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Las Cruces Sun News: Wednesday, March 5, 1958 - Page 1

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   Las Cruces Sun-News (Newspaper) - March 5, 1958, Las Cruces, New Mexico                             OUR HOME TOWN If you are not registered to vote, deadline la April 14 for the primary election. April 14 is also deadline for changes in precinct registra- tion. Las Cr 'm News AMD DIO CRAN6E FAI M UtOCMHKMTWV MfO SUNMf tfUOVCO THE WEATHER I.AS .CRUCES AREA: A few rnni-e showers; partly cloudy tonight. wurmer tomorrow. High 55. low' 2.S. last M hours: State' Cnllfgc 57-41; Cruces 68-12. Vol. 287 ASSOCIATED PRESS LEASED WIRE LAS CHUCES, NEW MEXICO, WEDNESDAY EVENING, MARCH 5, 1958, CENTRAL PRESS PICTURES 5c Hears Moons Still Sending Data Although messages from the first satellites have stopped com- ing to scientists, these "moons" those people who wish to receive them. 'This was the statement by Dr. Robert Mac Vicar, dean of the graduate school and vice-president In -charge of academic affairs at Oklahoma State. University. He wad principal speaker this morn- ing- at Religious Emphasis Week actiVlties at New Mexico College. Doctor MacVicar said the satel- lites, are sending three messages: 1. Russia has achieved a great competence, another great power has arisen; 2. The success is due to their tremendous educational program; and 3. The ft. S. must accommodate itself to hew world situations, facing them realistical- ly. Message From Explorer The speaker added that we can also get a message frbm our own Explorer: we can't achieve suc- cesa by merely matching Russia. Doctor MacVicar went on to say we must foster scholarship at all levels. But, he emphasized, we cannot depend entirely upon phys- ical force. We must join in spirit- ual force he said. The college's Religious Empha- sis Week continues this afternoon and tomorrow with a number of classroom discussions, seminars, and special meetings; Scheduled this afternoon and evening are seminars on race rela- (See Hears, Page 8) CandiclatesPay Fees' For Elections The 50 or.more candidates who filed in Dona Ana county yester- day for prtmlary; and 'general elec- tion paid, -In filing fees, Rudolfo (Rudy) Carrillo, county clerk in charge of filing, announc- ed today. The money goes to the primary election fund. The county commis- sioners have budgeted for election expenses this year. Juatice of the "peace and con- stable candidates pay no filing fee are paid on court cost and fee baals. But the county clerk, treasurer, assessor, and (See Candidates Pay, Page 8) ALL IS NOT LOST ASIA NOT LOST U. S. Ambassador to the U. N. Henry Cabot Lodge rests his head on His hands at his press con- ference following his 31-day swing through Europe and four Asian countries. He expressed satisfaction with the U. S. foreign aid program and said the battle for Asia is far from lost, despite Communist anti-American propaganda. (International Soundphoto) Army Launches Second Explorer-Type Satellite In Space Race With Reds CAPE Flo., March 5 Army launched second Explorer-type satellite with a Jupiter-C rocket today. The launching came just 33 days after another Jupitcr-C recaptured lost U. S. prestige by hurling the Tree world's first satellite into an orbit. The 70-foot launching rockets were identical. The new satellite, vehicle, like the one that preceded it, was a metal tube more than six feet long- and six inches in diameter. It streaked skyward as a twin to the Explorer "moon" and as a traveling companion to the Soviet Sputnik II, both now orbiting the earth at about m.p.h. As with the first Explorer, the Army planned to let the world know within two hours whether its newest apace vehicle had at- tained the minimum of 200 miles of altitude and the. speed it must have to stay aloft for long. -The four-stage rocket, a slim and snow-white giant, roared away from 'its concrete .launching stand at a.m: Moves Up Slowly The rocket moved up slowly at first, itH tail emitting a stream of (See Army, Page S) Lifelong Cruces Resident's Riles To Be Thursday Rosary services for Mrs. Jesusita Telles, 78, lifelong resident of Las Cruces, be held at 9 p.m. Thursday in St. Genevicve's Cath- olic Church with Monslgnor E. P. Geary officiating. Mass will be said at 10 JLm. Fri- day at the church With burial to be in San Jose cemetery. Mrs. Tolles died at her home at 1853 N. Main St.. yesterday. She is survived by six daughters: Mrs. Pete Feltx and Mrs. Ca- milla Chavez, both of San Diego, Calif., Mrs. Mary -Odening and Mrs. Helen Diwyier, both of El Paso, and Mrs. Juanita Avalos and Sally Telles. ,both of Las Cruces; a niece, Mrs. Pete Triviz of. the 'Dominican Republic; four song; N. S. of Son Diego. Lipo of Dejntng, Victor of La Union, and France of Las Cruces, a brother Jose Sarabia of Las Cnices, 37 grandchildren and 37 greatgrand- children. Nelson's Funeral Home is in charge of arrangements. Russian Leaders' May Visit Capital For Summit Meet WASHINGTON, March 5 President Eisenhower said today Russian leaders have sent word they are willing to come to Wash- ing-ton for a summit conference. He said he thinks that might be a good arrangement if such a confer- ence was going to last for a long time. If it was to be just a short meeting Eisenhower told a news conference, he would be ready to go to any convenient place. But for a long session, he said, he should stay in the "United States. Eisenhower said, however, it would be absolutely futile and damaging to attempt to hold anj summitt meeting at ail without very careful preparation and ad- vance evidence of achievement. The United States, he continued never will close the door on East- West talks. He said if there Li any possible matter how crooked and no matter how will take the world even one step toward the achieve- ment of peace, he is perfectly will- Ing to try it. But he cndoi-sed Secretary of SUte Dulles' warning yesterday against becoming involved some soil of Soviet maneuver thai would amount to a hoax, as Dullca called it. Newcomer License Law Is Questioned In Local Case By GRKALD WWOIIT Sim-News SlftTf Writer The conatltutlonallty of the state law which require.1! s newcomer to purchase New Mexico license plates when he becomes "gain- fully employed" has been question- ed here and haa resulted in the fllnmlBSHl of a charge against local residents. The charge was filed here against former residents of Con- necticut, whose auto laat Septem- ber (as well as a few wcckfl displayed the Connecticut plates. Citation Is I A citation lumed ngnlnat the newcomers charging they were In violation of the state law which operates to require newcomers to buy license plnles under the "gninfxi! employment" section the statute. The attorney for tlir I probed into the law here rail ed to the attention of the district attorney's office a decision of the New Mexico Supreme Court 01 That decision, one judge dis Renting, held the law as then unwritten unconstitutional as being discriminatory. During a subsequent session o; the state legislature un apparen attempt was made to clarify thr law in keeping with the supreme court's decision, Attorneys Seem Ajjreed Attorneys seem Agreed tha while the attempt was sincere U; new net did not remove that de feet--in fact the leglslnture's new attempt further weakened lh law by removing 90-day pro vision ns stipulated with "gainful employment." (See Nrwcomrr, Pfign S) Flat Tire Halls ISO-Car Freight Train For Hour SPOKANE, Wash., March 5 ISO-car freight train was stalled for an- hour by a flat tire. .Vandals laid the tire on the tracks and it flipped up between two cars as the train passed over, breaking an alt- hose. The emergency brakes were applied with such force that a drawbar connecting two cars was broken. AlaincdaJunior 'iigh To Conduct Parents' Night' Parents of "youngsters nttcnd- ng Alameda Junior High school ave been invited to visit the chool tonight to check with eachers and school officials, this cing the fourth "Parents' Night" o bo held at Alnmeda. The hours are to 9 p.m.. ac- ording to Jess Andersen, prtncl- U. Report cards are being dlstribU' ed today. Parents have been in- -tted to attend three other such vents during the school year, Im- mediately following distribution of he cards. Dallas Finn Bids Low On Contract Al