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Allegany County Reporter Newspaper Archive: August 11, 1905 - Page 1

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Publication: Allegany County Reporter

Location: Allegany, New York

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   Allegany County Reporter (Newspaper) - August 11, 1905, Allegany, New York                                 ;ts»  m-Vf,  teììi hi  NUÌVÌQER64.  WELLSVILLE, N. Y., FRIDAY, A U G Ü 8 T 1 1, 1905.  ISSUED S É M I W E E K L Y.  TO-DAY  Opinion as to Outcome Continues Pessimistic. Witte Firm Against luiemnity. Japanese Peace Terms Given to M. l!8itte in Writing.  Portsniouih, Aug. 10.—The peaco plcu^wteBtiaiica Btartua fot tUo mivy. vard at 9 a- m- ^^ boM the second session of the peace conference at which it war» the general belief that Japan might bo expoctf^d to rHow hor hand to her adversary. In some well informed Quarters, however, doubt ciists as to whether the Japanese would disclose their terms* of peace at this time.  Eijero Talvisugl, Professor of English in the Imperial University, at Tok-lo, in. an interview following a lengthy conference with Mr. Sato, who has been the epoliesman for the peace commissioners, said that Japan's terms ^ould include the imm<sdlate evacuation of Manchuria, the cession of the island of Sakhalin and an Indemnity of a billion dollars. Vladivostok also ^111 be demanded. The indemnity, Takasugl said might be reduced if peace can be brought about in no other way. Mr. Takasugl said thePorts-mouiû conference will end in a treaty of peaœ.  Baron Komura handed the Japanese terms of peace to M. Witte at the close of the morning's conference. It has been decided that the Russian plenipotentiaries will study the terms and give their answer in writing as poon ÛB posBible. Meantime the Bessions of the conference are adjourned. The Japanese terms are drawn in both English and French. Baron Komura himself handed them to M. Witt© at the very end of the morning's conference. M. Witte thrust papers into his inside pocket and the meeting waç at an end The question of the full powérs of the plenipotentiaries was repMted at the morning meeting and there will be no difficulties on that  point ...................................................................................................................... .......  gt. Petersburg, Aug. 10—Dispatches from Portsmouth indicate that M. Witte Is now willing  surrender of the Chinese Eastern railway betwebn Ha 'and Port'. Arthur and to satisfy the financial demands of Japan if they are reasonable provided the iiussias are permitted to retain Sakhalin. These terms have been communicated to the Peterhof and are satisfactory to the Emperor.  THE CÜAR RECEIVES EMPEROR WILLIAM ON HIS YACHT, PreSÜemt'S LâSt  Siimiaer'Trip«  WITTE FIRM AGAINST INDEMNITY  First Meeting of Envoys Waa of In formal Character—Komura Forgo! His Credentials—Protocols of Meet Inge to Be Drawn In English ani French, Latter to Be Official.  Portpniotitli, N. H., Aug. 10. — Wltl the prol;:iMllty that Baron Komura ■will today rcvtiid V» the Russian pleni potcntiariiy the t^ ^ins upon v;htch Ja pan is willing to c;^K'lude peace, opin ion as to the out ^me among those tfho arc cdiii-i t ^ated here to watcli the rr(K<'njmi;s has bfcome <Hvloedl> pessimistic.  This is "I'.ic to the gr. %vlnp con;.r tlon that Japan's conditions will not  prove as inodiTate as Was.....at on?  time anticipa!» (1 and, especially in the matttr of imicniiiitj. may preclude tht possibility of tht'ir acceptance by tht Russian tiivojs as a basis of negotia tlon.  The firm attitude of Mr. Witte ic private coiivorsatlon against the pay inent of an liuh mnity and the insls tent reports (inanatlng from Japanese quarters tliat a stiff war contribution approximating the cost of the war, variously stated at from |600,000,00C to $800,000,(100, constitutes one of Japan's demands. Indicates a wide, if not an irreconcilable, difference between Japan's Irreducible minimum, and whal Russia is iirepared to accept.  Compensation For Sakhalin.  Upon the question of the payment ol a large indemnity the instructions ol ' the Riissi.'ui tUenipotontlaries are be lieved to aiimir of no concessions, al though it is pnsHble certain compen  sation In kind might be arranged. For Instance It, Is suggested that for the relinqulshnient of the Island of Sale halin, now potentially In Japan's, hands, the possession of which by Japan would give her command of the whole Siberian littoral, Russia could with propriety pay ri largo^um.  Gloomy forebodings, ho:^ver, may be premature at this juncture as everything Indicates the plenipotentiaries upon both sides are sincerely desirous of concluding a treaty ol peace.  The first meeting of the plenipotentiaries yesterday was of an entirely Informal character, so informal in fact 4haf Baron Komtira did not bring his letter of credence to the Ports mouth navy yard, wht-reas M. Witte was aniied with the original document in Russian setting forth the powers conferred upon him, and also with a translation of the document. The lat ter he read. Baron Komura was em barrassed and offered to send back to the hotel for his commission, but M. "WlttP expressed hl.H faith that the credentials were ftill and ample:  Later in the afternoon copies of the credentials were informally exchanged. It is known that the credentials differ Blightly, In exactly what respect could not be ascertained, but the correspondent is assured both by the Japanese and Russian emis.saries that the difference is not essential and constitutes no obstacle to the ofllclal opening of the negotiations. Indeed, the president was ofllclally Informed that the credentials were ftill, ample and satisfactory to both sids.  It was decidi'd to hold two dally sessions, at 0:;'.() a. m. and 3 p. m. To avoid delay- and give the plenipotentiaries and the delegates time for consultation between sessions, it has been  —Chicago Record-Her@ld.  of Scourge  ArclBislop Ciaf eHe Died at Mew Oi-leaas of ¥ôil©w Fe¥er........................  board of health on. the yellòw fevei situation: New cases, C3; total cases to date, r.79; deaths, 7; total to date 119; new sub-foci, 12; total sub-foci tc date, 130; cases under treatment, 2G5 Public interest In the general yellov» fever suffered a temporary eclipse in the death of Archbishop Chapelle, tht  Is Mescmed  Vessel Carrying Explorers Was Wrecked by Ice in 1903. Party in Good Health Considering Privations They Have Endured.  ■  -  fc  Norway, Aug. 10—The i Arctic strnmor The Torranova which j ^•ent to therellef of Fiala-ZeiglerPol-sr expediiion has rcscued Anthoriy i^'ala and nil others connected with e.vpeditioii with the exception of cne Korwrgian seaman, who died of i!2tural cauFos. The ship America, ^nlcli tooU out the expedition, was crushed in the ice early In the win-«r Of 1903 and lost with a large part hor coal and provisions.  The oi the ex-  Peditlou are in good health despite  the privation.-; and prolonged imprisonment in the Arctic region, niid sov ered from communication with the outside world sirico July 1003. Fiala said tue rescue was most timely as the America was lost early in the winter of 1903. A largo quantity of provisions and supplies left at Fran?. Josef Land by various relief parties saved us from serious privations. .Three attempts to reach high latitude failed.  The Fiala—Zk-gk-r polar expcdition reached 82 degrees and 13 minutes.  AKCHniSHOP CHAPEU&  —  arranged that hmcheon will be servt-d at the navy yard. Three secretaries for each side will be in attendance to draw up the protocols of the meetings, which will be written In both English and French. The French text, however, in case of dispute will be accepted In evidence (faire foi>.  The offlclai version of yesterday's meeting given out by each side, described it as "satisfactory." and other accounts indicate that while everything passed oft amicably, considerable re.serve was displayed upon both Bides.  Komura Couldn't Speak ís'rench.  Baron Komura, whom M. Witte had met in St. Petersburg during the former's service as Japanese minister there, was pleasantly greeted by the chief Russian, envoy in_ French, • hut^ the biiron was obliged to shake his bead and turn to his secretary, Mr. Honda, who explained that Baron Komura had forgotten the little French he knew while in St. Petersburg.  While the Riis.slan plenipotentlares expcct the Japanese to present the Japanese terms Immediately upon the official exchange of credentials today they admit they are In the dark. Baron Komura and his colleagues decline fo give any information of their course of procedure.  They are carefully guarding, all their plans regarding the present meeting. There was some disjtositlon to attribute Baron K<>,niura's forg<'tfiilness In not bringing lu:= credential.^ to the Sneeting, to a (b-sire to spar for tlnin and for that rta^fon sonie doubt was expressed whetht-r the Ja[)anrse would fhow til. ir hand today, but the Russian envoys do not que,stIon Baron Konnira's gOod fniih and fr:'nV:ly it was due to a nil.siindorstanding. I The Japanese and the Russian newspaper correspondents have broken the ice and have begun to fraternize. It is perhaps iignlfieant that the correspondents on both sides are sending to their respective homes dlspatch-T!H of anything but an optimistic character.  most distinguished victim of the pres éht^ sfdtii-gíé': ■ »Aitboiagh , .the- .prelate was a subject of scientific treatment and attention his physique and fa tigued condition on bis return from o particularly Irksome trip through lb« country counted against him.  What Is held remarkable is that the archbishop should have contracted the disease so quickly, whereas he had spent manv years in Cuba and Porte Rico, where the disease Is endemic without having contracted it there.  Among the scientific men there is little doubt that the archbishop fell a victim to a mosquito during a brlel visit he paid to the old archbishoprV'. on Chart res street, or from an Insect which found Its way Into his residence, in Esplanade avenue, which is not fai from the territory Vvithin which there has been infection.  Yestertlay:s record of new cases waa again largo and there was an In' crease of the deaths. The dally num ber of new cases Is swelling largely bpcause federal control has overcome the dlclnclination of doctora to mski known their casea.  Surgeon White has returned from Slldell and went to the originally in fected region to survey conditions H© also visited the emergency hoa pltal which was taken over by the marine hospital forces.  Actual control of sanitary work has passed to the marine hospital servico and Dr. Gessner was placed in charge Advices from Mississippi indicate that the people of the rural regions are growing restless under the severity oi the quarantine which has cut of? sup piles. Secretary Hunter of the Mis slsBlppi board of health announces himself as utterly opposed to shotgun quarantines and throughout P.liBsissIp pi a saner spirit la manifesting itselt since the federal government has tak en charge of the situation. Amonfl the cases in the last ofllclal report is one within a half square of the nev/s paper row in a lodging bouse In Com mercial alley. This is the second case that has been reported from the same quarter.  WiF SpaK This Afternoon at Wilkesbarre and Friday at Chautauqua.  Oyster Hay, Aug. 10. - - rr( sid< i5; Roosevelt left Oynter Bay today a; a. m. on what i»robably will be th<' lavt trip he will make <liirlngchls BUnmicr sojourn bore. Late this afternoon h.-will addres.s the mit. d .Mine Worli( rf and Catholle Total Abstinence l-nion at.\VilUe.'barri% Pn., and at 1ft:MO a. ni on Friday he will si^eak before th<> an-sembly at ('haiWau<juu. N. Y,  On the trip the president Is aCioin panlcd by his son Kermlt, bi.'^ nephew Hall Roosevelt, I'hip Roosevelt, a son of W. Emlen Roosevelt; Acting Secretary Benjamin F. Barnes, Jacob A, Rlis, Surgecui Charles F. Stokes of tho navy, M. C. Latta. his personal stenographer; H. A. Strohni"y»'r, photographer, representatives of the pre.ss ast'O clations, secret service ofllclals and messengers.  