Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Trenton Times Newspaper Archive: November 28, 1890 - Page 1

Share Page

Publication: Trenton Times

Location: Trenton, New Jersey

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Trenton Times, The (Newspaper) - November 28, 1890, Trenton, New Jersey                               VOL. IX. NO. 9179. I'KteNTON, FalDAY AKTKKNOON, NOVtfMBKK 28, 1890. TWO OKVl'fl PRINCE ION'S BLUE DAY. YaJe Mopped the Ground with the Tiger Colors 8COKE-WII, rf2, PKIMtlON, 0. und HI u k Outpluyed at tvery I olnt uiul a Crualilng it Inlr Min 1H( IUIIB I roved a Second 1 oe Severely Hurt Al l lie elmmplouship football gfuiie between Princeton and Yale, whieh was contesttd ou the Eastern Park grounds jentrrdiiy Hftprmiou, was wou by by n beore of 62 to 0 Ihe game was w il uesii d b} 25 000 persons who manifested their enthusiasm m ever} con ceivable man tier Ihe crowd came from every part of New York state from tbe in tenor of many surrounding states and from all over tbe United States Nearly all tbe different colleges m the east were represented ainoug the At-1 SO Jim Robinson run on the held the Princeton sweater aud wuh followed a few moments uftii bj the Princeton team and substitutes numbering twenty two in all The jell that went up must have been heard in New It had hardly died away before Capt Rhodes came on the field with bis u en behind him, and the yell that weut up for w im even greater than that for Princeton and lasted longer Ihe teams finally lined up in the follow- ing order How They Lined. Vil E POSITION PRTNeirrOH Haruiell L, fi ei d Warren Wallis Li-rt laekle Spccr Ueffelfinger Left puard Crater bymmes h M n Lsop 1 ihbt guard K ght taekle Crosby KiL.lit.ci i ir Q.mir hi k C tig Hulftm k Ilnivv Half Ijjek B risont, Full IHU t The Trick Fulled Brooks, of Harvard, was referee, and Coffin of Wesleyan was umpire Then the substitutes gathered up the sweaters and r in to the lines aim tbe crowd shouted and }elled as though it meant to a final im ictus to favorites be- fore the game began hen Mr Brooks called time Princetem had the ball and formed for the Lewis J? iruwu. Poe K Dg Bpicer King M CLLJ.G V trick This move was a failure, for King, who ran with the ball, was downed where he was On the second down the ball went to Spicer, who ran ten yards Then The ball went to Hntnans who kicked it It was caught by McClung within fifteen yards of Yale's goal Heffel finger made fivp yards OQ the fourth down with no gain the ball went to Prince- ton Homans tried to kick a goal from the field, but failed The playing was ter- ribly sharp and the cheering simply ter- rific. The ball was within twenty yards of Yale's goal until it was kicked The ball was brought to the twenty five yard line and Yale tried to force it by an open bridge, but balked by the Princeton rushers Poe tackled sharply aud Harvey could not make a gam around the end. McClung and Morrison both tried a dash through the line, but failed, and the ball went to Morrison for a kick on four downs The ball was fumbled by Princeton and fallen on by Ueffelfinger Six to Nothing In Tale's Favor. Harvey made a fine run of yards Another brilliant run gave him ten yards more Yale had now advanced the ball twenty five yards up the field by a series of brilliant forced rushes, and the ball was in the middle of the field. Moirison gained another five yards, but Priuoeton again got the ball and Spicer carried it back five yards to the middle of the field Hartwell got the ball and made for the Princeton goal He ran to the twenty yard line, when Furness donned him The ball was rar- rled in twenty yards and play resumed Rhodes got through Princeton's rush line and carried the ball two feet from the goal The crowd went wild as McClnng dashed against Princeton's rushers and managed to squeeze the ball over the line A goal was kicked, which made the