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Trenton Times Newspaper Archive: December 30, 1890 - Page 1

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   Trenton Times, The (Newspaper) - December 30, 1890, Trenton, New Jersey                               VOU IX. NO. 9.505. TRENTON, rUMSDAY AFTTJKNOON, DKCSOftlBKK 30, 1890. TWO Capt. Wallace and Several Sol- diers Killed by ludians. BEDS SLAIN BY THE SOOEE. Few of Bis Foot's Band Were Left AllYe. idejr Were Being TMcaruied by Col. Vonylh'fl Ctiiuuittud the Fact That They Were Outnumbered Over Four to One, the Desperate Trcacherontly, but Valiantly, Attecked the Troopa and a Scene of Cmmafe a Score of the Soldlan Hilled or vronnded and Big Foot'i Band Said to Have Been to Hand Encounters. KVEE CKEEK, Neb Dec 30 The first desperate and bloody affray be- tween the host lies and Uncle Sam's occurred yesterday on Porcupine creek In the Bad The surrender of Big Foot wae thought to mean that the troubles were at an end In the process of dis- armament that followed tb" capture a fight occurred in which Capt George D of the Seventh cavalry, and a soldier wen killed, and Capt Myles Moylan, Lieut. TcWnest A. Garlingtou and other soldiers were wounded. Many Indians were killed and wounded The killed among the troups are The Killed and vronnded. Capt George D kilted with a Mjles mortJilly wounded Lieut E A Darlington wounded In right mtta Color Bergt OmpbeU, wounded In mouth Dyer Troop A. severely wounded. Sergt Troop K, mortally Sti Lloyd, Troop B wounded iu breast. Sergi Ward Troop K, subbed to ihe Corp Clifford, Troop B, wounded in Adams, Troop K, wounded In the leg- Private Davis Troop B, nbot In arm Private Duncsn, Troop A wounded in Prlvaw Hazell Troop B, wounded in breast Private Hipp Troop I wounded in the leg Private Newel i Troop B, shot through ihe body Private Lew if Troop B wounded in leg Private S F Smith, Troop B, wounded in let Private Stone Troop B Private Sullivan Troop K. wounded in shoulder Private Toohy Troop B wounded in leg Private Zetter, Troop A, wounded In The Indians Located. The first battalion of the Seventh cav- alry, consisting of Troops A, B, I and K, nnder command of Maj G M Whileside, arrived at Wounded Knee creek at dark on the evening of the 26th for the purpose of intercepting and, if possible, capturing Big Foot's band of Indians, who recently escaped from Col Sumner on the Chey tune river Early on the morning of the 87lh sconts were sent out for the of locating the ftiKitives, and about half past 11 a, m yesterday a scout arrived with the iotolhgeuce that Big Foot, With 1BO men and 250 women and children, had moved into camp on the Porcupine crook Immediately the bugle sounded "Boots and and in a very short time the troops were upon the brow of a hill over- shadowing the camp The troopa f turned la position in double columns of fours, re- laying to the rvht and left, with two Hotcbkisi guns in the center, commanded ky Lieut Hawthorn UndflF u Flag of Irnce. The Tndi ins also drew up In hat aud for few momenta seemed uudecided as to what action the) would take, when finally t delegation moving toward the kvops under a flag of truce When Maj Whitside ascertained that Big Foot was not one of the number he demanded that appear in person, whereupon he was told that Big Foot was sick The major, however, insisted, and Big Foot was finally brought to his presence In a spring wagon together with hii wife, wrh of whom was positively sick MaJ. Whiteslde had Big Foot and hie transferred to an ambulance, ordered all the other Indiaus to dismount and fotOi la double columns iu the center of the line of troops, in which position they were escort- ed to Wounded Knee creek and encamped there within a perfect cordon of guards, "With battery of Hulcukiss and Galling guns conveniently overshadowing their Tillage Battle Begins. The remaining troops of the Seventh ar- rived under the command of Gen Forpyth, and the Indians were al 1 brought out into an open square and told to produce their aiiuFt At first they denied having nay, but finally turned over three Gen. For- syth put a close cordon of troops around the warriors, separating them from their tepoco, and several details of soldiers were, set to work ovirhauling their lodges and in securing about sixty gunn. Just at a tune when it looked as though a peaceful disarmament would be effected one of the medicine men who had haran- gued the Indians considerably during the morning, and whose talk had been stayed by order of Gen Forpyth, suddenly began his harangue again and the Indians begun firing 1 heir lire was immediately returned by the troops Fifteen or Twenty Kllled  troops were at a great disad- vantage, fearing that they might shoot their comrades Ihe Indian men, women and children ran to the south, the battery firing rapidly as they rau Soon the mount- troops were after them, shooting them down on every side The engagement lasted fully an hour and a half. Capt Wallace instanily killed with a war IHIWL'Fil Absolutely Pure, A l of in i'. High ,n. club at ftii opening ol me LI _atouneut Between 11 f teen and t ti j[ were killed but up to the I oui this lispatch was written their minus could not be learned Fifty Slain It is impossible btute the number of dead Indians 'inure were more than fifty killed outright It is reporti d that at least 100 were slain lliu soldiers are shooting Mit Indians found no quarter beiug given In uny n io say that It vju tt most nil In dians 500 ilr> desLrihes the affair but faintly It u b heved that uot a buck or a squaw of all Big boot's band will be left to tell the ulo of the day'i treachery A Crisis at I'lne Illdgo. PINE AGI >u s l) 30 now seem-imnos ir n I i I inuian war, lor uo sooner hail tne irieudly iifiiis eucamped about the agency heard the new b of tie b.utle than they rushed i to their after donning their I war array dic-hed awaj to the hills aud are concent rating northwest of the agency I What few troops are still hereare deployed about tbwageucv building aw skirmishers to repel an attack Several times during the afternoon Btragylera from the Indtau camp have sue-iked up to the agency and fired into the buildings At about 2 o'clock a brisk fire was kept up between the Indian police and the Indians, several hundred shou being ex changed No one was hurt, but an attack U momentanl) expected As there are less than "500 soldiers now here the result of an attack may be >ery serious unless the Seventh or Ninth cavalry return at once A Gloomy Outlook The situation now w exceedingly serious The change here will result in stampeding the Indians who were on their way m from the Bad Lauds During a skirmish here later iu the afternoon two soldiers were wounded and a hostile Indian killed less thau 300 yards from the ceuttr of the agency Indians who heretofore have been friend- ly now appear thoroughly In earnest in ou the-wniyath, and from burning buildings afew milei frum the agency is alread) plainly seen The prairie has also been fired at several places The News Confirmed. WASHINGTON, Dec 30 The war depart- ment has received detatln of the battle in the Bad Lauds They differ little with above account. A GREAT CONFERENCE Paruell and O'Brien Are to Talk It Today DUBLIN, Dec 30 be Freeman's Jour- nal aoDooncrs that the conference between Mr Parnell and William O'Brien will take place today at Boulogne sur Mer It addi that Messrs John K dmond, Kenny and Clancy, and perhaps Mr Campbell, mem- bers of parliament, will be present at this meeting The Journal also remarks that whatever the result of the conference no- body will lie able to say that Mr Parnell has placed barriers in the way ofany agree ment that be looked forward to The mayor, mayor elect an l five previous mayors of Cork tm e written to Mr O Brien stating that it is the opinion of the people of Cork that English statesmen, in con- junction with Mr Gladstone, have attack ed Mr Parnell's position Much as they appreciate Mr Gladstone's services and deeply feeling the obligations due to the Liberals, they deny their right to dictate to Irishmen as to who should or should not be their leaders Mr Vincent Scully, who was recently defeated by Sir John Pope Hennessy in the contest for North Kilkenny's seat in parliament, has written a letter to The Freeman's Journal in which he says that the attitude of the Irish bishops before and during the election referred to only shows that Mr Parnell "committed a private vice" and allowed judgment by default to be delivered against him, and therefore he has been pronounced to be no longer eli- gible to a position of public trust Con- tinuing, Mr Scully says that the Irish struggle is essentially a political aud nota moral one a struggle for leave for the Irish to manage Irish affairs after their own fashion The struggle is one of pounds, shillings and pence, and not of the sacrameutB fonng warren on Trial. EIMIRA, N Y, Dec trial of Herbert Warren, a 17 year-old boy, for the murder of his father, J Frank Warren, commenced here before Judge Smitn The day was occupied in an effort to se- cure a jury J Sfank Warren was a trav- eling man, and was home but little He brought his family here from Mrs Warren was an iuvalid, and Warren was engaged in intrigues with other worn en In Connecticut, it Is alleged, and his wife learned of it. June 13 last he came home and had a quarrel with his wife At 3 o'clock In the morning Warren was shot dowo by Herbert, who claimed that his father was assaulting bis mother, and she called for assistance The boy admits the shooting. The Jeweler Played the Races. Nsiw YORK, Dec SO diamond and Jewelry store of Albert Jahn at 889 Eighth avenue is In charge of a sheriff's officer. Jahn has been mi--.: L Chrlstmu, and when his big safe was opened instead of worth of stock being found there- in the safe contained only one copper penny and a lot of pool tickets on the Gut- tenbarg races Silver plated ware was found In the store to swell the total value of stock, safe and fixtures to or Wholesale jewelers are creditors in sums ranging from to the whole aggregating tlfi 000 Jahn's desert- ed wife aays his only bad habit was play- Ing the races Detectives are looking for the missing jeweler A Bis Dublin Failure. DUBLIN, Dec 80 firm of F E. Dubedat Son, stockbrokers, has sus- pended, with liabilities estimated by The Dublin Mail at over and by others at various sums ranging from ifJOOOO np to the former amount It is rumored that the members of the firm are missing The senior partner was chair- man of the Dublin Stock Exchange Upon the announcement of the puwpenslon Mr Copland, the vice chairman was elected to the presidency of the exchange The exchange was thrown into demoralization by the news of the suspension, but the nor- mal feeling was soon restored A nUok Fye Tor Bond. CHICAGO, Dec Horton has decided that the ordinance giving the West Chicago Rapid Transit company the right to build an elevated railroad on Randolph Btreet and Ogden avenue in this city is nullttud void, because many signa- tures to the petition uekjng for the ordi- nance were authorired An appeal will be taken to the appelate court by the tiiinnit company Why not, when you have a cold, take a remedy that you upon to tme your Hire', tough areHaienvdy i i ,It hu cured t> lirger ptroeniAge fill otktr cough MURDERED BY M'BRIDE. A Republican Postmaster Killed in Mississippi. THRLE Ntff IDAHO SFMTORS. There a Spirited Debate hen the of Two of Them Were Pre- sc ed to the the Action of Idaho's Leglalature Strictly LegalT WARHiMjTos Dec 80 M Matthews, of Mississippi, who was the Republican candidate for congress against Congress- man Hooker in the last election, Is a brother of JohuP Matthews, the Republic- an postmaster at Carrollton, Miss who was killed in Cnrrolltou last week by a jnan named McBride Mr J who is in Washington, has just thi following telegram from Carrolltou An Account of the Murder. John was murdered by a mob He had been notified by a dozen men that a mob was going to kill him that day He saw the nieu with tbeir guns, and he got a rifle When he did this the sheriff arrested him aud placed him under bonds John pointed three men out to the sheriff, and asked him to arrest them aud protect his life The sheriff refused It was a plot and all were in it John told Lloyd (a )oung mau working for him) he thought they would kill him before night He stajedat the postofflce until the second dinner bell rang, when he said he would go to dinner They begged him not to go, but he said he would When he reached the hotel steps McBritle, who was still in his drug store, shot him down with a shotgun, killing him inxtantly Not satisfied with this, McBride fired five shots at him from a revolver after he was dead The mob then began dancing and shouting around the body with the most vile and curses John had received several anony- mous letters telling him he must leave the town The murderer goes free and all because they mast have the postoffice at Carrollton Carrolltou's First Republican Postmaster. My said Mr Matthews, only 21 years old He was a bright, in- telligent boy, He was appointed post- master several months ago at Carrollton and while mnce there there have been a uumber of threats on his life I did not think anything would come of it He was the first Republican postmaster to Uke the Carrollton office for many years, and it was freely said that no Republican should hold the offi-e Carrollton is Senator George's home The dead man conies of an old family in Misbissippi In 1S83 his father was shot down by a mob at Hazlehurat, Miss In the senate. Dec the senate a communication from the governor of Idaho was prese ited, transmitting credentials of the senators elect from that Gtorge L. fehoup and McCon nell Ihe credentials were read and that as Mr Shoup was pres- ent the oath of office be administered to him Mr Vance remarked that the new state of Idaho appeared have elected moie than its fan share of senators, and he thought the credentials should be referred to the committee on privileges aud elec- tions Mr Hoar's motion was agreed to and that senator escorted Mr fehonptothe clerk's he took the oath of office. Mr Vauce bald that it was stated in the newspapers that three senators had been elected in Idaho, and that the legislature had gone to the extent of aligning to each of them the term for which he should serve That was contrary, he said, to the rule of the senate and to the constitution. He thought it proper therefore that the question should be determined by the proper committee of the senate Three Senators from One State Mr Hoar argued that it was clear and unquestionable that one of the two sena- tors, whose credentials had just been pre- sented, would go out on March 4, 1891, aud the legislature beiug in session, had elect- ed a senator for the term that would then begin all question there would be a at that time, because one of those tn o senators would have to go out on that date Mr Carlisle said the legislature of Idaho had 110 nsht to assume (in advance of ac- tion by the senate) that there would be avur-Aucy in the seuate from that state on March No election of a senator to fill such vacancy could take place until it was legally known that that would occur He Imagined thai th'Ure never had been a case in the history of the country where a state legislature had chosen three senators at once Mr Hoar moved to lay on the table Mr Vance's motion to lefer the credentials to the com- mittee on privileges and elections. The vote 22, nays, 15 (no quo riim) Then Mr Hoar withdrew his mo- tion to lay on the table, and Mr VancVi motion to refer the credentials of Messrs. Shoup and McCounell to the committal on privileges and elections was agreed to Hlsooek on the fcleotlona Bill Mr Aldrlch offered his resolution for the amendment of the rules which he had heretofore given notice of. aud asked that it be printed and laid over The senate then resumed cousideration of the elections bill, and Mr Hiscock spoke at length in favor of the measure He said that on the pnrity of elections depended uational health and perpetuity alike The gravity of this question surpassed that of any other question before the senate If It were not for the gravity of the situation the argumeuts made on the other side would excite only mirth He asked on what ground the Democratic party laid claim to the virtue and patriotism which it claimed In this controversy Mr Aldrich said he would not invade ntntc to oppress or disfrftnchiae her people, but where congress hud the constitutional power to allevi ite the wrong or to secure rights more perfectly in co-operation with state authorities, thj senate should not hesitate to accomplish it He said that testimony of frauds and the defeat of the public will has accumulated during this debate and still the other side did not pur pose to correct thm monstrous evil, but rather it was in tho air that measures of obstruction might be resorted to to con tinue it N. t. only had these senators to whom the constitution was dear failed to propose a remedy for thesp evils, but tho> had refused to unite with the Republicans, either in tho senate or in committee, to frame a measure that would secure that result T he cone ti-uon was irresistible that the Democuillc paity was content with tho present older of tilings and pur posed to resist ita improvement Speaking of the frauds against the ballot In New York city, Mr Hiscock Raid that a fact that somewhat prepared the public George N. Packer, 680 and 611 street, opposite En Ing nothing but Upinr I.e high Bed Ash and I-Hl-jr white T.ftt, uklud lol tli Ut moLratlc puiltluu lo tins bill was tint at the Him of thine great frauds Samuel J Iildeu nlm had bton by tie 'Jemotratu p irly was the chairman uf thi Dytn t. ui statecoin rolttee ami H-i himself a nsidtnt of the city wliLii llu daily TH wtrtnplete with lufoi n atlon n bout fiUt rt_klstr mot) Referring to the c ear Dr Abbott, for another suppiy of Ij niph, has returned with it He enthu siaatic over its curatne merits Murderrd by PARIS Dec 30 -While the cure of Mer- Imiont, near Arras, was attending to hit duties last evening burglars entered house, aud being discovered and resisted by the cure's mother, aged 89 years, they murdered the venerable lady and I here is as jet uo clew as to their idtutity Fatal Slide at FalU NUGAUV FALLS, N Y Dec 80 rock slide occurred at the mouth of the new tunnel mitanth killing William Anger, of BPTITP OnT UHd h'reaking the leg and fracturing the skull of Peter Scan Ion, of this ulnce Both were workmen If ffODiBtutlona1 toe aot t loeal u CK-PO c> by leoal li rquirei t 'oaitltutlonal nmedy like Hood j wklofc, werklnf through the hkod Ihe whl' i ci I'M nnd promotes pffHcti nrrmimtnt raoaiinds ol i 1 1 t r nits It cured that contlnu il ina hi my throat, ItuDed up lei ins 11 1m helped my who l.ai 1 1 i t for rim down tf health IIH! v truuble Mm I, TV Putmti Conn arloi, Lowell '.10 Dollar THE LARGEST and MOST ELEGANT LINE CONf'KCTlONKKY HOT .i Will be found at Camera's New Confectionery, NEXT DOOR TO BROAD 8TRKFT NATIONAL BANK. The larfrent and most el gant line off ancly Boxei n liable for presents, Inoludlng tho fnmouB MeDnnald Silver Boi oi Boston, w York BOB Chocolates and Bon Bons will be found here, at prices from np to 7no for one pound box, dou'ile price for double None an flue and cheap In the cl tjr tandy Xoyi Mixtures at renuced rates Come and ieo before you bny oe an io Wlihing yon a Mrrry rhrlntmai and 1 TCIJ Happj New Year, with pockeW full oT money, I remain your moat flei1- Tant, Angelo Camera, SOU1M TRENTON, ISTJOYO Goth the method fi'id Hip "f TlDrS 13 t.ll 111, it ISp'i I- I 1 and refreshing to tlit, ta-U .ml ail illy )et p'omptlj on l' e I n Liver and BuwcU, tVuiMi th 'tin efitctuulh, cii licml u lies and nnil onus li Iiitna' of I igs is tin jul) remedy of its kind ever pro Juceff, pleasing to tlie taste and ae ccptible to the stomach, piompt in its action and truly beneficial in its effects, prepared only from the most Healthy and agreeable its many excellent qualities commend it to all and have made it the most popular remedy known. bjrup of 1-igs 19 for sale in 50c and 81 bottles by all leading drug gi'ts. Any lehahla druggist who may not have it on band pro- cure it promptly for any one who wishes to try it. Do uot accept any substitute. CALIFORNIA FIG CO. SUN FRANCISCO CMl. KY ri-mr, n r ITY OF TRENTON C An ordinance to change the grade of a portion of Clinton avenue W HKRKA8, The PenuBvIvama Railroad Tom panjr, lessee of the United New Jeneyand Canal Company, In pursuance ot authority conferred on them fcr that purpose by the Legislature of this State, are engaged m widening the r railroad and building a new passenger station in the Cily of Tren ton, and Whereas, The paid Improvements cannot be properly made unless the grade of a cer- tain portion of Clinton 'ajenue be changed as hereinafter provided aittrHho brfdge on avenue ver said railroad tracks be ex- tended and Whereas, The said improvements in said railroad will promote the interestl of the said cilj of Trenton, and Whereas, Ihe said Pennsylvania Railroad Company have sgreed with the inhabttinta of the city of Trenton that they will fnrnuh or par for all labor and maierlals neco sary to make said change of gmde, and to extend sa d bridge and to ind mnlfy them against any expenses or losses that may be Incurred aa dftuiawrs topropertyBffected, or otherwise, by Eaid ch nge of grade, now, therefore, Tbe Inhabitants of Ihe City of Trenton io hereby ordam SKC 1 That the grade of a portion of Clin- ton avenue, beginning at a pilutonehnu drcd and sixty fonr feet nort icrly from the north cnrb lino nf Ore nwool avenue, nrcd on the curl h. o of Clinton aveni e und ono hundred Knd fifty fert on tho west cnrb lino, and rxto ding northerly a dli- tanco of six hnndrtd arid eiglity ono measured on ihe oant curb lino of raid Clhi- ton avenue, an 1 tovon hundred aid three fort, measure I on the wont curb Hue thereof IK and t e Bftme- Is hereby Is established so KS to eonfurm to tho profile of that piirt of (lin on avenno made by tho Pent sylvnnia Railroad ompany, No vemher 7lh, and nt w on fllo in the (IBroofC C Hav  Survtyor, and th Pennsylvania R llroad CompRiiy are authorized to onct a. new iron bridge over their tracks on lino of paid Clinton avenue In acr idancf Wllh the Plan No sub mined herewith, provided the Ponnsylvmlg Railroad ompany lessee of the Un ted Nnw Tcrupy and (anal Company, shall wnhm th rty days --ftertho pwi'Bge thor of, fi e a satlsfsctiry bond with iho Bald City Sullcitor f r tho fal'hfnl performance of ihe atropminta hefon met tioned indimnifylng the said city of Trenton sgalnst all claims for dimapoB arifl'ng from srv d changes of grade wh ch can bo enforced against tho said cl'v by s lit, slid that this ordinance shall not go Into i fleet until Ihu said bond is filed and tho cxpnnso of tho paspago of this ordl- nauc Is paid Passed ommon Council Do' ember OEO E WH1TTAKER, Attest President JNO 0 OWFNB, City Clerk by the Mayor, but psssrd by C muion louncll, notwithstanding the Vayor's objections thereto, Dtcomber S3d, 1690 1 f if i i i i i i 15 EAST STATE STREET. Winter Stylo Dorbyo, SkAL TURBA.N8, SEAL CAPS, S K .A. T c> T o "V i- S .o "V 1-1 YOUMAN'S HAT; A SPKCIATTY. l HE POSITIVE KI Y BROTHERS. CO HVaireu PrleeWc YOQT W KITING MA CHIT M. No Ribbon. Direct Printing. Perfect Alignment f. Challenger Co., GENERAL AGENTS, NO 1407 CHEfflNUi HTBEE! Phfladelphla, Pa. SKM1 FOR LATAIOOn I I V r, v j-- dX' v Butchers, Restai ran i, Grocers, ivote s, Etc. All klndsofMeat Uaoks ilocl Benchn, Lonntflrfi, Bn ra aud roc Desk-s KriwdanJ heeseta Fl n and Oyster i cunte.s, l rayo to The Monitor li ani Cart, 1 LL 4 Zb. Manufactured by C.V. KILL, LOR LA AND WILLOW 8TB. Part of Green A Hill, TRENTON N J HAD THIS MAN Ho hw panta of the CLOTHING rillXJKING 00., would aot no ni neh the wmd whutied thiongh his tftilc, t-rt MIB, Soye Cluldrsi w'M TAILOR-MADE CLOTHING A' .narh in. Phlladilphiit prices. Oar g> t W-dKT OVEHOOAT8 US fH, our SAMPLE BVJIIrl, M'J and J14, for h vtdo. tor Okililren'i CLOTH ING MADE fQ teutitrj M das  t toO students argues couclu sivelj that the pretensions oi the institution are not ill-founded. Our siueess is our boat argument, our work our best recommendation, and the work do. and by it alone do we to bo adjudged worthy of patronage. Term begins Mondav, Sf ptomber 1, 1890. Enroll at ouee b'or utalogue, address TH08. J. STEWART, Box 627, Trenton, N. J. '0 nnH 12 S Krnad Slrret Between Warren Broad Sutett. JPO Jt e J A V (w 20 EAST FRONT STREET I have on t %rgn line ol at the lowpgt prlcen, to aiofle out nlook Hpeolal nltnntlon la called to mj Loug Reach Skate Ibity mllfi hour,   

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