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Hobbs Daily News Sun: Friday, December 6, 1963 - Page 1

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   Hobbs Daily News-Sun (Newspaper) - December 6, 1963, Hobbs, New Mexico                              Hobbs Daily News-Sim VOL. 37 NUMBER: HOBBS, NEW MEXICO FRIDAY, DECEMBER 6, 1963 SANTA FE Alamos residents recently voted in Uvor o( community owner, Ux exempt electric and gu util- ities for the city. The expression for more tax exempt facilities in Lot Ala- mos points up the situation in which the county is getting its share of state services but is not paying iU share of the cost. LESS SALES TAX FROM LOS ALAMOS A recent report oJ the collec- tion of slate sales tax, the largest revenue the state has. showed Los Alamos produced per person for the three- j, month period covered. The state per capita aver- age, alter deduction ot the tax on processing and on the re- moval of natural resources, was Santa Fe County adjoining Los Alamos produced per person. Figures from some other counties without extensive pro- cessing operations or oil and gas show Qaay Curry >11. Dona Ana J5.H, Otero (9.18, Luns tS.OS. FROrERTY LEW BELOW AVERAGE The state receives for gener- al purposes ad valorem Ux on each Of assessed valuation. The assessed valuation per perm in Los Alamos is The average in the state to Per capita assessed valuation ta SaiHa Fe County it is ISJTM in Dona Ana, It'll Rest On 'Bells' UTILITIES ESCAPE mis IMPOST The community owned util- ities favored by Los Alamos Totm will be exempt from UM wt TalwwB tai, the slate fa- lax, and the om'ITalt of one per cent of cross revenue tax that goes to the state. tsi-AJsssos members of the legislature got through a law last winter, granting their "Clan H County" utilities ex- emption from regulation by the state public service commis- sion and from fees charged by the commission. Bui tncy did not amend that part of the law to give Los Alamos residents the right fay referendum to bring their util- ities under state regulation as Is provided for residents of cities with city owned utilities. PECULIAR COUNTY, APART FROM STATE IMS Alamos, which exists only because of the federal AEC installation in the com. munity and only about acres in erca (enough to Braze miybe 150 head of cattle) has a long and growing code of special stale laws for its own peculiar operation which make H a county apart in New Mex- ico. It has been facetiously sug- gested that the county be abolished and the area return- ed to Sandoval from which most of it came when Ala- Bos was created in 1849. BLENDING PROCESS MIGHT BE GOOD Sandoval, in the ISM census and Los Alamos arc about as far apart as pos- sible in culture, economy, polit- ical attitude. A melting pot process might do them both good and make a jumping county out of slow eld Sandoval. OLD COURV OPINION FORBIDS ABOLISHMENT The trouble with that Is that on Pift 3) Wj' atJ C-NEWSSTAND 10 CENTS Hobbs Ma Dies In Rig Accident Christine Pleads Guilty Play-for-Pay Gal Sentenced LONDON Keeler, the 21-year-old play-for-i pay girl who almost brought down a British government, threw herself up on the mercy of the court today and got nine- month term in prison. With her housekeeper and IT Ali are currently in the process of drilling more than 120 stalls for an unusual "drilled and belled" foundation for the Jl million Hobbs Diwitowi Motor Holel and Convention Center, which Is planned for completion in the fall 1X4. Tke skaTU will vary from IS to 24 laches in diameter and will be "belled out" at Ike hcitaa tkree to six feel In photo by Jim Hauls. What docs it take to sup- port a building? In the unusual case of the Hobbs Motor Hotel Conven- tion Center, it will be "bells." There will be 120 of them, located at the base of 12-foot shafts. Each will be able to support a pressure in excess of pounds per square foot, experts pointed out. Actually, the "bells" are part of the unusual "drilled and belled" reinforced con- crete foundation employed to support the structure, which is planned for completion in the fall of 19W. "This