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Albuquerque Journal Newspaper Archive: July 25, 1947 - Page 1

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Publication: Albuquerque Journal

Location: Albuquerque, New Mexico

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   Albuquerque Journal (Newspaper) - July 25, 1947, Albuquerque, New Mexico                             TODAY'S SIMILE LOUIKVILI.r. KT.. Julr -I KtAll0n WKYW, HWe diner time on the Air to eommerelAl tttrt hut nnw rone further. WKYW Aff it 1 p. nit with A reminder to thAt Ihr tl nt Alienee ATP hy A firm whlen mAke.H rnndgclve In renlfiil Good Morning EW LEADING NEWSPAPER An .lle.ten Three Tln-ei A PAT IXvoreei And some Their lliiihAndi Ntrer Nollee They Are Around. 67th Year Volume' 373 Kntcrcd second clnsa manor Albuquerque, Number I.1) N Ml- under net or Congriw 187U Friday Morning, July 25, 1947 Published Every Morning Price 5 Cento Democrat Central Meeting Breaks Up in Near-Riot War Vet Admits Slaying His Wife On Colorado Hike COLORADO SPRINGS, .Colo.', July 24 trict Attorney Irl Foard said .today.David A. .Downey, 29-year-old San Francisco accountant, had admitted kill- ing" his wife, Lolly, whose body was found last Friday on a slope above the Rampart Ranjfc highway northwest of. here. 28 Miners Die In Illinois Blast; 200 Make Escape John L Lewis' Brother, Superintendent, Turns Up Safe WEST FRANKFORT, 111. 24 (AP) Frank'jn County Coroner D. J. Clay- ton tonight said 28 miners perished in the explosion slope. Fourd said the handsome form' er Army flyer confessed orally to strangling his, attractive, 24. year-old war bride but as a mo. live. said only that "I was mad at her." After Downey's Czechoslovu- kia-born wife was found under a 50-foot ledge, Downey told'of- ficers they both had fallen while climbing the mountain. He was arrested after Coroner Henry W. Maly reported that strangulation, and not the fall, probably was the cause of death. the original questioning, Downey declared he could not remember what happened after he imd his wife left their auto, mobile to climb the mountain until he was picked up on the that rocked the Old Bon Coal Company's No. 8 mine this after- noon. Clayton said 15 bodies of the trapped victims, had been re- moved to a temporary morgue setup in the Central. Junior High School and "that 12 other bodies still were in the gas-filled pit. Howard Lewis, brother of UMW Chicflain John L. Lewis, is underground superintendent of the mine and for a time was to be among those trap- oed but he later turned up safe. This was confirmed by his wife. Injured Sinking One miner had been removed dead from the shaft shortly af- ter the explosion. Fjvc. others in .the..UMW .hos- pital, in critical condition. William Lament, hospital man- ager, said Thomas Palmer, 40.- previously reported dead, was alive but "in an awful condi- Four others in the hospital vcrc Lament EUCAPC by Shaft Most'of those who escaped did Continued on I'ACe. Nine. Fight Over Diner Flares Up Again; Showdown Set The intra-clty squabble over a revoked permit for a Pullman diner at First and Silver flared anew Thursday, with a showdown slated at a special city sion session next. Monday morn ing. Two months ago Building Sup ervisor G. J. Erdmim issued a permit .to Armando Ginnnini, au thorizing him to convert an old Pullman imp a cafe. He had start- ed remodeling when City Man- ager Charles E. Wells' ordercc the permit revoked on the grounds the diner didn't meet inner fire zone requirements. Giannini subsequently appcalcc to the city commission, which held a hearing but deferred de- cision until Wells returned from a vacation. Monday Erdman and City At- torney Donald B. Moses ques- tioned the legality of the com- mission's hearing, pointing out city building code pro- vidcd for a hearing before three-man board. Queried about this point. Wells flatly declared Monday aftcrnpor He acknowledged he had taken out two J10.000 insurance policies on' his wife, each, carrying a double-Indemnity clause in event of accidental death. The Downcys were returning to San Francisco after tt visit with his mother, Mrs. Dcnnie Downey, in Bloomficld, la. They had- left San Francisco in May. Prior .to the trip, Downey was manager of the Alexander Ham- ilton Hotel in Sah Francisco. He was discharged from the air forces in July, 1946, after serv- ice (is a bombing plane navigator in the European theater. Tolicc Chief I. B. Bruce said Downey broke down this after- noon week of grilling and told officers "the urge to kill_cnmc over me" as he walked with his wife in the mountains. "We were the chief quoted him as saying. "I had'a rock the size of two teacups in my hand and I struck her on the back of the head. "She fell diwn and I rushed to her and choked her, ihcn hid her body in ihc crevice where she was .found." Downey then wonl lo a poln near ihc highway and lay down feigning injury, al the spot where he was found by motorists. Police said Downey had served a two-year term in the Iowa state reformatory _on a charge 01 passing at Daven- port, la. Death of Buying Controls Voted By Conferees Congress Approval Forecast After Mixup In Truman Interview WASHINGTON.- .July 24 by a mixup at a White House news con- ference, a Senate-Ho use conference committee voted tonight to kill all controls on in- stallment buying on Nov. 1, 1047. A' remark by President Tru- mun gave Congress the impres- sion he might use his emerg- ency powers to keep the curbs In effect. Later it .was explained that he had no such intention; that It was all due to a misunder- standing. To Pass by Saturday Senator Flanders (R., one of the conferees who ironed out differences in legislation passed by the two chambers, told reporters Congress probably would ratify the agreement and send the bill to the White House- before the1' scheduled Saturday adjournment. The-House originally had pass- ed H bill to end the controls Inv. mediately. The Senate had pro- posed to permit some curbs to re- main indefinitely but to end others Dec. 31. The existing controls, which could be continued unchanged until Nov. 1. under the compro- mise agreement, require third down payments, with in- stallments running no longer than 15 months, .on automobiles, stoves mechanical dishwashers, ironers, refrigerators, washing machines, radios and some other goods. A 20 per cent down payment, with installments limited to 15 AIIKESTED IN Paul G. Shelby capitol stands with a man at the capitol Wednesday after he was arrested in the Senate wing, Edward F. McGinnis, Somite sergcafct-at-arms, said the man identified himself as Clifton R, Spires 39. ot Augusta, Gn. Shelby and another officer said they searched him and found a .25 caliber automatic. The arrest was made about five minutes after President Truman spoke in the .Senate. Cnnlfnuetf on that "that diner is not going in, Continued on TArn H ot Days Back; Rains Elsewhere The mercury climbed back to P5 degrees in. Albuquerque Thursday afternoon, and the weather forecaster said it may hover in that vicinity for the next few days. While some parts of the state received generous amounts ol rainfall, a beaming sun pushed temperatures to 100 degrees at Rodeo, the highest reported in the state, arid 98 at Carrizozo and Engle. Tucumcari, Portales and Clovis xharcd rains of a half inch or more Wednesday night and Thursday morning, the Asso dated1 Press reported. Tucumcari reported 1.1 inch precipitation. Portales 1.01 and Clovis, .50. The Weather Bureau recorded .16 inch rain in the period at Raton traces at Santa Fe, Englc, Carrizozo and Clayton. The .forecaster ss.ld he could see no immediate return of thun- der showers which have visited the AJbuauerque srca tht past week. Rocket launching Is Postponed WIHTE SANDS, N. M-, July 24 difficulties forced postponement of a .German V-2 rocket Jaunching at the White Sands Proving Ground late today, and the Army said another at- tempt would be made early to- morrow. 'Lieut, Col. Harold R. Turner, proving ground commandant, said the firing was timed to obtain sloping rays the sun for spcctrographic' research. -Tomor- row's shoot is scheduled for a. m. The postponement disappointed a party of 150 Civil Air Patrol pi- lots here to witness the firing. They flew on to their next stop at Deming, N. M., on a tour of New Mexico, Texas and Colorado, Col. Turner announced that the launching tomorrow will be the last in a series of guided-missiles experiments here until late in September. Commenting on earlier reports that the Army is about ready to confine its experiments to Ameri- can-built rockets, he said tests with' reconstructed German V-2s will continue "at .least a "The program is too valuable for-upper-air research to 10 said. lie also reported that Gen. Philip P. Blackmore, who is bc- ng transferred from the Presidio of San J'rancisco to command the White Sands Proving Ground, will arrive here Aug. 4..'' Plane Identified As Marine Craft Lost WtthV Men SEATTLE, -July 24 The Navy announced tonight positive identification of wreck- age on Mount Rainier as that o: a Marina 'transport plane, con- taining 32 bodies, which has been missing since Doc. 10. The plane, disappeared on a flight from San Diego to Seattle with 32 Marines aboard. Searchers found part of a Ma- rine uniform and bits of a Marine service record at the level on" Tahoma glacier. The Navy said wreckage was scattered down a 3000-foot sheer cliff, and expressed doubt that many of the bodies would be re covered, The wreckage was found at (PST) by William' Butler, assistant chief National- Park ranger, and his companion, Dis- trict Ranger Gordon Patterson. Butler wirelessed the base camp at Longmirc, and the news' was telephoned from thence to Scuttle. Butler said the plane secming- Jy had flown straight into the cliff, exploded and disintegrated. It disappeared in a storm, Quakes Rattle Los Angeles Area LOS ANGELES, July ,24 Three earthquakes shook southern California mildly today, and seis- mologists said they apparently centered about 100 miles from here, possibly in the .mountainous regions of Riverside orSan Diego county. There were no 'reports of dam- age in the temblors, latest of which came about p. m. The heaviest, at p. m., was pre- ceded by one at a. m., said Dr. Charles Richter, seismologist at California Institute of, .Tech- nology, Pasadena, Mountain nrcas where Dr. Rich- tcr said.the quake might have centered arc'sparsely populated, ind built up chiefly with frame vacation cabins. Urges Removal of All Excess Russians in U. S. WASHINGTON, July 24 down by the Soviet gov- ernment trip to Russia, a House labor .subcommittee' today urged "immediate removal of all excess Russian nationals" from the United States. N Representative Kersten (R., subcommittee chairman, proposed this step to Secretary Baby Sitter Now National Issue Over Deducting Cost From Taxes Bartlett, Edwards On Trial Again SANTA FE, July 24 Prosecution rested their case late today in, the Gov- ernment's; second of five indict- ments charging illegal withdiaw- al of more than a million pounds of sugar for soft drinks manu- facture. The indictment now being tried charges A. M. Bartlett, H'obbs Dr. Pepper Bottling Co. official, and Mrs. Trudy S. Ed- wards former Leu County State Bank ration teller, with conspiracy to commit offenses against the United States and to defraud, respecting the rationing of sugar. Edwards Denies Shortly after the Government rested, Mrs, Edwards .took the stand in her own defense, de- nying all the prosecution. The defense also examined two other witnesses, Mrs, Ruth Burke nnd Miss Continue) mi FIIKI. Thlrlfru Two Los Alamos Ex-GFs Indicted In Secrets Theft FE, July 24 grand jury indictment paved the way today 'or removal .of two former Gl's to New Mexico for trial on charges involving theft of atomic secrets.' The grand jury in a less than four-hour special session return- ed the indictments, each contain- ing two counts, against Alexander Von >der Luft, 23, Lebanon. Pa., student at Princeton; and Earn- est D, Wallis, 34, Chicago photo- grapher. Arrest Caused Sensation Their arrest July 12 caused a sensation across the country and followed disclosure in Congress by a member' of its atomic en- ergy committee that some ma- terial had been taken from files of the Los Alamos, N, M., atomic Continued on Pare Seven WASHINGTON, July 24 Representative Keating. (R.. 'N.Y.) idmitted today that he has be- come the No. 1 authority on a pressing national lilting. In case there are >achclors in the audience, let hem peer at Keatlng's mail. It clearly shows that the voters of his country arc concerned about baby sitting, and rightly so. Kcnting, father of one, never wanted to became (tuch author- ity. He had introduced a bill into Congress that would make five changes in the income tax laws. One change would allow deduc- tions for "all necessary expenses paid, by a working wife for nurs- ery care cost or lor wages to a housekeeper." A reporter translated this to "baby sitter." And before you could' say, "Shut up, Keating had. enough correspond- ContinHM M Put Costa Rica Riots Toll Raised to Eight Dead SAN JOSE, Costa Rica, July 24 dcafli toll in four days of-political'disorders and sitdpwn strikes in four Costa Rican cities grew to eight today with the ieath of throe persons previously .istcd among 59 injured. Troops in armored curs con- tinued to patrol San Jose, armed forces policed Cartago, near here, and the sitdown strike which pre- cipitated the -series of clashes be- ginning Saturday between police and members of the opposition Democratic partv was still in1 force. ENTHKONED QUEBEC, July 24 Rev, Maurice Roy, ft soldier-priest, was; enthroned-as the-llth Arch- bishop of Sec of Quebec to- day in colorful ceremonies which officially brought to an end mourning for his predecessor, Ro- drigue Cardinal Villcn'cuve, who died in January. of State Marshall. In addition, he asked in a let- ter that the secretary "adopt a strictly reciprocal policy towards Soviet nationals and authorize the residence in this country of only that number ot Russian na- tionals as is permitted to citi- zens of the United States ifi the Soviet -union. Kersten was named to a sub- committee with two others to visit Russia in September to study education and labor condi- tions there. The State Department ap- proved, Kersten said, and pro- vided passports, He added that he. saw Soviet Ambassador Nik. olai ,V. Novikov July 2 to apply for visas. Trip Turned Down On July IS, he got a letter from Yuri M. Bruslov, chief of the consular division of the em- bassy turning down1 the' trip. The embassy letter said that because of "lack of hotel accom- modations and some other short- ages, both in Moscow and in the big educational and industrial centers of the Soviet union caused by the war, trips of foreign tour- ists arc not yet possible for the time being." Kersten got off a stiff letter of 'reply to Ambassador Novikov today and also fired one to Mar- shall. The one to Marshall concluded: "When a congressional sub- committee is refused visas by the Russian embassy because of''lack of'hotel I sub- mit it is-ontircl.v in order for you to request the immediate removal of all excess Russian nationals, registered and unregistered, re- siding in our country because of the acute housing shortage in the United Only 168 Americans Kersten snid he Is informed only Americans, including all the embassy staff, are 'residing in Russia today with passports and that the number has remained al- most constant for years. Russians registered with the State Dcp.artmcnt in the United States have varied -from 2500 in 1945 to 810 this year. Kcstcn said. And he said he suspect- ed a "considerably larger number of Russian agents" is in the coun- try. Activities of Soviet citizens, as described by recent testimonies Continued on PAge Thirteen Russia Adamantly Against Policing Balkan States Balks U. S. Proposal For Semi-Permanent U.N. Commission LAKE SUCCESS. July 24 for com- promise .solution of thu Bal- kan problem faded today when Russia turned down French proposals intended to "soften" the American plan for a powerful semi-pcrmnnciU com- mission in the Balkans, Soviet Delegate Andrei A. Cromylco, breaking his silence after hours of debute by other delegates on various before the Security Council, de- clared that Russia's opposition to the U.S. resolution would re- main unchanged regardless of what happened to the French proposals. Would bar Bit Powers The Soviet attitude was disclos- ed after the delegates had.left un- resolved a new difficulty raised by a French proposal thnt the Bin Five powers be excluded from the proposed Balkan commission' The proposal, was strongly op posed by the United Stales. Cliina and Britain, which insisted thai each of the 11 members of the Security Council should toe rep- resented on the commission dc signed to set up a .semi-permanent watch over the disturbed area. "We believe a commission TCP resenting all the members of the Council would more fully repre- sent the moral as well as the legal weight of the council toward the maintenance of international said Herschcl V. Johnson, deputy U, S. representative, Banditx.Not Identified Council rccoiv. cd an interim report from the Continued on Victor, Oestreich Firms Sell Most State Insurance SANTA FE. July 24 Victor Agency of Albuquerque, founded by State Revenue Com- nissioner Victor Salazar, received the largest 'share of the state's insurance business dur- ng the fiscal year which ended asl June 30, records in the office of State Purchasing Agent H, N. McDaniel showed today. The Victor Agency, which is operated by Louis LaGnwe of Albuquerque and with which Sal. izar has said he no longer has my connection, sold the state in- surance policies totaling 06, all but of which was sold since the first of this year when Snlazar took office as rcve- me commissioner. Ocstrelcli Firm Next Close behind the Victor Agency was Oestroich-Haggard, also of Albuquerque, which collected on automobile fleet po- Icics for the Highway Depart- nent. Third wiw the Mountain Stales Mutual Casualty Co., another Al- juqucrquc firm, operated by Sec- of Agriculture Clinton P, Anderson, which received for workmen's compcnsa- ion insurance for the Highway Department, In all, according to McDanicl's Continued on PAKC Six Adjourns Without Election of a New Chairman for Party The county Democratic Central Committee meet- ing Thursday nijfht broke up in a.near-riot and finally adjourned, leaving Manuel Sanchez as 'county party chairman. The fireworks ensued when' supporters of Leo Baca for the not members of the central com- post sergeants-al- arms and into the meeting room. After s few disordered moments Sanchez recessed the meeting, reconvened it after half an hour to receive the motion for ad- The Weather AI.IIUQUKKQL'K VICIS1TV: Pair nd coiulnurd hot nnd Sulurdny. scnUrrcd clourta In lllf Afternoon, 07. Low Prldnv nljlil In he vMle.v, ?o. In the Helghta, NKW .MK.XICO: Pnrtly cloudy Friday 'Ith A widely ncnttrrrd' htternoon or nrly cvcnhiB Miondcnhowcri In thr nor- hcrn mountains, tlMr with lit- le chnngF In temperature. Hlfth afi-DS orth, 00-100 AOUlh. SJIlri'EltS' FORKCASTt North And ond west 100. Baby's Condition Is Serious After Lung Operation EL PASO, July 24 peb. blc was removed today from the lung of 15-months-old Frankic Solano of Albuquerque, bul the baby's condition remained scr- Tous, At his hospital bedside here was his grandmother, Mrs, Josc- fina Luccro of Albuquerque, a Red Cross nurses aid. She brought little Frnnkic to El Paso by plane last night and spent the night In prayer an she at- tended him. Dr. Frank Schuster, who per- formed the bronchoscopy, found Frankie too weak last night upon his arrival for operation. After removal of the pebble, he said, Frankic wilhslood the operation fairly well, but his condition still was serious. Hospital reports this evening listed him unchanged. The pebble was inhaled while Frankie was visiting his maternal grandmother in .Santa Fe. The baby was rushed to the home of his Mr. and Mrs. .Joe Solano, in Albuquerque, but-suit- able equipment was not available there and he was flown, here last night. House OK's Bis Totaling 9 Billion WASHINGTON, July 24 to adjourn Saturday, the House today approved in appropriations for the fiscal year that started July 1, It passed four separate money bills. One was a brand new measure written by the appro- priations committee only this Horning, The others were com- promises with the Senate on the stalemated agriculture, inde- pendent offices and government corporations bills. All were sent to the Sen- ate, which lost no time passing the Independent offices measure and sending it to the White House, along with a non-controversial government corpor- ations supplemental bill passed by the House last week. The day's action left several big- supply bills still kicking around the capitol. Among them lire the ar Department civil func- tions bill, to which the Senate appropriations committee has added several hundred million above the House-voted 000. Another is the House-passed supplemental bill Continued on FAIR lOP Wins Round WASHINGTON, July 2S The Senate refused today to post- jonc until January action on 3 jroposcd Senate investigation of Attorney General Clark's hand- ing 'of Kansas City vote fraud charges. The 45 to 30 vote brought a first-round victory to Republi- cans in their seven-day fight to ;nln action on the proposal, made >y Senator Kern (R., Planes Fly In but Never Fly Out on Huge Tract Where the Navy's Proximity Fuze Was Developed The New, Mexico Experimental tract on which the U, S. Navy's proximity fuze was .developed during the inspected Thursday by a group of U. S. Naval reservists and a Journal reporter. It was the first a'uch inspection of the hJRhly-guiirdcd' range since I was started up in 1942, Work of the V.T. (variable time) as America's >Jo. 2 secret still pro- gressing' under the Division ot Research and Development, New Mexico School of Mines, headed jy. Dr. E. J. Workman, As a result ot the-experimental ,vork the range has become known as the place scores of planes fly in, but never fly out. They're shot to pieces in testing of projectiles equipped with V.T. fuzes. The range sprawls over the al- luvial plain at the foot of the Manzano Mountains, about 15 miles southeast of Albuquerque. Here Runs ranging from 20 mm. to six-inchcrs blast away at real and mock-up aircraft as technici- ans observe, photograph and re- cord data on the V.T. fuze, .The shooting is chiefly at ground level with the Manzanos as a backstop. In..one section a pair of 250- foot Wooden towers is used to suspend mock-up or light war planes while guns 3200 yards away away to determine the effects of various-sized proj- ectiles on aircraft. The dntn ob- tained from these tests produces not only more destructive wenp- ons but aids in the building of safer planes. The towers are made of wood so that they can't interfere with the radio 'waves ot the V.T. fuze. The V.T. credited with turning the Battle of the Bulge and shortening the war in -the Pacific by n consists of a miniature radio sending and re- ceiving set. By means of radio waves it locates the target and selects the split-second to deton- ate for greatest effect, The project employs 200 per- sons and entails an annual ex- Continued journment. The adjournment was the.only thing on which the Democrats could agree during the entire-pro- ceeding. Not a single dissenting voice was heard against the mo- tion. The committee, under terms ot motion, is' sub- ject to a new meeting at the call of Sanchez, upon five da'yi writ- ton notice to committee members. About Delay This delay might cause an en- tire change in the situation with- in the party, since Clyde Tlnglcy, leader of one of the.party's groupi in this county, is scheduled to re- turn, from an out-of-town .trip within the next few days. Gossip among .some Democrats after meeting was to the effect Tingley might tip the scales In favor of. one of the two candidates for Deacon Arledee. and cause Sanchez to reconsider his scheduled re- signation, or might put forth in- other candidate. Thursday night's meeting wai licctic even before it was cauUed to order. Among the first to trickle into the meeting room in El Fidel Hotel, from the throng gathered n the hotel lobby-'and bar. were several Democrats who were not members of the Central Commit- :ce. Sanchez ordered them to leave, declaring the meeting WM to be an "executive xoiwion" oi. the 85 committee 'members only. He then stationed two scrgeints- at-arms at the door, homself assisted them, in identifying com- mittee members- Baca Protests Baca protested this.action, and renewed his protests when San- chez called the meeting to order. Baca, as a member of the com- mittee, had been duly admitted to the meeting room. Sanchez, after overruling proceeded to call the roll ot committccmcn. A dispute when he called the name of E. R, (Zcke) Baca. of Pet. 11, PnjariW. Dnvld Chavez of the same pre- cinct rose to claim he hnd been duly elected committecmnn from that precinct, and thnt had been "appointed" by Sanchez. E. R, Bncn denied this, saying had been elected nnd th.it David Chavez was the choice only of t small group which had left precinct election. I-eo Baca up- held Chavez' claim, but Sanchez ruled in favor of E. R. Baca. Burst' Through That; 18 morn still to the Inst cnlkd In the roll call. The ,at-arms had opened the doors to let In a late commlttecman, Continued on Dry Days Relic Unearthed Here A relic of prohibition dayt, two-barrel was recently unearthed alas, not drop was saved.. The discovery was made on Lceacrcs, a highly restricted su- burban development on the 6200 block of North Fourth, according to Mrs, E, Lee Stroud. owner of the land- She said n street improvement crew moving dirt with n carryall, uncovered the metal hoops of what was a barrel, some copper coils full of "plenty potent" li- quor and two five-gallon bottles of wine. Wheels of the machine smashed the bottles, she said. The find also brought out a story Mrs. Stroud says is reliable. A former owner of the 85-acre tract that was once a dairy farm, she was told, buried the stuff, then forgot where nnd spent years digging up the place in search of "Wo really got more than bargained 'laughed Mrs. Stroud. She said her firm, the Stroud Realty Co., bought the tract about a year ago nnd is now improving it. EXEMPTION VOTED WASHINGTON. July 24 The Senate todnv voted an addi- tional year of life for special In- come tax exemptions allowed members of the irmcd services in wartime. v   

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