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Albuquerque Journal: Friday, July 25, 1947 - Page 1

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   Albuquerque Journal (Newspaper) - July 25, 1947, Albuquerque, New Mexico                                 TODAY'S SMILE  LOHRVILLE, K* . Jill* SI (AT)— Station MK1H, liar other kruddiirn, •rllt tim* «n Ihe air ta rom mr ma I upon-•or* aal non Pa* con* furthrr WHIM’  W * B * *tf •* " I* * »ilh a rrmmri-r (a t»»imrr« thai the nrat ll hour* mf aliener arr apanaarrd hr a firm ohirh mahra maltrr»»r» ronrfumr ta restful %lrrp.  RNAL  Good Morning  M amati Itralrn Thrrr fur** A Ha* Gad Duarte. In4 Ham* Htatt Campialn their Hatband* Mr*et Xalice The* Arr A roan 4.  67th Year  \ olume Ii 3 Entered aa aecond cia** mallei Albuquerque.  Number 25  N w  P° st  eftlSS under act of Congree ig7»i  Friday Morning, July 25, 1947  Published Every Morning  Price 5 Cents  Democrat Central Meeting Breaks Up in Near-Riot  War Vet Admits Slaying His Wife On Colorado Hike  COLORADO SPRINGS. Colo., July 24 (AP)—District Attorney lr! Foard said today David A. Downey, 29-year-old San Francisco accountant, had admitted killing his wife, Lolly, whose body was found last Friday on a slope above the Rampart Range highway northwest  .of here.  28 Miners Die In Illinois Blast;  200 Make Escape  John L Lewis* Brother,  Superintendent, Turns Up Safe  WEST FRANKFORT. 111.  JuIv 24 (AP) — Franklin!f emember  what happened after County Coroner D J. Clay-lJ^ lf ton tonight said 28 miners)until he was picked up on the perished in the explosion;slope.  that rocked the Old Ben Coal! Be ^knowledged he had taken Company's No. R mine this after-1 01,1  1*’° SIO.OOO insurance policies noon.    wife,    each    carrying    a  Clayton said IS bodies of the I  d ? uli, e-indemnity clause in event trapped victims had been re-1 ° 1T a N  CC  S® death, r o\ eel to a  ? emporarv morgue . ~ c  Downeys ut re returning  Foard said the handsome former Army flyer confessed orally to strangling his attractive, 24-year-old war bride but as a motive said only that “I was mad at her.”  After Downey’s Czechoslova-kia-born wife was found under a 50-foot ledge, Downey told officers they both had fallen while climbing the mountain. He was arrested after Coroner Henry W. Maly reported that strangulation, and not the fall, probably was the cause of death,  In the original questioning, Downey declared he could not  setup in the Central Junior High  to San Francisco after a visit  School and that 12 other bodies! £!!£*** i"m!’ er ' f  *}?■,  Dc "" ie   atill were in the eas-iilled pit. i *    - oomfield, la. They  Howard Lewis, brother of  IMW Chieftain John L Lewis, is underground superintendent of the mine and for a time was feared to be among those trapped but he later turned up safe.  This was confirmed bv his wife.  Injured Sinking One miner had been removed  had left San Francisco in May. Prior to the trip, Downey w'as manager of the Alexander Hamilton Hotel in San Francisco.  He was discharged from the air foil es in July, 1946, after serv- ;i  e as a bombing plane navigator in the European theater.  Police Chief I. B. Bruce said Downey  and told  grilliiu  dead from the shaft shortly af. I noon after^*^ 0 do ^ n l ^ ls aR *r  ter the explosion.  F i e others in the UM VV pita 1 , in critical condition-  a week of . I, .,,    officers “the urge to  hos- kill came over me” as he walked _,. IM     .    ...    with    his    wife in the mountains.  ilUam Lamont, hospital man- “We w r ere arguing,’’ the chiel seer. said Thomas Palmer. 40, quoted him as saying ‘I had a previously reported dead, was rock the size of  size of two teacups in my .land and I struck her on the back of the head.  She fell down and I rushed to her and choked her, then hid her body in the crevice where she was found.”  Downey then went to a point near the highway and lav dowm feigning injury, at the spot where I ne  wa* found by motorists.  