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Allegany County Reporter Newspaper Archive: August 4, 1905 - Page 1

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Publication: Allegany County Reporter

Location: Allegany, New York

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   Allegany County Reporter (Newspaper) - August 4, 1905, Allegany, New York                                 VOLUME  64. NÜMiEfl  W E L L S V I L I- E, N. Y., FRIDAY, Â Ù © U QT 4, 1905.  fS 8 U E D SEMI-WEEKLY.  Afraid of  ml  Italiâfls in Mew'Orleams Conceal Fe^er Patients—Cases in Most Unlikely Places.-  t -i  ps| i :  P-l l'i  } M 1.' '  New Orleans, Aug. 3,—The reports .. tbe ft'vor sltuailon oliowecî an !n-®rca=e la tîio number of deathg. High tempc-ratufés siiccectled by lieuvy rain end cooler wcatlior produced climatic Editions favorable to fatalifir's Ho«f of tb<J .leailis were of Italians and" nearly all of thoui were eitlier hi tho Emergency liospital or In the quarter adjacent thereto.  \Vhile the iover spells a serioug Btate of affaiiH, it is not bellevcfl that tberd is justification fèr the terror ^blch ECcniB to have spread over the country outside of New Orleans.  THl' city board of health's report of 42 new cases and 6 deaths shows that the Itiilian patients numbered 35, wliUo the six dead were all Italians. In Hospital street, In the beart of the criglnally Infected area, there were 12 cases, all in one block. In one Hospital street houBo five cases were found and in another four. Most «f the other new cases were found near the French market.  Id spite of all that^haa been done to reassure theiu, many Italians contln-tally try to conceal their cases. They are fltill stricken with panic and they turn in fear from doctors and health offlcere.  It was due largely to the energy liitli which the marine hospital forces eet about the work of discovering hidden cases that Tuesday's record was made so large. With local Inspectors they Insisted on reaching spots where they believed cases to exist. Since thlfl fedeni! c.inipaign has been in progress, cast's have been turned up in the most unexpected places.  In one iu.'^tance when the oiTicers had made a tliornni,'h inspection of a' house and had fnileil to find a patient they went ilirou.uh a skylight and found a ^¡^•k man lying on the roof. In enotlier < as(.' ¡Ik y found a patient concealed umlrr a ci.^tern. The other day a wa^nii. loaded with household goods and accompanied by Italians, started to cross on one of the ferries. OfScprs insi.'^tcd on an Investigation and when the goods were unloaded a Blck man was fo\md In the bottom of the wagon.  Po6tma.ster Woodward received a letter from the railway mail service at Atlanta Kaying that Greenville, Miss., hereafter would accept no letter mailed from New Orleans that had cotbeen disinfected and that under no clrcumstanc» s would it receive newspapers.  The mosquito theory being accepted by the federal ofTlccrs, disinfection of mail is regartU'd us unnecessary. It is said thai Secretary Hunter of the MissisFlpjti health board will probably come to New Orlean.s to survey the situation generally and especially to study the sci.-nilfie light now in pro  gress on tho basis of the mosquito theory.  Louisiana offipers expert little modification of tho quarantine regulations until the fever in'entirely ntamped out owing to the widf spread IndinnniJitlon of tho lay ptibiie of MlfslsPippi to accept the mosquito theory,  Snrgeon Whlti? of the niarlno hon-pltnl service has returned from the Mississippi coast, where ho talked oyor the phone with Governor Varda man. Dr. White cald. that Governor Vardaman had given courteous eon-sent to the estabHflhment of n detention camp on the MlBRl?oippi sldo of the state line "of tho Louisville and Nashville railroad and would arning«' for admission to Mlr,aisfilppl points of persons from New Orleans who enter the camp and are discharged with certificates of fod<'ral surgeons. There Is no longer any obstacle to the movement of through passengers across Mississippi.  No apprehension exists of any seri-CUB results from the trouble that has arisen on the Mig.sisslppi and Loui;-lana border over the enforcement of the Mississippi quarantine. Repriris of Captain Bostick of the ijaval re serve and of Colonel Arsene T'orilliat of Governor Hlanchard's staff edii Armed the charges that Louisiana lish-ermcn, hoal.niet. and citb.'nx have Been interfered with and tliai fher* has- been some olistr'iciion to traffic in Lake liortrne '••»nal and that ilic revenue euiier Winona, which is iloinp sorvlf" um' -i." (liiiM tion of Surgeon Ward.n, has inn rfer.'.i with Lotiisiatia hj ats.  These rein.rts led Oov- rnor TUanch ard (<i or(i( r ('apialn HosiieK am! ¡¡h riosquito fleet of the ovstep eoiiiiiiis sion ;o the si-i n". With (Iovtikh Varth.nian anNioiis to avoid atiy eon lilct v.üli ill' l.oiiisii! Iia ail! hdi ii i( it is th'iUnln that (he .Missis,-ipp;; sol di<-rs, v,-. (, ii is s,u;l. !i. ea com  ing a'.'russ tlv Loiiisiana line will here-al'ti'i' h<' r'qihrcd to le i! on ih.ir side of th" tel ler and t'lns all funher possibility of clashes will lie removed  Illinois Dcclareij Quarantine.  Caii'^o. ill.. Aug. Southern 111; tiois, a third of the state lying south Df the Baltinioie and Ohio Southwest-im railroad which extends from Rt Louis to Vincennes, Ind., deelar^ d luarantines against all yellow fever Infected points. Four inspectors will begin inspecting all trains and steamboats at the borders of the quaranlined area.  ^E WITTES ARRIVAL  Denial of the Statement Attributed to Him About Japan's Terms—Formal Statement for Press—Met by Baron Rosen and a Slavic Society  SHOT GUN QUARANTINE ESTABLISHED.  Memphis, Aug, 3.—A dispatch from Texarkana says a young lad from New Orleans was stricken with fever (Continued on Eighth Page.)  W  ÖS  Copenbagyi. Aug. 3. — Prince and  Princess C'haI l. s iaat night paid a  visit to iCiuperor William, when ! majesty Mgain promised to support f ^^cej:'harlei ir..r the throne of Nor-j ^ay. The ( tiipefor also met the Russian minip,,,,. M iswolsky, with whom ie discussed Far ICastern affairs, on ; ^Qlcti M. iHwulsky is Well informed, L^^^^g betiiLi,,inisier at.Tcddo._______________,  i of Woman  »ho Mh, i„. Qoeen ^f Norway. ' i'or the daughter of a king Princesa , paries of I),.„mark, whoso husband is : alkc-d of for ¡,ing of Norway, la In-. ciinea to be quite democraUc. Heir fa-Irh!, king of Great  IrS emperor of  II. Maud, third daugh-  Of the liritish monarch, she was I jme popular nitii the English public I and was ^^^  j J »¡"'•onventlonalltv.' She  L.f ''omplain about" tho du-  & Oiice when  land 1 V'^' " ^^^ opening bazaars  'ifftho'*'^ • "niei Htuiic;j she is reported ljocavo8ui.l. -What a bleasiug to have  Ithw > ' " the days when  ArTf ^^ '"''liliig to open and shut!" J^Q sbe added: "I sometimes get tiral f. ^^ "kß ot Mme.  CSf I often think  ¿Slorlou.s it „luat bo to be able to  " Peimi' like an  j ^ary person and have a 'day off.' " ijaJ^^®® Jinud waa born In 1889 and Charles, EGcond bob of  FäIT'^'^''"'® ^^ Deüiüiuk, la iSSa  a 9 good linguist and Is a« as-  I'HINC li-SH ( IIAKT.nS Ot'" PF.NMAIiK.  (■otni)Iishe(l Kiissl;i!i sebnlar, is a clever bookbinder rfuvl phot<)gr;t|-.her, eiin sew well and even spin and use<l to spend hours at ..lier spinning wheel. She 1« very fond Of out<ioor anuisomenta, is a fine horiiewonmn, sometimes rides a wheel ajul lovea dogs. She got out a novel in typewritten form for circula-^ tlon among her friends some time ago. It told a simple story of liffe in England and penmnrk and sketched l)Oth flg-nrea In low life and in arlatodratlc society.  Now York, Aug. 3.—Sergiur; Witio, the Kusslan ponco plenipotentiary, on his arrival hero yr.sterday aftefnoiKi Ituiidiatieally deniod liaving said that Japan's peace terms wero intolerable Ho also denied jior.illvely that he liad preilieted Ihiit the e.ouferi'neo vvniii 1 break up in a w<>.ek.  Awaiting M. Witte at the dock was Baron Rosen, Russian anibassador a! WaidiinRlon, wUh hla fusl secretary of embasiiy, Mr. Hansen. Ilaron Ros<>n came on board as soon as the .ship reached the dock and cordially directed his confrere and the members of hiß suite.  After 10 minutes conversation during which the majority of the passengers landed, M Witte came down the gangplank on tlie arm of Baron Rosen, followed by his suite, but soon found his progress impeded by a tremendous crowd >vho cheered him and whose greeting M. Witte smilingly acknowledged by r«iieafedly lifting his hat.  Several policemen soon came to his rescue and cleared a passage to the automobile which was awaiting the party outside the dock.  Midway down the pier the procès sion was again stopped, hovvever, by a delegation from the Slavic cociety of New York, who presented M. Witte with an address. The Russian envoy made a brief but cordial response, thanking the society for its greeting and also for the cordial welcome he had received from another deIegatlo?i which boardo<l the Kaiser Wilhelm off Quarantine in the morning, having gone down the harbor on a tug which flew the Russian flag.  Scope of Witte's Powers.  As M. Witte does not speak English, he was not pressed for an interview, but the members of his party were each atiproached for their views about the negotiations. Naturally on a subject of such delicacy they were reticent but this much was ascertained beyond a doubt:  In scope the powers of M. Witte, ■who comes as the plenipotentiary of Russia to discuss with the Japanese plenipotentiary means of ending the war, and provided a basis acceptable to Ruçisla is obtained, to sign the treaty, of Washington, equal in every way the powers conferred upon Baron Komura by the Japanese emperor.  M. Witte brings with him instructions prepared by his emperor which outline the general policy which he is authorized to pursue. They are in many respects elastic and will air', rather than hampei- M. Witte/ provided the terms submitted by Japan, in his opinion, appear reasonable.  It was also made plain by several of M. Witte's suite that he had not come to the Washington conference to obtain peace at any price. OiBclal-ly, the Russian mission is, of course, unaware of Japan's terms, and until they have been handed to M. Witte by Baron Komura, "Russia will await results patiently and without anxiety,' was the way a close friend of M. Witte expressed the attitude of his country.  When tho Kaiser Wilhelm der Grosse arrived at her pier M. Witto handed to Professor DeMartens the following statement which Professor DeMartens read aloud:  "For the friendly greetings of tho American newspapers upon my first visit to the hospitable shores of the United States I offer my heartfelt thanks. This kind attention to-ichea me all the more profoundly because I realize the vastnesa of the power wielded by the press of the United Sfiit<-s an<i H<lintre the keen inttilli. gence v.ith which it is uniformly directed.  '•[ am glad to be able (o add that I also appieeiate (he ethical worth of the aims for tiic attainment of which that iiowcr is so often and so success fully employed. One of the nohlesi of these aims is the establishment of peace and fiiindshlp among nation--and it is to the pralsewortliy efforts of the peopid of liie I'lilled i-;ti(■in this .lin-eridii th;'' my vi-^il, to th.> new worlii is ar r i üui^ aM.^  To Ascertain Conditions.  "For il I- ::i i . i, i iai,' ■ v, i h 'ii Ann-i ;i::n p.^',;/. -, . for !>• 01 whiv ll I'i . ■ 'I Ii' , \ • !• \V;| ^ ! !,.■  ftui hoi'i.'.d :ii. -K:!! Ill-- ril:ij. -1.'.  ''-.ar ha.- . d Ui- to < of,".-  liilhiM iiiiii ;i M V ! : .Ilii l.lu I'oieill Inns which cur Lul'nm ad\i'/-ar>' h-'/ns Eucessarv ai..l ad' (¡iiaie a.s' a basis for peace n< goiiaruuis,  "I need haul!) point out liiat it Is my ardent (hsiie ihai the two chl\al-ro\is foes, who lirsi bt'ca.ne acfjuaint-ed on the iiel.i of battle, may have found in eacli o;liei s sterling qualiti«'S niotlvea pown i u| t-iiough to cuRival«  that .'ieot!alnf;;nr ship iiiiMl it riin ns Into last in;: f'rl< ndshiiK ,  "M'iiiiv.liile, howeve r, »'i" ¡"nusoffered niii.st lir.-.t li" iK'cert aiiii'd,-w.eigh- , ed anil jud.'vd admis-ibli- by Uus-ia befoif ; h'- I-iii proe< "d to ioiMal ne  . ' "iiillu>r|o, IIS ■. r.' aw;!,I', i! r.-i .  CUsioru.'ir.v i!i Ii!;( fh s io  til' all ::nei> ivrclin.itiai'if s ìo-t ; ^ îlf(Uni;- of ll)o pi-ni).'ìli uMa: i . , wjio -U^k It. was !() «■otiir id il Till.il .i^i' i-!  •nent on tiie, teaMi ni t!nd«>r d!scu'< ! Sion.  "No'.v, tl',i> vfvy :',4i-t-ihat his nia.les'> the czar coiis« n;.'d to tal.(> a couisf involving drparture froi'i ihi^- anci'-nt dli)lomaiic u/iafv and to aiipoint a ne • Sion to lea!!! the nature f>f (lur lirav enemy's terms Is an eloquent token ol the friendly feeling which li<' and hi subjects continue to cheri'-li towa:•d^• the people of the rnlte-d States I sa continue to eherl.sh because at epoch In our history have otir tradition al relations w;th this great republU been other than cordial.  "And now I should lliie to say, aye and to prove to your peopl", who livi less In the ¡last than in th(> iMeserit and the ftiture, tliat It Is the fiuvenl wish of the eii!i)e:(jr and the peoide cI Russia further to str<'ngihon the tie'i of friendship which have hithrito sub sisted between the two nafions.  "It is in virtU'' of that sinci-re de Biro that his Tîiaj» sty the czar, wuivini; all other considerations, has unh.si tatlngly accti)trd the coidial invit:u tlon of your first citizen and genial leader. And if niy nils! ion should prove in all oilier restx-ets barren and the endeavor (o finri a common basis for iie.aci^ negotiations shotild fail foi the time bciii'-r, the signal proof ol friendship given by his maj-sty the czar and the Russian nation would Btill stand out as a memorable event fraught, I trtist, with far reaching and beneficent results to the two great peoples of the West and the East."  Other Members of Delegation.  Some of the members of the Rus elan peace delegation have visited America before. Professor DeMartens said it was a real pleasure to hini to return to America. "It was In the United States in Oclol.er. UiOl." h said, "on th - occasion of having con ferred u)ion me the degree of Doctoi of Law.s b.\ Val.' universitv, to;;i'i)ii' With Presidi n! itooseveli, Chiet .tus tice .Melville \V. Fulli r. Marijuis Ito. .Mark Tv.-..;n ai.d the iuLe Secretaiy (j.  Stale Hay. t!:;;! f j iid fho prlvile-, of luaking the peri^oaal acquaiutànc'_ of l'r.';'.id"nt Uoo. i vrit.  "Uverywht-re the niost exquisiti hospitality syas extended to nie iind the most (listinguisiu d ..\nierican citizens arrnneeii in my honor a large and fine dinner at the Metropidit¡ui club in New Vorlv. I also visited (he uriiu) pal Amiuic.an cities and in iioston 1 was t'hi' inte-st of President ICliot of Harvard univ . i >|( v.  "Of that sojiuirn In America I re tained : ueh a f.rateful mornory that 1 gave an account of it in an article un d<>r the fille nf "American Inii>re.s-sion.s," puldi.died iti New York. I re C(dved the best lmptesHh)n of all classes (d' American eitlzens and I an; esiieciaily indelited t,o Cliief Justicf Fuller, who was my colleague at Parit-durlng the great arbitration of 1800 between Venezuela and ICngland."  Jean Korostovetz,-who is one çf M Witte's Hocretarles. went through the United S taten twice, In 1894 going from Japan to the Riissian leiiation at Rio Janiiro, and in lHOl going to R\is sia from Port Artliur, where h(> wa--' the chief of Admiral AlexlelY's eivii staff.  G<'neral Yermoh ff, the leading mili tary member of the Ru.Kfian dek'gr' tion, said: "I retain a very good re mernbrance. of my former sojourn in America where 1 was In lS!t8 as Rus sian military iepresentative with tin-American troops during the Spanish American war At Tampa I had tin honor of being pres/uiti d to Mi'. Uoose velt. I remained in Oub.-i luifil tie fall of Rantiaio During all that tine I recidved the liesi imiiressien of tbf American ;frmy. of whieh 1 .idmii'ed the heroism re^ w.ll ¡is the spirit, dis cipline. and ili" exei pi ionul smaj-tness I ¡bhall Iheiefoie l,,ive great pleasun In meeting again man\' military fiit-nd.-whom I have in- Ame, i( a."  GEN. LINEVITCH'S POSITIONS.  Tokio, Aug. n.—An oflicial report has been received here that General Lincivitch's first army is disi)Oscd near Chungmunlen; tho second army holds Feng wa Pamlenchen line and the third army occupies positions in the vicinity of Taum Cava, Teloma. The cavalry protects the extremities of the wings. The Russian forces at theTumen river are estimated at twenty-two thousand.  MO  Kingston, Aug. 3.—An explosion "occurred at the dynamite factory of the Nitro Powder Co., at MInge Hollow, near this city at 2 o'clock this afternoon. Reports received at police headquarters state that sixteen were killed and a number injured. Other reports place the loss of life as high as thirty.  —©—@—^—©—®—©—©—©—®  DANCING DECKS FOR BATTLESHIPS.  Spread'Rails on Bridgd Lets, the :Tram Throttgh Into the Creek Below Railroad Hero ^Eilled . Many Injured ■  .lohnstown. Pa., ■ Aug. A lialti;, more and Ohio passenger train ttoiind for .JolHiKtown and Hooliwooil w is wrecked altoul eight thirty at Pain! Creei' liridgo, ¡^(uneiset eouniy. rail was broken on tin; bridge nnd t.hii train pltrnr.ed (h)\vn to tiie creel., below. It is believed that every person on board is either killed or injtir-e-d, bui aH the spot la isolated, are not yet oblainabh^ A specl.al train bearing doctors, nurses and newiipaper men has gone from hero to the» scene of the wreck.  Later.  Pittsburg, Aug. ;!.—A dispat-c.li HaV.H i-ou Don, a baggago master, was killed and seventeen others were injured. The sinok(ir iind baggage car went into the river. Tiie train left Somerset at 7:17 for Johnstown and consisted of a baggage car tind two pass-onger coaches. The. rails spread on the Itrldge and the baggage car and coach next to it went over a twenty foot embankment into the creek'. Tlie engine and Ia,st coach wa.s not dragged down. Don, tho only man killed, was known as the hero of the Due-tlue.sno Limited wreck at Connells-ville two years ago. On that occasion allliough his eye was knocked out and banging on his cheeK',lio wont back to Hag the next train.  Early reports of the-wreck wert; exaggerated an<l only one o£ the injured is in a ¡■.erious condition; thii oihers escaped with slight bruises.  The injured arc Mable IJeacl), Wintl-bor. Pa., will die; Emma Vlckory, Windber, Pa.; Miss Georgia Rodgers, I'ittsburg; Agnes Hoffman, Scdsop-hle, Pa.; Mrs. Y. Herkebill, Kent, O.; Mrs. O. E. Berkebile, BufTalo, N. Y.: Mrs. Frank Freesburg, Hooversville; .Mrs. R. .M. Pyette, I\noxvilie, and Conductor Harry C. Ilenford, whose injuries consists of broken limbs and  RUSSIAN DESTROYERS  VENTURE OUT.  K.io Chou, Aug. :!.—It is ollicially reported that two Russian destroyers appeared off Chun Chulgon, the nortn-ern coast of Korea this morning and attacked the Keishot, a small merchant steamer. Tho destroyers fired sixty shots some of which struck tiie steamer, killing her captain and one boy and wounded two of tlie crew. The destroyers steamed toward Vald-ivostok. The Kiesho was able to continue her voyage.  BISHOP. HARGROVE DEAD.  .Nashville, Aug. 3.—Bishop R. K. Hargrove of tho Methodist Epi.scoi>al church died today.  TN S UR A N C E ! rv'.' !" 'rn G A T ! r 'M,  CommiGjiof.f'rr. of Fcwr sr.-'lc-^ ',c T«: c .jGint A'.'ion. ■  Chicai'o. Aui- ■Ï';.: ! r:-.' :■;  nn<N' retiij-a;:;. Ili > i-v i i- a;- .  invesi d I.V ¡Ih Ì!|- Ur:'.m:e i'Miii'«;;. !doners of I'l an« M e !-:..ntw"l-v. W'-i cousin and Minne- o';! as .•', r": uU of meeiin;; of ej-lir ;,t i; c in, u :; nee (^otii misiiioners. here.  It was tin uiiar.inieu'- opiiiii ii of tfii experts attending tlie eonveniiou liait there .should be ini(-r:-fa!e im [leethu: of Insurance eomj>anie.s, tiiu.s in.surin;^ fair and unprejudiced report». Only those commissioners known to be in favor of such a movement were Invited to attend the conference and it Iß said that a combinaticm Iti • to be fonned whdreby several eomml.'iaiou f^H will look Into the biisine.ss of all life insurance com[ianies liavlng license to operate in their states.  The men whf) will go to New York on Aug. 10 to begiin the inventlgation are Reati C. Folk, state treasurer of Tennessee apd ex-ofllcio Insurance commissioner of Tennessee; Henry R. i'rewii't. li^siirance comniis.sloticr ol Kentucky; Zeno M. Host insurance cominissj<nier of Wisconsin, and T. D O'Brien, in."urance commissioner ol Minni :-ota.  Rockefeller In Carbon Deal.  Cleveiarid, Auc. -- The National Caibon fMuiiiian>■, l<riown as the carbon trust, will soon have a, compt-titor with lmm<-iis(. finanrial backing. It has developed that Rockefeller interests arc- lielilnd the United States Carbon company, which will soon be llnanced with a capitalization close to $1,011(1,(100. In addition to a plant here branches will be established and a niammoth organii'.at bin built up. Lighting plants and electrical concerns will throw fuuirmous patronage to the new organization.  Tourists Driyen Over Precipice.  Cody, \\ yo , .Aug. —Word has Juct been reeeiveii' hero that a driver with a six horse coach loaded with tourists drove over a preripice in Yellowstone park, killing tlnee pa.ssengera and lii-juring seven others No detai's have been ascertain<'d, as no t(dephor.<'' corn munication exists with the part of the pat k where thr accident is said tc hav*; occurred.  Counsel Fees Denied.  New York, Aug —The application Of Mrs Alice Wehh Duke for alimony and counsid fees ¡lending the trial oS her suit for divorce frOnl Rrodie 1.. Duke was denied by Justice Giegerich In th'' suiueine court In giving his decision Ju.'^tiee Giegerich said that the success of Mr Duke's suit for divorce appeared to be inevitable  ©■—©—Q—■©—©—©—©—®—®-—®-®—®—©—Q-©-©-Q—© —Q-©  Dì  31SS1S12  Captain Cowles' dance, givon on board tho battleship Miesouri In honor of a Bocioty debutante at Newport, calla attention to th® o»"«®* need of thia Improvo-meflt In naya! architectur«. '—Brooklyn Sqqìo.  t; u.is ! :Uîf Id ! Ue to.uiV.'' : ve." r.l'ji Î. <if  , . ,.•■., , ■ I Ii.ar:iîei:e<,. i or s: n • ra >n - of rci  the h():\ svi.nii !:i:'I!"ì: 'e ihe ' • ,■ r , ,, ,  , , . . , . iU,'u:it-in i repoiiiiou was tak»n u:- ..iie.  tlons of a i;1eini;e, ha • aiiavcd ( o;:! ! , , ,,, , , ,  , , ,, ct v i ibis «::!-Ì:IISS;OII \SH! be ooniimu'i; u!  Lanif-ue-i !{. lî.iiii-?! r e.f-for-Mgn niSair-- 1 , , ..- . . . . . .-s ' . . . - . . .  . i, todav s: at PvU'i'bur,   

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