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Albuquerque Journal Newspaper Archive: January 19, 1962 - Page 2

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Publication: Albuquerque Journal

Location: Albuquerque, New Mexico

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   Albuquerque Journal (Newspaper) - January 19, 1962, Albuquerque, New Mexico                                A-2 ALBUQUERQUE JOURNAL 1-9, 1962 I Journal Brldjre -----......_-.--.D-1Z comics Crossword Futile '__'-i--D-I2 Dally Record Editorials' Louclln Parsons' __'____l-D-2'. Movies Obituaries------1-.-.....C.-l Our Patterns _______.....D-1Z Hellion Today....._..C-16 TV TV Previews A-15 Weather Table 1_____..C-6 Woman's..World .--..'_-B-l-2 Union Head Cites Future Dangers Of Automation Appeals fly JUDITH The international president of the Office Employes Inter- national Union Thursday pre- dicted a bleak future for the white collar worker and the nation unless the government and others act to meet the problems of automation. He also took a swipe at International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers' strike New York City, saying the union's tactics of ''getting more for those at the top oi the ladder" is no real answer lo Ihe threat of future.unem- ployment. Howard Coughlin, New York City, addressed a joint meeting of union members and the Uni- versity of. New. Mexico's Eco- nomics .Club at the Student Union -Bldg. Sees Unemployment Hike Using' U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics figures, he estimated 1.4 million while collar jobs were affected and per mancntly abolished during 1961 because of the widespread use of the transistorized com- puter. This small computer can .be used by small and medium-s i z e businesses, he noted. Coughlln said although un- employment has decreased slightly, the number of unem- ployed ijivhile collar "workers HThe official-Epoke ol devices 'may' cost hundreds of thousands of Jobs in the fu- ture, among them: 1. A machine which will transcribe the spoken word. This is being tested by RCA in New York City and by Japanese Electronics Co. in Kyoto, Japan. If successful, it wjll affect 1.5 million secre- tarial, stenographic and typist jobs in this country. "jfnbol" Siles Clerk w-2. An-automatic ;sales clerk. A pense 36 change these. 3. IBM readers and scanners. One device which scans at the rate of 1800.-words a minute does.the.work oE 24 key punch operators. (Coughlln noted that some jobs which were created by the.advent of the computer, such as key punch operator and output clerk, may be abolish- ed.) 4. An automatic- inventory taker. Too Expensive 5. An automatic law clerk. This machine presently is too expensive for common use. However, it can do seven-hours work in a few minutes. 6. An automatic meter read- er- Coughlin reported his member union has called for government help In establish- ing training and retraining centers try. It rehabilitation for older ers, earlier retirement, system of mobility wherein job- less insurance funds may be used to help transport workers from one job area lo anolher. This last proposal has received the backing of the President's advisory council, and the secre- tary of labor has indicated he will press for its passage in Congress. Predicts Economic Crisis Estimating the country will have 37 million white collar workers by 1970, Coughlln predicted an In; I marathon hearing Thursday, -before Dist, '.'judge Edwin Swope, the city attor- ney's office continued'to'whit- tle, away at its massive list of appeals Of Municipal Court cases. More than 60 were disposed of from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Droves of city policemen, most in court on an overtime basi: were involved.....'-.. Ah equal number of cases was wiped pioff' .the books Wednesday. Judge Swope will noon" listen to 71 cases today in the final session of appeal hearings this.month. Another Series 1'lahned Another series Is scheduled n February. Twenty cases continued from Thursday, and 30 other appeals which have accumulated since Dec. 15, will be heard then. The city attorney's office has been working since October to get out'from under the black- log, which once involved 399 ases.' Cases heard Thursday inr volved gambling, prostitution, carrying a deadly weapon, petty larceny, illegal use of barbitu- ates, drunkenness and disorder- ly conduct and various driving violations, including 18 drunk- en driving cases. Enter Innocent Pleas Twenty seven defendants failed to appear nnd forfeited bonds. Twelve entered pleas of guilty and five pleaded guilty .o a lesser offense. Charges against 11 defendants were dis- missed. Pleas of innocent were entered by nine defendants; five were found guilty and two found innocent. One case was continued. Among the defendants who failed to appear were Thomas Crawford, 25, of 305 Charleston Pps'gessipns in A fund Is' being started 'at an Albuquerque bank by friends, of the Robert'. strong family, which lost all its possessions in a fire Tuesday. The father, a 22-year-old un- employed construction worker; the mother, Deanna, 20; and their youngest child, 7 months, are .In serious ditlon at Bataan Methodist Hospital. The oldest not as '.ijadly'. in flash was- condltlon'.i'Bte .Thursday: after- Director of N. M. the'. Tina, the couple's old was {released from the -hospital Thursday and is being kepi by'a7 friend of the family, Miss Belly.W. fnon, 11521 Mountain Hpad NE.- Miss Wilemon and. her-nelgh- bor, Mrs'. Don Poland, Mountain Road NE, have open-, cd the Armstrong fund at the Wyoming branch of the Bank ol New Mexico. The first check was received Thursday. Since the fire'destroyed the Armstrong's trailer home and nil their possessions, the family need clothing Miss Wilemon and arid also will furniture. Mrs. Poland will store these articles at their homes'' until the family is reunited. Months and even years-of hospital bills face the young family. If the baby pulls through, he will exten- sive skin grafting since burns cover more than 80 per cent of his body. "It Miss tears your.. heart Wllemon said SE, convicted of five counts of gambling on June 15, 1961, and fined 5250; Edna Houston 22, fined .on a charge ol prostitution, and sentenced to 10 days in jail for carrying a deadly weapon, and Norman Foster, 32, of 1618 Broadway SE, found guilty of carrying a deadly weapon'.'" Sandia District Votes to she described the family's plight. The''father, who was employed by a construction company, has been' laid off since before Christmas. Al- Ihough he had been looking, he was unable to find another job, Miss Wilemon indicated. The Armstrongs had no per- sonal property insurance and it ia not definite if there is coverage on the trailer house, which recently was re-fi- nanced. Robert's brother; Larry, who lived with them in the trailer, also lost his clothing in the fire. Larry is staying now.Avith a third brother, Henry, who lives at the home of Miss Wile- mon; Caring for LUCKY TINA: Little Tina Armstrong, is the most fortunate member of her family. She escaped with slight injuries whilo her parents, Mr.''and Mrs. P.obert Armstrong, and two brothers were seriously burned when their trailer homa caught fire. Tina was released from the hospital Thursday and is being, cared for" by Miss Betty Wilemon, a friend of the family': .'Liirry Armstrong, left, a brother of Robert, helped pull the family to safety. (Journal photo) machine 'can dis- articles' and give up to for each of CootlLOtJ Ira, the two burned throughout the coun- also has pressed for work- and a the change of mind, Parham replied: "We don't have any money to appeal." opinion early this week' by.Asst. Dist. Ally.: William'J: Bingham ad- vising County Treasurer Mae Kieinhein not to remit to the district assessments she has collected for it. Parham indi- cated he felt the court would have upheld this opinion had the directors attempted to fight it. This would have left the dis- trict with insufficient money to appeal, not only the dissolution order, .but the expected order denying it funds. What could we asked Parham. Outstanding Bills The district now has about or about less than needed to pay outstanding bills and debts, according to Campbell. He said district judges had assured him enough money would be ordered re- leased by the county treasurer to'pay the bills. Campbell itemized debts as due June 1 as princi- pal and Interest on a loan ob- Lained a year before; due Chapman and Cutler, Chicago bond attorneys, who had given a preliminary opinion on legal- youngsters has added quite a problem to the pediatrics de- partment of Bataan Hospital. A private duty nurse volun- teered her services Wednesday night lo care for Robbie and Johnnie, who Jneed '.'a lot of extra nursing hospital spokesman said. was searching for an.addition- al nurse Thursday night. The need for a special" nurse -is more critical at night, since there are fewer floor nurses on duty then. Seth Is Favored For Circuit Court from .VI check by the FBI. The attorney general, then prepares a nomi- and-'outlining the candidates experience and rec- oirnmen'dations.arid sends It; to th'.e White House. The nomina- tion then goes to Ihe Senate Judiciary Committee and from ere to the Senate for confir- ation. The 'entire process of nomi- i arid confirming' a fe judge'r may -take "ty Kistler-CoDister To Open Feb. 17 Kistler-Collisler plans to va- cate its downtown store Feb. 10 and open its center at San Mateo and Lomas Feb. 17. economic crisis if these millions do not have purchasing power. "Only 'through intelligent planning can we devise systems to insure that automation will be a boon and'that we will reap the benefits of increased he concluded. Coughlin also will participate in a Southwestern conference of union