score 6 to 0 in Yale's favor Beffelflnger's Great Work. Princeton lined up for the V tricfi, but gained nothing The ball on the second dowu was fumbled Heffelfinger fell on it Yale advanced it by short runs through the center The ball went to Prince- ton, but she could gain, nothing on four downs It went .to Yale and MoCIung made five yards easily Heffelflnger took the ball and was pushed ten yards, driving the Princeton men before him like chil dren The rush line work of the Yale team was immeasurably supenoi to Princeton's When the ball was once more putin play Crosby gained five yards tluough the center 'Ihe ball went to Pnnceton for off side play Homans made a long kick down the field which was caught by Me Clung, who advanced the b ill twenty five yards before he was tackled Ihe ball theuchangid hands Homans tntd for a kick and McriuiiK  ards Mc- Clung then made another of his centrums seormg a touehdowu He to kick goil, howover Una made Yale' Beore 10 with Prineetou still nothing When plaj was begun at, an Hainan made a kick which was well taught bv B Morrison and (arriixi back ill teen jards when ho was tackled out of bounds Princeton's hue stemed to be unable t withstand the onslaught of McClung terrific dashes and skillful dodging Clung a Second Ames McGlungswurk Was as brilliant as an Ames ever showed, and the a InnralTon the crowd DSC for Yale as thej saw how great a game she was putting up he the ball had advanced to Princeton twenty-five yard line Harvej tiled to hue the center but was successfully tackle by Poe Yale s playing was marked through by the most brilliant interfering desperate rushes and daring dodging Th ball was gnen to McClung when withi ten yards of Princeton's goal aud he score another toachdowu and kicked goal bring Ing the score up to 16 for Yale to Prince- ton's nothing Again the Princeton me lined up and started with the V trick an gained about five yards Then the ba was passed to Spicer and he made a run gaining ten yards. The ball was now 0 Yale's twenty five yard line Homan kicked it on the fourth down It went be- hind Yale's goal line, and was brought ou and carried to the middle of thr field Pnnceton got the ball and King made run of ten yards Homans then kicked i weU down tbe field, whea Mtfelung turn bled it and then fell on it Ihe first hal ended with the ball ten vards from the in Yale's possession Capt. Poe Hart. At 8 10, when the second half started the Yale men came ou the field confident while Princeton seemed rather despond ent Yale began by taming ten yards Princeton then got five yards Homan punted and Rhodes got the ball and mad' a great run through Princeton s hue fo twenty five jards Pue was hurt in th scramble which follovve 1 and it looked a one time as though he was going to qui playing, but he finally pluckily resumed Bj a series of runs Yale got the ball within twenty yards of Princeton's gf al Prince- ton got the ball and gained ten jards, bu McClung got it again and carried it back eight yards with two men on his back only five jards to gam Yale lost the ball and Homans saved a score bj punting to the middle of the field All lnle s Way. Once more Yale worked the ball down toward the goal bj forced rushes of Rhodes and McClung McClung finally kicked and Homaas caught the ball on Pr.n ton's ten yard line Homans then kicked back to the center and McClung imme- diately returned it The ball went out of but Homans got it after a tighi race At this point Dhss took Harvey's place, the latter having had his ankle hurt The ball was then advanced ten yards by McClung and after a scrimmage he got the ball again and carried it to within five jards of the line Rhodes rushed it across the line and McClung kicked the goal, making the score 22 to 0 in Yale's favor Rhodes got the ball when the men lined up and carried it to the middle ol the field Morrison gamed ten jards more Bliss