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Daily Herald Newspaper Archive: October 29, 1888 - Page 1

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Location: Santa Fe, New Mexico

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   Daily Herald (Newspaper) - October 29, 1888, Santa Fe, New Mexico                                JL DAILY ALD. vol. i. SANTA fe.-new mexico, MONDAY, OCTOBER 29, 1838, NO. 83, Prexli Fish Dinner* from '} |>. in. 10 (i |i, in, ill lite Hon>Ton Short"Ordur G>inHts. SANTA .FE, NEW MKXICO. ~ w71," soehnchen, Jobbing ill': I! kiiiii.'-. 1-L'JiNITUJtK s' NK \TI/T   UKVAIKKl) U|i!ioJ'it one door north of Kridge on   Hridg St., SiinU Fe, N. M. DR. j. h, SLOAtf, PJIYHTCJA ArA NJ) HUH a J'] OA', SANTA ]']:, N. M. j�'-i0M�t:MMl.,>mM�lwe iiij floor of ' Srtfliu Block,-en. WMMiiigMm Avenue. > :Jttv�ic;aii.in.cliarire of St. VmccniVTios'Hyl. Chas. Wagner. r{a�. in ,H]oe|c..t)iJ finest ; .Assoi'tiiiRpi of  Parlor Bedroom aiut Julchen Queeiwwaye  and   Glaasie/ire, 't JJuy iwid si.'Uuv�),ythii',:,fTiii a ichiUl'i; (.-hiilr-to a monument. Can (it ;ou out JiwiujUiIih; fiutn JttteHeii to Pinlor. Auction and cimiiijIssioii.iiMiso on fltn Fraiielaco St. Call mill h� us. Nutioulilo (Oiihow good*.    '.'..�..,:'..�, AH gi>oU�sold (in tiiisy jKiymoiulu, Don't Like William. London, Oct. 27.-The London Telegraph in a dispatch from Rome publishes an interview of its correspondent with the pope in which it is remarked that the pope's health is good, considering his age, and that -Hie learned prelate is himself writing ;l lust.ory-of the Roman .episcopate, in regard to the late visit of Emperor William, the pope said: "I . cannot. ;;a.y that I'was either satisfied or dissatisfied.-. I did. not find that he re-Kcmbled his father whom I personally knew and liked. The Emperor Frederick was ,a   wise  and good � �prince, well read, intelligent, and ol large mind. Mis manners were per-ifcet; what he said was always fuli of good sense-and good wilJ." The pope appeared to/be satisfied with the-present-relations, between Germany and the: valican. Prince Bismarck, lie said, was a reasonable man, and was willing to accede to any just request.  : The uopo said: "Emperor Williams visit was. no.t favorable to us. His.:.visit';,- to European courts was calculated to strengthen our enemies and solidify their position without benefit to us. At the beginning of the Emperor's interview with me he interrupted me by calling Prince Henry in order to present him.- - �      -90�- - -.....-�.----- iiriijhi Outlook in Indiana. Indianapolis, Oct. 37.-The long line of visitors continue pouring into the headquarters of the Democratic State committee. All have the same story to tell. It is that of certain Democratic success. The State was probably never better organized than it is-this year, There has been systematic work in every section, and the outlook for Democrats was never brighter, they say. It- is - brighter,' ' too, than it was as late as two weeks ago. As to .the -members of the Democratic . State committee, they are jubilant. - Si Sheerin, Secretary  of the National committee, and who has been engaged here night and day, , speaking tlii.j evening of the brightening 'prospects of the Democrats, - said: �� . ,; ' "There were some who felt a little ; dubious a few weeks "ago, but I never did. The victory has at, all times been ours. It is like the farmer entering his wheat field. He knows the wheat is there, but just how much there is he can not tell until he has sifted it. We have done that, and I am free to confess that the members of the committee are themselves surprised at the. good, yield*  - -..............,�. Hewitt. New York, Oct. 27.-In a letter to the chairman of the county Democracy at the ratification meeting last night at Coo�er union, Mayor Hewitt used these,' words relative to national results: "Some persons seem to think the mullipiiey of candidates may injure the national ticket. I see no reason for this, but il 50.1t is not my fault, as I have exhausted every honorable effort to secure ajjmon of the party on some -Pembcrat who would not represent a faction. J regard the success of the national.ticketasthe.paramount con-r sideration. Mr. Cleveland possesses the confidence of the masses because -he has earned it Jjy his unswerving honesty, his coujrai'.e and his independence, and the name of Allen G.  Thurman is a bqsehold word with-tlie people. alarmed. New Y01 k. Oct. nS,-Considerable .Harm has been occasioned ovex the death in the hospital in Jlrooklyn of Captain John jillard of yeljow fever. The health authorities, however, assert that there is no cause for any fear as everything possible to prevent the spread of the disease ha{> been done. The steamer Carenz Immediately returned to lower quarantine where she is to be thoroughly fumigated. A portion of her cargo discharged has also been disinfected. The hack in which Jillard rode to the hospital has been thoroughly disinfected. Officers are at work trying to locate the.passengers. A Collision in Indianapolis Likely. Indianapolis, Ind., Oct. zS.--Both political parties are making preparations for big street parades Saturday night, November 3. and the efforts of prominent independents to induce either or both sides to forego their demonstration on the same night have met with failure. Should the two columns, which are certain to contain several thousand men each, come together, there is no telling in the present state of feeling how many would be hurt, as a big free for all light will, it is ieared.be the outcome. --------------�e�.............--� � ^- - Gen. Joe Wheeler Becomes a Catholic Macon, Ga., Oct. 28,-Gen, Joe Wheeler has become a Catholic. At Gen. Sheridan's funeral he was a pall bearer. The requiem service at St. Matthew's- church Washington, on that occasion so impressed him that, he began to attend the Catholic church. Then he asked for instruction, and through a well known, priest's explanation of Catholicism was convinced that it is the only true religion. Off the Track. Paris, Ky,, Oct. 27,-A train on the Kentucky Central railroad yesterday afternoon left the track near here. Engineer Robert Black was fatally injured, Elmore Bryan, a passenger from London, Ohio, was fatally injured, John Ryan, brakeman, injured severely, also Joe Allan, an engineer on the Chesapeake & Ohio, who was a passenger. MOIjEV. 27.-^Mo.ney on Telegraphic Markets. NEW VOUK METAL. New   York,' Oct. 27,-Copper, unchanged. Leads teady; domestic, ,13.95. Tin, firm.    Straits, $23.03. Bar silver, 94^. NEW YOUK New York, Oct. call easy  1^(0)2'"last .loan  if4j closed offered at i^@z-   Prime mercantile paper, A%@1- CHICAGO CATTEE, Chicago,* Oct. 27. --Cattle receipts, 15,000. Slow. Ten cents lower. Choice beeves, $5.25(0)5.70, steers, $3.oo@5.oo; stockers and feeders, $2.00(0)340; Texas cattle, $1.75(0)3.56 western rangers, $2.50 @4.5�* Sheep,-Receipts, 9,000. Dull. Ten to fifteen cents lower. Natives $2.75 @3-9o; westerns, 50(0)3.30; Texans, $2.25(0)3,40.. KANSAS-CITY CATTLE. Kansas City, M.O;, Oct. 27.-The Live Stock Indicator reports cattle receipts 10,000; shipments, 5,400. Offerings common and chiefly grass range, choice grass range steady, others stow, weak and 10 cents lower. Choice cows steady, others 5 to 10 lower. Good to choice corn led, $4.75(0)5.25; common to medium, #3-25@4-5�> grass range steers, $1.60 (0)3.15; stockers and feeders, fi.6o(o) 3-35J cows* $1,25(0)2.75. Sheep.--Receipts, 240, shipments, none, Steady, Good to choice muttons. 3.50(0)3.75; common to medium $1.50(0)3.00. LABOR GRIST. Some Freshly Gathered Facte for the Workingman--WJiat is New in Field and Factory, Mill and Workshop. Oscar Falleur, a Belgian window glass iworkerylias beenexiled from his country lor organising labor unions. He was n Knight of Labof-roaster workman. In 1885, 400 miners struck for pay for oyer time. They marched from town to, town and induced 30,000 men of various .occupations to leave their, places. Mjlls along the route were pillaged and' burned, Falleur, with 1,150 others, was sent, to prison for riot and conspiracy;   Sentences ranged from six months to life terms. The press and peonlc clamored for Fal-leur's release, and hi* sentence was reduced from twenty years at hard labor to seven and a half years. He was pardoned after serving tiventy-six months. On his release he renewed the work of organizing and the capitalists induced the minister of justice  to exile  him.   He was given   fifteen   daj to  leave the country. Falleur will become an American citizen and settle in Pittsburg, Pa. ." Beaver, Rochester, Bridgewater, Phillipsburg and Freedom  (Pa.) barbers have organized. They -close (heir stores at 9 o'clock every evening, at 12 on Saturdays and at noon on holidays, except when they come on Saturday. They don't open at all on Sunday The scale adopted follows: Mustache dyed, 25c; hair cut, zoc; shave, 10c; shampoo, 20c; sea foam or tonic, 1.0c; ladies' sham poo, 50c; ladies' bangs trimmed, 10c; ladies' bangs, recut, 25c; shaving outside of shop, 25c; shaving a corpse, $5- In an address, to the Butchers' Protective association of San Francisco, A. Mercer, United States agent of the Bureau of Animal industry, said:' "It will be two years before this country can be thoroughly cleansed of diseased cattle, for from San Francisco bay to Southern California one-half of the state's stock is rotten. Out of every 100 consumptives 12 acquire the disease from drinking the milk or eating the meat of consumptive cows." Kansas City people are shouting loudly for a boulevard. One man has offered to donate a quarter of a mile of land for use in widening the favorite thoroughfare. The livery stable men say they would have to go out of business, if the boulevard scheme should fail. The horse owners and livery men talk of holding a. mass- . meeting to promote the scheme. �.'.-' One of Florida's leading orange growers, Adam Eichelberger, asserts' tlie yellow fever will not materially affect, the crop. ,Ke says the world hj-rapidly learning that the Florida orange is the � best grown. London, which has become a new customer, recently ordered 250,000 boxes. A new Buffalo machine pulls up trees. The wagon has a low, broad box swung below the "axles, and a boom extending/ behind from the rear axle. The roots of the tree- an area of ten feet in diameter was excavated-reposed in the box, and the tree was .chained to the boom. " Some time ago at Houston, Texas, tlie Tailor's union gained an advance in wages. Recently women were permitted to join the association, and ten men left the union; since, then the employers have cut the wages. Dakota is growing splendidly both in population and resources. Last-year the new arrivals numbered nearly 63,000 persons, making the population 640,823. New land taken amounted to 2.5000,000 acres. The Buffalo Express says: "The United States will have, when the count of 1890 comes., to be made, more great cities than any other country in the world now has or has ever had." .The political association, of railway employes, which recently met at (j.alesburg, Hi., has 15,009 members, and they vote for the party that will db them the greatest good. England has, already purchased 186,000 barrels of apples from this country. The increase over last year's export is 80,000 barrels so far. A Boston man gained a large trade under the name of "Lloyd Optician." His brother put up a similar sign, and the court ordered it down. Ben Bow, a war ship in the British Mediterranean fleet which has two iii-ton guns among its arnament is the biggest war vessel afloat.     * At Pittston; Pa., dry goods clerks make from $10 to $20 per week, .the average being about S12. A Seattle (Wash. T.) house has been cut in two through a dispute be-tween;the owners of the site. All the Wheeling (W. Va.) mills have discontinued the use of natural gas on account of its cost. Jerusalem's trade is growing. Exports to America and Europe last year were worth $ 100,000. Several Buffalo milk dealers have been arrested for watering their milk. The fine'is $25. 'London held the first world's fair in 185�'; Paris had the next in 1866 and the third in 1878, ',.'�'.:..,..'...' THE' ' FIRST NATIONAL BANK e^StfT-A. FE- wm W, GRIFFIN, pedro perea, President Vice-President. r. j, palen,  Cashier. iONAL BANK OF NEW MEXICO CAPITAL PASO UP $150,000. Does a general banking business and solicits patronage of the public. L. SPIEGELBERG. President, W. G. SIMMONS, Cashier Ichael's College santa fe, new MEXICO, This JnHlUidion, under the direction of the Brothers of the Christian ticlioob. was established hi 1850, and incorporated in 1888, with full colle- tjiate prlvilcf/cs. The Curriculum embraces the -usual .Primary and Commercial branelm. Lessons in French, Spanish, German, Phonography and Type-Writing are given 'without eetra charge. Chemistry, Assaying, Telegraphy and instrumental Music (brass instruments excepted) are charged extra. TERMH-Board, Tuition, Washing awl Bedding, per month, $22.50. Use of Typewriter, $1.50.   1
                            

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