrng in a somnamlnilism is (ooWell autl . ,  to he doubte;l, a!th(Hi:;ii, in many instan-1 ¡"d irjy lather CCS. ¡5 was a iVaudiiìe-nt (rick dI'animal mc (o k'ive-(<> «nai^nctism. This sii^nlar power ii-^  sfato cf ■ gi've opviUihold así please —when.in ficí,;ií was fnrnf'dihorfT r!sidcíiirnd»c8íícd their en^íeáted. i^c M'"' ^vhioh beloncr^ (o-his I'Vt^  ■that which was civen to ilin—tliat wlijch I cannot  I'very hrench of vcrûclty Jndicatci  __________________ __________________ ____________ withhold wi'hont withholdinxthc-payment '«'»m»» lnt'»iî-t or somecIrrtntñaTm^   

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