Monday, April 18, 2005

Santa Fe New Mexican

Location: Santa Fe, New Mexico

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New Mexican (Newspaper) - April 18, 2005, Santa Fe, New Mexico THE SANTA FE Locally owned and independent Set vingNew Mexico for 156 years MONDAY APRIL 18 2005 FIFTY CENTS Cardinals begin conclave take vow of secrecy By ALAN COOPERMAN and DANIEL WILLIAMS The Washington Post ROME Sequestered behind Vati can Citys medieval walls 115 Roman Catholic cardinals from 52 countries will enter a secret conclave today to choose a successor to Pope John Paul II following elaborate rules that are both written and unwritten ancient and new spiritual and political The cardinals arrived by foot and by car Sunday at the Domus Sanctae Inside A look at the process of the conclave Page A6 Marthae the Vatican guesthouse where they will sleep and eat during the conclave All were dressed in their traditional redtrimmed black cassocks their waists wrapped in scarlet sashes and their heads bobbing beneath scarlet skullcaps Already for bidden to speak to reporters they will take a vow of complete secrecy when they enter the Sistine Chapel today There under Michelangelos depiction of a stern Christ delivering the Last Judgment they will mark their bal lots at long tables covered with golden cloths To become pope a candidate must receive a twothirds majority or 77 votes in the early rounds of ballot ing Most conclaves in the past century have lasted only three or four days But if the cardinals remain deadlocked for more than 12 days they can change the rules and elect the pontiff by a simple an innovation intro duced by John Paul The ballots are Please see CONCLAVE Page A6 Starting today 115 cardinals from all over the world will hold closeddoor meetings in the Sistine Chapel decorated by Michelangelos Last Judgment to elect the next head of the Roman Catholic Church The Associated Press INSIDE TODAY Ultramarathon man A hundred miles is a far drive for some but for 73yearold Richard Dick Opsahl of Los Alamos its a typical run Sports Bl A bitter pill As the Smithsonians National Museum of American History in Washington marks the 50th anniversary of Jonas Salks introduction of a successful polio vaccination many researchers are angry lack of glory Health Science Cl Unrest in Ecuador Residents of Quito Ecuador hit the streets for the fifth day to protest President Lucio Gutierrezs handling of a crisis in the Supreme Court Page A8 Pobres y con hambre Las apariencias impiden reconocer que la creciente pobreza en el pafs hace que muchas personas no terigan suficiente dinero para comprar comida Solo en Nuevo Mexico mas de 54 mil personas se alimentan semanalmente de los bancos de comida existentes El Nuevo Mexicano Dl Todays obituary Jenlne Marguerite Clifford April 13 Page A2 Todays forecast Partly cloudy and warmer High 67 low 35 Page A2 INDEX AniTes MaiBtH B5 Horoscope B5 Classifieds C3 OpinionA7 Comics B6 Police notes A2 Crossword B5 Scoreboard B2 Education D3 Spanish pg Dl Health Cl Sports Bl The Wests Oldest Newspaper Four sections 28 pages 156th year Issue No Publication No 596440 Late paper Classified ads News tips Main office 9844363 9863000 9863030 9833303 Allnight playwrights A highschool drama teacher and a group of students produce six oneact plays in 24 hours Photos by Jason New Mexican Julien Seredowych 15 takes a moment to gather his thoughts before writing a oneact play Friday night First you walk around talk to people play some music Then you he said of the creative process He participated in Stress and Coffee a theater event at Santa Fe High School in which students wrote cast rehearsed directed and performed six oneact plays within 24 hours By ROBERT NOTT The New Mexican It took Joey Chavez quite a while to figure out what a homey lamp was but you couldnt really blame the guy after all he hadnt slept for more than 24 hours Chavez a drama teacher at Santa Fe High School orchestrated the schools 24hour theaterevent Stress and Coffee on Friday and Saturday In the span of a day high school students from Santa Fe wrote cast rehearsed directed and produced six oneact plays simply to prove that they could do it Chavez said he decided to try the event to both demystify the process of making theater and to give students the confi dence to write and direct He titled the event Stress and Coffee because he knew everybody would be experiencing a lot of both No wonder then that around noon Saturday when Chavez and his production crew were trying to gather props they couldnt figure out what a homey lamp was Chavez figured Please see PLAYWRIGHTS Page A4 KatyBoweh left who wrote A Thousand Times Over takes a bow with actors Ariel Morgan Entheos Bellas and director Ian Wallace as the cast members of the events other five plays applaud behind them American aid worker killed by suicide bomber in Iraq By COLIN McMAHON Chicago Tribune BAGHDAD Iraq Maria Ruzicka should have left Iraq last week But there was too much work too little time and too many Iraqis who had widowed or orphaned by a conflict they did not invite but could not avoid Vacation could wait Ruzicka said The little Iraqi boy whose leg was blown off could not So Ruzicka stayed And Saturday Ruzicka died killed by a car bomb that was not aimed at her but took her just the same Along with an Iraqi colleague the 28yearold Califprnian became the very figure she had gone to Iraq to help a civilian casualty of war She went from being just an anti war activist to someone who realized that the war was a reality and that people needed to be helped because of said Sen Patrick Leahy DVt who credited Ruzicka with helping secure government funds to compensate Iraqi and Afghan civilians hurt by Please see AID Page A5 Maria Ruzicka The 28year old Californian became the very figure she had gone to Iraq to help a civilian casualty of war Report Taxpayers paid for Social Security polling By SHARON THEIMER The Associated Press WASHINGTON While politicians debated saving Social Security its federal overseer spent million to poll the public The Clinton administration wanted to know if people thought the program saved older Americans from poverty The Bush administration refocused questions on its private investment plan Taxpayers covered the cost of the polling according to government documents obtained by The Associated Press under the Freedom of Information Act The Social Security Administration first hired the Gallup Organi zation in 1998 when Bill Clinton was in office The survey changed markedly in 2003 when George W Bush began Please see POLL Page A6 I