type of foundation construction Is unusual for thii pointed out W. T. Har- ris, associate architect for architect Norman M. Ciller and Associates, designers of Use vast project Workmen currently arc in the process of drilling the foundation holes at the con- vention center site, located be- tween LJjiam, Dunnam, White, and Shipp Streets. Supporting the motor hotel, which will tower to three floors high in some portions, wUl be numerous foundation shafts ranging in diameter from 18 to 24 inches which will expand at the base to from 36 inches to six feet in diameter. Most of the more than 120 shafts will be 24 inches in diameter, Harris said. Each will be filled with concrete, reinforced with steel. The shafts will extend upwards to the roof of the structure. literally at the base of the whole project arc the men who are lowered into the shafts to "clean them out" after an unusual rig drills the shaft and then "bells it out" at the bottom. Precision Foundations, Inc., of Lubboct. Tex., is drilling the foundation for the proj- ect at the present time, work- ing under J. W. Cooper, Inc., of Odessa, general contrac- tors. John H. (Jack) Caward, executive director of Property- Investors. Inc., comprised of local investors who are fi- nancing the project, pointed out Friday that "construction is on schedule." "The construction is plan- ned for 10 Caward said. Groundbreaking for the (ConUmitd On raft a> Town Is Dead, But Story Lives By DICK HARBWICK Gallup Dally Independent GALLUP town has died but its part in telling the Christmas story goes on. Gallup Mayor Edward Munoz Hill throw a switch tonight to Ight Christmas scenes that once dazzled eyes in a New Mexico town now crumbling nlo ruin. Unfolding the Yule story in the city's Ford Canyon will lie many iomc ghost town on New Mexico 10. of the colossal figures, carved with childlike Mrs. Kennedy Moves Today WASHINGTON (AP) Mrs imagination, that once brought Jacqueline Kennedy leaves the the season to Madrid, now a While- House 'today in sorrow and Miners of the coal town built almost to the hour, after her husband wss siain in Dallas. Mrs. Kennedy is taking her ihildren from a goldfish bowl 'Xistence to the quiet life of a wrrowed home on N Street in Georgetown. She and her husband lived in the area before Sen. John F. was elected presidcnl n 1960. When she moved into the ex- ecutive mansion on Jan. 20, 961, Mrs. Kennedy's predeces- ior, Mrs. .Dwight D. Eisenhow- er, left a parting gift of flowers m every room. This time., the White House bears the black drapes of mourning in many of the stately the Christmas one remembers when. Then Ma- drid's population, once persons, ebbed away as the coal ndustry slipped with the coni- ng of dicsel engines in the early 1940s. The Christmas figures, aver- aging about 20 feet high, were thoughtfully stored under the schoolhousc. More than a year ago, the Gallup Jaycccs began to res- urrect with bro- ;cn wings, shepherds and sheep ;urning the color of dust, and "Jack and the Bean In place along the hills of HIE canyon, they will tell their mute- story of Christmas. The Jaycces began tho proj- ect with city money, but the Christmas Canyon became a community project. City prisoners planted Yule Irecs; Ihe Chamber of Com- merce donated" stovepipes thai, with paint, became candy canes; members of Local Union 13299 (United Mine Workers) erected the lowering bean slalk; organizations and clubs volun- teered labor to paint and repair. A sphinx flanked by s pyra- mid gazes down on visitors to the canyon, even as the Egyp- tian sphinx must have when the holy family fled to the land of salons. They will stay there unUl having as many as the Christmas am far away, an Santa Glaus Candy Parade Scheduled Here Tomorrow Santa Claus makes his HritjSanU Claus tour will go to the under sponsorship of the down- official visit of Hcbbs when he (he year 'to Broadmoor and Bel Aire Shop- arrives at J p.m. tomorrow to lead the an nunl Santa Claus Candy Parade. Loaded with bags of candy, Santa will be helped by members of local men's clric clubs in the distribution of tattti to children along the pa- rafc route. few at the ran- taut tracU West Broadway, east on Broadway to Fallowing that Ow pint Centers. Heading the parade will be the Highland Junior High School band and Fire Chief Archie Con- ner, who traditionally is honor- ary parade Candy will be hauled on a tract fur- nished by (he K. L. Towlc Con- Unction Co. AIM m the will he a Plymouth, U be given away at 4 p.m. Dec. M at the Hobbs ChMnber town retail merchants. Volunteers who are to distri- bute the candy arc being askcc to'mect at the New Mexico Oi Conservation Commission office 100 Broadway, at p.m. tomorrow. Cundy is to be siren only la children of U yean or younger. Harry Nuaan, manager ol ttte Chamber of Commerce, express cd the organization's thinks to oil industry firms who fii (CiBUmw I) a girl friend, she pleaded guilty I to charges of perjury and con- jspiracy to frame a discarded Negro lover. She could have gone to prison for seven years ir more. The stony composure of the irostitute girl friend of ex-War- Minister John D. Profumo and ithcr men in high places broke momentarily as she heard Judge Sir Anthony Hawke pronounce entcnce in Old Bailey. Tears welled in her eyes and her lips quivered. Paula Hamilton-Marshall, 23, he girl friend who shares an apartment with Christine, was ;iven a six-month sentence. Their housekeeper. Mrs. Olive Jrooker, 56, was placed on pro- ration. Both Paula and Christine ooked sad but were composed as two policewomen led them to cells to await transfer to prison. In a moving pica for leniency, Defense Lawyer Jeremy Hutch- nson described Christine as a simple country girl who became .he sexual plaything of men in 'today in sorrow weeks, Dec. 22. when the 30-day period of national mourning ends. Caroline Kennedy, 6, will be coming back every day for a while to attend first grade class- es at the White House school, which Mrs. Kennedy founded to ;ivc her children privacy and he company of other children .heir age. John Jr., 3. will have to find lis play pals elsewhere now, And there will be no more vis ts to the big oval office where lis father managed to find time For him despite the awesome iurdons of the presidency. Their new house, lent to them is piped Mrs. W. Avercll Harriman, is a the Pharaohs. A choir's song throughout phithcalcr. angel walches over a figure for a permanent home in Wash kneeling among roses. Santa Claus and his reindeer ride through another part of ths canyon The Star of David, pointing its rayi- to a nativity scene, was the gift of the Gallup Minis lerial Alliance. Extravagant as the selling is (Conuuued On Page S) temporary residence for the three. Mrs. Kennedy will loo! for a pc ington. Cotton Ginning Hits Peak Here Car Hits Bus, Girl Injured A 15-year-old Lovington High chool student was hospitalized fter the car she was driving rashed into the rear of a school us which had stopped to pick p a youngster near Lovington his morning. her early udge: teens. He told the "Miss Keeler has said quite simply to me from the start: (Continued On S) LBJOutines Foreign Plan WASHINGTON (AP) Presi- dent Johnson in outlining his foreign policy philosophy says the United States must be strong, just, temperate and pa- tient. Johnson made Ihe slalement Iwice Thursday at separate closed meetings with govern- ment officials. White House sources later gave newsmen ttie list of his remarks. The President, who has been The 21 students aboard the ms were not injured. Listed in satisfactory condi- ion at Lovington Lea General Hospital was Elizabeth Lee, 15, f Buckeye, who was being reated for face lacerations aft- :r the 1961 Valiant she was driv- ng was demolished in the mis- iap. State Policeman M. J. Payne ;aid the Lee auto had left skid marks for 117 feet in a futile attempt to stop before hitting the bus. Bus driver Henry Griffin, 53, of Lovington. said he had stop- ped to pick up a child. Damage o the 48-passenger bus estimated at All passengers in the bus were taken to the hospital for examination, but no injuries vere reported. nounced appointments 10 an- a day. slackened his public pace today and announced only three. Scheduled to see the President were Director John A. McCone of the Cenlral Inlelligence Agen- cy and Secrelary of Welfare Anthony J. Celebrezze. Johnson outlined his view o the appropriate American pos ;ure in foreign affairs at a one lour meeting of Ihe Naliona Security first in his later ex panded on the subject in a talk Wore 800 fop officials at tho State Department. He told the Stats Departmen by Undersecretary of Stats and officials that an increased sense Lea County gins have ginncc bales of cotton up to to- day, tte New Mexico Employ- ncnt Service in Hobbs has re- vealed. Of these, bales wen; produced on Lea County arms and the remaining >aies came from farms in ad iacent West Texas. Ginning operations here reached its peak in the week ending today, with bales ginned in this seven-day period. Approximately 3 percent of last week's cotton was harvested by iiand, with Hie rcsl gathered by mechanical cotton pickers andj pullers. The county harvest WES reck- oned at tt per wnt complete today. Employment service officials Mid some need exlsti 'for cot- ton hairfrt hands with roqucsls on.file for six small groups of between live and ten workers each to pull bolu. of hope had been developing during the final months of Ken nedy's because o what Johnson called a balance of power shift in favor of the United Slates. I have not become Presiden lo give away this he said. Johnson said another basis for developing hope reflected wha he termed advances in working with the Soviet Union. Describing the State Depart mcnt as the central force in framing and executing foreign iiolicy, Johnson said he look to the departmcnl for "initiative in proposal, energy in action, frankness in advice.1' JAHTAWUWAYJ m SHOPPING DAYS TO CHRISTMAS SHOP FOR IN OUV! AD PAi f FINN WATSON to state board Watson Gets State Post Finn Watson, longtime Hobbs businessman, has been appoint- ed a member of a state devel- opment advisory board to assist tubing board when he fell. Derrick Man Tumbles 60 Feet to Death A Hobbs oilfield work- er was killed today in an accident west of Jal. The victim, James Bennett Kingston, 25, of 411 West Mesquite, fell about 60 feet out of a pulling unit rig, investigators said. The accident occurred about a.m., approximately three miles west and one mile north of Jal. Deputy Sheriff Louis Bryan, who investigated the mishap along with Deputy Sheriff R. E. N'eal, said Kingston, a derrick man for Bateman-Whiisitt, Inc., had climbed the derrick to the "He had his safety belt on the director of the New Mexico Department of Development. The nine-man board, estab- but he fell just as he got to tht lished by law, was selected by tubing board and hadn't fasten- Gov. Jack M. Campbell. Campbell said he expects the group to play an important role in a program to boost the state's economy, increase the tourist trade and attract new industry. Watson is owner of the Wat- son Truck and Supply Co. here. An official in the Industrial Development Corp. of Lea Coun- ty, Walson said he welcomes the ed the belt Bryan said. The victim dropped to the cellar at the installation, hitting boards over the cellar and well- head connection. He was report- ed killed instantly. Bryan said Kingston was "broken all to pieces." An inquest was held at the scene under the direction of Jal appointment to work in the Peace Justice Linda Pendleton. Investigating officers said the mishap occurred about one mile south of the Lovington city lim- ts on Stale Road 483. Mother Helps Neighbor's Child; Her Own Killed KANSAS CITY (AP) Mrs., Dalford Vanvant's son was killed Thursday while she was trying to help a neigh- bor's child. Mrs. Vanzant was babysitting vith two neighbor children when one of them, Byron W. Hodges, 22 months old, drank some bleach. She quickly put her son, Jef- rey, anu me Other two children n the car and started to a doc- or's office. About a mile froiu he Vanzant home she swerved o avoid another car, lost con- rol and her car overturned. Jeffery was killed. Mrs. Van- zant suffered severe head injur- es, fractures of the clavicle and right thigh. The other two chil- dren had minor injuries. The Hodges boy had no ill ef- 'ects from the bleach. Country Club Sets Membership Plan Membership arrangements for >ersons who do not know how ong they will be Hobbs resi- dent have been made at the Hobbs Country Club, it was an- nounced today. The plan will work this way, he club's board of directors said: An associate nr regular mem- bership may be purchased on an annual basis of a year, until the total membership fee s paid. At the end of each year he member remains in Hobbs, will be billed another {50 un- til the fee is completed. Kach applicant for such mem- bership will be screened for ap- proval by the board of directors. Ircak-in Uniuccttsful An attempted break-in was re ported at the Union Bus Station iate Thursday. Police Hid some- one had broken a (last panel on She north door to the station which is located f 4W> South Turner. Apparently entry not gained, however, according to police. The incident was n. at p.m. Thursday state development agency. have a lot of wonderful opportunities here in New Hex- co. I'll be glad to do everything can to help in the le said. Others named to the board were Ted Bonneil, Alamogordo >anker; Frank Burke, Gallup banker; Reece L. Bennett, For- ales finance official; Henry J. Gustafson, Las Graces business- man; Peter McDonald, member of the Navajo Tribal Council executive staff at Shiprocfc; Ro- tert Mateucci, Albuquerque bus- nessman; Robert Nordhaus, Al- buquerque attorney and busi- nessman; and James W. Ruth- irford, Albuquerque insurance >roker and former state legis- ator. At 100, He Asks To Be Citizen COLUMBUS, Ga, mar Martindale, a Briton who las spent 75 of his 99 years in he United States, has notified the government he to be- come an American citizen r.n March 25, his 100th birthday. "I want to show how much I appreciate the kindnesses and in he said. Martindale, who lives in a nursing home, came to Colum- bus in 1953. He was born near A ruling of "accidental death, falling from the rig" was return- 1. The site was described as a Gutf Oil Corp. well, WDDU, Tract 5-2. Friends said Kingston had moved to Hobbs about six months ago from Kermit, Tex., where he was employed by Long- horn Well Service. Survivors include his widow and Iwo children. Mrs. Kingston is expecting her third child, the report said. Funeral plans are pending. Bateman-Whiisitt, Inc., with offices and yard at 805 East Tex- as, formerly was Bateman and Whitsitt, Inc., before the firm was purchased by Frank Pool of San Angelo, Tex., last January from Frank Baleman, who no longer is associated with company. Wife Serves Cop But HotSupper MOUNTAIN HOME, Idaho [enerosity that I have received Patrolman Cal Bcr- nard stopped off at the Mountain Home sheriff's office to work on records. He felt a tap on his shoulder o Canada. Then lie settled in Angeles where, he says, he conductors. and early in life moved and was handed a subpoena to appear as a witness in a Dis- trict Court trial. The subpoena was one of the first cable car server was his wife, an Elmore County deputy. Yule Fund Aided Homeless Family Your contributions to the Christinas Basket and Salva- tion Army Winter Relict Fund help many. This assistance will go to such persons as the members of a family whose home recently burned. The early-morning fire destroyed, the rural home of this man and wife and their five children, who lost their cloth- ing, food and household effects in the blaze. They were given the essentials of clothing and other the Salvation Army, which could do this, thanks to your generosity in the 1962 Christmas Basket and Winter Relief Fund. Help. Help. Help. Donations to the fund: XI Alpha Gamma chapter of Beta Sigma Pal---------? ll.M II. A. Douglass _____...........____________________ S.M W. M. (Billy) Walker, lac--------------------------____2S.8C Cub Scout Pack IS__________________________ UM Aaoaymons Salvation Army kettki________________________ Wtmaa'i Aulllary tf IWriK Vrinteer Fire If .M Previously donated TOTAL TO DATE J4S.3 ____ 55.M fM.31   

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