members from seven stales. About 100 delegates will attend Ihe sessions, to be held Saturday and the Cole Hotel. al ity of proposed district bonds; and payrolls and office bills which are due or will accrue by March 1. The secretary said he planned to end the district's telephone service Feb. 1, to va- cate its office at 1015 Tijeras NW by Feb. 15 and to have all reports ready for the court by March 1. Short Session Thursday night's meeting of directors lasted about 10 min- utes the shortest on record The vote ended almost 10 years of history of the district formed In 1952 to combat floods from waters flowing down East Heights arroyos. Another governmental agency could still pjck up the sponsorship. But it would have to act fast, since Congressional authorization expires In No- vember, 1963. The Sandia District has al- ready spent about will spend another before dissolving March 1. New Restaurant [s Planned Here Construction mil begin hdxt month on a "Big Boy" res taurant at Truman and Cen Iral E. r t The concrete building en compassing 5000 square-fee will seat 116 persons and of fer parking space for 55 cars It will replace the Bar X Mo tel, 5115 Central E, presently being razed. Daniel T. Hogan and James O'Connor, both of Phoenix vill operate (he restaurant un der "Big Boy" franchise They plan to specialize i n 'Big Boy" hamburgers steaks and pancakes, but als will serve other foods. T h restaurant, slated to oper July 1, will be called VIP' Big Boy. The Big Boy chain operate or has granted franchises fo 297 restaurants in the South Southwest and Middle Wes It is owned by Robert C. W an, Glcndalc, Calif. Hogan and O'Connor wi lease the property from Har ry Driver, who will construe the chipped stone-faced build ing to "Big Boy" 'specifica tions. George A. Rutherfor Co. of Albuquerque will d the conlracling work. The restaurant .will 3oy's" first operation in Mexico. Illegal Trash Containeri To Be Picked Up by City All illegal garbage contain- ers, including 55-gallon barrels, found in alleys will be picked up by. the City Refuse Division: City ordinance specifics con- tainers must not have a capa- city larger than 30 gallons, must have a lid and be of gal- Building costs have bcu estimated at with a additional to he in vested in fixtures and equip ment. The restaurant will b staffed by 50 employes. aling 1 fed- two eeks, two. months or a whole sfjioh of according a- spokesman. deperids'ori the.time'of year nd how busy.Congress is. When. Judge ,'Bratton re- gned, Sen. Chavez staunchly acked his brother, N. M. Su- reme. Court Justice David havez, for the post. Sen. An- erson favored Ross Malone, oswell lawyer and .former resident of the American Bar 'ssn.' Seth, 46, told the Journal in anta Fe, "I would accept the He said both enators talked with him bout the appointment "in. eneral way." Seth and his father, J. O. veteran lawyer, are.asso- iated with .the law firm bi Seth, Montgomery, Fcderip .nd Andrews, Santa Fe. Born in Albuquerque, Seth moved to Santa Fe with his larenls when he was 2 years ild. He was graduated from Santa Fe High School in 1933 a BA degree from Stan ord University in 1937, and was graduated from Yale Uni Law School in 1940. Seth, who calls himself small-town lawyer, passed the New Mexico Bar examination n 1940 and then enlisted in Ihe Army 33 a private le was discharged in ID45 as major after seeing service will he .First Army in England France and Germany, mostly in the Infantry and Inspector Gen eral's Dept. A registered Democrat, Set nas never.held public .or part office. His. wife is Ihe Jane MacGilliyray. The coupl has two daughters. Sandy, 13 and Laurie, 8. ..The 50-year-old department store .firm .will occupy Ihe of the square-foot, .two-level building, The firm .will occupy square duplicating the space it has In the Third and Central building. There will be a two-level parking facility for the ground, floor adjacent to the building and on the lower level. :The new building is of pre- stressed concrete with 6D-fool clear spans. The exterior has a cast stone facade. J. D. Collister, president, sold some former employes will be recalled to handle; the opening rush. The permanent staff will number about 100. John Hallahan of Carlsbad said Lhe.board agreed on the selec- tion of Scudder and there was no dissent. Hallahan said Scud der and other applicants were not asked for thelr'pblltical af- filiations. To Offer Assist Davidson will remain -to as- sist Scuddcr in'seUling into his new duties until he enters the University of New Mexico Feb 12 lo complete work on an M.A. degree in business. Davidson lacks only.. nine semester hours to get the de- gree. The personnel board- also gave its approval to a code o: ethics'for'employes'coVered by the new personnel merit sys tern. The board and system were created by 1301 legis latiire 'and since the effective date of the law theiboard has aeen completing new regula tlons and procedures. The code said employes un der the merit system "as serv ants of the people, must in al instances maintain their con duct at highest standards. Em ployes of the classified serylc ore expected to conduct them selves in a manner which wil reflect favorably upon Ihe serv ice and the state of New Mex Ico.- Must no Reliable "Although the state is no particularly interested in th Drlvate lives of its employes, i Joes expect them to be relia die, .trustworthy and of goo the code said. "The are expected to be .loyal to th state and to tha department i which they are employed." Ohcr portions of the cod dealt'-wilh outside interests employes under the system "an gratuities. "Normally employes may en gage in outside employment acquire private interests justness, provided such in tcrests do not interfere with c WateriTo Be Off Today The water engineer's office reports water will be turncc off from 10 to 11 a.m. today on El Enchanlo Place NK between Alvarado and San Ma'tco. Also will be Alvarado NE between Constitution and Mountain Road. flcient performance of. the duties or conflict or give ris :o suspicion of conflict with th Interests of the state of Ne Mexico or the department; which they are employed. "Employes of ".the classlfi service will not except ony'f vor-or gratuity irom any pi son, firm, corporation or oth entity which is engaged in Is attempting to engage in bus ness transactions with the sla which might .affect or a pear "to affect the employ judgment In the pcrformah of his duties in an impart! the code said. acing ro M'ECICO CITY.: UFIX A rmer'' Argentine y diplomat 10-was.once er" Fidel Castro1 he quit his st to help him "snys the ibari peoplo .facei; 1962 ingry and hop'elesV.V? V The' ostimato'.campVf r o m uben first crelary of the" -Argentine mbnssy in Havana.! Rcyno- 'deeply disillusioned 'with e results of dastio's revolu- fled Cubs! .a weeks go in'despair.-' Cuba's laboring c 1 a s s, :u'ch hnd hoped to', benefit om the revolution, finds 11- H virtually enslaved, Ren- oso snid. lopmy Here is the picture he paint- d: "The right to strike is for- dden on penalty of death, worker who quits his job charged with sabotage of iduslry and faces a 5-to-10 ear jail sentence. 'The eight-hour .work day a myth. There is no over- me. Farmhands are slaves. Vhcn they work fields, the militia is nearby to oversee hem. "Despite this rigid enforce- ment to mnkc people Work, icre arc not enough jobs to o around. I would estimate nemplpyment at 45 percent." Dr. Ard Resigns As Health Chief Dr. Faissal Ard, district nealth officer here, has sub- mitted his resignation to State Health Director Dr. Stanley .eland, effective Feb. 5. Dr. Ard said he will al- end to some personal business t his former home In Damas- cus, Syria, for at least two months before he decides on one of several job offers he IBS received. Jobs with the World Health Organization In Lima, Peru, nd as division director in the African regional office have Deen' turned down, he said. Ard said he Is giving serious ihbught loo "top position in D. C." Ard came to the Dist. 3 health office here March 9, 1961. He previously was health of- ficer of Dist. 9 at Raton in 1958. In September, 1959, he resigned to accept apposition at in Bei- where [he. taught health. Studies Budget Tonight Berna lillo Board of Education wil consider a proposed budge for the school system'for th 1962-63 year at a special mte ing tonight. The meeting wi be at p.m. at the supe intendent's office. PATTERNS OF ENCHANTMENT BY MELMAG 45 PIECE SET FOR 8 Dtnnerware REGENCY vanlzed metal. Persons having 55-gallon containers must keep them In- elde their yards and must not use them for garbage. Podiatry Seminar Starts Here Today Raymond K. Locke of Englcwood, N. J., and chief of podiatry surgery at Oradell, N. J. nive.-dell Hospital, will conduct a three-day Sun Coun- try Podiatry Seminar at the University of New Mexico, to- day through Sunday. .The post graduate study couran, sponsored by the Ber- nallllo Counly Podiatry Soci- ety, is expected to attract more than 30 foot Epeclallsts New Mexico and four adjoining Dinnerware WEEKEND SPECIAL Drive a New 1961 Car this weekend Your low Hertz rafo includes insurance. Yours all weekend :ridoy Noon fill Monday AM FIRST 50 MILES FREE DRIVE A '61 CAR 201 Firjf St. NW Phona CH 7-1561 HERTZ Rent a cor _ STAFF OF LIFE Graceful wheat pallern in natural colors with accessory pieces In desert tan. RHAPSODY.- Timeless elegance. Sprightly In lurquoisa green with gold. Accessory piecet In turquoise groen. REGENCY High ilyls contemporary Captivating In desert tan with gold. Accessorial In desert tan, Downtovn HilonJ, 4800 SE Snow H.ljM., Open a Hubbard's Budget Account for Your Shopping Convenience NOTHING DOWN- UP TO 12 MONTHS to PAY Open Monday and Friday Til 9 P.M.   

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