While Sands ALBUQUERQUE. March 5 The Corp.i of Engineers says J. W. Bakeson Inc., Dallas, with .'as low bidder yesterday on en- nee ring and' contractor facili- ties at White Sands Proving Ground. The work will be In con- nection with Hawk missiles and vlll include five buildings and storage magazine area. Nevarez Draws Name From Race In Justice Contest Thomas M. WirschJng become .he nominee of the Democratic party .for Justice of the Peace of Precinct Three In LAB Cnices whei z Nevarez withdrew from thi race today. Nevarcr, hnd filed for the pbsl rat made vacant with tho dual! of his brother, Miguel Ir. (Mike] over two years z.ga. Wirsching is a law school grad ate, nnd is a retired army off! cer who has lived In Las Crucca for the last several years. Legion Members To Char I Birthday Celebration Plans Final plans for the American igion birthday party, 'schcdulct on March 15, will be charted at a meeting of legion members on Thursday at the Legion Hut. The meeting; will open at 8 p.m Members of the American will observe the 30th fuinlvernar> of Jose Oucsenbcrry Post No. 1 on Mmch 15. APPROVED WASHINGTON. March 5 Thc Nntionnl Ounrd Bureau approved armory projects fo Ilobbs and Fiirmlnglon, for whlc n total of J120.000 In fedora funds is available. One tmlt woul bo built in pinh plfirc, State Okays "ity-Airport Funds Plan The attorney general has op- rovcd, with slight modification, contract between City of Las races and Airport Development orporation, according to Mark H. liompson, president of the cor- oration, who announced today nit in stock had been ubseribed. Goal ia and President hompson said thnt the stock sub- zriptfon list is still open, in nutl- ples of Thompson alko announced that 'inn" inquiries had already been ecelved by the corporation on pos- blc location of other Industrial ntcrprises at West Las Graces Municipal Airport. Ion With Families At the airport, the city, working Ith the A. D. C.. will erect facil- ies to provide for the location ere of a unit of Cornell Aeronau- cat Laboratory, Inc. Cornell will ring to Las Cruces a personnel roup of at least 18, all men with amllies. The co-operative agreement wetn the city and the corpora- on, formed here to provide funds hich the city itself could not alse, has received approval of tale'agencies. Thompson said'to- ay that plans for the basic build- ng a hangar had been ap- roved by Cornell as well as by ngineers for the city, Scanlon and rwin, Santa Fe. SctH Ditadllnn Cornell set a deadline date for ic move here of Mny 1, and not it erf than May 31. The project is L connection with work now be- (Sce'state Okays, Page 8) Senators Ready To Fight House On U.S. Exhibit WASHINGTON, March fi "he stage WHS set today for a now .enate-House fight over the U. S. xhiblt at Brussels International Ixposition opening in April. The Senate Appropriations Com- littee, without n dissenting vote ns approved the full equested President Eisenhow- r to complete the financing of the project. It took this action yesterday in otlng out. a supple- mental money bill which llkoly vill be taken to the Senate floor or action Friday. rqutwt The House rejected the request d voted instead to transfer to he Brussels fair one million dol- irs of funds previously appro irlated for the 1958 World Trade Fair in Gorki Park, Moscow. The louse earmarked thnt transfei or a public health exhibit. The Senate committee voted to teep the million dollars serve for the Moscow exhibit when it can be undertaken, and the earmarking for ubllc health exhibit on the rounds that It is too Iftte to sel t up In time for the fuir'.s opening i Additional Funds It similarly voted in iddltional funds for trade fairs Spirited Races Develop In County For Three Spots in Legislature Mechem Will Seek Fourth Term; Five In All Bidding For New Mexico Governor irouncl the world. The House had 'oted to transfer this amount also rom Uie Moscow exhibit appio- )riHtlons. which The supplemcntHl money hill to which it In attached finances gov- ernment agencies for the rcmuin- ng months of the fiscal year end- ng Jimc SO. The largest allotment s for the Agricul- ture Department. This Is mainly .0 reimburse the Commodity Crcd- t Corp. for financing special ;ommndlty disposal programs. Stern Discipline 1 aimed Today [n Boyett Case The widow of Rev. Leonard Boyettc, pastor of Grandview iaptist church who was shot to death on the steps of his resi- dence at 911 South Chaparro street February 27, said today that al- .hough her husband was under- handing to people outside of the "amlly "he did not seem to realize ylmt he was doing to his two Mrs. Boyett testified at a ju- court hearing for her son, lohn, a 14-year-old student at Court Junior High School, who las been held in Dona Ann. County ail In connection with the fata! shooting of his father. Dial. Judge W. T. Scoggin, who also serves as juvenile judge, conducted the hear- ng which Is being held to deler- nlnc whether John Boyett will be tried on a murder charge as an or whether his case will bo decided by juvenile officers. The twin boys were ex pec tod to testify later today. Slern Discipline Mcjitmres Both Mrs, Boyett and her J7- ycar-old daughter Curolyn, who preceded her on the stand, said that John and his twin brother lack, were subjected to stem disciplinary measures by their father who, they said, was "always fussing at the boys and sometimes whipped them with switches or a belt." Both mother and daughter said that the boys resented the punish- ments and restrictions on their participation in school events and occasionally flared up "to talk back to I wish I'd followed my first in- tuition left my husband two years Mrs. Boyett said. "But I was afraid that n broken family would be too hard on the boys." (Sec Stern Discipline, Page 8) John Barncastlc Rosary Rites Set In Graces Tonight Rosary sen-ices for John M Barncnstlo, 87, native of Dona Ana county, will be held nt 8 p.m., to day, tit Graham's Mortuary. Mr. Barncostle died Saturday In n hospital nt Las Ve.pas. Mass will be held tit a.rn tomorrow In St. Oenevleve's Cath- olic church. Burial wilt bo In Dona Ana cemetery. Pallbearers will hi chosen from among Mr. Burncas- SANTA K-K, March 6 Mexico Democrats, always good for some family feuding, today faced fights In 'all except three statewide contests in the May 13 primaries. The Republicans mostly featur- ed unopposed candidates headed by Oov. Edwin' L. Mechem, now serving a record third (tcrm and going for his fourth. The only Re- publican competition wan In the :onteata for the U. S. Senate (md ant governor nominations. upplug Deniocrats' Hacn Topping the Democrats' contests ere the U. S, Senate race, the overnor's contest with a record ve persons entered, and a lleu- nant governor's affray In which even hopefuls were off ami run- ing. John J. Dempsey, the veteran ongressman and former governor ow bidding for his eighth term In engross, and Joseph M. Montoya, ectad in the '1057 special elec- on, were unopposed for venom l- ation by the Democrats. Their epubllcim opponents In Novem- er will be William A. Thompson jul George McKlm, of Alhu- jerque nnd also unopposed. o Fnw KUlo Former State .School Supt. Tom Vlley, seeking a return to that fflce afLer a four-year absence, ind Joe Callnway of Springer, andtdale for state treasurer, were he other Democrats who snagged fhat the politicians enviously re- or to ns free rides. In all, 35 Democrats and 16 Ue- blluans .filed for Sen .u, the two eohgrcHHlomil senls nd 10 state offices. Three Demo- rats and a Republican filed for (Sre Mechom, Page H) tie's grandsons. He Is survived by two sona: Pal of Donn Ami and Henry of Albu- fo'jr daughters: Mrs, Charles Madrid of Lnjt CnicoH, Mra. Clarence Liebert of Denver, Mrs. Natalie Romero of Albuquer- que, and Miss Emily Barncnstle of Albuquerque; two brothers Tony of Las Cnices, and Frank of Lou Angeles; a slater, Mrs Mnry Bnrela of Dona Ann; 24 grandchildren and 35 grout grand children. EISENHOWER RECOVERS IKE FULLY RECOVERED President Eisenhower bids goodbye lo Maj. Gen. Leonard D. Hcaton Comman- dant of Walter Reed Hospital in Washington, B.C., after an overnight stay at the Army medical center. Doctors who examined the Chief Executive pronounced him fully re- covered from his mild stroke of Nov. 25. (International Soundphoto] Spirited races for three positions in the state legislature eveloped here yesterday with the filing of candidates for oth parties, the 5 p.m. deadline finding four candidates for ominatibn in the sheriff's contest in the Democratic party. Dona Ann county will elect three to the state House of Representatives. Two incumbents seek re-election. They are James CrP Patton. for position three, and v> ci o LUI Jnclc D Mnlo'nc for posiuon two To Vie Two Democrats will go into the party primary seeking nomination for position two. They are Calls. Eylar Wolfe, former representa- tive, uiui R. L. (Bob) Mayse, local contractor. James T. Martin, local attorney, is to bo declared tho for position one; Patton for pos- ition three. The slutt> House race, for the primary, shapes up in this fashion: at an average rate of Wartin- onc' feet dally sine, Sntur- Plltton aml T' B- ory OOP nominee, for poaitlon three; Democrats to choose May Ki between Mrs. Wolfe and Mayse. Stays Excellent Viler Irrigation Water storage totals nt Elop'mnt utte and Caballo Dam reapf-iiis, olstcred by hwivy and siip'-uned .flows within the past week, re- .nlned lit high levels todny dos- i le tho release of ater which has been flowing Ca hallo at mi avi 000 acre feet dally Tempers Trip At Tempe As Students Angry TEMPE, Ariz., March B UTt Vhat's In n name If you're one of the Arl- ona State College nt Tempo stu lents who stormed the eapl ol yesterday in protest over n pro school name change, the an Rwer Is simple: dynamite. And tho fuse Is 10 years old. Tho students have been trying 0 get the school nnmo changed Arizona State University for overal years, but University of 1 rlzona supporters Hay such mine clmnge would "filrh the good name" of their school. Besides, they add, Arizona nan inough trouble supporting one im- voralty.. To end the feud. State Ken. Har- d C. CJias. chairman of the pow- erful State Institutions Committee imposed a compromise: rename he school Tenipe University. 'Dr. CJratly flammage, the be- eaguered president of Arizona Stale, mild he didn't like the com- iromlse too much hut would sup to end the feuding md fusfling between the two state schools. But students and mime iiluinn 'ell the compromise, WHS a retrcal "rom principle. So lho filudenlfl marched to tin Capitol and hanged Glsn in cfflg> in full view of his fellow law Makers. Otiw Hhmggcd off the demon itratlon n just a "heiillhy font if expreiwlon from young Amerl ;ans This is n new form 01 obhylnfj lo whlr.h wo are not ac ciiatomH." But Ciiunmiifif, conscious of thi 'art thai mippnrti Ihe ntnln school, apologized lint mined an Investigation. Las Owes Bank Elevated In Rank Among Associates The and Merchant Bunk of CI-UCCH gained 75 placed itf Us alamtlnff among lh inrgeAt banks In lho U. J during J0ft7, tho American Ilunko publication retried todny. The local bank, which rcporle of nt the en of now ninkit nn 3.HS larg r-nl in compared with rank at the end of U'Rfl. Thoie arc 14.000 bnnkii In lh United HtnlcH. of the Elts n district. John Gregg, muntigo uint Bullf in-igitti ild that water stnrngr totals at ic rmcrvolra stood at 85S.320 cm foot yt'Ktcrday. On March 1, ic day the first irrigation water the seHson wns released, storage itals iimountcd to S60.G31) acre ot. Gregg said that Ilia inflow into )c resetToii'H has been only 2..100 :rc feet loss than I he rnto of elense. The release of walur from Ca- ullo was continuing nt a niti- of 500 cubic fei't of wnler per :ond loiliiy, an amount wliiclt ogs described as n "pretty fair clcase for this time (if year." He rcporlH Ihnl orders laced hy Mcsilla Valley fanners live been light to dnle. Tho Initial allotiupul of wiitur o Rio Project farmers, '21 ichn.1. Is the higlu-.sL in night 'ears. Inebriated Birds Will Get. More Slewed In Time TOTTOIU. Japan. March 5 (A'} farmers thrmv a rock- tail party for the spin-rows lust night and hundreds nf the guests wound up In the bag. Tho fiuim'rs, who consider the, irds pests, HimUeii whenl in nl- coliol and acuttereit U iilnml their homos. The sparrows ale their fill, ftUiggurud about ami pas-sed out In the snow. Tho runners bagged them and plan n lea.sl. Masaji Watanabo. chief of the local tigricuHunt bureau, midl il Was a coinniiinlsl trk-k. He leiini- eii how to loud tin? birds lo drink on a visit to Red China last year, CriiccsWHUhsl Slate Postmasters Meeting April 10 Treasurer 1 Only one county office was nuto- m.'ilienlly filli'il when Mrs. Smullwowl, treasurer, remained unopposed in the parly, and no GOP candidate filed for nomina- tion for that post. John W. Herbert, local business- man, will oppose the winner of Hit- parly primary May 13 for w 11 h four Democrats king nomination. They urn Nelson (Jerry) Oorondalc, Al- fredo H, Gurclii, deputy sheriff imler KYiink Romero who Is serv- ing out. the second half of- his second term and cannot seek re- election; A. L. iHnppy) ApodacH, former sheriff, whose filing about p.m. was followed minulea lule.r by the entry Inlo the raoi of Max' Com. of Hatch, deputy sheriff. No Republican candidate, filed for immlmithm for assessor. Two Demon-ills seek that party's nom- ination for that post: Clarence E. (Pop) Dean, Las Cruces city tnifunirrr nnd Harlow Hyland. chief deputy assessor under II. Davenport who fills out his second term this December and cannot seek re-eleclkm. ('Dimly ('Irrk In the November general elec- tion. County Rudolf o (Rudy) (Sou Hplrlleil Raves, Pago Sj Mai I Deliveries To White Sands To Be Increased Approximately IM New Mexico c expected Lo attcnrl the minimi vent ion of New Mexico ei's of the National AH.soelation of U. S. Postmasters which will op-1 in In LfiH Crures on April !0. The will oxtcnd over i thrto-dfiy period. Hnloinon Las Cnu-cs )oslniaster who i.s directing nr- for Ihe said .hat convention hi'iidqiiiirtor.s will jo at the Amndor hotel. will bo held at the Town-and Country rostiiunml. The number of daily mail delh'- rlc.s to White Sunds Proving Crtiund has been increased and a new route will be opened in early Mny In fin effort to keep pace with expansion at tho Proving Ciroiind. Solomon Alvarez. LaH Oniecn postmaster, .said today. Alvarez paid lhat nn average ft' ftO sue Its of mall Containing ap- proximately to pieces of mail is neliif; delivered to WSPG dally. At a result of the Increase In mail volume two deliveries to WSPCi IIP; being made daily. Alvarez said. Up until February mail .serv- ice lo WSPd was limited to one delivery daily. said Unit a new postal mule will bo put into service ut iWHPtl In early Mny when work on i a new mo-home project is com- pli'li-il at tl'.c Proving Oround. rour mail clerks, nivl a jioslal car- rler nro now working nt WSPCJ un.l.T the dim'tUm of WKPr. sta- tion KiiperinU'iidenl Luis Marllncx. that on Mondays and iliiys after holitlnys, mall aorv- im to WSPCi ia incmiHfd to threy 'Motionless Moon' Program Is Announced Bij Air Force C A P F, CANAVKHAI., Klu., Mureh f) M-> The Air' I-'nn-e Fiaw plarut for n IIIOMI" lhat j will hung rertalii point in the sky, nnd night o.idlltiUnf; geu- H.V. oxports it would be wnndrrful a rndio mid tr.levl- ,lon relay station, or for rounllnR cotunlc ni.Vfl or obKorvtng went her. lHO nx a Ifitim'hlng platform in e.e, for it with a thoi- monuclnar wiirhuait. Hover Kuitlh U. lien. C. S. Irvine, Air Chief of Material, told the Armed Forces Communications Klcrtronlc at Wiwhlngtoii that tho Air Force In Htudylng n proposal for a HiilcllUo that would hover over a fixed point on tho mirth. Irvltlo itnld the vvhlcle, mllcrt out in ftpucn, would be Ideal for inlHullo launching. lit' (laid It would be relntlvely to film a mitisllR from wueh :i point above a nn tin- Snmll Ammiitt Of Tlmist Irvine thnl In the nlinrnco if atmospheric iTHlstance, only a lively small timoiutl of Ihniat would be lo start the miflaitn on ItH way. KurMu'i' .Irtall.i were iiviillabli! by put'Mons Hi" Air I-'ori'i! misnilo U'sl. i-Hiiter hoiT. Thti flliitiontiry moon would bo hurled lo an attitude of mllo.H ami sent inlo a circular or- bU.TnivoUiiK parallel to lho eqim- lor ul a npeetl of or O.OftU miles nn hour, depending upon tin lutUude, It would complelo nn or- blt around Ihe earlh onco u day. Kurlli Alno Holntrn Hut the nlio roltites onca u day. Tho sutolUlo, moving In the same, wouht krep pace with lho earth.   

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