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Albuquerque Journal Newspaper Archive: November 13, 1962 - Page 1

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Publication: Albuquerque Journal

Location: Albuquerque, New Mexico

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   Albuquerque Journal (Newspaper) - November 13, 1962, Albuquerque, New Mexico                                Today's Smile II.   Thlerci Iwk rlfkl met ef lbe h.rd Ibe rrelnrad. The Cenniy ShciKl'i eltlce Ibe fcetr Tt moved lie bottle it time ttutitb holt In Ibe wludiw ALB LEADING NEWSPAPER NAL Good Morning Tie BlUIc Sil til.l Sl.rr Cm H.J ClJIjintd Al A True Bkltl T. KJfi E.lc. 82nd Year Volume SU Numlet 41 Second. elau poaUit fica at Albuqueraue and it udnlBsil mulllnc ollfcu U.S. Stands Firm About Removal Of Red Bombers Concern Deepens Over Unpredictable Castro Behaviour WASHINGTON (UPI) President Kennedy Monday stood firm on his insistence that Soviet IL28 bombers must bo removed from Cuba now Hint the Russian missiles have been with- drawn. Kennedy and his chief mili- tary, inloHijjence und diplo- matic advisers met for an hour and -15 minutes to review Idlest developments in the Cuban crisis. They heard a report on current Sovicl-Americnn ne- gotiations from Adlni Slevon- son, U. S. Ambassador to the United Nations, and John J. McCloy, head of a (hrce-mai "coordinating committee" lhat is dealing with the Hus- sions for removal of "of- fensive" weapons.from Cuba. Forty-two missiles now have been taken out of Cuba nnd are on their back to Russia. The I1.28s, medium-range bomber capa- ble of carrying nuclear wcap. ons, still rcmain- Prcss Secretary Pierre Sal- inger said the government's position on removal of So- viet weapons from Cuba, in- cluding the bombers, had not changed. The Soviets, in Ihe talks with the Americans at ihe United Nations, have tried lo "downgrade" the TL28s from the category inlo which Ken- nedy had placed Ihcm. They .nlso have claimed the planes are now part of the Cuban Air Force. But Ihc United States has made Ihe removal of the nnvnl blockade conditional on Ihe pullback of llic bomb- ers. Qualified officials said Ken- nedy has bpcn informed lhat the Hussians appear to be act- Ing on good faith in laking out the missiles. But the admin- istration's concern was said to be deepening over (lie un- prediclablc behavior of Cuban Premier Fidel Caslro. Most U. S. officials work- ing on the Cuban crisis are inclined to give credence lo Moscow's difficully wilh Cas- lro. There slill is no word here on whnt progress if been made in the talks between the Cuban leader and Soviet Fii-sl Depu- ty Premier Annstas I. Miko- yan. Mikoynn has been Cuba 10 days. It is expected thnt the min- imum result ol the Mikoyan Jrip lo Cuba will be Castro's agreement lo send back the Soviet aircraft which have not yet been uncraled. But failing Caslro's a'cccpt- of international on-lhe- spot supervision, the Unitec Slalcs is cxpcclcd lo continue its aerial surveillance of Ihc island indefinitely. This woulr be to make certain there is no new altcmpl this time by Cuba to secretly build launching pads for any mis- siles the Cnstro regime may have concealed. Deputy Defense Secretary Roswell Gilpatrick suid Sun day that the United States had no proof that all missiles had been removed, and svould never be sure unless on-site Inspection was permitted. The Russians said '12 mis- siles were in Cuba. The DC tense Dept. Monday gave a breakdown of (heir departure Officials here stress the point that nny relaxation o Ihe blockade around Cuba would be a concession towarc Moscow and not the Caslro regime. Tuesday Morning, November 13, 1962 Pages ta Two Sectlbm Price 7c larines Cancel how of Force It Guantanamo Armored Display Planned After Cuban Rock-Throwing GUANTANAMO B A Y, ulJii (AP) U.S. urines plan to run an group today along ic fence line separating is naval base from Cuba as abruptly cancelled Mon- ay night. The Marines had been plan- ng (he show of force after flurry of rock-throwing by ubans in the area. The appearance of a dis- ilch transmilled from here radio promplcd a hurried inference in the quarlers of car Adm. Edward J. O'Don- ell, chief of the U.S. Naval ase. After the cancellation of Ihe ission, Ihe notation of it slill ppoarcd on the bulletin oard in the news center here. said: "There wil! be an nnorcd run along Ihe fence age. Dr. Spain lold his audience, nadc Tip mostly of veterans and their families, that all great nations have symbols hat relalc to a country's his- ory and added that, symbol- cally, Veteran's Day should remind us of our history. But he pointed out that we A MOMENT OF SILENCE in honor of the nation's war dead was observed Monday morning during a ceremony at the Veterans Hospital. In the above picture, the flag is being lowered to half mast while a squad waits at attention to fire a three-round sa- lute. The flag ceremony took place on the lawn in front of llic Veterans Hospital. (Journal photo) Veterans Urged To Stress Values Of U.S. System Dr. Chailc-s R. Spain in an" address called'upjn vclcrnns ii_ 'demonstrate' Ihe unique values of our system." He spoke Monday morning before several hundred persons attending n Veteran's Day program on the Veteran's Hospilal grounds. He called for "continued loyally, understanding nnd sup >rt" of this country's heri------------------------------------ Jen Bella Encounters 'easant Bitterness ALGIERS Ah- med Tien Bella returned Mon- day from a lour of the east- ern regions, where he ran into stubborn Berber guerrillas de- manding aulonomy and also Bitterness among hungry peasants. Promises of sweeping rc- :orms' and stale conlrollcd farms brought lilllc apparent comfort to the ragged "fcl- .ahs" (peasants) of Ihe im- poverished easl, informanls snid. The peasants expected large European ostalcs would b c chopped up inlo small plots nnd Ihe land parceled oul. Ben Bella's announcements tha' large holdings would be ad- ministered by the state and not partitioned brought disap- pointment to many. TRADE TALKS OPEN BRUSSELS (UPf) Nor way has opened formal nc golinlions for entry inlo the European Common Market A Norwegian delegation let by Foreign Minister Halyard M. Langc met wilh ministers of Ihe six-nation European trade bloc for slighlly less than one hour. ire living in "a period of cri is" and said there arc more iignificant things to be con  rinciples and our nation' In this line, he said it i he duly of each person t demonstrate "active citizen ship" in the community. arnde Opening Feature The hour long observanc wilh a parade dow San Maleo to the Veteran' lospilal, where much of th crowd already had asscmblcc Veterans of four Spanish American, W o r 1 War I, World War .II and th tCorcan in Ih parade. All major veteran1 organizations participated an were recognized during Ih ceremony. After (he flag was lowerc to half masl, a salute by firing squad, and Taps, th formal program slarlcd. Cil Commission Chairman Archi Wcstfnll was master of cen monies. A large number of paticnl at the VA Hospital, some i Ihem in wheelchairs, gall ered on the lawn. The Uniled Veteran's Cou: cil sponsored the program. Battered Island of Guam Declared Disaster Area Billie Sol Estes F'l t fl" 1 hies Affidavit He Is Pauper Texan Once Rated MuUi-Miliionaire Asks Free Appeal EL Billie PASO, Tex. Sol Estes, whose t a.m." There were two rock-lhrow- ng incidents. Capl. Patrick E. OToole an Clcmcntc, Calif., related latest rock throwing ind- ent. Ho said the Marines were uilding whnt- Ihcy called a andmade machine gun bun- dislinct from the con- rele block bunkers built by he Marine engineer battalions the Cuba mililiamen egan hurling rocks. Tiie Marines' reaction, O1- Toole said, was that "good rofessionals." "The Cubans are starling to lake this a personal war and t we ever have to gr> after :iem, they are going to wish hey had never started throw- ng O'Toole said. "A lot of the men were tile worried about the possi ility of going inlo combat lor he first time, but they are not iow. They just think the 'ubans are childish. They fig- ure that it-is pretty childish o be throwing rocks when you >ave a rifle on your shoulder. Flying above the bunker on an improvised pole was a flag >rought along by Cpl. Gordon Fine of San Clcmonlc. Fine xmghl it when he joined Ihe in ]056 "for jusl :omething like he said. So far, none of the Marines has been hurt by the flying ocks and none has lost his restraint. Not a shot has been 'ired. wealth once was estimated at more than million, Tiled an affidavit in U. S. District Couit Monday swear- ing (hat ho Is now a pauper. The affidavit wns received together with Estcs' petition asking that he be allowed to appeal from llic federal courl order declaring him baiik- rupt without having to pay costs of. Ihc appeal. The request came jusl lead of Thursday's deadline appealing the ruling ol S. Dist. Judge R. E. Thom- on. If granted, the govcrn- cnt would have to pay Ihc sis, e.xpccled to amounl lo bout including r preparing the lengthy enograph transcript of Ihe ankruptcy proceedings. nys He's 'Farmer Estcs said he is now wilh- ul property or money will1 hich to pay cosls and fees. is weallh has been dcplclec nd exhausted, he said, by e various lawsuits brought gainst him. He has filed no- ce of appeal, through his al rncys, and in the aftidavi rwardcd to J. C. Brooke ;fcree in bankruplcy, he so' Marshals Inspec destructive tire At Court Cafe Skies Are Clear Over New Mexico Skies remained clear over New Mexico Monday and daylime temperatures were veil above normal for thi dalc. Albuquerqtie registered i IB for the second Btraigb day, 8 degrees nbovo t h day's normal. Considerable warming oc cut-red in the northeast quad rant of (he slalc, where Clay .on warmed 14 degrees abov Sunday to a 72. Las Vega gained 10 degrees to C7. Th owcsl maximum Monda wns at Red River with a 58 Minimum (cmperat u r c Monday morning were nca normal. The coolest spot were Gallup wilh a 21 nn Red River wilh 10. Albuquoi que rcgislered a 22 in t h Valley and a 30 at Ihe Air port. S31 MILLION COLLECTED WASHINGTON at New Mexico collected million from highway user during 1961, reporls (he U.S Dcpl. of Commerce. Californ led the list of stales wil millions collected fron the users of its highways, Post Office Dept 'Points With Pride After Goof on Hammarskjold Stamp WASHINGTON (.fl Wilh a louch of pride, Post Office Dcpl. admitted Mon- day lhat somebody goofed on Us new Dag Hammarskjold slamp. But the prldo was in the fact such a thing hap- pens so seldom. In running off 120 million of the 4 cent commemorative stamps, government printers turned out 200 wilh an in verted yellow plale. said n posla official, "This is only the second time in 55 years lhat such n thing has happened." Tho inverted yellow plnte means lhat Ihe lower portion of the slamp, which should he yellow, is a blank while and Ihe J-cent designation is in the upper right, instead ol lower lell corner. It also means that some slamp collectors arc prclty jubilant about the whole (hing. Three in Akron, Ohio, have 19 of the 200 rarolics and eslimalc Ihcir value at to each. James F. Kcllehcr, special ossislanl lo Ihe postmnslcr general, said the ID were authenlicntcd Sunday night by a posla: inspector who made a special Irip from Washinglon lo Akron. Another inspector left Mon- day for Irvington, N. J., Kel- Ichcr said, to check out an- other claim. A collector Iherc says he has come up wilh a pane al 50 of Ihc rare Hnmmarskjold stamps. The oriRinnl sheet of 200 wns cut into four 50 slamp panes. "This is a great Iributc lo Ihc Bureau of Engraving and sifjhcd Stanley J. Hodziowich, chiel ol tha de- partment's philatelic scclio: "When you slop lo Ihin ;hat Ihose fellows print 25 30 billion stamps a year f cen wiped out. The U. S. Air Force typhoon varning system was crcdiled vilh keeping down the death oil in the worst storm i n Guam's recorded history. Kennedy ordered an immedi- ate survey of relief needs. The Office oC Emergency Planning dispalchcd a team of experts lo the island and the Ameri- can Ited Cross flew in five disaster workers from Tokyo, Washington and Manila. A radio broadcast from Guam heard in Honolulu said three towns, including Agana, were leveled. Water was being distributed by truck but a ma- jor sanilatmn problem re- mained. Almost All Homeless Gov. Manuel Guerrero, in a report to President Kennedy, said Ihe typhoon destroyed 05 per cent of the civilian com- munities, including commercial Continued A-l Albuquerque Weather ALRCnilEHQUE AND YTCTNTTYi Con- tinued mostly 3U3D7 today Wednrj. day UK vHh variable tlih C-Uj n'.ltmocu irtcds both dsfs. .voi WcdKeuIsy. HUb liay 68? lawl t 2fi OK airport. NEW Generally filr today and Wednesday but Tlth Tarlible high Briefly a llllle vlr.dy IfaU alternant end In esji Wednesday. cocker Wednesdi p. HUhs 6J-75; lovj ff.Mlly 25-13. SOUTHERN NEW today except partly In cslrernc ttsi -Mrl'on Ihls mfternoul; [air lo partly :lotdy looJKbc ar.d Wednesday, Warmer porlkm today and In ir.wl seellcrj .ociJxbl; a ]JU> cooler In DCTlb ar.d west porttcTj Wednesday. Inlay 56-G6 ir.ounlalos, C6-73 elsenbere: tovi ler.lght The cafe has been operated he last Iwo to three years k' jy the three Chronis >rolhcrs, home addresses not available. If was founded at lint site in 102G by Robert P. Kalson, now a realtor here. One of Ihe operators de- clined lo venture an estimate on his losses. Unofficially it wns put al upwards of nol including struc- V .ur.il loss. The blaze and attendant smoke and walcr also did serious damage to the adja- cent Acusticon Hearing A i d office, fronting on Fourth SI., and considerably less, mostly from smoke, lo Franklin's Fivc-and-Ten Store. Some nine firemen s u s- l a i n c d minor injuries in battling Ihc fire, among Ihcm Chief Simon Scligman and Assl. Chief Leo Rcynaud. Be- lieved most seriously hurt were M. Armando whose left arm and leg were struck by a w h i p 1 n s hing water hose, and Fireman Adolph Liiccro, who cut a toe while using an nxc. Firemen estimated they put in about 500 man-hour's fighling the tire using 7000 feel of two and a hnlf inch hose, lesser amounts of smaller nnd 300 (cot ladder, Ailditinnal Weather Page B-5 ATTACKING BLA7K: Firemen plunge into billowing smoke -.vith hoses in nn effort lo control a midnight Sunday blaze which destroyed the inside of Iho 36 year old. Court Cafo 109 Fourlh Among firemen are Asst. Chiefs Leo Rcynaud, right, and Ray Knhn, foreground, nnd Lt. Jim Chavez, name on jacket, Al ils peak, some 50 men fought the fire. (Journal   

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