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Santa Fe New Mexican Newspaper Archive: February 28, 1969 - Page 1

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Publication: Santa Fe New Mexican

Location: Santa Fe, New Mexico

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   New Mexican (Newspaper) - February 28, 1969, Santa Fe, New Mexico                                TH E 1VEW Wtft'f Oldtft Newipapcr... Founded 1849 120th Year, Issue No. 81 18 Pages SANTA FE, PiKW MEXICO, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY Otic Sec lion Price 10 Ccnti Direct Air Service City Appeals CAB Choice By RON LONGTO The City of Santa Fe i5 appealing ihe decision o( Ihe Civil Aeronautics Board (CAB) in ils service to Albuquerque case. In a brief filed with the CAB, City Attorney Dean Zmn said (he examiner in (lie case ignored Santa Fe's position in reference lo air service. Tlie decision ol Examiner William J. Madden, Zmn said, deprives Santa Fe of needed one-carrier and pos- sibly one-plane- air service to Chicago, Us Vegas, Los An- geles and San Francisco-Oakland. "This was accomplished by the failure of the examiner lo recommend either one or both of the local service carriers which now serve Santa Fe lo render the new air service found Zirin said. The cily attorney pointed out lhal Santa Fc has slrongly supported additional long-haul service for Albuquerque pro- vided it is not at the expense of the service lo Santa Fe. The city made its position clear in that it would like to be guaranteed ready connections wilh Ihe new long-haul service through increased local service. Ziim said Ihe city also asked to be assured that the trans- portation pattern for Albuquerque did not deprive Sanla Fe of needed direct air sen-ice lo points with which Santa t-e has a common interest. "The assurances we sought are not in the examiners Zinn said. "The initial decision com- pletely ignores and neglects the public convenience and nec- essities of Sanla Fe. We find ourselves in the position of being completely out of the air transportation picture al- though Santa Feans conlribuled substantially to the economic growth and air traffic figures used by the examiner as a Continued on Page 2 _____ D Has Confidence In School Finance Bill Berlin Election stm On BERLIN (AP) Mayor Kliius Schuetz said today that (he election of West Germany's new president will take place in West Berlin "on March 5 as planned. Schuetz (old a news confer- ence the adamant sland taken by the Easl Germans toward negotiations wilh his govern- ment made further contact im- possible. The East Germans had indi- cated Ilicy would issue passes for West Berliners to visil friends and relatives in East Berlin at Easier if the election was moved from Berlin. But the West German government said il would change the voling only if Ihe East Germans gave much more than lhal. The mayor's personal assisl- ant, Iforst Grabcrl, met wilh East German State Secretary Michael Kohl in West Berlin Wctlnesday. On Thursday, the Cosl German government lold (he West Berlin Senate that Ihe exploratory talks could not con- tinue until Ihe elections were called off. Wesl German Chancellor Kurl Georg Kiesinger said on televi- sion Thursday night that he as- sumed Ihe election would be held in West Berlin as planned. The East Germans and the Russians ohjccl lo the holding of Nixon Asks De Gaulle A confident Sen. Aubrey L. Dunn, n-Otero-Lincoln, said to- day he has no fears about a compromise plan that will put his public school finance bill, Senate Bill I, and SB191, Ihe rival measure introduced by Sen. Harold L. Runnels, n-I.ea, Into the Senate Finance Com- mittee once again. The compromise solves the problem of the rival hills being deadlocked in committees head ed by the two sponsors. Dunn heads Ihe Education Committee, while Runnels is chairman ol Ihe Finance group. Fraud in Medicaid? Atty. Gen. James Slaloncy said loday his office will be- gin Ihe invesligalion o! possi- ble fraud, in the Stale Medi- caid Program after he re- ceives all informalion regard- ing the alleged violations Sen. R. C. Morgan, D-Cur- ry-Rooscvelt, submitted a llsl Thursday to Ihe attorney gen- eral ol 50 medical providers who possibly defrauded Ihe government under Medicaid. In a Idler to Sen. Morgan Maloney said "will you please supply us wilh all information you have regarding each of Ihe individuals or associallons lisled." He asked for Informalion which "specifically relales lo alleged fraudulcnl dealings wilh the stale of New Mexico. "Immediately upon recelpi of Ihcsc particulars we will commence the requested in vesligalion based upon any fraudulent dealings lhal have In fad lakcn Maloney said, Lee Francis In Hospital LI. Gov. E. Lee Francis Is under observation al Bataan Me- morial Hospital in Albuquerque, wilh a touch of the flu. His office said lhal after com- plaining of chesl pains Thurs- day, he was advised by his physician Ihat hospilalization would be his best course. Francis checked inlo the hos- pital Thursday nighl, and ex- pects lo be there for several days, his office said. He will be able to receive visitors, the re- port says, and is cheerful and in good spirils. Presiding over Ihe Senate in his absence is Sen. R. C. "Ike" 'Western Purpose' Is President's Theme PARIS Nixon came to Paris Iho climactic stop on his five-nation lour, with an appeal lo President Charles de Gaulle lo join him in "efforts to build a new sense of Weslern purpose" and in a search for "a jusl and lusting pence." Alier strained U.SI-French relations timing back many years, the American President urged the French leader lo join In look- ing not lo Hie past aggravations but lo the future. "We shall not repeat the slogans of old disputes In our clforts lo build a new sense of Wcslem Ihe U.S. President said in an address prepared for his arrival from Rome. 'We will respecl your convictions. We'1 NIXON GREETED BY FRENCH President Charles tie Gaulle shakes hands wilh President Richard Nixon in the Salon d'Homicur at Orly air field following the arrival of llic American Chief Excculive from Rome loday, (AP Wirephoto by cable from Paris) ___________________ Both measures go to the Sen- :e Committee of the Whole for ebate Tuesday morning: At the nd of the day, they will-both eturn for aclion to Ihe Runnels ommiUec. SB19I was thrust inlo (he dis- ule when the cost of SD1 came nder lire. The Dunn bill, SD1, alls for increased slate ex- wndilure of some million, e Runnels' SB191 would aise la.xcs by about mll- on, according to ils sponsor. Proponents of Ihe higher- riced bill say (hat II provides superior system of distrihut- ng the money. The Runnels bill, hey conlenii, is merely the pres- nt inequilable system warmed ver. "We'll be ready for them." aid Dunn, looking ahead to (he 'uesday clash. "SB1 is flexible, t can sland heing cut, and still nil he a better bill than B19I." Since the main argument of hose backing SB1DI is the sav- ng it would email, Dunn malched their argument. "Even if SB1 is cut down to he same cost as he said, "it still would do a belter job than that one docs." Dunn's bill enjoys approval of most senators interviewed on he subject. It was the fruit of a year-long effort hy the Legis- ative School Study Committee of which Dunn is also chairman. Eisenhower Develops Pneumonia the election in West Berlin be- cause it is a demonstration ol West Germany's claim lo the former German capital. To har- ass Ihe election, Ihe East Ger- mans barred all members of the Federal Assembly, which will elect the president, Irom using Hie surface routes across East Germany to West Berlin. In- slead the electors will come by plane since the East Germans have no control over the air- lanes. The Soviets also have an- nounced troop maneuvers west of Berlin next week, but this sa- ber raltling did not force a the election plans, announcement wi Ixigislaturc Pomlers Money Minimum Needs Require Million Tax Increases WASHINGTON (AP) Gen Dwight D. Eisenhower has de veloped pneumonia, the Army announced today. A morning bulleiin from Wal- ter Reed Army Hospital said Ihe 78-year-old former president, who underwent abdominal sur- gery Sunday, "is generally weaker this morning, but is cooperative and determined to overcome this latest complica- tion. The bulletin, relayed probably set off new propagan da blasts from Easl Berlin and Moscow that will increase in in- tensity over the weekend. Campus Unrest Continues By The Associated Press New incidents of violent pro- est and vandalism have struck al three of Ihe nalion's universi- ies where protestors have been nost active during Ihe current ivave of campus unresl around he country. Club-swinging police and hit- run dissidents clashed in a day- long series of scuffles at the Berkeley campus of the Univer-i sity of California. Twelve per- sons were arrested including three demonstralion leaders. One was Ysidro Macias who said earlier, "We're going to close it down whether it be by striking peacefully or by talking or whether we have lo burn the s-o-b down." About 50 windows were broken during Ihe day. In Madison protestors at llic Universily of Wisconsin ran through five buildings tossing stench bombs, overturning chairs and disrupting classes. Some students were forced to flee. The outbreak followed a r.oon rally (o assess progress on de- mands for an autonomous black By The Associated Press The' New Mexico Legislature is talking about Ihe possibility of million in tax increases just to meel the defined mini- mum needs of state government during fiscal 1909-70. If a richer public school pro- gram is adopted, the new mon- ey need could soar to nearly million. The Senale sat Thursday as a committee of (he whole to hear lire lalesl facts on finance and taxes. Robert Kirkpatrick, assistant state finance director, presenl- ed ihe latest tabulation on what le termed minima! general fund appropriation increases for the coming year. A minimum increase of million includes a public school bill from Sen. Harold Runnels, D-Lea, which calls for an in- crease of million In stale supporl 10 the schools. Addilional tax money is need- ed over and above the mil- lion to restore the public school reserve fund lo a level of mil- lion, lo build up the general re- serve fund lo its former level of million, and to make up for decreased general fund reven- Camp us Ii ivestigation Vetoed by Governors These would bring the total linimnl increase needs to iiijlion, Department of Fi- lahce said. If Ihe Legislative School iludy Committee's school II- landng bill is subsliluled lor Runnels bill, the need lor new uoney would be increased lo million. The committee hill calls for 2C.8 million in additional school inancing compared wilh Run- nels' million. Generally speaking, Ihe De- partment of Finance calculate! uinimum need for all genera und-financed agencies, except ng education, on the basis of a lat 5 per ccnl increase in Ihe current budget. Higher education would re- WASHINGTON (AP) The nation's governors have con- demned campus disorders but problem, thus indicated agree menl with suggestions present cd bv Hie Rev. Theodore lies rejected a call for a presidcnl of Notre Dann by the invesligalion out of fear il might slir more unrest. By overwhelming voice vole, Ihe governors approved a reso- lution Thursday saying "lawless acls by a small segment of Ihe sludenl populalion must not allowed to interfere with the vast numbers of 'students who are seeking lo exercise their ed- ucational opportunities." The action came after Ally. Gen. John N. Mitchell assured the National Governors Confer- ence on Ihe second day of ils iwo-day winter meeting that the Justice Department is keeping an eye on campus disorders. The proposal by California Gov. Ronald Reagan, whose own stale has had some of Ihe severest upheavals, would have called on President Nixon to or dcr a study "lo dclermine i Iheir is a nationwide plan or or ganizalion behind (he currenl outbreaks." Jniversity. Hcsburgh, who was praised arlier by President Nixon for lis policy of dealing firmly with protestors al the South Bend, nd., university, sent his recom- mendations lo Vice Presidenl Spiro T. Agncw in a letter made public about the lime Reagan ccs Department would million additional. your will strive to find areas of com- mon understanding. We will talk, but we will also listen. For without France Ihcre is no Eu- rope. Both your conlincnt and our worltl need your wisdom and experience." De Gaulle strode out to Air Force One lo grecl Nixon. Nixon emerged from Ihe Jcl with a wave of his righl hand to a wailing crowd of officials, then graspetl llic hand of the 78- year-old general, whose face was wreathed in am amiable "It is Indeed in your person Ihat the United Stales Is paying cordial visit to DC aulle lold Nixon. "For 200 years, during a lime when many things have hap- pened, nothing could keep our counlry from feeling that your country was a the French leader added. -'You have come'-lo.see'us so Ihat we can 'make known our thoughts and our intentions on Ihe problems anil (he affairs ol [he world, and that you enlighl en us on your views and proj ceive an increase ol million compared with the S3.7 million recommended by the Board of Educational Finance. Other education programs, in- cluding the voational reliabilita- lion program, Ihe schools for Ihe deaf and visually handicap ped and the Museum of New Mexico, Ihe Albuquerque Tech nical Vocational Institute and other vocational education, would he increased by a total of million. Nixon also sounded a call to something new and different. "Our Weslern he said, "differeni as they may he in culture, history and tradition face in common the task o creating new which will inspire our peoples, goal which will lead them to con structive ralher than deslruc live relations." The President to his oric links between France am America and said (he Iw 'must once again begin a jour ney together" in search o something more cxciling iny previous advcnlurc lhai Ihe; invc shared. :We must discover the way t a just and lasting Nixo said. "The search will be diff cult, hut we musl succeed, to the price of failure cannot b home. I look forward, Mr. Pre idem, lo discussing wilh you how lo carry put this essential ask." In a glowing compliment lo Continued on Page 2 The Health and made his proposal. Actress Arrives Today California has been troubled sporadic unrest at Ihe Uni- Penlagon, reported thai Eisen- hower "experienced some res- piralory diflicully during the night which is due to pneumonia which has developed in the right lung base." "It is too early lo determine how he will respond lo Ireal- Ihe bulleiin said. He was described as having spent a restless night. The issuance by Ihe Penlagon of Ihe hospital bulletin was a der ended an eight day lull on the campus where National Guardsmen were with- drawn only lasl week. At the University of Chicago a call for a sludenl stride ceived liltlc support from the students bul about 100 dis- sidents marched on the law school. Six stench bombs were set off in campus buildings, bul the protestors denied they were Irespon: .sible. Morgan, D-Roosevclt Curry, parlurc Irom the usual 'proc- pi-esidcnt pro lem of Ihe upperjtiure. Previous ones were an- Houie. Inoiinccd at the hospital. In Washington, (he nalion's governors voied overwhelming' ly lo condemn campus disorders bul rejected California Gov. Conlinued on Page vcrsity of California's Berkeley campus and at San Francisco Stale College. see no need to foment (rou- ble in Florida by indicaling it is federal said that stale's chief executive, Claude Kirk. "In tenns of the Michigan sit- uation, 1 do not believe a federal investigation is necessary or ad- visable at this said new Gov. William G. Milliken. The governors, many ol whom spent a good deal of the two Film star Nancy Kwan arrives in Sanla Fc loday. A reception is planned by the officers of Ihe New Mexico Film Cenier (01 Ihe slar at 5 p.m. al Ihe !im of the Governors. Miss Kwan is Ihe slar of 'The McMasters" a 2 million dollar novie lo he filmed here in March and April. Miss Kwan starred in "Flow- er Drum Song" "The World of Suzie Wong" and lure in Paradise." "An Adven Social Scrv- recelvc Viet Cong Offeiiswe [s Legal PARIS (AP) American nc- oltnlors at Ihe Vietnam peace ilks appear lo have reached le conclusion that Ihe current id Cong offensive llius far has at violated the lacit "under- landing" under which Ihe Unll- xl Slates hailed the bombing of s'orth Vietnam lasl Nov. 1. Chief U.S. negotiator Henry Cabol Lodge Is due to present a detailed report "on the dead- ockccl conference lo President v'ixon during a scheduled hrec-hour meeting Sunday morning. Conference sources said South Vietnamese Vice President s'guyen Cao Ky will attend at east a part of Nixon's talk with Lodge. They are expected lo review he fivc-week-old stalemate and discuss Ihe possible repercus- iions of the Vicl Cong allacks. There was a noliceable differ- ence in emphasis belwcen American and South Viet- namese commenls on the at- tacks. Following Ihe sixth weekly conference session Thursday, South Vietnamese spokesman Nguyen Thieu Dan stressed Ihe large number of civilians killed and injured by what he called indiscriminate Viet Corig shell- ing of populiilion centers. Lodge also deplored the civil- ian victims of Ihe Vicl Cong's "wanton violence." But U.S. spokesman Harold Kaplan I old newsmen the United States was satisfied Ihe Viet Cong attacks were aimed "mainly" at mili- tary targets. A (olal increase of mil- ion would go lo all other areas, including the judiciary, the leg slalive, the executive agencies and public safety functions. The state's share of the cost lo bring all state employes to Ihe minimum wage salary leve of Sl.CO per hour would be million. If no new taxes are enacted genera! fund revenue next year would be an estimated mil- lion, about million under Ihe million lo be spcnl this (iscal year. Proposals lo issue mil- lion in severance lax bonds would require debt service re- quirements totaling S2.8 million that would be diverled from the general fund to be made up In additional taxes. Senators al Thursday's meet- Viel Cong Rockets Rip De Nang Navy Dock SAIGON (AP) More than 30 towns and bases in South Viet- nam were shelled hy Ihe Viet Cong during Ihe night and 100- pound rockets ripped Ihrough a U.S. Navy dock al Da Nang. The rockcis sank two big land- ng cralt and heavily damaged Ihird. The enemy off a series of explosions aboard he ammunition-laden boats. Al east one American sailor was tilled, 51 sailors and eight Ma- rines were wounded and 300 ions of ammunition were de- stroyed, U.S. spokesmen said. AP correspondent Edwin Q. White reported Ihat Ihe fronts She will receive Ihe red car-jing attempted lo get some idea pet trealment in how much of a tax Increase on her arrival and will hold a brief press conference there. Burl Ives and Hrock Peters are expected to have a formal reception at Sanla Fe Airport Saturday afiernoon, arrange- moms are now being made. The public is inviicd lo both the public will lolerate. State Revenue Director Franklin Jones lold them: "It's a political matter to be decided at Ihe ballot box ader you have imposed the lax. That is Ihe only tesl of a tolerable limit. People judge. It is meas- days talking about Ihe campus said, receptions Film Cenier at Ihe ballot box after Ihe 'act." rockeis touched were blown off nine small ware- houses loaded wilh everything from chocolate bars lo bombs. Part of one of Ihe boats was hurled 150 yards across a road, and pieces il metal up to a foot square were thrown farther. Ammunition explosions (lam- might explode, evacuated civilians from a half square, mile area surrounding the dock. The civilians began moving back inlo Ihe area this morning wilh the dock slill littered with debris and explosives. Al leasl enemy troops were reported pushing toward jSaigon loday, and military spokesmen reported several oth- er indications that small units were attempting lo assemble lor an assault on the capital. N'onh Vietnamese and Viet Cong troops were intercepted 10 miles east of Saigon Thursday. They were reported still fighling loday as U.S. Isl Infantry Divi- sion soldiers followed up a night bomb and artillery attack witli a sweep of Ihe area's rice pad- dies and marshes. A U.S. spokesman said at least live of the enemy v.ero known killed, and eight others were taken prisoner. Two Arner- armored personnel car- leans were killed in the fight- riers, trucks, bulldozers and other equipmenl in the area. Officials, fearing that some 500-pound bombs stored nearby ing; one helicopter was shot down, and three others were hit by enemy ground fire but man- aged lo get back to their bases,   

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