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Angelica Allegani County Republican Newspaper Archive: July 16, 1880 - Page 1

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Publication: Angelica Allegani County Republican

Location: Angelica, New York

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   Angelica Allegani County Republican (Newspaper) - July 16, 1880, Angelica, New York                                 ..........., . .  T«E O-TFtCIAL^ *NO REPRESENTATIVE PAPER OP NORTHERN ALLEjiANY-DEvi^ED TO THE INTERESTS OF ITS PATRONS.  VOLUME ly.  ANGELICA COUKT HOUSE, ALLEGANY CO., N. Y., FRIDAY, JULY 16, 1880.  NÜMBEK tär^T  the BEPÜBLICAN  I^ONTB a. BAYMOHP,  jEdttor and PubtMisr,  UDAY MORNIHG AT  ANGELICA COURT HOUSE, N.Y.  BiTESr-Pcr year, $1.60; six months, 75  three monlliH, 40 cU; •^h in advance is pro<erw>d¡ but W6 ar* particular, eolong as subscri^ are {¡atf^na wiU P«y w'll^ * teasouable timo.  AdTsrtlsIuB Bates*  -JW.  I Inch...  jiflches.  linches, tí;;-  fçioo  150 2 00 300 fi 00  airn^'y»  fil 503200  3 00  6 00 8 00 ;Ì2 00 lÔOft  2 00 3 00 5 00 8 O» tliOÔi  Jnt.  9300  ÖOO 8 00 12 00 16 00  SOOfi  85 00 8 00 1200 IC 00 30 00 6000  lyear  9800 12 00 15 00 30 00 60 CO 100  "BannesTDirectory conia, ^f.pw /«»*;• SnirNoticos 10 cts. per Ime, first insec-♦im. Set« per Une cnch subsequent inseirtion. odvcrtisenients will bo published at  '^»r^ odvcrtisemont« changed quarterly il  —Transient advertisements, cash in Jxtaco- A settlement ttUI bo made quar-Iriywith regular advertiuoi-s—Jan. 1, April l,Jolyl,Qct.l- -  Is. til« reprsssnt^  «¿^Mr of Wortlierii Allcmuy,only -Stf SblUhra «t AnaeUc» CpwrtHouse, STto the OfflcUil Paper of'^IleBany fSaiy. At an «dvcrtlslnir medium In TIlK^fePCnUCABI giwrlTal nor compeUtor.  ----------trv^K'—^ ^ ^w— ^ —»-------------- — -  Orfenfo«^ Jo^ Printing of any d^ripUon {Bed at (be hour promised, and Mtisfaotion «•»ateed in every instance, . . _ . . |a*^Our invariable terms ior Job Ftinting  ItS^CMMOSPEUYKItr.  DIBECTOBYr"  1 BNOIiD, MANNING.—Auctioneer, will sttend to the sales of iarm stock and imuehold property. Terms reasonable. Ad. AageUcs, N: f^r —-;-  Allen, F. M.—Fashionable Barber and lfflirwtr«aiier. Ladies' hair'dressing a spe-dtlty—will cnllat residence when desired. Bbomi over ¿e postoflice.  JOLTON, SAJlUEL.—Barber and bair> dresisr. Service equal to that found in a pr ' _  EGQLESTON, J. H.—Watches and Jewelry repaired^--Also general dealer in  KtwipaMrs llw'günet.  repwret^ -Aiso generai aeaierin rs and^riodicals. Best Cigars in  H  ÍLUES, JOSEPH.—Proprietor of the ■ "Chirles Ilotel," Angelica,,N. T.  ;'ANOOCK, G£0. ft CO—General stock ot Dress Goods, etc.  Lockhabt, JAS.'-Dealer in Dxt Ckwds, Boots and Shoes, Groceries, ete.  KATHOND.LAMOMTE G.—PublUher o  l^B Bsfuducah; also Book and Job  - ^.....  StTTRU. WM. — Wagon and Carriai* Woita.  LÂW FIRMS.  I KGEt ft ARMSriRONG.—Attorneys and L Counselors at Law, Cuba, N. Y.  lEMIS" « BENTON. — Attorneys and } CounseloreatlAw, Homellsville, N. Y.  B B  EMENT, WiLBER F__Attorney and  Comuelor at Law, Cuba, N. Y.  iROWN,.WESLEY ft CO__Attorneys and  ' Connselors at Law, Homellsvillo, N. Y.  "DRUNDAGE, B. C.—Attorney and Conn. A* seloratlaw, ......  , Andover, N. Y.  j^DI^B, ^ L.—Attoroey and Counselor  , Whitesville, N. Y.  nOLLIN8,A. B.~Attomey and Counselor V St Law, Alfred, N. Y.  f((X)LEy,IJOHN.-Attomey and V idor at Law, Ahnend, N. Y.  Coun-  püimSS, JAB. M.^Attomey and Coun-V íelor atLaw, Bolivar, N. Y.  Elliott, a L—Attorney and Counselor at Law, Friendship, N. Y.  Ths Haymikers.;  In the clover meadowa Sharpened fioythes ai» Bwingiag, lUngioK oot their mercy mtuub to the mower» V, there;  In'Ut^ noontide shadows« . .  Fa^ng iSowera aro filling  Jgragrant, .plighted  Idke the fading flowers, And as grassw wither, Leaving only perfume to the mocking moni> ing breeze; Let OS all the hours— Flitting, none know whitlior— >reathe oat lirra of sweetness, thongb they be devoid of ease.  OOltt^*  CariBfoUy to gather Heaps of dead and well-dried foliage for the winter's store; So should pleasure-takers. Not dispel, but rather ^^ue IhopoI^IiQom<^ joys of yore.  Only in the sunshine Will our hay be making; Greater its dead talue than when growing fresh and green; So a mortal lifetime Freed ii'om all heart-aohing Finds it full fruition in the elosiog of the Ecene. —S. T-, Clark.  The Old Sea Captam's Slory.  " Cnptoin Gray, what is a land lubr berP"  The old sea captain laufrhed one of Lis hearty, rollicking laughs, as he met the gaze of the serious brown eyes lifted to his face.  "A land-lubber P Why, my boy, that's what the sailors call one who has never been on the wide blue sea^ljt  A ILM, JOHN L—Attomey and Coun-M selorat Law, Angelica, N. Y.  TOBARD, A. J:—Atîora(0v"âM^Coirn-  ■ Mlor at Law. AngalicA. N. Y.__  strikes me that two verygop44eflnitlona of the word are sitting close beside me now, waiting for their sailor friend to begin his yim. Well, I'm ready — what shall it be P" " A true story," exclaimed Walter. " A love story," coyly added fifteen-year-old Alice.i  The old sailor looked thoughtful a moment; th^n he said:  "Very well, it shall be both a true story and a love -story—something which happened in my own life.  " Thirty years ago I was not the old man you see me. These gray hairs were as black as the raven's wing then, and these wrinkled cheeks had been bronzed beneath the skies of many climes.  "From a mere lad I had always loved the sea, and theaea most have loved me; for *fh>m a poor cabin boy, I rose through hard work to 'what the world calls a successful man. and the owner and captain of as stanch a vessel as eyes could wish to see.  "I had one daughter named Nellie,the pfetfiest gii-rXso Wefy" one" said)" for miles arotmd. She was ail I had to love, and with a fond father's pride I gave her the finest of clothes and sent her to the bfest of schools. Then, when she came home from school for good such fpleasant times as we had ! But af^ ta while a cloud came over my happiness for I began to see that my pretty daughter could not always stay with me.  " Admirera began to be attracted to our cosy cottage, and one, I soon saw, Nelly liked better than any of the rest. John Estey was his name, and that he was a fair appearing lad I could not but admit, but he was only a conimon sailor^ before the mast, and in my pride I said that never should the, daughter of the captain of the Ellen Gray wed with one so far beneath her. Besides, quite lately 4her€^iad-been--anothernvbo7'hacr eeW and fancied my daughter, and who had  H^ ft SULLIVAN.—Attorneys and Comsclors at Law, Wellsville, N. Y.  HOL^AY, D. H.-Attorney and Coun-, «elor at Law, Canaseraga, N. Y".  nABDING, E. E., G. W. ft F.-Attor-■»Aneysand Counselore at Law, Hume, N.Y.  JO^^Jt SPARGUIj, - Attorneys and  a look in her eyes I had never seen In thembiefore:  "'I love John Estey, father,and i would be a Bin for m« to marry another man.?  " After that, when it came time for my next cruise, I made up my mind it  cottage home as I had always doiic hitherto; for, fordil knew, that scamp (as I called him) might induce her to marry him while I was away.  " When I told Nellie of my intention 6f taking her with mo, she only answered:  " • Why, father, you know I have alwayg wanted Jo go with you on. a  cruise, but you never would take me before.'  "So we started. had her cabin fitted up as pretty as a little parlor, and the days went by merrily. In the evenings we Bät^tögether on the deck, and NeUie wosrd^nli irhwirweet voicer * Rocked in the Cradle of the Deep,' and 'A Life on the Ocean Wave,* and all the familiar sea ballads 3 loved. The three weeks, were drawing to an end, and I began to hope that Nellie was coming round to my way of thinking ; so I said one morning, just as we sighted the home port:  " • Now, Nellie, like a good girl, make ^our father happy by consenting to do as he wishes.'  " She flushed an indignant, rosy red as she sprang to her feet and confronted  me^^^ _______ ________________________  " ' Father, I have told you that I can never love any one but John. I would rather die than marry Mr. Morris.* "Then, in my turn, I got anttry. " *Very well,' I said; • we will be in port in an hour's time, and I havelo go to L—-(naming a town some miles distantj before we go home. I had intended to have taken_so30ötliLme.,JMit  crew save the cabin-boy, who told faint that EUen waa on board locked in the; cabin.  " Ina trice he had picked the lockf and that very day the two young peq-' pie took matters into their own handf »; and, j^ing before a minister, had;  other their TOWSi ,A * NelUeheld back at first.' said Joht| for she feared that you would neve;! forgive h(?r. But I said it would all come right in time, and tbat if we waited we might be separated forever« So she consented.' . y  As he told me all this, I, who bad^ always prided myself on my strengtbtf broke down and cried4lke a hahy—  Then came a step outside, and sweet voice I had thought never to héals again called out: • Father! dear father 1% and there was Nellie clasping me rounc^ the neck with both soft arms as if shê would never let me go, and weeping and|  smilittgTilIrlrtogethçr.------- -------^  They were happy days, and ycara after that, John and Nellie came to live with me in our cosy cottage near thé sea; and I hardly could tell whica I; loved best—my son or my daughter. ;  As lb thé Ellen Gray, I scarcely felt^ her loss at all. In my gèeattjbankful ness that God in His mercy had kept mo-from living with the dreadful thought always before my mind that I had been my child's murderer, J! Jiad not^oom to^ mourn." :  We never see that person-called the life of the company, be it man or-woman, that we are not curious to know-how agreeable he or she is at home; whether all this delightful vivacity is-at the expense of the fireside consump'^ tion; whether home is only a _ElMe'  you shall etay fiereail day till I return.' ....................,..........................  " That frightened h«r, as I knew it would.  V ' Oh, father, please do not leave me alone on the ship. What if something should happ^P'  " But I was obdurate; and when she saw that her pleading had been of no avail, Nellie saw me go without another world;  " I smiled to myself as I locked the cabin door.  " • I'll see,' I thought, ' if a seventeen-year-old girl can set her will against mine.'  "So off I went. But I was not so hard-hearted as I tried to be; for thoughts of my little Nellie locked in her cabin all alone troubled me all day. and as soon.as I cuuld I transacted my busineM and hurried back. f  "It was growing dusk as I reached the dock where the Ellen Gray I was moored, and the first thing I saw was a great crowd of people, seemingly much excited over something. Then I missed the Ellen Gray; though I strained my  eyes I could see no Bign of her. ...........-  "Trembling and shaking under the influence of a terrible-fear, I asked some one who was passing:  " • What is the matterP What is the crowd forP'  "The man did not know me, or he certainly would tiave used more camion. Bluffly he replied:  "'There's been an accident, sir. A barge loaded with iron ran into the Ellen Gray, and sunk her. The captain was away, they say, and the crew bad gone off on their own hook. Only the cabin-boy was on l)oard, and he was picked up half drowned, and taken to his home. So it isn't so bad as it might be, for no lives are lost.'  " I gazed for a moment wildly into his face, hardly comprehending his words, then flinging up my arms,^ I cried in a  jg:oice of agony;_______________ ______________________________________  " 'Nd lives loatP 'Man, I am a mur-  dererl Mw dftii?hti>r wa« nn that, shin!'  confided to me his wish>'to make her his wife. Mr. Morris , was older than she to be sure, by some ten or twelve years, but he was very rich, and I thought to myself how well Nellie, with her beauty and lady-like manners, would grace his elegant home.  ,r— w — ^kniomoyg  Counselors at Law, Wellsville, N. Y.  Counselor  10NBS ft FARNUM. — Attorneys and w Counselors at Law, Wellsville, N. Y.  _ F.-Attomey and CoutaMlor  «it Uw, Wellsville, N. Y.  JO-yi-'S, mFw.-Attomey and at Law, WellsviUo, N. Y.  LOpRiriGE ft SWIFT.-Attorneys and tounselors at Law, Cuba, N. Y.  MJ'ERS, IRA H—Attorney and Ccun-__J^r at Law, Behnont, N. Y. ^  \rQRTON, S. M.-Attorney and Counselor « atliaw, Friendship, N. Y.  T)ICHARDS0N. FLENAGIN ft SMITH. jJ^Attomeys and Counselors at Law, An  RTPl^V^O®^—Attorney and Coun. f^^^at Law, Wellsville, N. Y.  PELYA, HENRY W. - Attorney and t-ounselor at Law, Hume, N.Y.  pÜpE ft LOVERIDGE.-Attorheys and at Law, \^'ellsville,' N. Y.  C.—Attorney and Counselor at  anaserRgtt; N. Y.-------------------------  WSSPîf®^^ ^ LANING-Attomey» J y ana Coungelera at kw, Rushford, N. Y.  _ B. C. WAKELY,  wfe Dmii anl Fine Met Aim  ¿y^PtioM prepared with skiU and ao-  •kwd^iF: «^nd aU proles  Jl^ii^ M usual. Offlceat drug>to».|i|  ^^^g^n^ and Counselor at  Andover, N. Y.  Conn*  LION. —Attoniey and  'I hadn't told -Nellie as yet of my ideas for her future; but as she had always been one of the gentlest of girls, I didn't expect any opposition.  But one j|ftemoOn _ as I came home firom the river and walked quietly up the garden path, what should I see but John Estey and Nellie seated close together on the stoop. And, to my great indignation, the audacious fellow had his arm around my girl's waist! They were evidently far away in some world of their own, for my presence was tm-known until, like a bomb-shell, I burst in upon them. What I said I do not remember. I was very angry; but words spoken in passion are soon lorgotten— and it is well for us all that it is so.  " I know that I must have said some cruel, bitter things, for when I had finished John Eatey rose flrom Nellie's side, and his face was very white as he replied quietly, his manner inmuked coj^trast to my wratir:  'Captain Gray, I iQve youf daughter.  " Then a merciful darkness came over my vision, and I knew no more for a time. When I came to I found myself in a druggist's shop, where I had been carried, and I dould hear as in a dream low voices about me saying:  " • How sad! Of course the poor girl ■must have gone-down witirthe-ship;  and^~Bhe has acknol^edged tiiat^ she loves me. Surely that is no 'cause for the insulting things you hatvo said to me.' . , ■  "Just then N^lie began to cry. " Suddenly his calmness left him. '"If you were not her father,' he sidd, * I would not bear such words from you; butaaitis—'  " Here Nellie came and wound her arms around me, Where I stood nursing my anger. '  'Father,'she said, 'we love each other BO!' .  " '-Lovel 'between a boy and a girl!' I ¡exclaimed; * 8tailand nonsensQl'  " Then I tuned to John and («omted totheg^e.  V'Go!* I 8ud,, fiercely, *iuid never ooike near mj danKhtier agdn. Sh«is not for lubli as yoa.*  " With %pwtiBK, pitfins looktowwrd l^dUe, who was Mbbbig •• ifher li^ would bMr, JohB »wpy^ ^  Then suddenly I remembered all, and cried out:  "'My child! my child! I have killed my child !"  " Then I lost consciousness for the second time,and when I awoke I was in bed. ac.d some one was seated beside mc. It was John Estey. With ¿ sharp pain at my heart, I recognized thimanly, handsome face of the lad my girl loved. No, had loved. Alas! through her un natural father's own act her sweet young life had been made a sacrifice to a moment's angry passion.  John saw thit I knew him, and bending over my bed, he took my hand, as he said: "' Are you better, captain?' •"I do not wish to be better,' I an swered; ' if I dared to pray I would ask the Lord to let me die. But I am a murderer*-I have killed my child—I dare not pray.'  • Don't feel that way. Captain Gray, How could you know what was to hap  penP'  His gentleness—he who had such cause to hate me—went straight to my heart.  " 'John,' I exclaimed,' can you for give mo for my angry words P I see now how Wrong I was, for I had noth-  ns agaiiut you save tluit yon wf^ no^ rich. Oh, Jolm, how I wish I could put my child's hand in yours and say take her. My daughter, my beautiful child!'  "'Captain,'said John, huskily,'are you sure of that! Could she not l^t^ve been saved by some jchwceP*  - " His tone and the expression of his flBkcesIiowed me he was keeping something back. John!' I almost shrieked * wjby do you f peak in that way P For mein^^i si^e do not wait if you have nby food nevts for mel'  be told >e how shortly after I had left^ seeiiig ithM the EUen Gray wat in port, he had gose.doim to the aiiilit; «ad, rbw^ hiauetf ofer to the lb. toy iililiii  Mi mriM he iMd  Mm '  -Tba:kiffr4>t tbe-Company..  whweJt_iaJiotticdrcoi4edrMd wired ^¡^n for public'effervescence; and, if sa, wh8tw|^lesff^l^l"home to the littl^Bildinen ah^^ young people belonging to it; and how the wife of the man who' is the life of the company must chafe at the fireside silence, and sicken at the wit which is brewed there  If, dear friends, there is not enough for both, in the name of justice, remember first the wife who toils to make her portion of home bright and comfortable; and the young people who will soon ollow your example of saving themselves up for company. There are men, and women, too, whom I remember as the life of home; whose meals are seasoned with wit and fun and innocent mirth, those wonderful helpers to digestion—meals where the children's intelligent, curious questioning is not exr tinguished, but encouraged^ and sy'jtki-pathetically answered—meals where the family expenses are not the skeleton beneath every dish cover, being kept under, and judiciously arranged under the wise old saw of a time for everything. What a legacy beyond price is the memory of a sunny home-like thia to-the ¡children, whose skies, whether cloudy or fair, God only can foretell for the future!  How likely they will be, too, if possible, to reproduce all this in their own homes when we are dust; and how much better than being the life of home—the intelligent home, where the new books are bought and discussed from different standpoints, where the daily newspapers are read aloud and merrily commented on, or top'cs seriously considered upon moral grounds; Where the choice bits of fun and pathos are banded round with the coffee and eggs, and before each separates for the day's duties, perhaps itsunforseen triads and pains. Contrast with the silent home where food is bolted, that the father may rush to his money-making, imd^ihe wife^d^mGfcher^o^h&^onsid-eration of fashions, and the children are  faeked-off4o-schooi-by«er^?antsrinstead of having their bonnets and , cloaks fastened, with a kiss, by loving fingers —turning back to the open door, as they go, for another bright simile, which they will try hard to be worthy of that day.  As I walk the street I fancy I can pick out the men and women reaied in these  yon want it. but you don't make mine of red. that's all" ^  "There's a pretty shade of yellow flannel—"  "Most indubitably,^ Mrs. Spoopen-dyke, but if you think I'm going to masquerade around Manhattan beach in the capacity of a ham, n^ou havea't yet seized my idea. I don't apprehend that l shall bënefît by thé waters any more by going around looking like a Santa Cruz rum barrel. What I want _ Js a, bathingisuit^j&nd_if you can't^^^^^ one up without making me look like a Fulton street cur, I'll go and buy something to suit  "Would you want it ail in one piece, or do you want pants and blouse P"  " I want a suit easy to get in and out ofi-^Pmiiotparticulttt^out-^f^owing the fashion. Make up something neat.  S^entfyke's Bathing Sull.  "My dear," observed Mr. Spoopen-dyke,'looking up from his paper, "I think I would be greatly benefited this summer by sea „baths. Bathing in the surf is an excellent tonic, and If you will make me up a suit and one for your-«elf,ify6i-nk«." wn W'dbwn"^^ «nd'take a dip in the waves."  "The very thing," smiled Mrs. Spoopendyke; "you certainly need something to tone you up, pnd there's nothihg like salt water. I think I'U make mine of blue flannel, and^ let me see, yours ought to be red, my dear."  " I don't think you caught the exact drift of my remark.^' rfttnrted Mr.  right, and as he buttoned it up and surveyed himself in the glass the clouds passed away and he smiled.  " I like it," he remarked; " the cote^ suits me, and I think you have done very well, my dear; only," and he fbowned slightly, " I wish you would mark the  ftom the other, or some day I will present the startling spectacle of a^respect-able elderly gentlenian hopping around the beaph upside down. That's all."— Brooklyn Bcvle.  The Americin Postal System.  A postoflice system for the colonies was established by the British govern-  Spoopendyke. " I didn't say I was going into the opera business, or that I was, going to hire out to me con nti^ village as «^conflagration, ^y plan wa^ to go in swimming, Mrs. Spoopendyke, to go in swimmixig, and not grow up theicountry-a3-4v-cremation- fut!!^ nace. You can make yours of blue if  iwo he^gsr «i'iig"With^irbiight. ioyous face, and the free, firm thread, the other, with no sparkle or glow of face or form, robbed ere Kfe^scarcely begun, of its dew and its sunshine. Oh. how should such have strength to strike firm root, or put forth healthy blossoming? Ob, the pity of it, that the seedtime of virtue and happiness should be so little considered -that home shouldn't be the best company, and we more anxious to be the life of it. than to shine in courts! So wrote Fanny Fern years ago.  Peculiar Sentence for Sheep Stealing.  Sentence was recently pronounced in a case of sheep stealing by a judge n the Perm government, Russia.^ A peasant accused one of his neighbors of stealing a sheep from his flock, and of slaughtering . it, thereby causing its lawful owner prejudice to the amount of two rubles. In answer to this charge, the defendant al-that one afternoon a sheep with ichhe h^ po previous acquaintance hadcertainly^allcd^ttpon Taimlh a pri^ miscQous kind of way; whereupon he, regarding its visit as providentially intended to supply, a vacuum in his larder, had promptly converted it into mutton by the usual process. T$.king this frank confession into consideration as an " attenuating^ cireumstimce," the l?ar^ judge pronounced the folldwlng sentence;,:  " The defendant shall, first of all, receive twenty blows from a rod. He shailthen be arrayed in the skin of the murdered sheep and be conducted, to the beat of drums, through all the street of the village.. At the. door o1 each house he shall be halted, and the respective honse-bvuer shall deal him a blow with a stick."  As the condemned peasant, by declining to appeal to a higher court agidnst this sentencd, tacitly admitted its justice, it was forttiwi^ carried out^ to the manif^t ecjoymeat of his fellow-TiUagen. 1 _  plain and tubs(»^tiaK^ttt don't stick any fancy colors into it. 1 want it modest imd serviceable." ^  Mrs. Spoopendyke made up the suit ^under the guidance of a lady friend, whoso aunt had told her how it should be constructed. It^was in one piece, and when completed Was rather a startling garment.  •Til try it on to-night," said Mr. Spoopendyke, eyeing it askance when it was handed him*  , Before retiring, Mr. Spoopendyke cx-amir*ed the suit, and then J)egan to get into it.  ' jWhy didn't you make some egs to it? What d'ye want to make it. all arms for?" he inquired, struggling around to see why it didn't come up behind. . §;" You've got it on sideways,'^ exclaimed Mrs. Spoopendyke. " You've got one leg into the sieeve."  " I've got to get it on sideways. There ain't any top tolit. Don't you know enough to put the arms up where they belopgP What d'ye think I am, anyhow? A star-fish? Where does this  JeggaPr»-.-.,....................................................  "Right in there. That's the place for that leg."  " Then whero's the leg that goes in this hole?" "AVhy, the other leg." ' " The measly thing is all legs. Who'd you make this thimg for—meP What d'ye take me for—a centipede? Who else is going to get in here with me? I want somebody else. I ain't twins. I can't fill this business np. What d'ye call it, any w^y, a family machine?"  " Those other pi ices ain't legs; they're sleeves."  "What are they doing down there? Why ain't they up here where they belong? What are they there for—snow shoes? S'po<^ I'm going to stand on my head to get my arms in those holes?'* " I don't think you've got iton right," SUfigestiJA^Mrs. Spoopendyke. " It looks twisted."  —*^4mt'siiie-way^ you-told-mei -You said,'Put this leg here and that one there,'and there they are. Now where does the rest of me go ?"  " I made it accord ¡ng to the pattern," sighed Mrs. Spoopendyke.  " Then it's all right, and it's me that's twisted," sneered Mr. Spoopendyke  montlriTIO. Unde^thirSystgrnVBeiiji^^^ min l^anklin was postmaster at Philadelphia, being appointed in 1733, when he was twenty-seven yeare old. Ho held the office until 1753, when he was made the colonial postmasterg-eneral, and the British government guaranteed Wm-arsalary^)f-£6(K>-'*^for-himse]f-niid^ his assistant." The system was not completely organized until the general management of postal affairs came into his hands. He held the oflice of post-mastcr-general 'twenty-one years. He was removed in a rather summary manner, in 1774, because he wa!Stm outspoken patriot, who couldn't be a tory.  After the national constitiition was adopted in 1789, a postal system. I r the United States wm established by Congress. The first postmaster-general w^ Samuel Ojgood, of Massachusetts. Ill 1790, the first year of his  RELIGIOUS NEWS AND NOTES.  A new church, built as a memorial of Bishop Wilberforce, has been dedicated in Coburg road, England.  The Universities' mission in (Central AfMca is to be reinforccd by nine missionaries, whosaiffrom London. ' ^ The Swedish Baptist conference of the Northwest reports altotal of B33 membeira. There are seven congregations, of which two are in Chicago.  The Congregationalists have giyen, during the past^elght months, $357,-343.41 to fore!^ missions. They will  more to meet their appridN^ prialions for the year.  Thus far forty-iix delegates, the great mj^jority of whom are ministersj-ha^ been appointed from the Presbyterian church of Scotland to the Pim-Presby-terian council at Philadelphia. ___  The Mower.  CatUng bis Swath in the sun, tO'day,  He hears the hoes on the olover ham, He cees the birds át their darllbg play, -He {opks where tho great olouds «tei]t|i% come.  And suddenly stays his soythe Itt air,  'ffîrkeg^iDT'hlâ  Qoes with the man she long sine« tired-And the passion leaps that was dumb and doaO*  Ob, heaven! what desolato yean since tbenM  Have written their rede on life and brow, When she Wás one 61 the daughten of men.  And ho ol the sons of God. And now She walks In peace her perfect way, And be is a vagrant cutting the hay.  S  CuWtBg Ihéliouer'eweèt èlôver Héw  On the lands he lost long years ago.  What is the 01 ael fate that brod  iler to honor and him to min ? — — What is the pitilosa power that led  Him in his strength to bis own audoingr Let the breese blow up Andthe cloud roUover^  administration, the whole number of postoffices was seventy-five; the whole amount of postage' received, $37,935; and the whole net revenue to the government. $5,795. In 1800 the whole number of postoffices was nine hundred and three ; the whole amount of pceiage7^280;80irthje wholcTfi^^foveP nue, $66,810. The first r^tefi of postage Were as follows : For a single letter, under fdrty miles, eight cents; over forty and under ninety miles, ten cents; over ninety and under one hundred and fifty miles, twelve and one-half cents; over one hundred and fifty and under three hundred, Eeventeen ceifits; over three hundred and under five hundred miles, twenty cents; over five hundred miles, twenty-five cents. In 1816 these rates were changed as follows: A single letter, not over thirty miles, six and one-fourth cents; over thirty and under eighty miles, ten cents; over eighty and urder one hundred and fifty miles, twelve and one-half cents; over one hundred and fi'fty and under fotir hundred miles, eighteen and three-fourths cents; over four hundred miles, twenty-five cents. In 1845 there was another change, and rates were established as follows: For a letter weighing not more than half an ounce, carried not over three hundred miles, five cents; over three hundred miles, ten cents. In 1651 Congress enacted that a letter weighing not more than half an ounce might be carried three thousand miles ii prepfttd, for three^ cents;-or for ff cents if not prepaid; for tfver th thousand, six cents, if prepaid, 'or*^ twelve cents not' prepaid; but in 1852 the twelve was reduced to ten. In 1855 the rates were made to be three cents for all distances under three thousand milea; ten cents for all over three thousand miles, postage to be prepaid in al cases. Finally, by means of several acts and amendments, the rates were established as we have them now.  Cheap postage cannot as well be afforded in this country as in Great Britain, because the expenses of the postal system are necessarily much greater here than there. Great Britain is a small country in extent, with a great population. Ours is a country of " magnificent distances," and large portions of it, where there are postofiipes to be served, are thinly inhabited. In a majority of the States, the amount of rpostages TJatd is far below-the-cost-of-the postal service they receive. In some of the States the an[:ounts paid for posf&ge are much greater than the cost of the s^Jryice. Nevertheless, the post-office department does not pay expenses.  The Protestant-Episcopal church has only 1.694 communicants in the State of Mississippi, in, which' there has been a diocese fifty-three ye^vs.' Tiie baptisms during the year past were 337, of which sixty-two were adults.  One of the native congregations connected with the Scottish United Presbyterian mission at Old Calabar has a regular attendance of ^0 persons. King Eyo recently op,cupied the pulpit in thé absence of the missionary, ^he MorayJan3j«pOrtJO,883 communicants in America, Germany and Great Britain, an increase, of 264 dui^g the past year. The above total does not include the communicants in the mission  field, who are more numerous.  -i ..if..  The opium ti^ffic is perhaps the rtestubsiacieto missionary work in China. TheChin^e argue that the Bible mtist be a Bad book, since the EngUsh, who believe in it, bring opium to China. Any book which favors opium-eating must be bad, they think.  A circt^r has been sent to all pastors 01 Metliomst-Episcopal churches, asking them to raise twenty-five per cent, additional for the Episcopal fund to what they have been raising, as there are four new bishops to bo provided for, and the whole'^pport of the episcopacy is now thrown upon the churches.  The Prince of Wales was preesnt at tho Sunday scholars' gathering at I-am-beth palace, in celebration of the Sunday-school centennary. About 25,000 children and teachers were present.  The Sunday-school of the First Baptist church, Philadelphia,Pa., numbers among its teachers a lady seventy-tliree years of age. She has been a member of the school for Sixty-five years, liaving joined in the year of its organisation.  The following figures show the nur raerical strength of the foreign mission work of the Presbyterian church : Min-istera,of .whora-eighty^three-arfr natives; licentiate preachers, 147, all natives; medical missionaries and teachers, U; American women, 209; native teachers. Bible readers, etc., 516;' communicants, 12,607; scholars, 17,791,J of whom, in boarding-schools, 1,317. .  The Flavor of Meals.  M. Mondar, a noted agriculturist in France, has suggested a singular plan for varying the fiavor of meat. He imagines that by feeding cattle, sheep, pigs and poultry in a particular way, or rather by flavoring their¡food in various ways, their flesh may be rendered much more agreeable to the palate than it often is ; and there can be no doubt that he is substantially right. Thus, for instance, it is welPknown that poultry which have been fattened upon food containing a slight admixture of chopped  Nothing cares he for oload or olover;. But he blesses the grave that is just at hand, -And will give him his share of his father's land. Harper* $'Saxnr.  MISCELUNEOUS.  The balloon bushiess is going up.  Thomas L. James, the postmaster^ of this city, is a printer by trade.  Before 1870 there were in Paris thirty cine clubs. Now there are seventy.  When banks become unsteady even the depositor is likely to lose his balance:  $The editor who calls on his girl] the oftenost attends the most Press excursions.  Out of 223 papers published in Call-  An Item-Mber«^—  chickens which have been stuffed or larded with truffles after they are killed. It is only natural that such should bo tho case, for the flavor of the truffle thatia consumed by the chicken permeafcFtlie whole system, which it  -----------over^OíOw.*  it'year m üpttAettin^vatohoKucttl' tow lR ^ "  I'll have my arms and legs altered All I, want is to have my legs jammed in_the small of my back and my arms stuck in my hips ; then it'll fit . What didyoutakq for a pattern, a crab? Whj^e'd you find the lobster you made this from? S'po^ I'm going into the water on all fours ? I told you I wanted a bathing suit, didn't IP Did I s^ anything about a chair cover?"  "Ithink if you take it off and try it on over again it'll work," reasoned Mrs. Spoopenkyke.  "Oh^ of course. I've only got to humor the blasted thing. That's all it wants," and Ife-rSpoopendyke wrenched it off with a growl.  Now puliiton,"said Mrs. Spoopendyke.  Mr. Spoopendyke w ent at it again and reversed the original order of disposing bis limbs.  " Suit you nowl" he howled. " Tliat the way you meant it to ? What's these things floppffignro^ind h«»*"?"  " Those are thè legs, I'm afraid," saidMrs.Spocpendyke, dejectedly.  What are they doing up here? I see^- oh, I see, this is supposed to rep resent mc making a dive. When I. get this on, I'm going head first. Where'^ the balance? Where's the restP Give me^the suit that represents me head up," and Mr. Spoopendyke danced around the rooniin fury.  ".fust turn it over, my dear," ,said Mrs. {Spoopendyke," slidjyou all right."  , " How'm I going to turn it over?" yelled Mr. Spoopendyke. " S'pose I'm going to car¡|i7 arqund à steam boiler to turn me over when I want the other end of this thing up? S'pose I'm going to hire a n^an to go around with a griddle spoon and turn me oyer like a flapjack, just to please thb dod.bhuted bathing suitP D*ye think I work oB|kivotsP"  "Just take it off and pat it on the other w»j," urged Kri.^Spodpétdyke, who b9vm iff mi^ oleihr.  Some supposed friends of a newspaper have peculiar ideas as to what kind o items a paper really requires. Not jgn^  since a gentleman <»ime into the Galveston News sanctum and said: "Look here! You miss a heap of hve Items. I'm on the streels alLday; I'll come up every once in a while and post you."  "All right; fetch on your item; but, ren»ember, we want news."  Next day he camo up, beamirTg all over. ' I've got a live item for you. You know that bow-legged gorilla of a brotaer-in-law of mine, who was in business here with meP"  ' I believe I remember such a person," said the editor, wearily.  " Well, I've just got news from Nebraska, where he is livins', that he is going to lun for the legislature. Now, just give him a blast. Lift him out of his boots. Don't spare him on my account."  Next day he came up again. " My little item was crowded out. I brought you some news," and ho hands in an item about his cat, as follonts:  " A Remarkable Animal.—The family cat of our worthy and dist^guished fellow-townsman Smith, who keeps the boss grocery store of Wwrd No. 13, yesterday became thé mother of five singu larly-marked kittens. This is not the first time this unheard-of event has taken place. We understand Mr. Smith Is being favorably spoken of as a candidate for aldejrman."  The editor groans in his spirit as he lights fi cigar with the effort. It Is not  UM e^g, mA »hnted ii|to It ammWf lim« lte«»e 911k al}  liands to testify that they are personally acquainted with the guilty party.  Chan^ of Key.—"What carrot-head-eä^ little urchin if that, madamP"  dotí^ikiyiiot Wh« « de«c littl«iw^t  cannot down ho simply placed In tho  carcass. ^I. Monclar instances cases In which hares killed in a wormwood fioldriarks shotln a cabbage field, and eggs laid by hens which had oaten diseased fiUk worms, bad such a nauseous taste that no one could toiuch them; while, upon the other hand, some ducks jjind fieldfares which had fed upon some sprigs of juniper had a delicious flavor. He has made several experiments— among others, three upon tame rabbits, which he fed with the waste of anise se^d, with barley and bran containing a little cssence of thyme. In each case he found that the flesh of these animals was far better tliat that of rabbits fattened in tho ordinary way,and yet that there was to trace of anise seed or juni per in the taste. His conclusion is that cattle, sheep and pigs might be fed in tho fame wayj attd^ that by varying the flavoring matter, the beef, autton and pork might be made to have several different tastes.—CWciiiro Times.  A Snake Whipped by a Rabbit  A'rew days ago, whilst riding in the mountain, Mr. Fogg's attention w^ called to a certain spot by a peculiar sound, caused by some animal , in distress. Mr. Fogg.i upon examination, found a black snase had sccurcd in its coil a young r.ibbit and was attempting to prepare for .its dinner the little creature, after the mode of procedure the snake always follows. After a little  years old.  iPèninark Bas only 1^80,676 inSàìtìt < ants, and that is 200,000 more than ten years ago.  A blind boy, eight years old, in Alabama, can play any air he hears, on the violin.  An Iowa county official walked fivo; •miles to have some one explain to him what the " fifth prox." meant;  Counterfeit^trado dollars of date 1880 are circulating. The government has, issued no trade dollars this year. -  Andrew Aimers, a printer who helped set the " Waver ly" novels fr^m Scott's manuscript, died at Edinburg a short time ago. He had been a compositor seventy-two years. ~  Nevada has a mountain which is filled and covered with, agates. _The nodules are dug out of tiie ground like potatoes out of tho^ hill. The nodules are tho shape of half an apple, and the outside is rough like that of a nutmeg.  San Francisco has been flooded with a small thin Japanese coin, worth alwut three cents, but made to do du^ so_ex-„ -tensively arw Iralf-dimffthatspecuhitors are evidently responsible for its appear* ance.  After all, the profession of journalism is the safest of all others. You never hear of an editor losing his life in an ocean disaster, orraihroad smashrup. It is,^ perhaps, a little more tiresome, but s safer to walk.—A^w York DispoMi *  Some one with a talent for economy has discovered that the bright and shiny appeturance on black cloth and cashmere wiilch have been a long time in use, can be removed by sponging them with ammonia; or, if that fails with unsweetened gin.  Philadelphia claims be the greatest manufacturing center in the world, and the„ maaufaoturera of textile fabrics publisli fetatistlcs showing that the yearly productions in their industries amounts to $90,000.000, and of all the ty's factories to §060,000.000. " ^ A gentleman was promenading tFe~ street with a bright little boy at his side, when the little fellow cried out: "Oh, pa, there goes an editor!" "Hush, hush!" said the father; "don't make sport of th^poor maurrGod only.knows. what you may come to yet."—^«ftftord'a  a  while its attention was callcd ttoanotlier  „6...., f. ...e,-. ________________—- spot by the approach of tiie mother  long before he hears that 8mith„is goinr l^bhit. who, bristl^ and ready for .the  ______.1 ;____Al.... I.,/.,' k../. iMnilA tli'k c-Ui. >t4nAt>/>/l ft>A annV'A iinfil li(> tirna  around saying that he has made tl^. fightrJU.ta«ked the snakp until he was paper what it is, but it is not indepen- —* «...i rAiMund Hap ^nnnv.  dcnt° enough for 9^|)lace like Galveston.  Many readers will say this sketch is overdrawn, but thousands i)£^tors all over l^e county will lift up their right  Advertiser.  The peasants of Lombardy live chiefly on black bread and- a-broth- made....Qf__ rice, a few vegetables and rancid oil. By working fourteen hours a day the . agricultural laborer can make $78 r year. The women work sO hard thai ,; few survive their fortieth year. It is an Italian authority that gives these facts.  At tho recent Press Fund dinner in London, Sir Alexander Gait, in reply to the toast of tho American press, told how In every little village of Brifcisli North America the people havii "' their newspaper, which contains sub- ■ stantially the same general news of tho world that is printed in the great London dailies, and warned the British i newspapers that they must have a care for their laurels or the American and colonial press would distance them in the race for supremacy.  The ideal newspaperman is one whose brain is crammed solid fiillof all things: classical, social and political, whoee pen can r^l off poetry, sentiment imd sense to order, and into whose presqioe:^ we should come with feelinsi of awe inspired by ovcn>owci^g genins; the rea,l newspaper man is a wom^oot fragment of humanity, who carries a nokly! smile significant of hope dt ferred and financial depression, and wears a seventy :five-cent alpaca (mi.---Neio Bdom ^ Jiei^Ur.  A California heroine, who li?« upon her father's ranch in Siskiyou county, wai receiitly introduced to a bear in the absence of her fathejc* ^he did not cUwe and bolt the doors and take refng«| ntfdlJr the bed. She summoned the family dog^, and turned them .loola npon her visitor, i Broin made nuM-  put to flight and released her young. Like a great general the old rabbit followed close upon the ene&y, biting the  anak<Ln)»tllh^wured himself by crawl- rj-T" .  ingiitohisden^theliolloW-oralr^T  -^Bhu Bidge ( Ka.,) Scko,  Onr edition o! Webster does not con-bOnth^ wofds which theUr<d editor Qtten when, as he is' aboujb to go ¡»me.  toriat, loojai and yelb ottl> 00^1"  'Mote  Jennie took down her father'e WinelWh ter rifle, and wrtl^to the Ib^ ti«e, took delibemte nim wtA Forumioely, the fiitt ehót yiéf«!: nor^^Mie^aBd the b«ìM^ fini»;  and   

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