The party w^« nt by iiiM-elal iriilii on the' Long Island railroad to Long Island City, thence by boat to Jersev City and left on a special Lehigh Val ley train at 10 a. m. Brief stops were made at Phitllpsburg, N. J., and Eas ton, Bethlehem and Allentown, Pa. the president speaking at each plar-from the rear platform of his car. Wilkesbarre will bo reached at 3 p m The president and party will be con veyed to a stand on the river com mons, where the president will de .liver his address.  John Mitchell, president of the Unit-ed Mine Workertj of America, will pre Bide over the meeting, being Intro duced by Mayor Klrkendale of Wilkes barre. Cardinal Gibbons is expected to be present and probably will speak After the meeting the president will be taken for u drive about the city End to the Wyoming monument.  Leaving Wilkesbarre at 7 p. m. and making brief stops at Sayre, Pa„ and East Waverly. N. Y., the president will .^rrjiye at, iChautaiiqua at 8: lij a m Friday. His addre'ss to the assembly will be delivered In the amphitheater. He will leave promptly at noon, the re turn trip to Jersey City being over the Erie railroad. He is scheduled to arrive at 9:4« a. m. Saturday In Oystei Bay.  PRESIDENT LEAVES  OYSTtR DAY. Oyster Bay. Aug. 10.—President Roosevelt started at 8 o'clock this morning for Wilkesbarre, Pa., where late this afternoon bo will ,deliver an address to the anthracite^ ^oal miners and members of the Carbolic Abstinence union. Tomorrow the President sjioaks at Chatuauqua.  iMtemew with-Wtt Ting Faag, Former Minister. Accepts Exclusion of CooMeSo  Sweeping  Insurance  Investigation  New Yoric, .'Vug. 10—Insurance commissioner Folk of Tennessee, who with the Insuranee commissioners of five other states. Is here, said today that an Investigation of insurance similar to New York's m'ay also be commenced in the states represented by the visiting commissioners, in-eluding '\\'iHconsin, Minnesota. Kentucky. Tlic Tennessee commissioner will ronfer wiiii the New York com-iJiiUee today.  WILKESBARRE WELCOMES  THE PRESIDENT.  Willcesbarre, Pa., Aug. 10.—The city Is in its gala dress to welcome Pie.Hhlent Roosevelt. Tho early morning saw thousands pouring Into the city from all points nearby. The mines are closed and most of tho stores were closed at noon. President john Mitchell of ^.o Mine W-ork-ers' Union, will be the chairman of the meeting at which Tresident Roose volt will speak.  Appeal of Christian Science Case.  White Plains, Aug. 10—Judge Piatt sustained the demurrers of John Qulmby, his wife, Gcorgiana and John G. Lathrop, Christian Scientists, to thf Indictments against them for man slaughter in the second degree. Tlu y were Indicted for allowing Esther Quimby. a child, to die of malignant diphtheria without calling in a physi clan. Assl.stant District Attorney Frederick E. Weeks of Westchester county announced that an aiipeal will be taken to the appellate division, and if necessary higher, again--' JiKJg'' Piatt's decision  Fiction Hii«l Publio 3lornìa,  Vienna Is seeking to improve Its nior-,nla by oiTeriiig money prizes for "healthy no vela" which' will bo sold on ea.sy terms to tiie poorer clftssea and tlma me(-t tho "shocker" on Its own footing. But who shall decide what In and what Is not a heal thy novel? Many of tlie authors In this country have at one time or another fallen under tho bno «if tbe self appointed eensor.—PaU MairGazétt®.  AH MnlI io ne <ire«>n.  AH Of tb.o ' uxes. the mail pack  age nixl ilu> f.ost.s Pupportbig  both i-las-^cs ol' in Chicago wlll  be paint.-l greon Tlie paint wlll bo sent In bulk fruiu Washington to Chl-cagi» and a(>)di»Ml by l'alntt-rs selei'te«! by ttu' ¡M.stuiaster. This is part of 8 general si-Ikmh.. ut' flif imstotrii'e départ-meut t ) ■•iirifiL'c Ih« l'olor of mail hoxes ali nvt'r the i-oiinvry froni alumiiiliiin to grct-n il-; fii'it th/'v need reiinirtii«, says the ('hii atco l'u'it. Tho alumitiluin Iinliit has been uiisntlsiactory. It wa9 Boh!(n<>(l on the theory tluit it would prevent Ibi» bo.xea frotu nu-^.ng, but II falled to do so A coinmltteo wius ap polntfrfl tn seleot a new palnL Aftfr going into the snbjeet thoroughly and Consulting nilb'eri of tbo navy as to tbo best palnt In use on transporta and wivr vessels tbe couiiiiittee unnnlnioasly si» lected gi-een.  ■ IVkhi.- A.in. U,. ,;I'..:,, former Cliinf>e min.! i .■ at Wa-i in:; ton, in ¡m intervi( w >a!d that tli ■ ' X-ist.lng regulations f<u the f'xelu;;i()n of Chinese from the Cnltrd States were unsatisfactory from the ChineHe standpoint and hence it vvaH d»n,ivd(J that they ahuuld be moditied by the hi w convention.  The Chlnere, he-.iaSd, agreed to the exclusion of coolies and thia point presented no dlfllculty, but tho existing regulations pressed with severity on other clasBos. Ho Instanced the casea of merchants, travelers for pleasure, students and others who, wHUe . nomiinally admissible to the United States, were forced to undergo examinations which, though possibly necessary, were generally rendered very objwitionable on account of the manner in which tho regulations were enforced.  Subjected to Indignities.  "A superior Chinaman arriving at San Francisco, for example," said Mr. Wu, "iB detained by the authorities while hiB credentials are being examined, and this detention frequently involves consorting with a low class of coolies in a common shed. Ho is unable to communicato with friends and is subjected to inconveniences and indignities to which Americans would refuse. . ,, „ ,, ,  "Moreover be ia not allowed to retain tho servlcea of 'any one to protect bis interests, and if the inrmlgra-tion authorities decide against him there is no possibility of appeal.  "That these grievances are well founded Is demonstrated by tho necessity for President Roosevelt's stringent order that courtesy bo shown the Chln«'Ke by fho Inimigrnfl<iii oillelals under pain of dismissal. There have been nimiberless in.stances of harsh treatment which the Americans themselves have been forced to admit.  The Chint'se gftvernment, he said, agreed to the exclu.sion of coolies, but it urged as the main points of a new convention that the better classes of (Chinese be treafd on an equal footing with oth' r aliens, with the right to retain counsel and the right of appeal if necessary, and the admission of coolies to Hawaii, which he regarded as of the utmost importance.  Hawaii was greatly In need of laborers. rui. Wu said, and sinit! the Ch! n(-se were ,.xrlud(<l the Industrier, of the Islands had stiff «-red. At all events the Chlnes(< ihtTc do not comi)ete with American labor. The Philipidnes had' long been a iiatural field for Chinese  Industry, but tlic nr-jiHration of th^ ■ exrlusion art to the islands bad changed thi.^?. Rfgardlnp the desirability of fMiineBe labor in the Far I'3ast, Mr. Wu Infitaucinl the prosperity of Singapore, in tho Straits Settlements, and the adjac<;nt country.  Boycott Well droanlied.  Mr. \Vu expressed himself as greatly regretting thft Chinese boycott of AroerlciHi . ¡fiod's and Rtearo«hi|> a.ftd Insurance companies, ns It might estrange tho goodwill of Americans, which ho highly prized. Apparently, ■ however, he said, the Chlnose claBseB most conceriH'.l, considering that the prospect for the «elutlon of the difficulties arising from the appllV,ation of tho exclusion act wero remote, decided on the boycott m the only means of ventilating the question.  He pointed out that the movement agalflBt Americans, though thoroughly organized by the best and most representative Chinese, was altogether pa-clOc and was not directed against per-Bone or property.  Mr. Wu confessed that he was eur-prised at the extent of tho movement and the depth of feeling manifested not only by the mercantile classes but by the studontB and even the women, and said that such an expression 'oi public sentiment meant extraordinary progress in the direction of the growth of a real nationality.  He could not tell what the results wotiJd- -be- sboisld-the' 'biiyiiGit-bS' ^Isre^' garded, but considered the rnovement a most Serious one and trusted it would soon be rendered superfluouti by the satisfactory settlement of the grievances complained of.  Mr. Wu'fl attention was called to the fact that he was credited with directing thi> boycott and he Indignantly re-|>udlated the suggestion. He eald it would be an unrrnnonahle to ciipcct that his government had the ability to compel the Chinese to purchase poods as to believe that the United fitates governHient was able fo prevent She Chieago strikes.  "I regret," said Mr. Wu, "(hat so little progress has bi-en made In the negotiations for a new convention. Should the American government permit the wishes of China to be embodied In this convention, It would practically have no effect on the United States, as Hawaii and tho Philippines don't concern American labor, while the farilities recjtiired for superior Chinese immigrants in the United States are adinittelily jusl'^ and reu-Fonable."  In conclusion Mr Wu said It was his opinion that a ebarer definition of the term "laborer" is necessary.  Entrances in September Willfbe Based on Qualifications Heretofore Allowed.  Souroc? of Klectrlolty In C'lilnft.  Aa the coin |)!et ion nf the »'¡eiülc tramway in Clilna dr-'iu-s near the rv-mors among ignorant native« grow apace, sayti tlie Singapore I'ree Pres«). The latest is tti.it 5uO ('liineiH? bead:? must be proeured and buried under the power bouse before tho "kreta hantu" can start nuinin/r In conso quonce of this Jlnrlklsha coolies refnso to tnkp faren Into the country districts at night............. "r ...... .................  Albany, Aug lo - The education de partment promulgated the following rules regarding tlie normal schools un<ler .its supervision situated at Albany, Brockport, Cortland, HufTalo, Cortland, Fredonia, (Imeseo, Jamalea New Paltz, Oneonta, Oswego, I'latt.^ burg and Potsdam.  Candidates must be at least 16 years of age. Candidatt-s for entrance in Seiiteinber, 1905, will be admitted on any of the qualifications heretofoi« allowed, except at Buffalo, BrockpoM and Jamaica, where a high scIh.oI d; ploma or équivalent is rt^iiriu il.  Beginning wl-th Febrtia'y. I'.M t: < .¡î; didates must present a lii^:t¡ diploma or its equivalent !(■ it-proved by the comniit:~i<)ii< i . f ■ : tlon. - Beginning with .  candidates must present a 'In graduation fi uiu t lu- eoui i : ■ by tlie ciiUinii.-.Mi.!;' • oi for a<!n;i'--!nu 'o niHii :ii m i.- ■■ ■ fit y traiîiin-' s.-Ium.I.j nn le. of ch.Aj.'. i- ; - :i .'! M;. ■ ' : ^  Candida!' - Jl :■•■«■ — have ■■ ' ^  work or it- ■ ' ■ ■  St. Tlion-ar' CHitrch t'o Be Rebuilt.  Xe u \ I': A : 0 \ I: i;' n,( III  thai a I.' U i.'— ■ ' ! ■ 'in^'e. -Í  n¡o}.t ,(!! r .\.tr: d «.!' ■!.'• la..--  Thoii;a>' cLuich v.!u(b  bü.'nei! "I 'l. ;ri \h<' In art of N' u  York's f;,.' .tiiinnb;.- r--;.id. nee per: ion  win i'U!'' :n;!i;' Ôi.lî' lv Ol! the ll' !  V. i! ( ■■ . (.■■ • !.•• pa^-'cr of S '  Tlioin..- , K' i.- M s. Cn:-  Î rar' ! b. ( i; :.-t 'o l  HI. .!! . : .. i:'. •  tlon thereto have taught two m ;u will be admitted to Itie lUMttial scIuhm with the understatuiiiig tha! ;lie\ tnu^! complete th*. biph srlio«.'. coui^e n addition to Ilie piofes-ional e.Miih.' t'l' for«' tb» y stial! b< inadiiat»-,!  Graduates ot traaiiiiK - iar^--- ^ wiu <>ntered the cia^s upon a !m,l;!! -i i.tut;  dijdOTIia " H!!i! win. l/!i\e tai!,i_ !:! 1 11. \ear.i^iliCe ;n!i:,!Mi!!i lioil, t h, :.!;!!, ■iilg- riris:^ i-« r- ijr-- -r-iT'l'-«^  Sliilia; < n ! one \ e,i T- : ajelMi,;,. !,  " Srl e., : ,la^ of !  ! !•  T  fe,  : -. ! i: 'lie :i,;t; s( lioo! :r  ' ■ ! . : i;.-' re.¡:i;i  .. : ; - ¡1. < Iii.: ; 1. , i: il., 5.-e,.t..! Wedî|e<  :i ! I r and eorraiii«- tn s« s  « rt.e < e;i- dlVi !  - i \vi ^ ci ; weei-.:-  . . V at , rti 111.  • \:: a. ■ !»•:.- a !;■: >' rad u;i . : ■)•■ of Î' ; -  : !• I.V in 'la p: of. s-:ioi.:u  . Ot Ofhrr il !X  ■. ei.il ap¡H dnîuu-n? ol  -■ ;■ nl' ( (]ll< a! UU: l'û! ar"  1, pa^. in a<U:;iK-< to 'h--  .i : ! e toa- d a 1 .eij  .1 VU-. oí IV »•'•.'■  Bt-UCt Uf" , <■■  uew ( Iu;' Bun)s <u li lîave V' « !. (  One Cî.e. k .  lu- -a-., d Lar:.:.'  a i:. V Mr t'iircs waà íor Játiauid  CROP REPORTS.  \\ !;. Aug. lA.—The monthly  Trop ?-oe,;a.-t gives the condilioii of  e.T!! of «spring wheat SO.2 and on's  ...................... ■.................  »   

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