Police said Downey had served a two-year term in the Iowa date reformatory on a charge of passing bogus checks at Davenport, la  Rocket bunching Is Postponed  WIHTE SANDS. N. M , July 24 —Technical difficulties forced postponement of a German V-2 rocket launching at the White Pullman into a cafe. He had start-I Sands Proving Ground late today, ed remodeling w hen City Man-1 and the Army said another at-ager Charles E. Wells ordered tempt would be made early to-the permit revoked on the grounds morrow .  the diner didn t meet inner fire Lieut. Col. Harold R. Turner. zone requirements.    proving    ground commandant, said  Gianmns subsequently appealed the firing was timed to obtain  to the city commission, which {sloping held a hearing but deferred de- 1   aine but in an awful condition ”  Four others in the hospital "err “sinking.’ Lamont *id. Excape by Shaft  Most of those who escaped did  < »ntinned on rage Slur  Fight Over Diner Flares Up Again; Showdown Set  The intra-city squabble over a revoked permit for a Pullman diner at First and Silver flared anew Thursday, with a showdown slated at a special city commission session next Monday morning.  Two months ago Building Supervisor G. J. Erdman issued a permit to Armando Gianmni, authorizing him to convert an old  cision until Wells returned from a vacation.  Monday Erdman and City Attorney Donald B. Moses questioned the legality of the commission’s hearing, pointing out that the city building code pro-vided for a hearing before a three-man board.  Queried about this point. Wells flatly declared Monday afternoon  rays from the sun for I spectrographic research. Tomorrow’s shoot is scheduled for 5:30 a. rn. (MST).  The postponement disappointed a party of 150 Civil Air Patrol pilots here to witness the firing. They flew on to their next stop at Deming, N. M., on a tour of New’ Mexico, Texas and Colorado.  Col. Turner announced that the launching tomorrow will be the  Continued mm Page Sine  Hot Days Back; Rains Elsewhere  that “that diner is not going in,” ! a st in a series of guided missiles  experiments here until late in September.  Commenting on earlier reports that the Army is about ready to confine its experiments to American-built rockets, he said tests with reconstructed German V-2s will continue “at least a year.” The program is too valuable for upper air research to stop,” he said.  Ho also reported that Brig Gen. Philip p. Blackmore. who is being transferred from the Presidio of San Francisco to command the White Sands Proving Ground, w ill arrive here Aug. 4.  The mercury climbed back to 95 degrees in Albuquerque Thursday afternoon, and the weather forecaster said it may hover in that vicinity for the next few days.  While some parts of the state received generous amounts of rainfall, a beaming sun pushed temperatures to IOO degrees at Rodeo, the highest reported in the state, and 98 at Carrizozo and Engle.  Tucumcari. Portales and Clovis •hared rains of a half inch or more Wednesday night and  Thursday morning the Associated Press reported.  Tucumcari reported I I inch precipitation. Portales 1.01 and Clovis, .50. The Weather Bureau recorded .16 inch rain in the period at Raton a id traces at Santa Fe. Engle. Carrizozo and Clayton.  The forecaster said he could sop no immediate return of thunder show-ers which have visited the Albuquerque area th# past week.  Death of Buying Controls Voted By Conferees  Congress Approval Forecast After Mixup In Truman Interview  WASHINGTON, July 24 (AP)—Aroused by a mixup at a White Hou.se news conference, a Senate- House conference committee voted tonight to kill all controls on installment buying on Nov. I, 1947.  A remark by President Truman gave Congress the impression he might use his emergency powers to keep the curbs in effect. Later it was explained that he had no such intention; that it was all due to a misunderstanding.  To Pass by Saturday  Senator Flanders <R.,    Vt.),  one of the conferees who ironed out differences in legislation passed by the two chambers, told reporters Congress probably w'ould ratify the agreement and send the bill to the White House before the scheduled Saturday adjournment.  The House originally had passed a bill to end the controls immediately. The Senate had proposed to permit some curbs to remain indefinitely but to end others Dec. 31.  The existing controls, which could be continued unchanged until Nov. I under the compro- I mise agreement, require one-' third down payments, with installments running no longer than 15 months, on automobiles, stoves mechanical dishwashers, ironers, refrigerators, washing machines, radios and some other goods.  A 20 per cent down payment, with installments limited to 15  Continued on Page Six  Plane Identified As Marine Craft Lost With 32 Men  SEATTLE, July 24 (INS) — The Navy announced tonight positive identification of wreckage on Mount Rainier as that of a Marine transport plane, containing 32 bodies, w’hich has been missing since Dec. IO.  The plane disappeared on a flight from San Diego to Seattle with 32 Marines aboard.  Searchers found part of a Ma rine uniform and bits of a Marine service record at the 10,000-foot level on Tahoma glacier.  The Navy said wreckage was scattered dowm a 3000-foot sheer cliff, and expressed doubt that many of the bodies would be recovered.  "If"****  was f °und at 6.15 (PST) bv William Butler, assistant chief National Park ranger and his companion. Dis-  d  Ra nger Gordon Patterson.  Butler wirelessed the base camp at Longmire. Wash., and the news was telephoned from thence to Seattle.  Butler said the plane seeming-  Hiff .°.j wn strai « ht  into the cliff, exploded and disintegrated. it disappeared in a storm  '    \A    djourns    Without  Against Policing    rn    ,• kt  Election of a New Chairman for Party  Balkan States  Balks U. S. Proposal For Semi-Permanent U.N. Commission  ARRESTED IN CAPITOL—Pvt Paul G. Shelby (right*, capitol policeman, stands with a man at the capitol Wednesday after he was arrested in the Senate wing. Edward F. McGinnis. Senate sergedf»t-at-arms, said the man identified himself as Clifton R. Spires, 39. ct Augusta. Ga. Shelby and another officer said they searched him and found a .25 caliber automatic. The arrest was  I he county Democratic Central Committee meeting Thursday night broke up in a near-riot and finally July    24    adjourned, leaving    Manuel Sanchez    a.**    county party  chairman.  The fire Works ensued when supporters of Leo Baca  for the chairmanship—who war* not members of the central committee—broke past sergeants-at- ( arms and into the meeting room, After s few disordered moments Sanchez recessed the meeting. He | reconvened it after half an hour to receive    the    motion    for    ad-  I journment.  L The adjournment was the only thing on which the Democrats  tone    opposition    |    hie    was    removed    today    from the loeedmc^ Nof    *    f™"  to the U.S. resolution would re- ,    ,    ,,    ,,    .    J'.*-* cling. .Not a single dissenting  main    unchanged    regardless    of     n *    15-montna-old    r rankle    i >«,**  was  heard    against    the    nee*  what    happened    to    the French    Solano    of    Albuquerque,    but the*    Hon.  proposals.    baby’s    condition    remained    ser-'    *    he    committee,    under terms of  Would Bar Rig Power*    trm«    the^gdjournment    motion, is SUP  RA KF SUCCESS (AP)—Hopes for a compromise solution of the Balkan problem faded today when Russia turned down French proposals intended to I “soften’’ the American plan for a powerful semi-permanent com-* mission in the Balkans.  Soviet Delegate Andrei A. Gromyko, breaking his silence after hours of debate by other delegates on various amendments before the Security Council, declared that Russia’s  Babys Condition Is Serious After Lung Operation  EL PASO, July 24 (A*)—A peb-  from the Frank te  made about Senate.  five minutes after President Truman spoke in the  Tous. ' At  his hospital bedside here  lect to a new meeting at the call  Urges Removal of All Excess Russians in U.S.  The Soviet attitude was disclosed after the delegates had left un- ™ * ,lJ *  uua *' , “ , ‘  Ul ^ »    °* Sanchez, upon five dayi writ-  resolved a new difficulty raised j  wa * grandmother, Mrs. ‘  0i * e 'j ten notice to committee members. by a    French    proposal    that    the    Big! Una Lucero of Albuquerque, a About    Delay  Five    powers    be    excluded    from    the | Red Cross nurse* aid. She This    delay    might cause an en-  brought little Frankie to El Paso jure change in the    situation with-  by plane last night and spentI ! n  * he     Pf 1r,v -    *<"«Clyde Tingle?.  ,,    .    u    .    leader of one of the party’s 2roue*  the night in prayer a* she at-    * ruupi   tended him.  WASHING I ON, July 24 (J*) I urued down by the Soviet government on a trip to Russia, a House labor subcommittee today urged “immediate removal of all excess Russian the United States.    x  proposed Balkan commission The proposal was strongly opposed bv the United States. China and Britain, which insisted that each of the ll members of the .Security Council should be represented on the commission de-  Representative Kersten (R  Bartlett, Edwards On Trial Again  to Secretary  Quakes Rattle Los Angeles Area  LOS ANGELES, July ,24 iJP)~ Three earthquakes shook southern Cal,forma mildly today, and seis-° RIS * S  J* 1 ** they apparently centered about IOO miles from ere. possibly in the mountainous regions of Riverside or San Diego county.  There were no reports of damage in the temblors, latest of which came about 2:54 p. m The heaviest, at 2:11 p. m., was preceded bv one at 8:54 a. rn , said Dr. Charles Richter, seismologist at California Institute of Technology, Pasadena.  Mountain areas where Dr Richter said the quake might have centered are sparsely populated, and built up chiefly with frame vacation cabins.  proposed this step of State Marshall.  In addition, he asked in a letter that the secretary “adopt a strictly reciprocal policy towards Soviet nationals and authorize the residence in this country of SANTA FE. July 24    —    only that number of Russian na-  Prosecution attorneys rested    tionaU as    is permuted    to    citi-  their case late today in the Gov-    ^ ™ "     IO    Cltl   crnment’s second of five indict-     1 the  United States in the  ntents charging illegal withdraw’- J Soviet union a! of more than a million pounds    Kersten    was named    to    a    #ub-  of sugar for soft drinks manu-    committee    with two    others to   fa( ThI e  i a'     v ’ isi j     Rl, ssia in September to  Ihe indictment now being studv education and labor condi-tried charges A. M. Bartlett, j tions there.  Hobbs Dr. Pepper Bottling Co. I The State Department official, and Mrs. Trudy S. Ed- Proved. Kcsten former Lea County vided passports, ration teller, with he saw  July 2 to apply  in this county, is acheduled to re turn from an out-of-town trip Dr. Frank Schuster, who per-    within the next few davs. Gossip  formed the bronchoscopy, found    among some Democrat#    after the  . „    .signed to set up a .semi-permanentI Frankie too weak last night upon meeting was to the effect Tingler  nationals from j  Watch OV p r  the disturbed area. his arrival for operation. After | m,Rht tl P the scales in favor of  Wis.l. subcommittee chapman  !  r „ Tf     comm ^ s,on , re H    removal of the pebble, he said J TL     f  ' h '    candidates    tor   _ * ,lm * n '|resent.ng    all    the    members    of    the!  FrankM> w . lthst0 ^,  the  operation    ‘ h * ,r ?* nsh, « > -, O' 800 "  Council would    more    fully    repre-,  rfur | v  well. but h.s condit.on still    l? nd  Baw—mitfit cause    Sanchex  sent the moral as well    as the legal Leas serious    I  rccons,der  his    scheduled re-  weight of the council    toward the    Hospital reports    this evening    1 **^f* a non. or might    put forth an-  maintenance of international j listed him unchanged.    other    candidate.  peace.’ said Herschel    V. Johnson.    The pebble was    inhaled while Thursday night’s    meeting wk  deputy U. S. representative    Frankie was visiting    hts maternal! hectic even before    it was ca.led  Bandits Not Identified    (grandmother in Santa Fe. The!to order.  baby was rushed to the home of his  Meanwhile, the Council recent ed an interim report from the!’ 11 * parents. Mr. and Mrs. Joe  Solano, in Albuquerque, but suitable equipment was not available there and he was flown here last night.  f an linn** nu P»f» rift  wards  State  said, and He added  ap-pro-  Bank ration teller, with he saw Soviet”Ambassador Nik 1  Vinton conspiracy to commit offenses, olai V. Novikov * ’    ‘    victor  against the United States and to for v isas.  Trip Turned Down  On July 19. he got a letter from V un M Bruslov, chief of the consular divi SI o n  of the em-bassy turning down the trip The embassy letter said that  prosecution. The defense also    "Thereon.'  exam",rd two othrr witnemm I aees. both in MoK'owand fn the  r. dUC *' 1 u"o l  »'i<l industrial t enters of the Soviet union caused bv the  Victory Oestreich Firms Sell Most State Insurance  defraud, respecting the rationing of sugar.  Mrs. Edwards Denies  Shortly after the Government rested, Mrs. Edwards took the stand in her own defense, denying all allegations made bv the  Mrs.  two other witnesses, Ruth Burke and Miss  I on tin »»*«! un Pag* Tkirifin  SANTA FE, July 24 (.4'*—Tile Agency of Albuquerque, founded bv State Revenue Commissioner Victor Salazar, received the largest share of the state’s 5178.000 insurance business during the fiscal year w’hich ended last June 30, records in the office of State Purchasing Agent H. N. McDaniel showed today.  The Victor Agency, which is operated bv Louis LaGrave of Albuquerque and with which Salazar has said he no longer nas  House OK’s Bills Totaling 9 Billion  Two Los Alamos Ex-Gl’s Indicted In Secrets" Theft  SANTA FE, July 24 (Ah—A grand jury indictment paved the way today for removal of two former Gl’s to New Mexico fur trial on charges involving theft of atomic secrets.  The grand jury in a less than four-hour special session returned the indictments, each containing two counts, against Alexander Von der Luft. 23, Lebanon. Pa., student at Princeton; and Earnest D. Wallis, 34, Chicago photographer.  Arrest Caused Sensation  war. trips of foreign tour-  anv  connection, sold the state in-  Possible for the jsurance policies totaling $24,584.-  time bemg     96>    all    but    $2?    ?5    f     £hich    was  Kersten got off a  96, all but  of    »-*i%•    .    .    -    Jtiff    letter    J    ^old    since    the    first    of    this    vear  of reply to Ambassador Novikov  lfKl«v and also fired one 'to Mar.  shall.  The one to Marshall concluded: n a congressional sub-committee is refused visas bv the Russian embassy because of ‘lack of hotel accommodations.’ I submit it is entirely in or<4er for von to request the immediate removal all excess Russian nationals, registered and unregistered, residing in our country because of the acute housing shortage in the United States.”  Only 168 Americans  Kersten said he is informed  only Americans, including all the  j  Department.  I when Salazar took office as revenue commissioner.  Oestreirh Firm Next Close behind the Victor Agency was Oestreich-Haggard, also of Albuquerque, which collected $23,940.69 on automobile fleet policies for the Highway Department.  Third was the Mountain States | Mutual Casualty Co., another Albuquerque firm, operated bv Secretary of Agriculture Clinton P Anderson, which received $21-934.84 for workmen’s eompensa jtion insurance for the Highway  I embassy staff, are residing in  Russia todav w’ith passports and  . . • *    .    ,    that    the number has remained al-  Their arrest July 12 caused a most constant for years.  Russians registered with the State Department in the United States have varied from 2500 in 1945 to 810 this year. Kesten said. And he said he suspected a “considerably larger number of Russian agents” is in the try.  Activities of Soviet  sensation across the country and followed disclosure in Congress by a member of its atomic energy committee that some material had been taken from file# of the Los Alamos, N. M., atomic  Cnnllnnrd an Pair Saran  In all. according to McDaniel’s  Cniiiinuad on Paga Sis  The Weather  WASHINGTON, July 24 (AP)—Rushing to adjourn Saturday, the House today approved $9,000,000,000 in appropriations for the fiscal year that started July I.  It passed four separate money bills. One was a brand new    proceeded to  measure written bv the appro-    committeemen  pita t ions committee only th is J when he  morning. Tho other* were com-    ,Zeke) Bae*, of    Pet.    ll Paionta  promises with the Senate on the     Davld  Chaver    of    the  stalemated agriculture, i n d e -     c j nrt rosf .  to   pendent offices and government|  e i ec ted <  a had  been “appointed” bv Sanchez. E.  Among the first to trickle into the meeting room in El Fid«i Hotel, from the throng gathered in the hotel lobby and bar, were several Democrats who were not members of the Central Committee. Sanchez ordered them to leave, declaring the meeting was to be an “executive session” of the 85 committee members only. He then stationed two sergeants-at-arms at the door, and homse'.f assisted them in identifying committee members Baca Protests  Baca protested this action, and renewed his protests when Sanchez called the meeting to order. Baca, as a member of the committee. had been duly admitted to the meeting room,  Sanchez, after overruling Baca.  all the roll of A dispute artHO ailed the name of E R.  same proclaim he had    been  ii,,    i    committeeman    from  corporations    bills.    j     tbat     p rec j nct> an< j  tbat  Bat-  All four were sent to the Sen  ate. which lost no time passing |r Baca denied this. saving he the independent offices measure had been elected and tha» David and sending it to the White House. Chavez was the choice onlv of a along with a non-controversial I  sma u group which had left the  precinct election Leo Baca upheld Chavez’ claim, but Sancnei ruled in favor of E. R Baca.  Burst Through  That precinct—with 18 more still to go—was the last callid in the roll call. The sergeants-at-arms had opened the doom to  and  Baby Sitter Now National Issue Over Deducting Cost From Taxes  WASHINGTON. July 24 (AP)_  Representative Keating (R , N Y ) admitted today that he has become the No. I authority on a pressing national problem—baby sitting. .  In case there are skeptics—i.e., bachelors — in the audience, let them peer at Keating’s mail. It clearly shows that the voters of this country are concerned about baby sitting, and rightly so.  Keating, father of one, never i wanted to became mjch an author-  Costa Rica Riots Toll Raised to Eight Dead  SAN JOSE. Costa Rica, July 24 <*>»—The deafh toll in four days of political disorders and sitdown strikes in four Costa Rican cities! grew’ to eight todav with the death of three persons previously I listed among 59 injured Troops in armored cars continued to patrol San Jose, armed I forces policed Cartago, near here, and the sitdowm strike which precipitated the series of clashes beginning Saturday between police!  VI RI QI IRqi r SVD VICI VITT F^lr  And continued ho? Friday and Saturday with scattered cloud* rn the afternoon. lf I* ti Friday 97 Lorn Friday night id In he »alley. 70 in the Heights  MW MEXICO Partly cloudy Friday ^rh a fra widely scattered afternoon or I early evening thundershowers In the northern mountains, otherwise fair with 1H-Itizens, as |Oe change in temperature High S5-05  •oun-  described bv recent testimonies * north 90 * 100  * ouU >  ( nutinned a n  Page Thirteen  SHIPPERS* FORECAST: North and OS. *outh and west IOO  eaat  $35,500,000 government corporations supplemental bill passed by • the House last week.  The dav’s action left several j big supplv hills still kicking | around the capitol. Among them I are the ar Department civil Tune* I bons bill. to which the Senate  1  appropriations committee has j added several hundred million J above the House-voted $339,186,-! OOO.  Another is the House-passed $1,603,199,094 supplemental bill  Continued on Page Eleven  COP Win* Round  WASHINGTON, July 25    —  The Senate refused today to postpone until January action on a proposed Senate investigation of Attorney General Clark's handling of Kansas City vote fraud  let in a late committeeman.  Continued mn Page Vina  Dry Days Relic Unearthed Here  A relic of prohibition davR. a two-barrel “stifl.” was recently unearthed here—but, alas, not a drop was saved.  The discovery was made on Leeacres. a highly restricted suburban development on the 6200  charges. The 45 to 30 vote brought 1 of  J^ orth  Fourth, according  Lee Stroud, owner of  a first-round victory to Republi cans in their seven-day fight to gain action on the proposal, made by Senator Kern < R., Mo.)  Planes Fly In but Never Fly Out on Huge Tract Where the Navys Proximity Fuze Was Developed  The New Mexico Experimental,of planes fly in. but never fly ou». the effects of various-sized Range—the 50.000-acre tract onjTh^y’n*    | 0  pieces in testing  which the V S Navv’s nrovimitv  of  Projectiles equipped with VT fuze  war  itv. He had introduced a bill into Congress that would make five! force changes in the income tax laws One change would allow deductions for “all necessary expenses paid by a working wife for nursery care cost or for wages to a housekeeper.”  A reporter translated this to “baby sitter.” And before you could say. “Shut up. Junior!” Keating had enough correspond-  Democratic party was still  S. Navy’s proximity. ^ was developed during the*  u.’ 9 «    Tu i    . I The range    sprawls    over the    a1-  wax inspected Thursday    by|, uvla ,  plain    a( th( ,     (oo ,  of    thc   and member, of the opposition!* * rou P of U  , S Naval  reservists;Manson Mountains about 15  _.:,t    :    and a Journal reporter.    miles southeast of Albuquerque..  It was the first such inspection Here guns ranging from 20 mm I of the highly-guarded range since to six-inchors blast away at real; it was started up    in 1942    and mock-up    aircraft    as technic** j  Work of the    V.T. (variablejails observe,    photograph and    re  time) fuze—rated as America’s jcord data on the VT. fuze.  in  ARC IIRISIIor ENTHRONED  . QUEBEC, July 24 iJV) — Most Rev. Maurice Roy, a soldier-priest, was enthroned as the lith Archbishop of the See of Quebec today in colorful ceremonies which officially brought to an end mourning for his predecessor, Rodrigue Cardinal Villeneuve. w’ho died m January,  to Mrs. E. the land She said a street improvement crew moving dirt with a carryall, uncovered the metal hoops of what was a barrel, some copper coils    full    of “plenty potent” liquor    and    two five-ga’Ion bottles  of wine. Wheels of th* machine smashed the bottles, she said.  The find also brought out a storv Mrs. Stroud sa vs is reliable •Stiles    on    aircraft.    The    data    ob-1A former    owner of the 85-acre  tamed    from    these    tests    produces    j tract    that    was once a dairy farm,  not only more destructive weip , she was told, buried the stuff, ons but aids in the building of .then forgot w’here and spent vears safer planes.    I digging up the place in search of  The towers are made of wood I it. so that they can’t interfere with “We really got more fbi the radio weaves of the V.T. fuze.; bargained for." laughed The VT. fuze credited with Stroud She <«id her fin turning the Battle of the Bulge Stroud Realty Co bough and shortening the war in the  triM . t about  Pacific by a vear—consists of  pro)-  unproven  a  it.  ear ago and  i we  Mrs  the  the  now  No. 2 secret weapon,—is still pro-j The shooting is chiefly [miniature  radl ° sending and regressing under the Division of ground level w?ith the Manzanos ! ce * v,ng set -  Rv  means of radio I EXEMPTION VOTED Research and Development. New I as a backstop.    wave*    it locates the target and WASHINGTON J v  Mexico School of Mines, headed; In one section a pair of 250-  s€lec ! s the  sP^t-second to deton-U^ Senate todat-’ vot*H by Dr. E. J. Workman.    foot wooden towers is used to  ate for  greatest effect.     n °     ?oda '    ' oted    an   As a result of the experimental I suspend mock-up or light war T^    employs    2(H) per  work the range has become)planes while guns 3200 yards *<»•  and  entails an annual ex known as the place where scoresiaw-ay blaze awav to determines  Tional vear of life for special Income tax exemption* allowed members of the armed services *n w artime.   

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Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

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Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 155+ million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

10 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 10 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 155+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 155+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 155+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 155 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 19 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication