Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Santa Fe New Mexican Newspaper Archive: July 7, 1961 - Page 1

Share Page

Publication: Santa Fe New Mexican

Location: Santa Fe, New Mexico

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   New Mexican (Newspaper) - July 7, 1961, Santa Fe, New Mexico                                THE NEW MEXICAN 112th Year, 14 Pnges SANTA FE, NEW MEXICO, FRIDAY, JULY 7, 1961 10 Cents NEWS IN BRIEF WASHING ION Sin Stjles Bridges, RNH, urged President Kcnncdj loday (o end the moratorium oh nuclear wea pons tests bcciusc Russii may be well along lowird develop- ment of a neutron bomb The President is faced with a'diffi- cult decision, but the office of the presidencj requires him to make H decision, difiicult though it is" Bridges slid "That decision might involve the destiny of bur nation." LA PAZ, Bolivia (UPI) Com -munist agitators demanded -to- day the government expel eight Canadian priests of the Roman if Catholic Oblalcs of Mary Order on grounds they were anil lab or' The demand came after'an attack 'by leftist tin on a Catholic radio st-Uion at Ca tavi last Tuesday which the priests and pro Western miners repelled and in which four of the attackers were injured The leftist miners in addition to at tacking the radio station vilh firearms and a shower of rocks also dynamited a nearby. Cath olio Church. .They 'accused the priests .of carrying out "unjust attacks oh noble mine workers. SAN DIEGO, Calif. (UPI) A (Continued On Page Two) Hit HI an Error [111U Behind SMiedule ALBUQUERQUE .The1 Corps of Engineers today con- firmed that the Abiquiu Dam proj- ect is behind schedule and spend: ing SI million more than expected because of a human error. Locke Mouton, Engineer spokes- man, said the costly .error was made in core drilling to de- Rodeo Ticket Sales Sldtecl With the annual four-day Ro- deo de Sanln Fe to'open next Thursday, advance ticket sales start tomorrow, in the downtown Plaza and at La Fonda. Members of the Women's Ro- deo" auxiliary" to the Rodeo sponsoring organization, will maii the ticket- booths through next week. Live music and other entertainment will be presented in the Plaza (o help publicize the approaching ro- deo.- termine. how -dirt and' rock wtiujd. have .to be removed from abutments to the earth-fill dam. Where' the abutments' adjoin rocky canyon ..walls, the aniouhl of rock to be removec was greater than expected, Mou Ion said. As a result, the confrac tor, Mitlry Construction Co. of Los Angeles, Had to slrip ou "bad rock" and replace some ma terial. Albuquerque Tribune qubt Gen.'Robert W. Fleming Southwest division engineer, telling' members, of Ihe House Ap prbpriations1 Committee in Wash inyton that is one projcc our faces are red." of the dam will be with completion sched uled' for May. 1962. Work was started in March 1959 as part o upper :Rio Grande conservatioi work. The Soil Conservation Service is investigating cost and extent o seeding.vegetation over the water shed'lo prevent dirt washing infc the project and silting up the dam Advanced US Atlas Thnnders From Gape To Indian Ocean Payload On Target DIGGING to the waist under a broiling 120-degi'ee sun, Britain's 2nd Battalion paratroops from Cyprus dig in on Ku- wait's stony desert near the Iraq border. In London, Prime Minister Harold Macmillan held a cabinet session to discuss United Arab Republic demands that Britain end its intervention in Hie Kuwait crisis. Premier Kasscm Says Iraq Won't Use Force BAGHDAD Ab- del Karim Kassem of Iraq says he believes practically all Arab the port his claim to the newly in- dependent sheikdom of Kuwait. But he pledged once more not -General Rains Soak Forest Conditions Improved .A general rain yesterday after- noon and last night covered prac- tically all of Sanla Fe. National Forest, improving conditions con- siderably in the dry timber areas. A heavy rain and hail was re- ported at the Glorieta Baldy look- out sfalion, and light to heavy showers covered the Jemez side of (he forest. Two small lightning fires were reported during the thunderstorms one this morning in the Cuba division at the head of Rio Las Reds Eye Border Crossers BERLIN Berlin's Communist government issued a warning today to the East Berliners who work in West Berlin that they must obey Communist law. They also were told they have no right to new housing in East Berlin.' Hundreds of trains go back and forlh every day on a dozen sub- way and elevated line's. Most au- los are checked only briefly at the scclor border, and pedestrians hardly at ail. But lately there have been re- ports that the Communist aulhori- lies were planning action 'against the border crossers. The commu- nists want to turn West Berlin into an isolated "free city." The West maintains that all Berlin is a sin- gle city under .fhc rult of 'the United Slates, Soviet Union, France and Britain. Today the Communist city gov- ernment of East Berlin announced some of its citizens have been complaining alxwit Ihose who work in the West. The charge was that they have themselves bo hired away by capitalist enter- prises in West Berlin." This is. (he same thing, (he Red 'authorities said, ns supporting Communisls enemies in Wi-st Ger- many. The statement recalled a Jaw that requires all Ensl Berliners to tell the aulhnrilics where they work. Officials were instructed to (Continued On Page Tv.o) yesterday after- noon' above La Ctieva in the Je- mez district. However, both were quickly brought, the U. S. Forest .Service reported. In U.S. Weather Station jn Casa Alegre reported .30 of an inch of moisture from the showers here. The Weather Bureau recorded .12, of rain in Albu- querque, but a gauge just cast of the weather station recorded 1 inch last .night and early today. Clayton reported .62 of an inch, Zuni had .5-1, Raton recorded .39, Sanla Fo had .39 and Las Vegas .35. Many other slations reported lesser amounts. Early this morning Clayton, San la Fe and Zuni reported it was still raining. High temperatures yesterday cooled under the influence of the increased cloud cover. The high- est temperature in the stale was 93 at Roswell. The lowest maxi- mum was 81 at Zuni. Veterans' Rousing BillSigned WASHINGTON Kennedy .today signed a billion- dollar veterans' housing loan bill. .The increases the amount available for direct gov- ernment loans to veterans in areas where they cannot oblain private financing under govern ment repayment guarantees! It acids million to the J150 millions alreay available for the remaining 15 months of the pres- ently authorised program, and ox (ends the loan authorization for five more years with yearly amounts (Dialing million. The money 'is borrowed from the Treasury for relemling. The bill also extends the time during whirh veterans would be eligible for home loans, both guaranteed and direct. The ex- tension would amount to about three years for most World War II veterans slill eligible and about eight years for most Korean veterans'. Low temperatures ranged from iS at Alamogordo to 52 at Las Vegas. The forecast for Northern Mexico tocay called for partly cloudy skies scattered after- noon and evening thundershowers. Temperatures will be slightly cooler. Steering Rod, Breaks; SF Youth Hurt An 18-year-old Santa Fe youth suffered superficial injuries yes- terday when a steering rod on his panel truck gave way, sending Ihe vehicle bounding over a curb and into a tree slump on Cafron Si. across from Harvey Junior High. The driver, David Michael Chavez, 815 Alto St., suffered a laceration on Ihe left side of his Kcad. Police said the driver was not at fault, and no dilation was is- sued. Damage to the truck was estimated at to use force to get Iraq's tiny oil-rich neighbor. Kassem gave his views Thurs- day in his first .interview with Western newsmen since announc- ing last Sunday 'that he regards Kuwait as historically port of Iraq. He appeared in excellent spirits.-'.' ''Wei "any means but peaceful .he said. "We. wilt never resort to aggres- sion." "Again I must assure you Ku- ait will return to the motber- he said, "adding "but we do in barbarian ages when brutal means are used to defeat the well-being of man." Though Kassem told newsmen he was sure Iraq would get Ku- wait without going to war, he didn't say how.-He hedged on the question of a plebiscite among Kuwait's inhabitants. "There is a sort of zigzagging on this particular the premier said. "Would you like us to go to Aberdeen or Liverpool and ask if the people there wanted a "The Kuwaitis are Iraqis. There are some non-Kuwaitis. Would it be fair to ;ask the Indians in Mecca if Mecca should be In- dian or Arabic? If you eliminate the foreigners the Kuwaitis would like a chance to return fo Iheir homeland." Kassem said that except for a number of sheiks he denounced as corrupt playboys, "practically all the Arab peoples" support his claim.. He specifically excluded Saudi Arabian sheiks from his denuncia- tion, although King Saud is (he stauncliest' .Arab backer of Ku- wait's independence and has sent troops to the threatened sheik- dom. "Saudi Arabia is an indepen- dent stale whose development is gradually benefiting Kassem said. Despite Kassem's diplomatic words for his--' neighbors 16 the spending- of-.- oil- wealth by Saudi Arabia's many One residential area along Sacramento River here seerr have been adopted as home by a family of very large family. Skunks Settle Tu Coiiimmiity SACRAMENTO, Calif. the ns to So far this year pouncimaster George P. Martin says six skunks have been shot and about 20 to 30 captured. were some Riverside area at one point. "I don't think it's quite as had Martin says. Back in JOSS (here 500 skunks in the King Saud, has caused rumbles of discontent among the desert ration's poverty stricken people. An attempt in 1959 by Saud's brother, Crown Prince Faisal, to curb royal spending ended when other prin- ces -rebelled at Ihe comparative austerity. oh'lhe'other hand, ruling Sheik Abdullah as-Salim as-Sabah has used part of his million a day oil income to give his people the highest standard of living and best educational and medical system of. any Arab country. Kassem was asked if he is con- sidering breaking diplomatic rela- tions with Britain because Brit- ish troops had landed in Kuwail lo guard against invasion from Iraq. Bulletin MIAMI BEACH, Fla. (AP) James R. Holfa today breezed lo an easy re-clcclion victory as president of the 1.7 million member Teamsters Union. business end of., aiuAtlas.missile hurtled out western sky like meteor and crashed Into the Indian Ocean early, today, al the end of the longest .military rocket flight on journey from Cape Can. avcral. The distance exceeded only 10 miles .the course covered b'y two Atlases also fired into the Indian Ocean last year. IJut, more im- portant, it marked (he first long-range success for an ad- vanced Atlas being developed to carry -blockbuster p'ayloads al- most halfway around .the world. The Air Force had been deeply concerned about seven failures in 10 previous test launchings of this new. Atlas "E" -series. But officials reported after :oday's success that', the prob- ems appear to be licked. The.huge missile, 83 feet fall and weighing more than 100 tons on liftoff, blasted off just before midnight Thursday 'night darted into a star-filled and sky. About minutes later, an iner- lial guidance system sensed the rocket was on the' proper course and 'ordered engine shuloff and separation of (he nose cone. ;The iVa-toh cone followed a bal- listic trajectory which carried it nearly miles high and peak speed of miles' an hour. On the war- head zipped east of the -tip of Brazil and south of the Union of South Africa. HD Facing Shortage -Unless' of Public Roads.removes on fed- era! funds Mexico soon, vHighway. Department sho'rt of paying 'Is billsifhis month. Highway Department man; said ;J2_.2 '.beeri expected from .the'federal" ment iii-July. He said withpufthi, mpneyVthe' slate .'isn't goirig'Ilo through the Rue, administrkV live Services' director of' the-HigH. way said none'of thi 21 'projects' affected by; order involving ?9 shut. down yet.'. Ha of the Highway Department' employes has been laidVpff. either." .On Thursday, the Highwayifiei parlrnent's .'cash b'a'l a nee 'yai launch, two tracking planes and ft ship fallowed the cone's fiery path as it plunged back into the heat barrier of the earth's atmos- phere and dived on target about miles southeast of Cape Town, South Africa. The improved Atlas, made by General Dynamics Astronautics, is the most powerful United Slates military rocket being lest flown. Its three massive engines generate pounds of thrust, more than the earlier D missile, which has been opera- tional nearly two years. The E rocket, scheduled to be- come operational within a few months, is designed (o carry a larger hydrogen warhead or to boost the present D warhead to targets up to miles away. Troops Move Into South West Africa To Prevent JOHANNESBURG, South. Af- rica (AP) The South African government has moved troops and air and sea forces into' the huge territory, of South West Africa to guard against any black revolt or invasion from strife-torn neigh- boring Porfuguese Angola. At the same time, South Africa DIPLOMATIC Kennedy Administration is reported ready to brave the of Nationalist China and establish diplomatic relations with the Soviet-sponsored Mongolian Peoples' Republic. Official sources said preparations were being made lo send n U.S. mission lo the c.ipilal city of Ul.in Bator tn agree on (he level of reprosenlalion in each country. The U.S. decision is expected (o spark criticism from some congressmen, -who back Nationalist China's contention (hat Communist Ouler Mongolia is nol an independent counlry but a Russian satellite or Icrrilory rightly belonging (o Ihe Chinese. rules "South West'1 un- der an old League of Nations barred entry lo a Jm'led Nations committee in- structed to investigate charges of racial discrimination. The U.N. investigators are tour- ing olher African countries fo iri- erview available refugees from South West. The committee said t would enter the disputed ter- ritory despite the ban, and Ihe outh African government said it vould arrest any committee members that crossed the border. The South African government contends that its racial segrega- ipn policies in South West es well as South Africa are a domestic matter .and no concern of the Jniled Nations. Soulh West Africa was n pre- World War I German colony. It s square, miles in area nnd ha.i a population of about blscks and whiles. Largely pastoral and desert, the] South West contains diamond i mines and good enough oil pros-1 pects to have Americans and oth- er foreigners searching. But most of all, it represents buffer stale belwcen white-ruled Soulh Africa and black indepen- dent stales of Africa. Soulh West has n long South Atlantic coastline which with South Africa's own huge Atlantic and Indian Ocean coasts make a long patrolling area for naval nnd air forces much larger than South Africa can afford. South Africa's defense minister, James J.-P'ouche, has recently been vis- iting Britain ami othcf European countries to shore up this de- fense. Hut Ihe main concern at pres- ent is the 000-mile frontier be- tween South West Africa and Por- tuguese Angola. The chief immediate purpose ol South African forces is to flush out or choke off gun running from Angola, or via the coast, to South West Africa's blacks and to prepare to repel any "terrorist activity lhat may cross Soulh West Africa's border with An- gola." iyas.Jlj893.376' in receipts' from'ths gasoline" fax, -.jj .in- Moto? V e h i c 1 e Department fees and in miscellaneous revenue. The payroll and other obligations yesterday and today total leaving a. balance of Chief Accountant John Mclnfosh estimated that bills for the rest of July will total million. Ha said this leaves a deficit ol counting all other obli- gations and estimated income. Lt, Gov. Hearing May Be In Aug. ALBUQUERQUE (AP) Dist. Judge John B. McManus said to- day it probably will be August be- fore he calls a hearing in the Tom Bolack-Joe A. Montoya election coniesl case. The State Supreme Court haj ordered McManus to call a hear- ing to determine the type of bond to be required from bolh parties in the contest for the lieutenant governor's office. Bolack was de- clared the winner over Montoya for the position after the fal! gen- eral election. The Supreme Court threw out i ruling by Judge McManus requir- ing a surety type bond in the case. The district judge said today that attorneys for bolh sides had informed him they would be out of contact until about July 15 and he was delaying setting a date for the hearing for that reason. Police Ordered Ambulance To Indian Hospital A slate police radio dispalcher disclosed last night he was the one who had directed St. Vincent Hospila! to send an ambulance carrying an Indian's body lo the Indian Hospital Wednesday afternoon. The Indian Hospital would not accept the body, however, since it has no facilities to keep an unembalmcd body while funeral arrangements are pending. The ambulance driver, Joe Chavez, had been directed lo SI. Vincent by the investigating officers at Tcsque, (he drowning scene, who knew the Indian Hospital did no! have the required facilities. Chnvcz eventually was directed (o Memorial Charicl, whe're tha body of Eddie Herrera, 3t, of Tesuque, was claimed by his par- enls. Chavez and Ihe police officer who had directed him to St. Vincent Hospital thought (he hospital was refusing (he body. Sister Mary Joachim, hospital administrator, said that was not the policy. Furllier investigation revealed that the hospital had received two calls from slate announcing the: am- bulance iv.is coming and the second asking the hospital (o re- direct it lo the Inrl'in Hospital.   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 130 million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 130 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 11 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication