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Allegany County Reporter Newspaper Archive: July 28, 1905 - Page 1

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   Allegany County Reporter (Newspaper) - July 28, 1905, Allegany, New York                                 ■ ' . « ■  numbers  WELLQVILI-E, N. V., FRIDAY, J U LY 28, 19O5.  I 8 8 U E D 8 E M l-W E E « l, ¥.  nsurajice  WiB Opem Amgmst 5 at Ports-"coutil lavy Yard—Jap-I aas .îerms Known.  Washington, July 27. - ,Whethor there is to be peace iu the Far Easi or a continuance of the war will be practicaliv (lecldotl at the first bus!  ¡CEB meeting,' of thu AVashîngton con fcrenrii which will convcne at tile navy yard, Portsmouth, N. H., about Aug 5 Baron Koinura will on that occas iin commuaicato to M. Wltte the es lentlaîa of Japan's peace terms foi  further neeoi-'i^i-'ona.  This, It iO; declared, will not be done la a spirit of tloflance; Indeed, there are many evidences in the possession of tho neutral governments that Japan la comrng to the Washington conference not imbued with a deslro to humiliate Russia but only to exact termîj which will infure a lasting peace in the far East and which will in a measure compensate Japan for the financial losses in the present conflict.  It Is known that Japan will demand BU indemnity that will approximately cover the cost of the war to date. The amount 1b still a eecret, but It Is based upon the most careful estiujalea of thi ■ cost of the war and will be accompan Isfl by a more or less detailed Btate-ment, showing the method by which r,tho final figures were computed. It will not fall far short of one billion dollars, according to advices reachlnr here from well informed sources.  Sakhalin and Liao Tung.  Japan's other essentials to the continuance of the negotiations are believed to be the cession to Japan of Sakhalin, of the Liao Tung peninsula and of the railway as far as Harbin ; . the recognition of Japan's prédominât ing influonoo in Corea and the return of Manchuria to China.  If the Russian plenipotentiaries are prepared to accept these essentials, the oiBclals here are confident that the basis will be laid for negotiations sure to lead to the signing of the treaty of Washington, bringing peace Tn the Far East  As for the subjects remaining to be discussed a tedious one. It Is believed '' and one on which Russia will be dis-, posed to noRotiate with the greatest caution, is the program for the restoration of Manchuria to Chinese control.  Because of the confusion and general (llsnnipr likely to ensue in the province after the withdrawal of the foreign annlea, ^apari believes : that certain time will be required in which to restore public order and the establishment of a regular system of Chinese police administration.  During this period, Japan will Insist that she remain in control of the ad-" alnistration of the province, at the Earn© time giving a definite pledge finally to evacuate as soon as China shall be in a position to take up the reins of government there and maintain order.  It is believed the policy to bo eng-gested by Japan In this matter will sot be unlike that followed by the Washington government with reference to Cuba, American; troops being withdrawn from the Island as soon aa astable government was In control of the situation.  A second subject for the plenlpa teatlarles to settle will be the sur render of all the Russian ships now Interned In neutral ports. Some persons believe that this demand will form one Of the "essoutials." while others claim P^und for bplievlng that Russia may *.Co,-.Japan_.Jto^-ialie--.lliese-irL--pari payment of the Indemnity. Neutraliration of Vladivostok. Europe bpHevps .Tapan will demand the neatrali/.allon of Vladivostok, file WashiiiRtnn government does not "are I" "lis belief. Indeed, In offl-iial circles here the statement Is nade without iic.sltation that such a flPTnnnd v,-fM,„l not be "aiodeiate" or  reasonabl, .' and it Is kno.wn that 'iussfa will not porniit the subject of Jladivosit.k come heforo the con-i^Tc-nce ).;■ !,, , t,ian submit to Ja-dir.,(j^jj, Russia  laiown that slin would -iiHU' (ho war, lias been  his efforts in this direction, and it is believed that in ease Baron Komurn goes to Oyster Bay in advance of his formal presentation It will be for the ptirpose of dlscussfng this pha^e of tht negotiations.  Application of Mosquito Externunation Pian New Orleans People Are Aroused. Eleven Few Cases Reported For Yesterday.  Legislative Committee Will Organize Mext Tuesday at Albany.  nu8Blan IViembers of CommisBloh. Manchester, Mass., .Tuly 27.—Baron Rosen, the Russian ambassador, !»avf' out a revised liist of the members of the Russian peace rommisslon as follows: M. Wltte, first plrnlpotentiary• Baron Rosen, second pleulriotentlary; officials of the foreign ofllco, PrlV> Councillor iMartens. Mlnl.ster to Chin5 Polcotlloff, First Secretary of Embas«\ • Hansen, M. DePlancon, M. Dc .Toroso vets. Prince Koudactioff and M. Nabok off; otnoialB of the treasury depart nient, Privy Coimcillor Sbipolt and M Vllenhlne; offlocr.s of the Konora staff, Major General Yermoloff anr Colonel Samayloff, ropresentlng tli army, and Captain Rousslne, rcpre seating the navy.  at Siberia«  ^ns lot  «■rtainiv Llttlp  Iho dir. lî^s nnj s,., presiden; i  m .lílj,:,.;  npfs to (■,„ I'fr p!,.  1  m  in a (i o ill iannisi ico. I.ondoii way clf'ar to aid the f^fforts to tills Cini ¡'■'lifaicd its unwilling'-to an artiiifitici» uiUíi "'i'"'-'i'iári» s bavo mot tbo ? <"t>nft'r.>noe. The òb-  ; of th,: hfcauKf. Japan wishes " ^c- nssnn.,] that Rus.^^la is prepared in oeriousnoss for peace vif.M^ commandera  »"V of their Kround in- the field  increase  Ol' piv thtir Info  , .......'litHJIlCU  ' president has,not ceased  , at the front.  'niorniari„u has  reached htne, hu«-  Japanene Seize a LlghthouBe 700 Mllei North of Vladivostok.  London, July 27. The JapiineW landing at Dekastries, which is the termlnuj of the only cable line connect Ing the mainland with the island o1 Sakhalin, la regarded by the London morning, newspapers as an attempt tc eeize the mouth of the Amur river In order to enable the Japanese to dis patch an army up that great watei way to threaten the Russian communi cations.  Japanese gunboats and " torpedo boats could thus reach Harbin and give effectual assistance to any attack on the Russian fortifications. Both the Ussurl and Sfingarl rivers are navigable for vessels of light draft and thus the JapancBe could advance Inland in three different directions for a considerable distance.  If, as Is supposed, Japan has a rlvei expedition in readiness, the mere threat of its advance may suffice to change the plana of the Rtisslans and cbmpeljhe retirement from the Kiiin and Penghwa districts upon Harbin  Will VIeit President Today.  New York, July 27. - Daron Komura and Minister Takahlra, the Japanese peace plenlpotentlarlea, will make an informal visit to President Roosevelt today. This announcement was made when Mr. Takahira arrived from a trip to Oyster Bay to^pfflcially notify the president of the arrival of hla colleague in the negotiations with Russia for peace. Only the two principals o1 the delegation will go to Oyster Bay today, the other members of the suite remaining here to transact the busl aess of the commission. The two plenipotentiaries will leave here about 11 o'clock and U 1b expected they will return late In the afternoon.  New . On^iUiB, .July 1:7.—Six death from yclhAv fever K'Corded, mak  Ing a total lo date of If). Tbi> numl)f i of new casr.s reported yesterday Is 11. making ail lold to date 105 casen. There ale now J'j ceutuia of InfecUou . Tb«' or^'ani/allon of r<»roes for flight Ing the Ffinad of the infection and foi a campaign of «Mlucation and pructlca' appllcarlon of the mosquito exteiniinri tion plans ha.s hwn conijiicted and sides lOU men have bieu hired to clean gutters, while IJBO men are working ai-pari of the syHieni of sanitation.  Citi/,en.s are Ijciiig organized In wardK and Ihese ward clulis will torn, preelnri rlnhs and a house canvass will be made to asKure ihe acreeninj' of every ciHtern and the oiling of ever> cess jiool and water pond.  The husiiu'Ks men have provided thi funds for thi.s work and the poop!« are aroused to the nec<-.ssity of action The state board of iiealth on Mon<la\ adopted new r<'gnlation.s for frui' ships, piovidliig tliat they .should n iriaiu six davH at sea between the la.s port and New Orleans and requlrini fumigation at the port of departurr and fumifutkm after the diHcbarge o« the car.'io.  Vesteniay the steamship Anselm of the  to come u|) after being at sea four and a half days and according to the ship's papers she stayed at the quarantine station exactly 40 minutes, durhi;:  wfilch time her crew or u men were examinetl and pas.sed, Tliis aroused the people to arflon, and Mayor Behr mÄn and other.s waited on President Souchon of the state board of health and Insisted that the regulations be mado Immediately effective.  In view of quarantine compllca.tIonH, Dr. Souchon has called a conference for next Sunday of the health officers of Texas, Misrinslppl and Alabama to discuss quarantine regtilations and devise a system by which travelers can bo admitte/l with cortiflcateo of tho marino hospital service. Surgeon White who is in charge of all the government work will participate.  The work of placing the detentlor-camps has been finished and supplle.s are now being sent to them. The In fection in the original center seems tc be dying out, as fewer cases are re ported from there. Indicating that modern methods have been effective  The work now Is to find the new oen ters and treat them in the same man ner. Physicians now are reporting all •ase.s of lever and wherever there Ih fhe slightest .suspicion rigid sanitary rules are applied, witli the re^íult thai up to now tb( re havS been no spread of any case from any of thf>^ new reivers. Those which are developing arr ill trac^'abie directly "to the original  The Kmergency hospital wa.s oi)enei^ yesterday and i>atienlH were removed 'o It in a screened ambulance.  PKtOAU I lOMS AT NEW YORK.  AM VesselB Arriving From Colon and New Orleans Subject to Inspection. New York. July 27.--Health Oineer Doty gave out the following statement riiRarding tiie y<'!!ow fever situatloii at Colon and N.-v» Osh au;-»; -  "I have reeclved no ofllclal notice that one or more eases of yellow fo /er were removed from the steamship Seguranea before h< r departure from Colon on .Iu!y 22. If-this disease is found on l)oai(l when tiu; vessel referred to reaehe.s tlie New York quur-antlne ytatlon, the patient or patients will remove to th(> Swlni)urne Island ho.spltal, and all persons on board whose temper:'.!urci! are above the nor mal register will be remove d to Hoffman island for observation. The present refMilation.s heiy. ;ire Kutneient to furnish full protection.  "All vcifist'ls arriving from New ('»r-leanB are now s-ibji ct to inspectloi^ at this .station and will be for the pro-'sent treated in the same manner as vessels irriving from Colon.  There is no danger whatever that an outlirrak of yellow fever in ^l.e North would be followed by any serious resiiifs to the piibTii^ prliu-ip^ny for the reason that the variety of nion qulto which transmits the disease is section of the coun-tr}' Besides "t fie "''i)í■es(''rtt■''•^ít'ff^m«^fí^ Of®i outl)reak of.this disease Is slm-pl<?'and effective if properly car'-'ed out."  Attack on Tumen River.  London, July 27.-^The correspondent of The Daily Telegraph at Toklo ser.c^B a report received from Osaka, Japan to the effect that a Japanese army of many thousand men is attacking thi-Russian position on the Tumen river.  M. WITTE SAILS FOR AMERICA.  Cherbourg, July 27.—The steamer Kaiser Wilhelm der Grosse was held at tho needles by a dense fog and prob ably will not leave there until this afternoon. M. Witte, the Rus.slan plenipotentiary, boarded tho steamer this morning. Tho Russians were most Interested In reading dlspatchcs describing the arrival of the Japanese at New York and expressed the hope that tho Japanese conditions would really be as moderate as set ft)rth in the disjiatches received here  japs at sakhalien.  russians will  FIGHT IN KOREA.  Tokio, July S7.—It Is expected the Russians will take a stand at Kyong Cheung, south f the Tamen river, iu northern Korea, which if. regarded as the key to Possiet Bay and the outer line of defences of Vladivostock.  THE BENNINGTON'S DJEAD. San Diego, Gal., July 27.—The Ben nington'a dead bow number elsty-two. S. Tacalo, Japanese attendant,  ana H. A. Meiios, pay clerk, died to-day.  Only One Boiler  Exploded  Examination of the Bennington Show Hull Has Been Damaged but Little.  Sau Diego, Cal., July 27.—The gun j boat Bennington is again afioat on ai even keel, and it will be towed by tht Iris to the Mare Island navy yard t< be thoroughly examined and repaired The naval tug Fortune will escort th< Bennington and the Iris. Divers art examining the Uenningtuu'ti hull.  Admiral Goodrich is expected to ai rive on his flagship tonight or earli tomorrow, when an official investiga tion of the disaster will be begun.  Much interests centers on the ques tion of what was tho steam pressun on boiler B at the tune of the explos Ion, It being said that the safety valvt had been set to blow off at 140 pounds  Ten minutes before the explosion the pressure was only 118 pounds ant was rising, It is said. The boiler ha( been cleaned only a short time befor« the explosion and filled wUh fresh ter from shore.  Only one boiler exploded. An exam ination of the inside of the ship showj that the hull has been damaged bm little, if any. The water whicl poured in and caused the listing camt through the blowhole and pipes, brok en by the force of the explosion. Th« entry of water Is now under contro and no difliculty la expected in makinf the vessel sufficiently seaworthy I stand the trip to Mare island.  ed and what he has been tioing dtiriii-that time are questions which he e:.;; not answer. He aeeounts for his siid den return to consciousness by sayin;^ "I had evidently taken out my wateb fo wind it On opening the rase I sad denly beheld my wife's picturo anf' with a start I seemeil fo awake as from a sound slumber."  The conductor told him the number of the street, and Mr. Butcher 'ii'n naked him the name of the city and date. For some moments he was unable to adjust his faeiilijeii to the new and strange stirroundings, and when he finally realized that he had, lost nearly four months fiis first idea was to get into communication with his wife and family. A telegram was sent informinf^ her of his whereal)oiits and in a short time an answer was received. He left on a ul^ht tram fur home  Many Concealed Cases.  New Orleans, July 27.—One cane of yellow fever has appeared at Carmery five miles from St. Phillip.  It is an Italian woman, who escaped from the French quarter. Several concealed cases of fever have been reported.  Novel Plea in  Murder Trial.  Rochester, .Tuly 27.—Senator lam W. Armsirong has sent out mi noiincenvrit«! to bis f,ena'forIal nnd as sembly •us.s<iciates who are fo serve on the joint legislative oomniiti"e which is to investir.ate the life insr.r anc<i buidness ill tliis state that '•-,< committee will meet for organi/.-iipu next Tuesday at 11 o'clock In the ^V-n-ate library in the Caplttd In Albany. Sergeant-at-Arms Charles Hofallng of tho senate and Frank Johnson of the assembly; Assembly BtenograpMcr Henry I^/unmert and Senator Steueg-rapher A B. Sackett, have been nr.ti-fled to be present at the opening session next Tuesday.  If Senator Armstrong's as.<?ociates agree, the eonimittee will orgimize at once and Immediately proceed lo New York, where heaihiuartera vvill be engaged, counsel selected and prepr.ra-tlons entered upon for the lnve.st'"a-tlon. He ha« already written letters to Governor Higging, State Supeiin-tendent of insurance Francis Hendricks, Attorney fJeneral Mayer and District Attorney .Jerome, asking that they meet- wlUi-.the.. -C(immlLtee . at., an early date.  Senator Armstrong said: "So far as I am concerned the Investigation w 11 ,bQ jsne iiideiiendent from i.tiy  now In progress, a'lUfougihi""these^^^ will tend toWard a common end It win be as iboro\igh and nr. nrarc'^inf; as It is iiossitde to make it.  "I appreciate fully the gravity and importance of the inquiry an<l I request that tliosewho have in their iios-sei^sion aii>- ini'oimatiitii which fr'ill throw lirht iipim the sut)ject tender it to the eommiiiee. I or anv member of Eive them u:.r fulb-st support in an ef-the eom.nitiee will be onlv too glad , ^ort to go over the whole field and In-to ree.Mve leuers containing such facts ! without resfrie-  or informalion.  "The investigation will lie r-'ju-menced as .sfiim as pos.'^ib'io and nisit ed along an rapidly.as possible, bu:. it Bhould be borne in mind thai 'he members of the c-ommittee are busy men ani (hat their services to ihe state will fie without compensation. Bo, wiiile We will elideavur to» keep the inquiry aiv «'(mtinuouf; and u:> uaiu-terrupsed as is possible, the pubilc should renu mber that we are entitled to some consi'deiadon and that our own private affairs must not bo neglected entirely,  "All our proceedings will be pui.lic and the investigation will be pursued without any other consideration than the discovery of .such facts as are nece.nFiary to the fiaminir of nejv lawg— If Bueli are deemed neressary—or such amendments to the existing ones, to be .s\ilimitteil (o tiie legislature. a.s Will insure to tiie policy .boldern that cvtry cent they pay in jiremiums over and above what Is n<-eded in eareful and prudt»nl nianagi-ment and the creation and lU'otection of nee» ssary . mortuary and res»'iv funds, ineluding safe und proper investment of sueh funds, shall BO to their credit; also to recommend. If the faetfi ju-^tifr, sii^b í\ réduction In premiums as may be foJind proper. ' " ""ThV-se' à re r<-ÏVr!>' "Í he "^piîi-poS'éff- "for" wliieh i'k eojiimitlee was appuli.ted and thi'. investigation ordered. I do not believe it vvill be necessary to in-'mk-e-' w. a. f) e ca u so  the insurance e(ìnn»ani(-R mu.st. Itíiow that it i'-, our purpose tf> aid in Ihe bringing aliout of erinditions which .ire In the interest of the lif<> Insurnnce comjtanies as well as in the interost of the polie> holders  "We .'-ha!) rnudoy the very best legal eoimsi 1 proeiirafde and we will  i tion.'  Transfer of Bodies.  Washington, July 27 —It was stateo at the navy department that the trans fers of bodies of those who perishec on the Bennington to the homes of rel atives will be made as rapidly as pos slble but that some delays must b( expected since there are certain healtl regulations to be complied with In tht cases of bodies already buried. The bureau of medicine and sjurgery, tc which all reciuests for transportation of bodies is referred, is usfng every eftort to expedite the work. An ap propria (ion'is available for such traus portation.  Captain Drake at San Diego ha.s re ported to the navy department thi death of R. Takata, wardroom cook ol the l!eniiitii:'nn. H!a father ia C Takata at Tuldo.  Chicago. .Inly JV .John Mu charged wi;li liHi:i: hi-^ wife child, makes ih". n<,. 1 I'b a tif t ij:'' tic somiiamhuli.'-ni .¡iiois in rlie case were selecied ve^hidas Mu " i declares iliere .was nojiictive; iba: h' slew his wife in his sleeii and that liis actions were due to a blow on the head received during a labor riot iwo years ago. Re is conducting his own case. Mueller killed his wife and child by shooting them and then hacking them with an ax.  om  Blind Siidemt  to be Minister  Baltimore, July 27.—The Presbytei. of Baltimore, after several days" consideration, has decided to take under its care as a candidate for the ministry James Cary Walker, who, although blind, has studied long to fit himself for the work. Mr. VV.ilker was examined orally on experimental religion and motives and passed in excellent fashion. Since being graduated from tho Maryland School for the Blind in 1903 ho has reduced to 'he point system, peculiar to the blind. 11 chapters of the Book of St. John and has reduced to the same system Had ley and Allen's Greek grammar, an extremely difficult taslc. ©—9—Q—@—©—©—0—©—®—©—©—®—©—©—©—m—©—©—  ALL THAT IS NEEDED TO MAKE HOWE HAPPY.  Poughkt eiJsie, .ji. V z'J. — \Vill:a:\ Slocum, a wellkno\.i Dutchess eouniy farmer *^residing a Poughtpiag, wts found dead on iiis | jwing machiiu a' 7 o'clock last nigh . lie <iid not re spond to Ihe call fo supi>t>r and wben u farm hand went to investigaie he found Mr Slocum on the seat of the mowing uuiehine appari-ntly aileeii. He .saf almost ereet with the r ins in his hands wlien the farm ban.! discovered that he was dead  —®  Panama Police Mutiny Quelled  Panama, July 27 A mutiny oe curred aniiiug the police forco her* yesterdax, but it wis quelled almost at the itfginning i)y Santiago De 1-Guardili, secretar) of w.nlr, who fa<-e(^ the mulini MS with a drawn revolvi i an<l, bael^ed Ity the ot!ieer.s of tli: force, ì>roiì:;ht thi'iii to stihnii.s-ion The priTifiyiai lenilers were s'-verei-chastized by the serrerary and th' other mutineers WMe placed in iro!: Folhies had noihing to do with Ue mutiny The ehi- T of police. Leonid:-.' Pretelt. is in .NiJinelnlee insppciinf tb( police force there.  Cruiser Olympia  Mussia Wants Morwe.gian^ort  London, July 27.—Tho correspond ent of The Daily Mall at Stockholm says: The ol)ject of Emperor William's Interview with limperor Nicholas wab to obtain tiie consent of (he latter for a prince of the house of Hohenzollerii. to aseen'i iiie throne of Norway. It i.^ possible thai the Russian empeiur will couseut, provided iiussia be permitteJ to sligh ly rectify fier frontier on tho Atlantic.' Th.- Daily Mail sugges's that the ••reeiified frontier" means that Russia wants to acquire the strip of Norwegian territory which parts Finland from the Arctic ocean, thus gaining a seaport. ,r  Kingston, .Jamaica, July 27. — The United States protected cruiser O'vm pia, flagship of the fifth division of the third siquadron of the Korth .M-lantlc fleet, with Rear Admiral Brrd-ford ci)mmaniiin^, on fuiard, arrived here from (iuantnnamo, Cuba The object of ihe' visit is fo grant the crew shore le.ive The Dlympia will '.e-main here a week  DENIED BY FOREIGN OFFICE.  Berlin, July 27.—The German foreign ofTice denies utterly the report pul)li.shcd by a correspondent of a London paper at Stockholm to the  of the latler for a prine(> of the House Hohn/.olle'rn to a.-cend ilio throne of .Vorwav.  S Ship Heads^North.  Noith Sydney, (\ H, .rul.\ 27 The Arctic steamer lioosix .dt, bearing Commander Robert I-: Peary's latest expedition, swung clear of îerniinal wharf alili h< ad» )! iiorth-.vard on her voyage t)f iii;-e()ver> Toward the North poie at p. in- \eKU?riiay the Steamer h it the wiiarf an uum».nse crowd wliich h;id ^athen iT to wilness ber deí).'ir(iir( ìnii-t inf<i ehe-ers which were inli;,!;!'.;: uith :h( whistles of the  decorateti i f'ouHinind'T th' expeditioü _ia (■■ an . shtiWi .1 il I !,<■• " o;'.!ec.<î;;p '.Il whieh <;tse he  was  Butcher At ?  Three Months Lost Out of the Life of a Detroit (VJan. Duluth, Minn., July 27. --- Wakin,-? from a tr.ince which ha.s «'loiided his memory for three or four moiiih-;. W. H. Buieher of 127 Michigan ;iv.iuie DiHroit, startled the [lassi ngt-rs on H street car here with "Where am P"  Three months ago he left his le^j. drnce in Detroit for his'i-.U" of business. How he 'has liv. d dating (h.i^ tbrte months, wliat citi».s he has visit-  m>'etiiig With íM anrio\); was sej/rvi i aes lay.  An oillcia! arumunceinent thi^ afternoon s;n a (h^t.achiue.nt vw'tn dei.'iin-ed to pro'eet tuo ¡atuiing on the Siberian co.'ist-of the .L'ljeincse troops from the Island of tíukhaüen. They dii:-  JAPS ADVANCING.  Katini h.\n,u-;su, Manchuria, ,ìuly 27 — The. Japauese • continuo advancing akaicr a forty nnio front. The Van-  Ono hundred and fifty Oklahoma farrtiem havo advortieed for holpmoetar— Mov»ô It«,,,. . ' —Chlùfiyô hiio,^ Oo®«, '  lodged tho enemy from Alkova Jnlv guard is about eighty miles from the 2'tth. Another detachment l.imied at , niouih of tho Tumen river. The Jap-  Mugati and captured 40,000 tons of ?oal and light railway material. Alex-  anese force eslimatcvl at forty thous-nud.   

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