then made a beautiful run of fifteen yards and Yule got five jards more on ou side play McClung and made runs of five and ten yards respectively which brought the ball to Pr nceton's twenty five yard line McClung then scored another touch down and kicked goal, making Yale's score 28 Yale's Great Ictory When the ball was brought back to the middle of the field Homans kicked it well up In Yale s field, but the latter worked it back by backs and runs into Princeton's field and Morrison finally scored a touch down McClung failed to kick goal and the game was called with the score of to 0 in favor of Yale McClung's great work throughout the game was greatly admired, and the En- glish football players who were present were enthusiastic over him A Bow at Rochester ROCHESTER N Y Nov 28 football game between the University of Rochester and Union college teams here ended in a disagreement Rochester claims to have won the game fairlj bj a score of 4 to 0, but the referee, who was the trainer of the Union eleven, announced the score was 6 to favor of his club He did not make the decision ou the ground, however, as he dared not on account of the menacing attitude of the enraged spectators Ihe game will be protested by Rochester Cornell Chicago. CHICAGO Nov us defeated the Chicago football team, composed largely of graduates of Yale and Pmceton, m an exciting game yesterday by a score of 12 to 8 LIKE THE NAVASSA RIOT Four Hen Killed in a Fight In South Carolina. BALTIMORE, Nov 28-Joseph Dynoski and William Zwinski, who left here three weeks ago with seventj five other laborers for the Ashley River Phosphate company's guano deposits, near Charleston, S C, have returned and tell of a not which oc curred there in which Emil Klein and three Poles who were in theie gang were killed Klein, who was a saloon keeper of this city, was in charge of seventy flvs men and promised them good wages The Poles, Italians Indians aud negroes who are the only inhabitants of these guano ixeepting the white bosses, became dissatisfied with their paj which was much less than had been promised, aud demanded better treatment Klein tried to qu et the belligerents but was un successful Ihe negroes then opi ned fire on Klein and some other whites Klein fled, but was overtaken and shot dead Dynoski says that three other men were killed in the melee A Demnle folaoned. GLTHRIF I 1 Nov 28 -Another trng edyln.the notorious McPeek West land claim affair has occurred May Bailey, a witness in the case, was to have testified Wednesday, but Tuesday night she died in great agony from tho effects of arsenic poisoning Mrpeek Is suspected, and it la likely that hn will be vnched If every leader could nndenitanot'what a remedy for oonghs and oolds Hires' Cough Core Is, every family in this land would talk praise U Is destined, for this reason, to be the household medicine id the world. Get four Ohiiitmw roods at l the Hatter. THOUSANDS WENT DOW A Stand Collapses at the Prince ton-Yale Game FIFfY I'rOl'It WIHL INJURE The W under Wus That a Number of th 3 000 Struggling Human We Crunhed to Death by the Debrl Fatal Accident at lutllnnupolU NMVioKK Nov .38 what seems have been a miracle the great I'rina ton football game jesterday escaped an i troduction u.f slaughter at hasteru par A temporary stanu broke down causm more or less serious injury to half a hu dred persons but, providentially causin the death of no one For the purpose providing more seats the managers of t: park had seut to it from Philadelphia movable stand capable of accommodatin about 3 000 This contrivance, with iro supports and wooden seals about six inch across and three inches in thickness, so constructed that it can readily b taken to pieces and quickly put togethei again It was erected in the southeaster section of the i ark nearly opposite th eastern end of the grand stand It was i tended for ufce by persons who had pal the dollar entrance fee, but had not pu nhased two dollar reserved seats The Stuntl Loaded Down. In anticipation of a great crush whe the hour for calling the game approache quite a number of sensible spectato reached the grounds about noon Th temporary stand having been erected at greater distance from the fence aud ther fore nearer the playing field than th other bleacheries, the early arrivals gav it the preference and as a consequent there were on it at noon some 3.000 pei sons, of whom perhaps a score w ei e women It was extremely cold on the grounds an some of the young men on the stand, wit a vietv to Tvarminji themselves bega jumping up and down on the beats, whic ran from about a foot from the ground i the front to a height of about sixteen fee in the rear The Stand Collapses The police saj that at least 800 men an_ boys were engaged in this perilous pro ccodjng when the great stand collapse with a crash The north end fell to th ground and the southern portion flew up ward, while thiee thousand people wer burled in the debris In an instant atte the collapse tbe air was filled with th shrieks and groans of those injurec Capt French of tbe new ward precinct who was on the grounds with a detail o his men, set them to work to th fifty or so persons pinned under the falli stand, and then rushed to the nearest tele phone and sent word to headquarters to have all the ambulances in the city sen to the park Owing to the llghtunfui of the mateiia with which the stand constructed th work of extrication was not either difficul or tedious, and the debris been almos entirely cleared away before the first am balanra arrived fn fifteen minutes it wi ascertained no one had been killed. A List of the Injured. The injured so far M lnuiwii are- John AglHIar, Cunt ctdet at PefllralrllL sprained Perrine Bonney, at Peeknfcill knee 8 penned w Q Dunning, Princeton, contusion of leg Frank K. Eldrldge, Princeton "98, hurt abon the legs H W Fuller scalp wound James McGlone, aged M 168 Stone Due Brooklyn, contused leg John E. Princeton, theologirol dent compound fractum of the leg Edward Petne PlRlnflolrt, N J, Pnnceton, nip bruised. E. B Remington 808 Clinton st'eet, Brooklyn, right foot ankle jammed D Turner 12 years, student Troy, N T, fract- ure of left arm. Ijiwrence Van Buren Plalnfleld a Princeton graduate right ankle badly crushed. Albert i od wa Clinton muscles of the strained and bruised Charles ilson j eara, M B jwery leg bruised George A Wjlie a years hihograpliei, Nunnaodie slight contusion of ihe back Alemndor Jr lawjer 100 East 1 hirty eighth street 1( p bruised Elder P inct ti n 91 thigh bruised GufiVy Princeton 9 arm jammed A Guild, Princeton 9i leg jammed F S Keeler 100 I a.st Th rij eigi th slreet, Lo- u i bia School of Mines 91 left wiwt broken W Keeler brother of atxn e right wriil prained Haukm Princeton ankle sptamed Cause ol the Acciil.'nt. Wagner Bros of Philadelphia erected ihe stand Ihej employed two expert stand builders who had the use of a pati nt owned by a Mr Ziegler of Buffalo Mr pier's patent was to build a stand con siructed with such an admirable mterde pendence of timbers that the more people ou put on the stand the '-trouger and firmer it became The manageis of the paik however chum that it would have stood the of the 3 000 people it was ixpecttd to hold Ihej SB} that it was the jumping at one end of it that caused it to ci llapse It Was a Sad Celebration INDIANAPOLIS Nov The foe tball :ame between the Butler eleven and the Purdue univeisity team for the state cham piouship was won by the Butler team Ibey celebrated their victory last night by driving through the city in a tally-ho coach containing thirty persons While crossing ,he street railroad tracks the king bolt ol the vehicle broke, precipitating the occu lants to the ground, fatally injuring md seriously injuring a number of others Ihe following is a list of the injured. George Linkenfelter, injured internally, will probably die, Robert Hall, shoulder .rushed and hurt internally, E W Bray, >adiy bruised and injured internally, Theo Layman both legs broken and in ured George Dean, back in ured, W Ivewoonib- bnilty cut about the Judgment student, Bayonnn, H J sltgh ihould be displayed In buying tine above all things Tn selecting remedy (or any disease, you should positive that It contains nothing lnja> to the health remcH' ct the market letwj the patient nuoh worse condition, them b purely vegetable, the most delicate child ve It with absolute safety mercury or Of any yet It never fallg to cure tt Is recommended for Book on Blood and Skin diseased ftefc Swift Specific Co., AtlantA, THE I bH LAND BILL INTRODUCE Mr I the M ,-ir, Whl, I ti, u 1 1 ONDtJN In the heusHofcoi mu s Mr liilf ur thief for li Ian I intn d ictd the Insl 'ai Mill H said the v imneut's poll uas tht sail as In b it for simpll tin 1 II ba bi en eut in half Both pun i h weie niLtit illy the same is in ihe I 11 lobV One vaiiatlon of th [res nt b fi JIM that of 1 st year was u u it met sonic d e Mr Parnell M Paruell li I suggested thu He iiMle, of be confined to ten u s who holdings w tre under v U i m i 1 hough be (Mr BalfourJ nil nut a cept exactlv that limltatlo 1 e 1 H 1 alten the scope of. the bill by t i lmm all pin 1> grazing farms and farms wt se tenau did not reside on them Ai i tlie oth u at all The government were using the Brills credit to carry out this vital reform uc primarily for the benefit of this eountr or that but for the benefit of the empire a whole Another consideration was th fact that tue land question m Ireland waa largely used for political objects It would be absurd, therefore to leave communities under the incitement of ag tators to determine whether tlie} shoul adopt a remedy going to the root of agi nan discontent If they were to give loea control m any form it ought to be by plebiscite of enabling them under the safeguard of the ball >t to voi upon the question of grantini, a coutingen portion ot the guarantee fuud for eac county Mr Labouchere moved an amcndmen pledging the imperial credit fo the purchase of land until the eouutr should have its consent at a genera election Lost by a vote of J j to 117 Mr Orladstoue Sir ilham Vern n Harcoun and Mr Morle} walked out before th vote was taken Mr Paruell and all th Parnellite members voted with the go eruuient Ihe bill then had its first read ing amid the cheers of the goverumeu supporters A Waiui Welcome to the Krazlllaus WAbHISGfos Nov afternoo the president entertained ut luncheon tweu t} hv u of the officers of the Brazilian squae rou The House was hands inel decorated for the occasion, and the i 01 expressed the nselves us bcrne, ul pleaded it their reception Ihis the prrsiknt will tender the ollieeis a le tepiioL it uliich arniv uavj diplonmti aud othei uflieidls will be pieseut Ui Baturda} night it is probable lliat a reeep tiou and dinner will be tendered the Bin ziliaus b} the Metropolitan club ol tui city, at which Admit ilKogeiswill preside Secretary I lacv will give them a receptior aud dinner at the hotel cm Mou eveuuij., Vu which all the proiuiueiit navy army and diplomatic ofliuals will be m vited Two Murderers Respited CoLLMlils boveniorCanip bell hm respited Henry Popp aud Isaa Smith who were sentenced to hang in th pemtentiar} annex last night. Popp was respited once before w lieu he was within three hours of tbe time of his execution He admits his guilt but extenuating cir cumstaiiees which suiruuud his crime wil probabl} secure ioi him commutation t< life imprisonment bmilh has now beei respited seven times His conviction vva secured upuii circumstantial evidence, auc protested hlS innocence I is now claimed that uew evidence has beei hscovered winch will establish his muo- ceiice anil fix tlie enuie upou another mau Gone with u Widow and sped il to Th eut his wile to Lmupe uu a visit to her :e atives CAtARRh J' t lODrQratlona1 toe not looal Jtseue, tbtrtfore It st looal II rer irei rtmedy like Hood s Sariapartlla whlou working through the blcod eradicates (hi impurity which nuses and promotes effects a Thousands of people testify to the succni of Hood s Sarsijmrllla as a remedy for when other prepintlons had failed. Stuffed-Up Feeling. "I win say I have been troubled for mini years with tint teiribly disagreeable dliedse, catarrh I took Hood s Sarsapa- rUla with the v ei y bi st results It cured me ot that contlmiil dropping in my throat, up feeling It h is sho helped my mother, who his tiken ft for run down state of health snd kidney trouble MBB S D. HIATH Putnam Conn Hood'tt 1 Is f Prepared only i lea Lowell Mail. kfO I 100 Doses One Dollar The largest variety ol BUPKRFINB CREAM madejn the U B will be fonnd Rt ANQKT.O CAMERA'S Fine Confectionery Store, !OB SO u J. Hf BEO ATI TBKNTON N J. Fancy Frnlts, Ice Cream, Soda Water, loe ream Sodiui, Milk Shakes, Lemonade, Ao Iways on hand, and the beat that can be hsa nd made These u re loots Priced convenl- nt for all (cms Mains Have been aaslgneil the AC- it a. c, Kl V J I >1 ix II i) it SMA in s i uj_ i s i s n0 l-lr I V .v Mil j i t i Cuugiisall iiuelmteti it rd at Ills h e in U uibui> i i u a eun i h id n I d s DM I w i, 1 in Vu 'Ilk I s( b n i t i sli lUUIlC e ,-u ,l( 1 Hilt HJ 1 1- HI L i- e li 11 1 Hi la 1 he 1 i I chinch is IU n u i uiie in il L l in I I e w i., v i} p i i in 1 ii u i t i I Hi u h kl Ik I i rtllc tWU 1 t I, il i u, tl u I I I a ill I0} u an in u j HlUir si I I l K I OO I 111 sit i i -Ml I K been bi uni t IBII t I I n H Hu, i il t n ek lat i w h u I 1 l u i j 1 st. uiieeusei JlltMHK, Iti tn Tho ts He ol Hi ul s 11 1 al i is il to h ive been i p ml In IheshentF visited Bakei s Hi t h us ,n Devon for the putpuse uf sen nit, the u n meus but fmnd it tlnhtl) clisid Mrs Baker h iv ing rUurued to the home of het father at Chester St Paul 000 Fire. fax PILL Nov fire which stalled i u Power s drj goods store at the corner of fcoiuth and bible} streets last ui0ht caused Oou damane before it was extinguished Ihe loss is fully covered b} insurant Ihe cause of the hie is uu known Cut In Pieces by a Tralu MEDINA N Nuv A dil btjit, au old and well known resident of this place and formerly au extensive oper ator 111 grain was literally cut in pieces by a freight train jesterdaj afternoon He wasstnckeu with a nt while walking ou the tratk toward his home Two Boys Killed FAUS N Nov Oatiiiau and Cliff Bentlej 9 and H years old rebpectiveh were stiuck and killed by a tram on the Uelawaie and Hudson branch railroad near band} Hill }ester day afteruoou A Carnage liurtied UTICA N Nov 18 carriage works of George M Brown 4. Lo together with several dwellings in the village of Clayville were totally desiroml b) fira last evening Luss ouu parti} cov ered by insurance Both the method und results -when fejiup of Figg is taken, it is pleasant aud refreshing to the taste, and acts gently jet promptly on the Kidneys, Liver and Bowels, clnuses tlie tern dispels cold-! head iches and fevers and cnus habitual constipation, fyiup of Figs is the only remedy of its kind ever pro duced, pleasing to the taste and ac ceptable to the stomach, prompt in its action and truly beneficial in its effects, prepared only from the most healthy and agreeable substances, its many excellent qualities commend it to all and have made it the most popular remedy of Figs is for sale in 50c and 81 bottles by all leading drug Ejists Any reliable druggist who may not have it on hand will pro- cure it promptly for any one who wishes to try it. Do not accept any substitute. CALIFORNIA FIG SYRJP CO. tOUISVIIIF K1 SKH FRANCISCO CAL. V Y pf N V MOST APPETIZING EASILY DIGESTED. Hoinrss prness renders their eouu of digestion and develops m the highest d, gree its delicious ;lh r ihe besst -oi :r :iflrh former' VANlidUUN'SCuCUA "BEST GOES FARTHEST.1 VAN HOUTENS 001 O A c. ,r 1 .1 mn Uco, Invented mud. and In and b.lter w i i i i l i 15 EAST STATE STREET. WlNTHJIt STY DH1I SEAL TURBANS, SEAL CAPS, S, H A V JX S. YOUMAN'S IIA'n A IKI.Y BROTHERS, en Sti, New York. PriceWctg.1 UT WiUTINC MACMINHi. No Ribbon. Direct Printing. Perfect Alignment. Challenger A Co., OENKRAL AGENTS, NO 1407 CHESlNUi 8TBEFT, Philadelphia, Fa. SEND FOR CATALOGUE HAD THIS MAN Bought hu pcntoof tho AVIEKICAN CLOTH IN AND TAILORING CO, a. would not h.v. biw innch wind whuiltd th oagh hu W clothing iht Boy. aad wit) but YAILOR-MADE CLOTH mtHh .em Philadelphia p-iccs ir 1 OVEiiOOAlfc. irifl S.1 ana and oar HA Mi LL I J, ?13 and for rfe? for Children 'i -i Ovixconai. CLOTHING MA 6. (tOS-p u Uu brat ko f jontry w iti, ngkt .A. M AT W A l.l.l i Pol la' Dolls' The largest and finest ortment to be found in tbe whole State toll heads, wigs, arms 'hoes and doll items f every k md Dulls that do everything nt talk, at lower prues thau over Also a grand new atocn of very fine and tyllsh Umbrellas among which we offer ne lot GOOD Gloria lull Umbrellas ith silver handles at only 9Bo, worth 1 40 in the city all over La'est stv les of Cuba Batch Ms and Hand Jags, Pocket Books I idles Bureau overs lumber Boboo, Bilk Handkerchiefs and Mufflers and ladies and gents' Glovos of very make Among our Gloves we carry ta most dnrab'e kids, warranted tbe b st ade in the market Fine Underwear ami ric parm ntfl, Hosiery and iany useful presents arriving now every ay Childreo's and Infttnti' 0 oar spe- alty Hand kMt Zephyr Worsted Goods, careful selected assortment New arn als also in misses' and children's hats and api, late t styles All our goods are the very best obtainable ndpri os GUARANTEED I i OPPOeirK 011 HALT. P received a lot Biuk AI.I, ILK Muffleii for ladles and gent) MSI OI'INHl. A CASE OF THOSE by of Boston, at iv.awoitaw'0 Broad Street f IIIY OF TEENTON LICFN8E NOTICE ihe following named persona having fl rd applications for license with the City Clei k, according to law, due notice la hereby given that the aaid applications will be ted at the next meeting, _of_tha Hnardof Excise, on WEDNESDAY, DECEMBEB at 730P M JIB8T WABD. Applegate, Edward H 14 S Warren, rt newal, retail Barlow, Richard, 119 8 Broad, renewal, retail Leius, Au UBtaa J 675 Perry, transfer from L Swetnam 8pi gel, Martin, 30 8 Warren, renewal, retail SECOND WABD Hibbs, Stephen, 201 8 Warren, renewal, retail THIBD WABD Hartman, George J 415 Federal, re- newal, retail Phillips Farley K, 433 Centre, renewal retail FODBTH WABD Feenane John, 401 newal, retail UriH WABD Falcey, Eecher atreet, renewal, retail Thomson, Wm E cor Bohm and Escher renewal, retail SEVENTH WABD Christian M 346 Brunswick ave renewal retail MoClarg, Edmond W 318 N Warren re newal, retail Walters, Jacob, 24 Morgan uve renewal, retail, EIGHTH WABD Brewster, Wm 518 N Clinton renewal retail Mtfmire, Hngh, 30 Olden avo, tranafer from 73 Olden ave retail TENTH WABD Sweeney Owen B, 5 Emory ave re newa', retail KLETSNTR WABD King, Paul, 801 Andeison, renewal, re tall Lelp, Wm H 82 Tersey street, transfer from Jamefl Flyun POOL APPLICATIONS Second Jamoa, 21 N Wai ren street Third Dennis, 130 S Broad atreet, Hastcrson, Hugh, cor Centre and Caea streets Eighth Jos 83 Brou ng ave Ninth Lambert 8 Clinton ave Dlabrow, B F oEmorv avo Qeller John 8S9 8 Broad -itreot Tenth Browu, George, 140 W ah Ington street, Hamell, Frank, 500 Mo month street JNO 0 OWENS City Clerk [Adv'g fee, t 11 26-Jt Oct. a J" ANNINQ 
                            

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 130 million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 145 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 19 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication