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Allegany County Reporter: Tuesday, August 8, 1905 - Page 1

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   Allegany County Reporter (Newspaper) - August 8, 1905, Allegany, New York                                 NUMöi« Ä  jMI  WELtavtUL é, N. y., tue ô d ä v, a y ©«sto, 19 Of,  ISSUED 8CM l-WEEKLV.^  YORK CASE  Seaman From Colon Died at the Beten-  tion HospitaL—Third Casé and Second Death.  - i  1  i '  ì :  ÍÍ« I : i. .  New York. Aug. 7.—Ono man died ®t yellow ftvcr at New Yorfa detention ¿ospitai at Quarantine Sunday^,-making the third case of yellow fever discovered on ships entering New York this summer and the second death.  "This l8 the flrot time In five years," lald Health Officer Doty/' tbat fork bas threRtened by mcire  tiittn one yellow fever caao In a Bum-Ber. William B. Smith, a pantryman takea oS the steamer Advance, from Colon, last Thursday with nlao other WspectB. died today with an acute case of yellow fever. Sereral mem* Ijerg of this party are still under in-ipccUon but I am positive that they ara not suffering from yellow fever Uli® other two yellow fever imtlents cam© here early In the iiimmor."  Hot one of these tester cases, Dr. Xtoty eald; hm (xme from th® f®T®r flittrlcta in the tlnltei Statea. Panama has supplied them all and this Is Ito first time since 1897, Bcrordlng to the o®cIal health records at tjie port of Ne^ Yorh, that fever casea from panaaia have been either threatening or numerouB.  "Pantryman Smith," eald Dr. Doty, "la only the third caae out of fully 200 guepecta who have been taken oS firom ships here. His death which came so suddenly that we could not even ìeam ^here his family Is, proves that the thermometer is not merely the only safeguard against yellow fever entering New York but almost a perfect protection."  Up to Saturday night Smith had apparently as pood a chance of life as any of the 197 other fever suspecta ■who have Bpcnt a few days at Quarantine, laughing at fever suspicions, and gon(i away in perfect health.  The pantry man was discovered Thursday among a row of the Advance eailors lined uii for medical examination. Ilf was laughing louder than the otlurs at tlie examination and when Dr. Dfify removed the thermometer from liiin. with an indicated tem-pcratiiro of 102, he made the test a second time to bo sure there was no error, bo healthy did Smith appear.  Taken to tlio (letention hospitai at Bwinburne Islaiul. Smith retained his chnfflniT nature until Friday  iBòrninp, Then he gave In and admitted that iince about last Moaday Le had been feeling ill.  Up to Saturday night, under the mosquito pr(H)f netting where each oC the fever susjiectR is i.snlntpfl, nr. Doty Ears that Hnilth was apparently as ^■ell of! as any of the other men from tie Advance wlio had only slighf. attacks of malarial fever. Late' Satur-evefrhtg, -howerer,—Sttrtth—^giw suddenly worse. Sunday morning no could not longer speak and before noon hf' died.  The program with the yellow fever dead is cremation and this was carried out with Smith's body today.  The steamship company which employed him will be asked to look up the pantryman's relatives.  There are at (luarantine 19 other per-Eons who were taken off ships because their temperatures were higher tban the defnee fixed as the lowest «anger signal for yellow fever sus-pecta  Only two of tho.se persons are from New Orlean.'i. All except one of the others are from the Panama district. Dr. Doty says that the two from New Orleans will bo released within another day and that there is not the kast danger tliat any of the suspects have been suffering from anything ^orse than malarial fever.  At the hospital on Swinburne island, Jfhere only ¡hone f»atients actually suf-jenng with :;(;rne sort of fever are ^ken, then, are still 16 men. all mem-cersof sill,,.s'crews. Three of them are Irom the Seranca Avona and At HofTtn.'ui tion for ¡„ I in but ar.' (1 PfOtS W.Ti^ fce Rl I'a.^^  Orleans, and one from the sioarnor Llgonler, from Port Arthur.  "The death of Mr. Smith," nr. Doty said, "I regard moroly nn an isolated casij which has not in the least jeopardized the safety of other persona at quarantine."  marine hospital service.  New Orleans Citizeng Will Supply All  the Needed Hounds.  New OrkanH. Aug. 7.—Fever report to 6 p. m.: New cases, 28; total cases to date, .^.33; deaths for the day. 8; total deaths to dale, 105; new sub' foci. 2; total sub-foci to date. 93.  The fever report Is interpreted by the authorities here as euconrjiglng. ■particularly as there were only two new Bub-focl, one uptown and one downtown. It is estimated that there ^re now 233 casei- under treatment.  The marine hospital service has not et assumed control of (he situation ut It Is'expected to do so today. The condition precedent to the assumption  Ef the work by the government that lie citizens of New Orleans pledge themselves to put up $250,000 to defray the cost of labor and material has been met and Surgeon White la in momentary expectation of receiving the formal order from Surgeon Gen-enil Wyman to take charge.  President Roosevelt and Surgeon General Wynian have biith been wired by the cltizen.s' comriiittee of New Orleans that all of the funds that the service may require outside of its own stated expenditures will be supplied by the people of the city.  This action \va.^ taUiii, at noon at a special meeting of the finance committee; It followed the news received frpm Surgeon White that Surgeon General Wyiiuui iiad asked for a definite Statement of the financial conditions of the- peojile-here and liad given a definite statement himself of what the marine boi^pital s-Tvice could do with the funds at iis disposal.  six from the v(n froni the Adviince. ^!and. the detentlon'sta-'!is who are not actually I" r suspicion, all tlie sus-^is.'d Simday, two from wliicb canu^ from New  Town Crowded With Sightseerato Welcome Peace Envoys. Orders for State Troops Countennaiided.  Presidemt's  , ■ tay Samoa  Eiwphaslied the Necessity 6f Sound Character Bulld'ng.  . Oyster Bay, Aug. 7. Pret^ident Roosevelt dollvf'h'd a lay Kcrnion Sunday afternoon to the Christian Brotherhood of Oyster Hay. He emphasized especially the necessity of sound character building, holding that high moral character was the real esnence of Christian life.  The organization before which the president spoke ls< a non-sectarli n body. conipoBcd in-inclpally of male members of the several local churche:?. The meeting was held in the Sunday school room of the M. K. church, of which the Rev, W. I. Bowman l«t jui«,-tor. Mr. Rowman Is also the prcgi dent of the (^hri-iiion Tlrotherhocd.  Several weeks ago an invltn 'on wius extended to the pkes'dent to addrefa the brotherhood and he liromfBo-l the Rev. Cliarlen I). Wight man. chairman Of the Committee, to accept the invitation at Houie later time. He nolifled the committee Saturday night that he would make the promised address yes-tofday, stipulating that no prevloTis announcement should be made of bis Intention to speak.  About 200 perpons attended the meeting and practically all of them were surprised when President Roosevelt appeared on the platform and WBB Introduced by Mr. Bowman.  The presldejit carried Ifls own Bible and In beginning his address read selections from the alxth chapter of iMatthew, the epistle to the Corinthians. and the epistle to James. No verbatim report of the address was made.  At the conclusion of his address the president shook hands with the members of the brotherhood present. After a brief call at the residence of Mr. Bowman, adjoining the church, he returned to Sagamore Hill.  New Orleans, Aug. 7.—With seventy thousand dollars in hand, resulting from an assessment on tiie citizens of New Orleans no diiTicultles will .stand in thfi way of Immediate fG<lcrnl control of the fever situation. The cost of its eradication is estimated at two thousand. There is there to go forward with the federal plans for a month or six w^eeks when the quarter million asked by .^o government will be on hand. It is believed the fever will be completely under coulrol by September fifteenth.  Eight hundred men started in today with a general cleaning movement.—^^hcre is a slight decrease in the number of new cases which has inspired confidence.  archbishop chappell better  New York, Aug 7.—Archbishop Chapoelle Is reported slightly better. Dr. Lawrus hopes the archbishop will recover from the attack of yellow fever.  Alarm Clocks on Grnvc0tones.  The Indians of Pala, in the foothiila of the Coast range in tlie soutliern part of the state uC California. T.-ere converted to the Catliollc faith by tlie Jesuit fatliers, who founded a mission among them. 'Hiough some superstitions iirevail, tlieir belief in'the resurrection Is strong. B<>lievlng that the dead must remain for some time la tlie grave, tbey observe exac tly the hour at which the siiirit defiarts. and tlie rude wooden cross over each gnivo in tin? cemetery states the exact iiour. uiiuute and day on which tiie person dieil. Suspended from tlie arms of one of the cro.Mses is an alarm cUx k. wit& the hands set at <5:57. The alarii» at tlie back of tile clo(^k has been set at the same nioaient. The person who placed the clock tliere believes that ut the proper moment tlie alarm will sound and will awaken tlie sleeping spirit.— American Inventor _  -©—04—0—#—#—#—©—®—©—©—®—®  Hebrews omt @  Bfi  s  New York Kosher Bakers Go on Strike 9nd Will Try to Create Bread Faming. '  ^"ew York, Aug. 7.—With thousands of Hebrews out of hr^ad on the «^t side, owing to the strike of the Kosher bakers, much trouble Is expected. Reserv-- patrolled the streets all night. The Journeymen bakers endeavor to bring about a real bread famine today, 'fhe sifikefs wutii ^snt a ten hour day; they number about eighteen hundred..  Newport, R. I., AUg. 7.—Instead o. arriving^ at Portsmouth on Monday the peace squadron will probably nol rearh that eity before Tuenday morn Ing. The vessels arrived olí Newoor« late Sunday afternoon and the con verted yacht Mayflower with M. Witti and Baron Rosen came into port.  After a stay of nearly five houri M Wltte left for Boston on a sp -da', train at 10 p. m. He decided to re tiain in that city until today an.l pro ceed to Portsmouth by rail. Barur. Rosen returned on board the May flower.  Commander Cameron McR. WMnslow of the :\layflower, the flagship of ttic squadron, issued instructions last night to defer sailing until today. Tin vessels will tlierefore be imable 1" reach their destination before >Ton day night or Tuesday morning and ii is expecK'd that ilu' en^o\s will Dv formally r« ct ived some time Tuesday.  At 1 o'clock Sunday moinia-i th« squadron encountered a d 'nse fog and anchored tv.-o miles off N"w f,on(-on. The fog did not lift until 1 p. nj.. when CommaiKb'i' Winslow suni'h-d '.issem ble off Newport." Newport wa i !;.;.ch ed about- 5 i». m.  The Mayflower ( n^-red the harboi and M Witte and IVi. Rosen, ac companied by Cinunandcr V^'in'^low went ashore. This 'nodiiiraiion of the original program war. d 'cidc 1 up'.ii at the lunclu'on at Oyste- Hay on Friday when .M. Witte confessed to the près ident that he was not a good saihu and preferr'd to make at lea.-t halt of the trip to Portsmouth by rail.  The president readily assented to the change and gave orders tbat a private car be htdd in Newport S'lti day afternoon. The fog delayed the arrival of the squadron off that pon and prevented the Russians from catch Ing a train which would tak > them to Portsmoiith at night. It was event ually decided to proceed to Bo-ston and go to Portsmouth todar.  Commander Winslow signabMl the dispatch boat Dolphin which has .n«' Japanese envoys on board and 'he convoy Galveston to ent-r > ewrtcn and leave for Portsmouth today. The vessels came iii'o the liarbor shortly after 7 o'clock and anchored for the night. The squadron got under way early this morning. The iiresent plan Is to ste;im slowly and to reach Ports mouth .\Tonda> iiit^ht or Tuesday morn Ing. When .M Wiite readies that city he will go on board the Maytlower and will be cordially receivi'il by Itear Ad miral .Mead, commandant of the navy yard.  The trip from Oyster Hay to New port was an \ineventful on<\ After breakfast I'hiid Assistant Secretary of State H 11 I) I'ei/i e, who is on tb,r-convoy, prepaied of greet  Ing for .M Wiite and Haron ivomura which Captain CiitP'r of the Galveston sent by wirep .-^s t.di ^raph to th<' Mayflower and ndlidiin,  Repiirs e.:iiiie later that both missions liad a comfortable night and Were fii.jox iii;.: !l)e trip thoroughly. the Maytlow. r ,unt under way M. Witie who st(<od n;i I he. hi ldi;.' with «'"tü mander \\":n Inw, doffed his liat to the Galvesii.n and waved a heart.s g reef in L'  After ditüTi^' at Commander Wins low's cotia.^ at night he was accompanied to the statiiju by that ollicer.  m. witte in boston.  Boston, "Aug. 7.-~M. Witte and his associate, Mr. Wllenldr,decided to re-moln In .Boston today, owing to the delay of the squadron. He will visit  Harvard, Bunker points of Interest.  Hill and other  Portomouth,Aug. 7 There Is much disappointment here over the non-arrival of the peace commissioners. The fact that the announcement of the delay was made on Sunday prevented a wide circulation of the news and this morning every electric line from the country came in crowded with sightseers and when the news of the postponement became generally known there was not a little confusion and expressions of regret and the dlsapiwintment was general. The state troops scheduled to arrive today wore ordered to wait until tomorrow. The jirograni scheduled for t(>day will be carried out tomorrow.  Warships Sailed This Morning.  New I'ort, Aug. 7. - Tho Dolphin and the Majflower with ineir convoys bearing the Russian and Japanese commissioners to Portsmouth sailed frnni liefe at 8 n. m,, with the exception of M. Witte, who left for Boston by rail last night. The. members of the Russian and Japanese parties were aboard their respective vessels.  french fleet  visits england.  ASClerical Fraud.  Bald to Have Stolen Pastor's Watch After Delivering a Good Sermon.  Catsklll, Aug. 7—John Etheridce. aged 24. In jail here charged with forgery, and wlio is wanted by thè lO lice of As»)Ury Park, Long Rranch, Scranton, Pa ; Dover, N. J., and other places where Ik» is said to have ib*' frauded noted menandcb'rgymen, passing for a ¡iriestoran F.piiicopal cleric, was idenflflcd here late last nl,i-')it Ir. the Rev. Ivlgar E Hrooks. rertor of St. .John's church. Povnr, as the mar. who called at the Dover rect ir'- oi i recent Sunda.s and int roduecd Inm > :i as a clerg,\m;in of M'.e (v,!; en ,,! church.  "I gave up m.\ iMili'iit !_o tP.-ger." said Mr liroolv>., ••:ind P" >!■ 'n ered to mv ]>'oide one of th ' 'e; mons I ever Ik aid :ind mdov ■ in. m.v house he stole tliv ¡-old u-"- h  Etheridge, wpo i- said to U-et,  lni|)risoned in l^n.^-land for i-i.iii,-//!-nii^nt, Will |!roP'ild> iie fiki'ii to .N'.-w Jersey toda.v  BATTLE IN CHINATOWN  Two CMaamem Killed mé Two' Fataly  ■■ '......Woitadeé.—FigM'Of -Factioms  in-Theater.  New York. Aui'. 7.-~As a result of £ battle between two of tlie big Chines« Bocieties in the Chinese theater It Doyers street last night twoChinamei were killed, two others prol)ably fatal ly wounded and many others injured.  When the "police succe eded in break Ing up the riot, they had arrested more than enough Inhabitants of ("hi nese district to flll the Elizabeth Btreel and other police stalious lu the vi cln-lt-y;.................. -- ...............- - - - ■  According to a report made by tht police, the Hip Sing Tong started the trouble and deliberately selected the Chlneee theater, which Is seldom visit fid by the police, as the more favorable scene of operations.  At 10 o'clock when the battle began not a seat was to be had, and many were standing. Among the latter. In the back of the theater, were several of the Hip Sing Tong members with revolvers conceiiled beneath thelJ flowing garments.  Suddenly as the actors on the Btagf' reached a climax In the play, there was a terrific explosion quickly fol lowed by several others In the fronl of the theater, near the stage. Tht actors fled In terror and the p;icked audience surged as far as It could to wards the rear where several of thi Hip Sing Tongs began an Indescrim inate fusllade into the throng.  It developed later that tho first explosions were made by huge fire crackcro. Finnllv in desperaflon the  audience charged on the num with thci revidvers and beatita! tiiem down, got to the one exit which wa^ open. There they fought desperately io it^ach tho Btreet,  The fir.st explo.silqn had ¡-(artled tho quarter and as the theater poured, its frantic crowd into Doyers stTeet the packed tenement houses added their crowds and for th" next hour China town wa.M the j^cene of the wildest excitement.  Wlien I lie five poUccnien managed to force their way into the theater they found four men lying in pools of blood and n sf<.\>- or more hidifif^ under benches, the liacks of which were splintered with bullets.  In a short time the reserves arrived. Two ambulances were called and the men most dangerously hurt—four ot them—were hurried to the hospital. ■ A squad of police hastened to the headquarters of the Hip Sing Toog where they arrested three me« in the buildlnR and found four oihers hiding on tho roof. A little later Mock Duck, alleged to be the leader of the Hip Sing Tong. was arrested. According to BtatementB made by Chinamen to the police he Instigated the affray and remained outside of the theater, having Bent Into it the men who did the shoot Ing, with orders to wait in the back of the house until a confederate In front set off the big crackers when they were to pick off certain designated victims.  missing teacher found.  Morristowa's  Elms Die  Cowes, Isle of Wight, Aug. 7.—A French fleet consisting of eighteen battleships and cruisers and a number of torpedo boat destroyers under the command of Vice Admiral Cuil-lard, drofiped anchor in tho solent this afternoon to spend a week the guests of King Edward and the British navy. The fleet was greeted by a great gathering of yachts and British war ships.  secretary shaw  visited president.  Oyster Bay, Aug. 7.—Secretary Shaw visited the President at Oyster Bay today. The secretary will go to Roanoke, Va., tomorrow to speak at the opening of tlie Republican StatQ conveijtion, •  caught beneath  immense girder.  Buffalo, Aug. 7.—A gang of nien unloading steel girders from a flat car at tho Buffalo Structural Steel Com-piiny's were caught beneath an immense girder which unexpectedly slipped from the car this afternoon. Michael Grace was killed and Jos-oidi Stein will die. Others were slightly hurt.  gov. higgins at a\lbanv.  ' --  Albany, Aug.'7.—Covernor Tirggins returned today from Glean. Tho newly created gas and electric coinmis-.sion will organize and seethe Governor tomorrow.  venezuelans order  torpedo boats.  Genoa, Venezuela, Aug. 7—The government has placed an order for six torpedo boats and one de.stroyer.' '  Belief Is That Gas Leaking From the Mains Is Kl ling Them.  Morristown. N. J., Aug. 7.—Beauti ful old elm trees in many streets in this ci are dyingr- T he fvtt r-ae^i v ness of the town is litdng seriously affected thert'by, and residents in many sections have sent leaves to foresters and government experts for analysis as to the probable cause.  In Elm street, which is ono of the fashionable tiiorouglifari's, several fine frees are detui. ICntornologist Smith of the state agriculture station at New Brunswick. sa\s the trouble may be due to tin; severe winter of li)o;5 and V.'oj. followed tiy the intensci heat last July, wliich has exhaustetl the vitality of the trees But the opinion has been advanced that a leakage in the gas mains running through the sfreet.s i.s responsible. Several years ago a large number of elm trees (ui South street and Ridge-dale avenue died from that cause.  'S  Escape  New York. Aug 7 - Paul .Morton, president of the I'^piltable Life Assur ance societ.\, and .Mrs Morton had a \»3rrow o^caiie from serious injtiry last fyight when their automoidlo ran into ail Eighth avenuo car at 2tlh sticet, M'r and .Mrs Morton were on Dielr whv acrn^-s town wiih two frli-nds vvlioni tin .\ bad tm-l at tlie r>'nir-\ ! varna lailrond di fuit wli.-n. in a'ti iniit jn.i; to av(dd .'i ; out P.lKjund car,. the. wheels sliii|i; <i ^uid tb-' lu.-ichine struck thi> car a i^laDciiii' blow. Tbo conductor was tbiowfi dovvn on the pl.-itfonn and sllgbtly hurt .'¡nd the automoidl.-ivas teniporatily disabled.  Fern to Be Used as a Training Ship. Ogden.sburg, N. Y., Aug. 7. — The United States guniuiat Fern coaled hero en route from the Port.sinouth navy yaid to Duluth, .Miiin., where she will be used as a ttaininu sp.ip. ('a¡i-tain C.uy . wiM: .Minnesota  naval IT ili';'¡Yr¡Aí n took charge of the  Kern at Montr* ai ' '  •è  Lying on a Pile of Underbrush—Missing Since July 25.  Rochester, N. H., Aug. 7. — Miss Mary A. Tucker, tho Providence Echool teacher for whom per.sisteiit search has- been made since her dl.s-appearance from Camp Ossipee July 25, was found Sunday, afternoon in the woods near Sotith Lebanon, Me. Miss Tucker was alive, though slu» was gre'all.\' exhau.'-fe<l and emaciated. Her iMilsi' was striuu;. however, an<l her att(-ndin).; ph.vsjckin tliiiii;s she may recover.  The woman revived ¡intHcienth' to say to her rescuers: "I am so tirerl I would like , .sonie warm i.uill<," Shf' tlien relapsed into semi eoii'eiou^!nei■:' in which condition slie remained dur ing tiie, -rest of thi.- d.i.v, -  The spot where .Mi.-s Tuck<.'r was fcnind is but a short distance ftoni where sire was reported to liave been seen July L'!».  Four eniployt'.s of the woolc'ti mill found .Miss Tucker. Slie was l\ui/r on a Jitle of underbrush and wb^ u her rescuf'rs ajiproacbed she roHi-d her eyes Imt could not utt-a siein'd. Tier clothing was soaked , li' r ieet. wei'C swollen and her limle, wi>!e badly emaciated------------ --------  Probable Failure of New Raiiroad.  Binghamton, Aug. 7. — Another of the numerouR schemes to bulld a rail-road freni this city to ■Wllllarnsport, Pa., Bccms to have nono the way nf ito predecesBors. The Colonia! Conci luetloii company, which liad tho con-tract to coTìHtruct the road known as tho New York. Pennsylvania and • Fnuibwestcrri closed ihcir ofilce.s in thls city on Saturday and ali work on the road has been stopped. Crading work Kin Ibis rond was liegun ni'ar Wyalusing. T'a , last January. lìuring the I.ist three nnintbs the different in-tere-sts in the rfiad have ilisagroed ba.Hy, and as a result ali elTorts to liniuice the project bave failed. iind it Is now thouirh,^ ¡hai nothiii.t-' tiiorf wi!! Ire tioiìi' abou! buildiuf! the ¡'(va-dT-coti-— Btruction work uu which '.vas ctoiijied Fevetal m'Uitlis .'ir.o.  Six People Fatally Hurt.  Cb vidand. Aug 7.- The fast . Pitts burg flyer, .N". .'•'.o, on the Cleveland • and Pittsiiiiig lailroad, crashed into an eastbound St. Clair streetcar at 9:30 last night, killing a child instam ly and fatally injuring six people while ].") otb'-rs were seriouslv hurt.  Canadian Regiment In Boston.  Ibtston, .Aug 7,-- The linke of Com-wall's own Ritles. tbe bird regiment of i'anadian niiliiia, v.'birh i. vi:-iting  New ICugland. aUeiided s-rvices,.....at  Trinit,\ P^piscoiia!'< l.U! eil SuneiaN after-noon -Thi- viMtor« wert: .t£.Cii«rtrttIy.. tlie Britli-h As^ieia-LkifT" of Nav.il,anJ Mijllaj:^- -YrrrtlTns, Boston F'isiiiei Veter-ans and 'ietacbni' nts ffom ofh>-r or.irani/ations. Lar.L'i- r-row'is .iloag the route of inarch eiitinsiasticaiiy greeted th' Canadianf. '.\t .ifght'tlie niilir,iau;en were ent«'rtained at Kniglits of llonor bal! and the ofli-cers and guests w re dined ai Ho'- l Beaconsfield.  .Editor of Kingston Argus Dead.  Kingston, 7 -Henry ,! Crouch.-  The car containeii 10 passengers wtui owner and fditor of the Kingston ..\r-were lu)und for their homes and fot j gus, died Sunda> . aged 77 lie w.is amtisement resorts. Only a few es- postnias'er at Kitiuston under Pri-si-  capd uninjured ' Tht^ train was tu-o-j dent Clevelatni s seec iid cee<iing at a "fav--t rate of speed when tion iind fot ve,-us wa the accident hapiiened and tP.e engi | Democratic pídií'ii s lie neer, it is said, couhl not check the. Cortlaml. X. Y. v. Pf re b speed of his train in time to pie vent journalist ir cai'.-tr ^ud la the «îlsaster ■ The safety gates at th'Vto Cab-na, crossing were uji and as the railroad In the hit makes a-curv«^ at. this ¡loint the con ' friend^i:;n ductor could not see the t!;.' r ap proachin.t;:  u h  di:  adnunist ra-a.ctive in as lioi II .'i! Peran Iiis : f^.inov^,! '■va- activo tiis  an  Justifiable Homicide.  Utica, .-Xug 7. — .At an eai'y Ine Bunday mornitig while oHicers we chasing three men suspected of r-i blng a New York Central freiL-li; t-, ono of the ileeing men' was shot, Instantly killed He is an naiian ; are his companions. nete'"ri\e Jani'  Landers of t lu road fir< d III man aft-T 1, yell ■'Shoo-Shay tl.ei, I.:-, rfferi Th. He wa- d: > 1 , juF.titi.i! !,-•! from tb" found at th', 1  Ni  w "^'ork Ceti'i'al air to f!i','i:;-i!  Pn^e Drill cf H-nru-a.-íri  Auia:;:: ' \ conven' ¡<-1. 'il urda} \\ iti: :i drill ' in i ■ BUîfulo ib..! and A ¡I .a II" < . av.ar.!. d !,;  ntur-A:i-:ri. - -■7;-.-i-(i  :  •tot  po;,  ■ Sa ) .it' ■ .i Ko, ! .. lia!!,!  . t r  an  Justifiable Homicide.  Utica, .-Xug 7. — .At an eai'y Ine Bunday mornitig while oHicers we chasing three men suspected of r-i blng a New York Central freiL-li; t-, ono of the ileeing men' was shot, Instantly killed He is an naiian ; are his companions. nete'"ri\e Jani'     ho afrini^i    .;!!,:■ -Ì Î «iP : h.-    e.i îiipai^'n          tour duríüi        i- i.inaoin-          Doaj;:    1 e. , :11 J,        Ï      Two    Yarntsmen Drov»ned,          PiiffaN-        -ìt Waì-          Ine,- r    . . u!^ IM S    , S C.re-e-n          of    i -!:<!-'., ^vl,o Wa    s drowned          Satiîrda;. r    iii, i.! u, ti a Mr Iiunroiig oí    ___      Chica I'o, P    ■ i.i' a;.s« tt ing i    ,>r a dingy          In wl.ic!:    M)':^ u.re going    ashore at.          P(dn' Ai.i!    ÜOHi Bufi    ,'a';o Yacht          ci-i!> ^ a. Î.'    .N. ■ r..;^ La:- been    recovered          The !.,.,:>,    oT 1 !UÍ;Í: is Pf il    ,! tnifoiHid              • car'. !,t í:;i0 cai"    rivai i!, out          hi;o ti:,.    , ............              Rea -v    f't to M.t-cIi 80    Miles. ; -          (H: '...ti.vb    N ^ .-X-íC :    ■—(ìrncralì          Cí.aífe.- !    ■ t'-a. r. T\\ ■    p. î y-second 1          r'    ( ■; . Sía'<=s i:    •liantry at!          SacKé"- !    t..ttr maro!; c    v^TÌand to i ^          Oír.p I.-!-,"    S.,' Hilles.    to partlcl-          [■ati, !:.    . i ,..1; oí ihti    nuniuuUnit'    x      ! íi Sí. 5 j i ■    ¡-..unty s    oidiers «          •Vu-e t'r.-^í    .ici ' t-\i!' banks on Aug 23.1          Tí.; e    A'ictorlan lì;,ties,1          Canada    a!:.; tìio" F<nirth    bat'aUò'ni          Nati..na'    of New York vili also          Í«e pr- Sia;-    ......' ...... "    ................-...............         Ali,:.  w   

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