Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Las Cruces Sun News Newspaper Archive: March 18, 1957 - Page 1

Share Page

Publication: Las Cruces Sun News

Location: Las Cruces, New Mexico

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for Liking us on Facebook

   Las Cruces Sun-News (Newspaper) - March 18, 1957, Las Cruces, New Mexico                             OUR HOME TOWN The Las Cruces High School baseball team will meet Ysleta at p.m., Tuesday in a game scheduled at Mike Apodaca Park. LasCr SUNDAY NewspapER. SHRVINS News THE WEATHER LAS CRUCES AREA': Fair with little eh.-intfe in temperature..High today, 60. Low tonight. 39, Last 24 IIDIII-B: Las Cruces, 70-38: State College, C8-37. Vol. 298 ASSOCIATED PRESS LEASED WIRE LAS CRUCES, NEW MEXICO. MONDAY EVENING, MARCH 18, 1957 CENTRAL PRESS PICTURES B So New Leacier Is Named In Philippines By DONALD E. HUTH MANILA March 18 kTi President Carlos P. Garcia took over the reins of government today as the Philippine nation and the free world mourned the plane- crash death of President' Ramon Magsaysay. Garcia flew in from the SEATO conference in Australia several hours after Magsaysay's charred body was found in the wreckage of his plane on a Cebu Island mountainside. Takes Oath The 60-year-old vice president took the oath office as fourth president of the Philippine Repub- lican -before Chief Justice Rich- ardo Paras. He will serve until after next November's presiden- tial elections, which now promise to. be a wide-open fight. A staunch supporter of Magsay- say's foreign policy, Garcia is ex- pected to continue the late Pres- ident's aim of strengthening American Philippine friendship, Magsaysay, 49-year-old cham- pion of democracy and bitter foe of communism, perished early yesterday when his twin-engine plane crashed in dense jungle just after leaving Cebu for Manila. Was Returning From Cebu Only one passenger, a Philip- pine newsman, survived the crash, which claimed the lives of 26 persons, including several top government officials and educa- (See New" Leader, page 2) To Carry Atom Warhead New Guided Missile Billed As Capable Of Destroying AllLow-Flying Targets By ROBERT EITNSOX COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo., March .18 Army Ordnance has plugged a hole in America's defenses with a.new guided mis- sile it calls Lhe Hawk. Those who know say it Is capa- ble of destroying1 any tiling that flies, no matter how low. CHe Potential Of Hawk Yank airmen long have been saying that America's air defense j was a sucker for tree-top-level aUack. They base'this belief on the fact that antiaircraft weap- ons in this country are designed primarily for high-altitude work. What if the Russians hurled j low-flying aircraft or missiles at I American cities and industrial areas from submarines off San Francisco or New York Army Ordnance says the Hawk, del-nils on which are yet to be released, is designed ,to atop such an attack. "They can send it right down the one Army officer said, "and we'll kill it dead." To Carry Atom Warhead This new missile, when it is released, will carry an atomic war- head, capable not only of shooting down the target it goes after, but destroying also whatever weapon the enemy missile or aircraft will (See New fjuided, Page 2) County Educators To Mark 100th Anniversary Of NEA With Banquet On March 28 Final Lecture Scheduled On European Art The fourth and last in a series of lectures on the art of European museums, illustrated with colored slides. Is scheduled at New Mexico Wednesday. Prof. Paul W. Mannen, head of the college's art department, will begin his program at p.m. in the Hartley Hall auditorium. The lecture is open to the public. There is no charge. Topic for the fourth lecture will be paintings from museums in the Netherlands. Works by Rem- brandt, Halls and Vernieer will be represented in slides made at the Rijksmusr.um in Amsterdam. Some paintings of Van, Gogh and Jongkirul from the Krnller-Mullcr museum in the National Park of Western Holland and pictures from the house in Haarlem will he shown. Also to be includ- ed will be paintings from the Maunlshauis at the Hague, from Boy mans 'Museum in Rotterdam, and from the museum in Utrecht. Colored .slides to be used in the lecture were made from the orig- inals by Prof. Mannen during a leave of absence in the summer of 1055. Dona Ana County educators will observe the 100th anniversary of the founding of the National Ediir cation Association at a banquet to be held in Milton Hall, Col- lego, on March 28. Sponsor of the event is the Dona Ana Classroom Teachers Associa- tion. In chcrge of arrangements is Miss Velora Reed, Mesilla School teacher. Miss Reed is vice-presi- dent of the New Mexico Class- room Teachers- Association .and is also a member of the International Relations Committee of the NEA. Ijirgft Atlendiinec Expected- Attending the centennial obser- vance will be faculty, school board members, and civic leaders of the Anthony, Hatch, and Las Cruces school districts; members of the State Department, of Education; many former teachers; and faculty and administrative, officials of College. All teachers or former teachers in this area are invited to attend (Sec County, Page 2) Funeral Riles For Mrs. Fannie Abbil To Be Held Tuesday Funeral services for Mrs. Fan- nie Mac Ahbit, resident of LJIK Cruces for the past six yearn, will be conducted at p.m.. Tuns- day in the Church of Christ. Lloyd Nash will officiate. Mrs. Ahbit died in her residence at 527 Juniper on Saturday night- She was 51. Mrs. Abbit is sur- ivcd by her husband, Perlin Ab- bit; her father, George Gilgoe of Kerens. Tex., and a daughter, Mrs. Irene Wiggins of Las Cruces. Interment will be in Unity cem- etery under the direction of Ful- mer Memorial Mortuary. W. E. Brickcr Dies AI Fairacrcs; Riles To Be Held Tuesday W. E. Bricker, lonff-timo resi- dent of the MeKilla Valley, died in his home nt Falracrea yester- day. Mr. Rricker was a farmer and had resided in Fairacrcs for. 27 years. He was 81. He is survived by his widow, two daughtei-s, Miss Ca politic Brickor of Las Cruccs and Mrs. Sylvia Harris of San Antonio, Tex., and a brother. Roy Bricker. Funeral services will be con- ducted at 3 p.m.. Tuesday in the Graham Mortuary chapel. Burial will be in Hillcrest Cemetery. Plane Forced To Land On Highway Near Santa Fc ALBUQUERQUE March 18 Colorado pilot and three pas- sengers took off from U.S. 85 be- tween Albuquerque find Santa Fe Sunday after bclnp forced down on the highway Saturday with en- gine trouble. State police said V. L. Janes, Littleton, Colo., was forced to land his Piper Apache on the highway 24 miles south of San- ta Fe when one engine failed. The "pilot said he hnd been practicing "feathering" one propeller und lost nUltudc when the engine failed to Mart again. With him was his daughter, Maurene, 7, hia brother. H. V. Janes, nnd Norman Affleck. Ala- mosfi, Colo. Tho piano WHS on n flight fiom, Albuquerque to Denver, Joe Montoya To Speak Here Tuesday Night Lt. Gov. Joe Montoya will de- liver a talk at 8 p.m., tomorrow, in the district courtroom at the Bonn Ana County Courthouse. His speech will climax a brief handshaking tour of Dona Ana county, a tour which is scheduled to get underway immediately aft- er his scheduled arrival from Truth or Consequences at 3 p.m., tomorrow. Montoya will leave Las Cm- ces for Alamogordo enrly Wed- nesday morning. His speech here will be presented during a public meeting program to be sponsored by the Dona Ana County Demo- cratic Women's Club. Montoya is running1 against State Rep. Tom Bolack, GOP candidate. In the congressional race to determine successor to Rep. Antonio M. Fernandez. A special election will be held on April 9. (Sec Joe Montoya, Page 2) Frank Pa pen Named To Port Of Entry Com mi I tec In House Krank Papen, Dona Ana county Democrat, today was numbered among the four members of the New Mexico House who have been named to the Port of Entry com- mittee. The notice of Papon's appoint- ment to the committee was re- ported by Donald Hiillam, speak- er of the State House of Repre- sentatives. Israel Asks U.S. Aid To 'Curb' Egypt WASHINGTON. March IS Jsrael's Foreign Minister Goldu Mcir took to Secretary of State Dulles today an urgent plea for U. S. action lo curb Egyptian moves before, wnr erupts in the Middle East again. The conference the goal which she sought in a hurried flight from Jerusalem over the weekend- Accompanied Ry Aitlfs Accompanying; her were three aides, bear ing big envelopes und stuffed brief cases. They included Israel's Ambassador Abba Eban; Minister Keuven Shiloah; and Ge- deon Rifael. a member of Israel's United Nut ions delegation. Dulles arrived back in Washing- ton yesterday from the Far East. He held immediate consultations with top aides on the Egypt-Lintel crisis and set up today's meeting with Mrs. Meir. Mrs. Aloir made her flight nfter Egypt's President (lamal Abdel Nasser ordered Egyptians to take back control over the Gaza Strip Trom United Nntions forces which had replaced withdrawing Israeli troops. This, plus Egyptian talk about re-imposing the Canal and Gulf of Aqaba blockades against Israel shipping, ran coun- ter to Israeli assumptions on which the withdrawal was based. Avoids Direct Reply "I am quite convinced." Mrs. Mcir told reporters at tho airport yesterday, "that with the Egyp- tions in the Strip we have (See Israel Asks, Page 21 Paintings By Faculty Member Shown A one-man show of paintings by Kenneth R. Rarrick. assistant pro- fessor of art at New Mexico College, is now on display in Mil- ton Hall lounge on the cam- pus nnrl will be exhibited through April 13. Open to the public, the exhibit fentures 15 paintings in oils and caseins. The majority are on Southwestern subjects, such as Relic Hunter. Fence Ride r, Beaching the Arroyo, and Tortu- ans. Work Widely Wlspliiynl Since coming to in Barrick has exhibited in Las Cru- ces many times in joint and group shows. The current exhibit is his first one-man show here. He hns shown In the Et Paso Sun Carnival, the Museum of New Mexico at San I a Fe, and at the University of New Mexico. His work has also been in several shows originating in the Museum of New Mexico and chosen for traveling out-nf-ntiile exhibitions. (See Paintings Ry, Pago 2> ENGINEERS SELECT QUEEN HEAD-ON COLLISION ONE MAN was killed and n man and woman wore injured in   Senator Chavez (D-NM) said to- day President Eisenhower "prob- ably" went to Bermuda by Navy cruiser "in order to spend a little time with plenty of water sur- rounding him after having been to the Southwest" drought area. Chavez made his? statement in a letter addressed to Chairman 131- Icnder (D-Lal of the Senate Agri- iidture Committee. The lelter urg- ;d the committee to approve legis- lation to help combat drought, Says, President Did IJtlle He said tin; President on his trip to' tin; Southwest "a few ago flew through ob- scuring dust storms and saw farm and ranch lands about as parched an the Sahara." "I had great Chavez wrote, "that his having come and Been would give him n desire to conquer the human depression which ho saw in tho people of the Southwest who for nine long years have battled the drought with linpf.- as their only weapon." He' added thai recommendations .he drought tour ini.slra! ion result uf we expected mid fnr, far less thiin wo had it right to ask." iVutifs Action Brilish Is Conl'ronUMl By New Thrcal Of Slrikcs LONDON. March IS Prime Minister Harold Macmillan called Cabinet ministers to an urgent conference today i.n a IHMl.OOIl- man shipyard strike paralyzing Hritain's vast .shipbuilding Mcohem Signs Bill Boosting Uranium Tax SANTA March 18 '.I1" Covernur .Mei-hcm'.s of the int The Lhreat of two mom giant strikes --among railway and Stm-mv Period Till- meiisiurf :IK il fumllv nfl. Chavez added thnt "members nf ntnbillzi-d I" fll Congress know, however, Mnriie tents over homes In An'mllii the Conserviitive Kovernmrnl only three dn.VH before Alai'miltiin'fi Hornuula President Light Rains Trail Tornado On Gulf Coast Ity The Associated Press Light rain fell around Gulvenlon early Monday following torrential downpours that dumped up to .10 inches of ruin in the area. Winds i. i of hurricane pounded (he I middle Gulf Coast and heavy tains i flooded .streets and highways Sun- Initial' day. Tornado Strikes A tornado injtireil several per- sons and e.'ilined Hi'allernl near Port Bolivar, advas the ship t j'1'1 "liki.1 1 nn from hi la ml. AsBt. Fin' Chief Jack Lung sai. of (he stunnieM i-invrs espi-r- icnred by any proposal of Hie ses- sion, increases the severance on uranium frctu the present one- einMli tif one per cent to one-half uf ,ine per cent. A bill .sponsored by Sen. Charles Koyall of Silver City anil nf spe- cial inleri'st at Sliver Hly al- so among UICMU annoum-ed It seeks Io clarify pmvers nf inii- nielpalit ies in' Much manner a.s Io ties. eliminad1 any .statiilnry diserimiii- (Kee Mrchem Sibils, Page Illinois Man Dies In Crash Near Brazito POMM Ana county todny had counted its fifth traffic fatality of (he year with the death Sunday night (if a Continental Trailways bus passe-tiger, George Adalr, of Fuwler. III. Ills wife, 71. was reported by Memorial General Hospital today to be in "fair" condition. She suffered a compound fracture of tin- rlRht leg in the collision with the auto driven by Arthur B. Ful- ler. 'W. of Las Cnicea. Thrown Through Windshield Fuller was also hospitalized with a fractured left leg. Tin- ai-riilent was timed at p.m. It. occurred seven miles south of Las Once.-; on Alt. U. S. 80-85 near Aduii, about 70. was thrown through the windshield of.the bus. The right rear wheels of the bus almost passed over the man's body. St ate Police Officer Robert l Bob) Lee who investigated said Mint the collision occurred in the .south-hound lane of the four-lane highway. The bus was south- bound. Fuller was driving1 toward Las Cruces. Lee mdd the bus driver, Richard UYddell, 57, of Tucson, Ariz., was tint hurt. I Let- siiiil the collision occurred six feet inside the southbound lam-. Jury Empanelled I A coroner's jury was ompan- I oiled by Justice of the Peace Don Kooiu-c. Mr; and Mrs. Adair had board- oil the bus at Glendale, Ariz. Their destination had not been deter- mined today. Adair was one of three accident victims who died in New Mexico Smuliiy. Illinois Man, page 2} I' i.) II. Smith, n [.liysi- in a yslei-- H fit ivns ilnn't care Mich 1 abcul v.-jih'r, us .'i foot of water. I duiiipeii mvir tun A.t TevjiK City, poli'if drnpalc-lier many ad'! un- F. C. Dawsnn tiaid water was Ilirce hiirnyd, ;md 'in.-nnJ1 :ti y es- fcet deep on Stain Highway I if! j laMinhim-nH, thev mark icrs, i nf ijie city, closing il to tln-h- liallnt.i in his lonnl brlieve the Congress should i fir (hm, ;IJM nn( sit idly by ami dn nothing .brrnuse of this possibility. hear- j ings and debate, we can bring to the nation's attention the ti-rii- j hie ih.siisler which ha.s ed tin; Southwest." my thing1 we might, try to do the admin- .stration recommendations might meet with reject ion, a veto Then he said; "NcvfirlhHers. T Missing Man Who Was On Probation New Chare .lesiiH (Jcoxe. i I Id in out cs of Cnices last week wan or- dered in court In "sign in" at the probation office In-re (o be- gin a new probationary term on .several chargi-H. After the court s-csMion was over. Hi-biumi-CN walked nut uf the building. Until lust night, offifriH hud sought him lo con- tempt order of .Imlgi' W. T. Kcogcin when i! was iPsirnrd Belniontes had never reported to the pi'obatfoi] of f ii e. night, it man anrl his wife engaged in 11 Men Ion nt tlie cornei' of Amu dor and Water street -across the from thf cnnrthmuse. Officers Jailed nn a charge of nn v.ife He JH fine to Ix-tore .Judge Hcoggin todny. s KVKNT SKT unroofed by the winds. Me streets w.-rn flooded by as Light Rains, RACE OVER STEEP COURSE I Bids On City Projects To Be Received LHH Oners City Commission lioliM its second meeting of the month at o'clock tonight at City Hull. Topping the agenda will be re.   the stto dnily. Appnitihueiils Slilttxl The North i Aliuneda drulniign prnjecl would take water from tht; a i Mini i in pou ml it temporar- ily iH a slle went of the North Ala- iiin1n Klementnry School. From thiit puint It would be channeled in a -Iniin we.st of the city. Cost "C project Is estimated at Tin1 Is also expected iipjioint the membership of Urn I'.i nnigjin Memorial Library hero under ;MI Jimendment to the ordl- governing operation of llii! hbrarv. ENGINEER'S BALL Queen Susan Myers, New Mexico coed from Fallbrook, receives her crown from D. B. "pad" Jell, dean emeritus of School of Engineering as Jerry Floyd, elected St. Patrick by engineering students, observes ceremony. Coronation was highlighted by daylong festivities and ceremonies fll marking annual observance of ceremonies for St, Patrick, patron saint of engineers. Photo by Huihnla) Miirch 1H (.1't crn New M ex i co 1 n I vepill y has bnen rhnnen rme of the eight Kites for University Chris- tian Mljwion ncrvlccH during The National Cotmcll of the of Chrint will wml n ChrlKtlnn MlMMlmi to I'ortnleH Mnroh 21-28 for Ihn tol- lege'H obHorvtince rif KtOlgjon In Life Week, offlclitbt nnid. jt, Woman Who Won Of New Nose To lii'tain Old One Mtirrh 18 Mrs. Terry Phillips, who won the prlco nl a new now; on a TV show, said tdtLty she hits dccldetl lo keep tier did nuse and give the money In hanty. Her Rinnll daughter her Ihf way she lij. Mis. PhillipM. 'tn, bus one of the lonp'Hf beak.s thin nidi: of Jimmy I'lirant.'. "I got chilblains on It in winter." she unlit "I scald it wlM-n I t.ike n hot drink." I.nsi week she appeared on Iho television Htalc Your Case, and won Then Hhlrley, 8, got Into tho act. "She changed my mint! for Mrs Phillips wild. "She cried bil- let ly and son. "Mummy, don't have your nr. e cut A MOTORCYCLE-JEEP up "A" Mountain Salttrtlay soltli'd a lunH dispute liolwi-cn prnlaKinnsts fur two vi-- hiclos. IJiukly M.illory of Kl i'a.so, almanl motori-yi-lu far outdistanced 'I'oniiuy Tlioiuason of IVOf) Colorado, Las Cru- ces, jui'p driver, in race up stccpost road on mountain. Thomason, however, pointed out "Ihoy hnd to K" of slate to get somebody that could heat a jeep." Once climbed only hy Tortugiis Indians, "A" Mountain apparently has become a testiny ground for every conceivable type of modern vehicle. (Photo by Melcski) .SI'KUII-IT WASIIINOTON, Mnreh 18 Son.iloi- Chuvez (D-NM) unj'ii ho j h.n asked the Army to npecil i-hanneliiuUIOil nnd work.fnr water milvupc nnd Hoot! prottotlon from I'ciw Hitmen to Socorro. Ho mild nreu concerned over any slow downs" tlmt might rtv .stdl from reftppnilHHl of tho 73 million dollar flood control and Ir- rljjatlon project.1'   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 130 million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 130 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 11 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication