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Trenton Times Newspaper Archive: July 11, 1899 - Page 1

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Publication: Trenton Times

Location: Trenton, New Jersey

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   Trenton Times, The (Newspaper) - July 11, 1899, Trenton, New Jersey                               Keep your eye on the I rento0 Times It will keep you posted the local news KIFTKKNTH YKAK--5943 Mrs, Joseph Ireland Injured by the Accidental Discharge of Revolver, SUICIDE STORY IS DENIED The Weapon Pell From Hus- band's (Overcoat on Sunday, and in pjcklng- Jt up it Exploded She is Now Recovering. Mrs. Joseph Ireland, wife of a con- ductoi ou -the T-awrenceville trolley line, is lying at" her home in the iear of 720 Second street, in a dangerous condition, the result of what the fam- ily claim was the accidental discharge of a revolver belonging to her husband. The distressing auddent occunrd OIL Sunday, but it was kept quiet, and did not become generally knowu until yes- terday aftemoon. The atury is that Belaud wa-3 drying her husband's overcoat In the yard, and when she removed It from the line the revolver fell from the pocket tn thp ground. She stooped to pick It up and it exploded in her hand, and the bullet pierced her gioin. She was carried into the house and a phy- -sent lui. He. 1 Ived soon after and extracted the bullet Hones are now entertained for her recovery, although she has not yet by any means crossed the danger line. A report circulated yesterday was to the effect that she had attempted sui- cide, but this was emphatically denied by her frlendn, who say that the facts Jfe ahnvn Shfl is quite young and her married life has been a happy one. She would have no reason for self destruction. Mrrand-Mrs. Ireland but recently lo- cated In their present home, having re moved from another section of the city in: order to be near the car barns, the starting point of the trolley trips. The young husband is utmost heartbroken over the sad accident, and he has tht sympathy of the community. He it, highly esteemed among the railway employes, and is regarded as one_of the best the system. Inquiry at the home this afternoon was answered by a statement that Mrs. Ireland was resting easily and doing as well as could be with good prospects of her recovery. STRUCK BY LIGHTNING. A PROMINENT CANDIDATE A Pen and Pencil Sketch pf Samuel T, Atchley, a Leading Republican Candidate For Sheriff. The Times presents to its readers .his afternoon a portrait of Samuel f. Atchley, a prouporous young farmer of wing township, who is prominent i candidate for the Republican nom- .nation for Sheriff. Sheriff Ashmore, the present Incum- bent, who has admirably filled the for the last two years and a lalf, Is Ineligible for another term, and as Mercer County is naturall} jublican, by a fair working majority, .here is usually a scramble and a cou- :est for the Republican nomination. havp way of UD nominations the rural town- ship and city wards, and it is now a well conceded fact .that this year's nomination goes to thp townships Mr. Atrhlpy's fripnds say he is well In the" lead for the nomination, although one other canditdate from "Princeton is jnaking a stiff fight for the place, and there are others who would be glad to enter the race if they though would have any chance to win. TRKNTON, N. J., TUKSllAY J ULY mm PEIIIII EH IIAHIYIIEM Eli Assaulted at a Railroad Station Which He Cannot Locate. THE POLICE ARE ON THE CASE TWO CHN'IS Jacob Herold and Other Hebrew Citizens Hate 'inem- selves in the Man's I he Cook Building Destroyed Early This Morning, THE FAMILY BARELY ESCAPED NEW WATER COMMISSIONER Avenue Family Kscapcd Injury a Storm. The family of of Ward avenue, had what was almost a mirac- ulous escape from death or serious in- jury during the storm on Saturday evening. Their home was struck by a bolt of lightning which the front wall, breaking windows otherwise damaging the building. A big hole was torn In the roof and family were somewhat daaed by the crash. They were more frightened than hurt, and soon- -say the; don't care to go through a similar ex perlence. The house is owned by Benjamin Walton and was damaged to the amount of at least Mr. Ccnsky is employed In the lino leum works and had returned home bu a little while before the shower. Rev. Andrew Jones, Prophet. Rev. Andrew Jones, the prophet, will in the Union Daptiot ChUreh in Academy street, tonight at 8 p.m. Mi. Jones has got a great, unto him self iy many rtf his prophecies whli.h he claims have come to pass, and saj3 the sent hi... to Warn the pco pie of this city to flee from the wrath to come, although the wicked flee when no man pursueth. Those who desire lu hear hrnr should do ,80 tonight, as this may be his in Trenton. If, however, he can remain another night, it will "be 'so announced in to- morrow's Times. German Night at Hill's. It will be "German Night" at Hill's Grove tomorrow evening. Manager Eistenmann and his excellent com- pany will present two burlesques en- titled "The Deaf Ass" and "The Prom- ise on the iherejwill German and English songs and exhi- bitions of the electric fountain. There was a large audience at the conceit there last evening. The entertainment begins at and there is an admis- sion of ten cents. Kicked by a B. V. Kelly, of 106 Butler street, kicked by a horse In Mr. Elliott's Perry street blacksmith shop yesterday at- tetuoon. He was assisted to a street car and taken home by a friend. The injury is not thought to be a serious one A Two Weeks Harry P. Moorehead, who Is in-the state boar1 office in the State House, will leave Saturday on a two weeks' vacation. 1 Fart of the time Mr. Moorehead wlil spend at his old home In Allentowu, part at Asbnry -Park, and he may also take a trip to Boston by boat A Fine Present. A new piano was received at the home of Miss Maggie Runyon, of No. 181 Passaic street, last Saturday, as a from her father, Morris C. Run- yon. To Picnic ThU Afternoon. This afternoon the members of the Sunday school connected with Trinity Episcopal Church, on Academy street, Will go on a picnic to the Broad Street Park. F. W. Allaire, the superintend- ent, hM charge of the affair. The. trip i by. trolley. Mr. Atchley Is 37 years of age, was born m Ewiug townshijr and has lived there all his life. He attended school at Ewingville and later spent4wo years- at the Trenton Academy. He nab served his township very the township committee for three terms and the large majorities he received for the second and third terms were the best evidence of what his neighbors thmkrof him. He ha's hpld other posi- tions of trust and of honor. For three years he was the sergeant-ab-arms of the State and gained the .es- teem of both parties and all otlieis with whom he came In contact. is by occupation a fainiei,  atrdly mi the-fiead and rerplverl a riital blow In the mouth that loosened our teeth and caused him intense gony. He fought off the gang with energy oi u of desperate fear, and finally aped. He ran from the place as fast as possible and boarded an electric car, ie number of which he says was 150. Patrolman Adams found him ime later on North Willow street In a adly used up condition, and being un- ble to find out from him any definite iformation concerning his trouble he ent him to theJIentral jolice station. His face was cut and bleeding and his clothing was covered with blood tains. His loosened teeth prevented him froui Ueaily and altogeth r his condition was a pitiable one. This uioming when arraigned bcfom 'ustiue Jackson he told his story best he rmilil,  e made to hunt down his assailants Thus encouraged by one who couli speak his_own language, the young man was left In a more cheerful con- dition, and foTice Surgeon Van Duya afterward attended to his injifries vhich are-painful but not regarded serious. _ The police tnmk the assault v committed with a view to robbery anr that the men were the toughs who frequently give more or less trouble In that vicinity. Mr. Heirold has interested himsel still further in the poor fellow, and with otheiB will provide him w whatever cJiuforts are necessary dur- ing here. Tent Services. At the Evangelistic services at th Gospel tent, of Division stree and Emory avenue, this evening ther will be preaching by Rev1. O. Barch witz; Wednesday, Rev. J. K Manning D. Thursday, Rev. A. Lawrence D. D. Fine hard shell crabs at Htldebreeht's Blue flame coal oil and gasolln stoves, ovens, Mason Jaia, rubber ring Jelly tumbleis and lamp supphSss wholesale and retail. 6 E. Hanove Btroot, Scarlet Fever in One Family. __ Albert J. Howell, the wood dealer, who resides at No. 272 Bellevue avenue, has had six cases of scarlet fever among his children and four were sick at-one time the only one sick now, thought he would escape, out wus taken sick last Saturday. It is be- lieved he will be in the house three weeks at least. Hardware Merchant Happy. Charles B. Everdell, superintendent of the Sklllman Hardware Company, of Philemon street, is the happy father of a bouncing baby boy, and he Is thinking of asking his firm to knock off, all profits lor a week in honor of It. Gold Mining furiosities. Miles Cannon, a South Clinton street barber, when he came home from Gold Hills, Colo, brought with him some minerals and a very fine oil painting of a mining camp. The Camp Is surround- ed by hills from six hundred to one thousand fet high. He has the paint- ing and minerals in the window of his barber shop. Blew Down a Tree. Tne strong winfl whfch was blowing Sunday afternoon blew a large tree down on one of the main streets in Bristol about 4 o'clock. Fortunately no one was hurt In its descent it took the elect.re light with it, oo that the circuit was completely bioken. t Omits the The sermons arc omitted in the evening services at Christ Church dur- ing the very warm months. The rec- tor gives a very short talk on different subjects of interest. A chance for a builder Good lot on Walnut avenue, Wilbur, cheap and On easy tents. Call ou B. M. Phillips A Co., 185 S. Broad st Fine hard shell crabs at Hlldebrecht's. Imbiber, Timber, Coal. Willis R. Doyle, successor to Doyle ft .White, 320 Rutherford avenue, large best giadoa, competitive pricoc, Volunteer Department Prevented Other Low After Hard Fight. The Origin Unknown and the Damnifo Variously Estimated. A disastrous fire of unknown origin destroyed the Cook building in Hope- -at in early hour this morning, and for a Urns a much more serious conflagration was threatened. The spread of the devouring flames was checked by the brilliant efforts of he volunteer fire department, and the jlentiful supply of water which the lofough system supplied. The fire was discovered Just after midnight and had alrparty galnei so -.-.uch .headway that the building was doomed and only the suuoundtng structures could be saved. The building was a structure of frame covered with corrugated iron, and was owned by A S Cook. It contained be- sides Mr. Cook's drug store, a barber shop, operated by M P. Puglia, A Zenalli's fruit store, T. J. Shepherd's grocery with his dwelling In the Hat above, the postofflee kept by if. K Hoi- combe, J D Smith's tailor shop, the aw offices of Holt and Van Dyke, the telephone exchange, and the lodge room of the Knights of Pythias and the Tnnlor American Mechanics, The bar- HhnjvwHs Hni-nRiwpdj-while the-mer- chants were but partially protected In this way. Mr. Shepherd's family escaped in their night clothes and the furniture of their home was destroyed together with all thp r'ontents of thp hnilflinjr The mall tags and other government property in the postofflee were lost, and the bank and business .houses _of the town will be inconvenienced" in no small degree by the loss of the mails. Every tenant of the building is a loser far beyond the amount of his insurance and many have lost possession of pri- vate value which cannot be replaced. The total loss is variously estimated at from to UOMKOPArHIC SOCIETY MEETS1 Second Session of a Now Organization firing Held Today The New Jersey Medical So- cjety, the recently formed homeopathic organization, will hold its regular monthly meeting this afternoon at half past three at the residence A. S. Fell, No. 312 East State street. The society is composed of the local homeopaths together with physicians from Princeton, Morrisvllle, Hights- town, Columbus and Bristol. A number of papers will be read, among then one by Dr. John H. McCullough on "Some Cases of Post-Partum Hemor- rhage." rhe Times man could not ob- tnin the names of the others. Rvangelist Granted Divorce. By a decree of Chancellor McGilJ Seymour J. Peters, the well-known local evangelist, has had removed the shackles of matrimony that have bound him since December, 1892. Two years after marriage he discovered that his wife had been married to George N. Porter at the time she consummated Lhv. with hint plea that she thought she had a right, because BaliTAhc feuBd Porter had w4foy dW act grnit Hor claims against Porter could not be Sub- stantiated- Horseless Hearse For Trenton. David Taylor Ivins, the East State stieet undertaker strongly consider- ing the purchaoe of horseless hearse. Mr. Ivins will go to New York Thurs- day to lorfk at some of the different styles of horseless heaves, and he may purchase one this week. It Is Mr. Ivins' desire to be the first undertaker in the United States to own a vehicle of this kind. The hearse he has In mind resembles a funeral car In shape, and Its motive power Is liquid air. City Healthy. Ine physicians say there is much less sickness than usual at this season of the year A special officer of the labor department at Washington, Wil- liam H1 Groves, was In Trenton a few days ago -looking up1 vital statiBties.- He said the death rate is much lower in Trenton than In any other city of the same size he knows of. Frederick Tllttm's Funeral. The funeral of Frederick of New Brunswick, who died Saturday in this city, was held yesterday from the home of his brother, Carl Tllton, of Chambers street. Rev. Mr. Studi- ford, pastor of the Third Presbyterian church, officiated. The remains were then sent to New Brunswick, where. they were Interred in the family plot. Miss Fitzgerald Recovering. MiflB Fitzgerald, of No. 845 Spruce street, who fell from a trolley car some ago, receiving injuries to her head which have confined her to the house ever since, is Improving, and hopes soon to be entirely recovered. This will be encouraging news to hosts of friends. Cadwalader Place. Fine stone colonial houne, ten elegantly papered, all conveniences, laundry, butler's pantiy, hot water, heat, hard wood flooiS and trim, large lot, comer, all windows command a fine view of the beautiful Delaware valley. B. M. Phillips k Co., 185 8. in Hour) J. Nloklln Elected Last Night by Council to Fill a The session of Common Council last night though brief, WHS oni nf great Important e, for Assemblyman Henry J. Nicklln, a well-known and highly pop- to flll thp vacancy in the water toard, made va- cant by the recent death of Joseph Stokes Mr Nicklln's name was the only one plated In nomination and his popularity la attested by the fact that out of the twenty voter cant, seventeen were for him The remaining throe were blank The new commissioner served as a school board trustee In 1891, was In from n 1895 and last year was re-elected to ;he General Assemlay by over- whelming majority. Mr. Valentine later introduced an or- dinniice providing for the Ismiancc of worth of thirty-year registered refunding bonds at three and one-half per cent, which sum, it is further pro- vided, shall be used In the payment of Ross' claim nxalnst the city for work done In resurfacing South Warren street between Front street and the water power bridge. The measure wag referred to the committee on laws and ordinances, anil then Mr Dearden submitted a resolution author- zing the city clerk to advertise for bids on the construction of a storm water inlet at vVard and Oldeu ave- nues. adopted. t DANGER OF SMALLPOX Health Officer Fell a or Warning and Residents to Keep Property Clean. Health Officer Ai 8. Fell asks the Trenton Times to state that coming IptO thp nfflop show iu gradually- and In all parts of the country, despite the efforts of the health officers to control It As a matter of precaution, the health officer advises every one who has not been vaccinated within the last five years to have it done He-says that citizens generally are showing a commendable effort to keep the city clean, hut-there Is still ruom for improvement He urges that every body take special care in removal of gaibage and In keeping properties ab- solutely clean. TRENTON BURGLAR CAUGHT. Negro AiieMed in Ph'lladelphln.Wlth Stolen Goods Podncssion. Thanks to the efficiency of jthe sys- tem which Chief of Police Miner has Introduced in the local detective de- partment, the burglar who entered and robbed the Trenton houses on Sunday morning been captured and most of the stolen goods recovered. Tele- grams were sent out to the different cities as soon thp robbery Was re- ported, and these were followed by the first mail with circular letters lescrlb- ing the missing goods. Yesterday afternoon a big, burly negro was arrested in Germantown, by a mounted officer, and when taken to the nearest police station It was found that he was wearing Mr. Wclling's coat and hat and had much Of" the stolw silverware In his possession. He ad- mitted the thefts, and said he robbed Mr. Welling's house first and the resi- dence of Mr Tattler afterward. From the latter hp hoarded a freight train at Trenton Junction and rode to Ihe outskirts of Philadelphia. He was on his way to a pawnshop when ar- rested He says his name Is James Miller, that he has been stealing since he WAR pleht vears old. The Trenton authorities were noti- flort nt nnrp and this morning Detec- tive Plleer and Messrs. Welling and Tattler went down to the Quaker city -and identified thfi utolen property _ The prisoner was held until requisi- tion papers can be secured to bring him to this city for trial. Chief Hiner has been congratulated on all sides for the effectiveness of his system whlefr-has resulted In the cap- ture of the first burglar reported (lur- ing his administration. Combined Picnics. The combined Sunday schools of St. Michael's, St. Paul's and Grace Epls- eopal Churches win hold a plcnle at Cochran Park to-morrow, ine "Volun- teer will make three trips in the moi u- Ing and two in the aftern6on. Jt prom- ises to be a record breaker. Woman Fined and Given Six Months. Advance in Building Material. Prospective builders will have to contend with an advance in the prlcet nf bricks and other building material The local boom In building is partly sponsible the greatest for yeara. Bricks have advanced a thousand. Resolutions of Respect. At a Joint meeting of the First Bap- tist Cadets, held Thursday evening July 6, resolutions of condolence were passed over the death of Clarence C Ecklps. Second Prcabjierlan Picnic. The_ Sunday school of the Second Presbyterian Church will hold an- nual picnic at Hutchlnson's pond to- morrow. The Yardville trolley ci run direct to ground" The Street Obstructed. A big pile of paving bricks obstruct Ing Fountain" avenue are not protected by a light at night, the city ordi- nance provides according to a teport by Patrolman Heher. The most cooling and refreshing drink for a hot day Is Mlnt-S-mgaice Britton's. tr Fine hardshell c.dbs at Hlldebrecht's If you have a want, use The classified columns. They be brtttjllg PUNISHMENT OF WITNESSES Widow Romarrtra With So rloiis Other IMxpowd of In thp V. S. Dlrtrict Court by Judgr Klrkpatricf. Although the June term of the Unit- ed States District Court Is about OTBC, and most of the Important cases have been disposed of. Judge KirKpatrtck had a busy day yesterday. One of the most pathetic that of the United States against Mary A. Bur- lOdfthn, of who was Indicted for perjury. She was convicted, and d to oU u.onthi at hard labor in the Essex tounty penitentiary, anri to pay n fine of f 100 Mrs. Burroughs is a woman past six- ty-two years of age, and presented a lady-ltke and refined appearance as she sat in the court room. She was a sol- dier's widow -four years ago, but en- tered again the state of matrimony. Instead of notifying the pension de- partment of her eecond rnarrtage, Burroughs btlll continued to draw her pension aiiJ escaped, detection until ro cently The crime of perjury wan committed when Mm. Bnrrottghs swore to her quarterly application for her pension. Two other women, Elizabeth Foster anj F_ Pprry, who wllueateil Mrs Buriuugiis' -papers-far her.- also tried for perjury, convicted, and sentenced to one day's Imprisonment and a fine of John Cheetham and Frank J. Hoff- man, Indicted for making counterfeit coin, were anaigned but not tried. Both men pleaded not guilty, theu Hoffman changed his plea to guilty. O. Sippel, alias S T having spent "nve weeks In Jail, while gwalting trial on a charge of sending obscene postal cards through the mallr WAS given a sharp reprimand and al- lowed to fo under a suspension of sentence Magdaline Tice, alias Magdallne Cook, pleaded not guilty to a charge of perjury and was held In ball fur he next term of court at Newark. ueorge Wright was tiled foi coun- lerfetting on Juft indictments, and con- victed on each In fined and in addition given year n the Essex eotfnty penitentiary. A petition In bankruptcy has been filed with the clerk of the court by Heber Wells, of Pateison. following have been 'discharged from bankruptcy Ferdlnand.L. Behre, Hopewell; Ray H. Olltsky, trading afe Han Company, Trenton, and Cyrnf W. Squler, Rahway. Orders to show cause why bankrupts should not be discharged, returnable August 7, were entered yesterday" in the following cases J Randolph An- pleby, Leona, Bergen connty; Albert B. Demurest, Haekensack; Phillip Mehr- iiof, Paterson; George C. Ordered, As tuny Park, and John L. Haas, ON TO PrtlNCIsrON NOW Trenton Street Company a Force at Work. The Trenton Street Railway Com- pany began work on the tawrenceville Prlnrptnn, road about tiRwrencc- vllle yesterday with a force of 100 franKhl'o OTtffndK for UK r Rrnnfc which U nhnnt Diilp above T-nwreneeville. By the time It gcta the road finished aMntM Stowy Brook it expects to things shape to go further. OiTll War Veteirv III. James P. DlsbroWjjhe Civil war vet- eran who is employed at tfte state House, is slek in bed at his home on Passalc street. His Illness Is not con- sidered serious, but will probably keep him Indoorv for weeks. Mr. Dlsbrow wns Janitor of the City years igo. Needed a Ferrj. The outlet for the Water on Hamilton avenue and utrnpt han Droved. to be entirely too small. Just after the storm Saturday the residents near there talked" seriously a ferry. Burned Improving. F. T. Hopper, of 137 Brunswick ave- nue, who was badly buined about the hands and amis on Saturday morning, Is now greatly Improved. It caused by the Igniting of a stove which he was oiling. St. Pant's BI. K- Picnic. "ihe Sunday sehoot of St Paul's Methodist Church, Spring street, will -picnic at Cadwalader Park on Thurs- day, July 27. A variety of sports and Inmpnt .will he piovidnd for the occasion. MULRYNE'S CASINO Contlnnoiw performance. Prof. CovinR- ton, the wonderful baritone sololnt; Little Willie, the boy soprano; Sai-olw Mike Bon Ami (Erin the waiter; also the from Buffalo in operatic selections; he will also ren- der his own little song entitled "Put Me Off at don't fall to hiiii. he is a show in himself. Go way, Go Way. Return of Dave Foy in hu latest sketch, entitled "The King of Tomatcan osslsted by Teddy the Mouse. Grand snapper rnnrr. all doy and night. Trenton Brewing Company's specialties always on draught. Admission free. Frank U. Mnlryne, tfute nFWSPAPFRI   

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