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Trenton Times: Thursday, September 11, 1890 - Page 1

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   Trenton Times, The (Newspaper) - September 11, 1890, Trenton, New Jersey                               VOL. VIII. NO. L3. rRKNTON, TIIUKaDAY AKTKKNOON, BHTfKAllJKK 11, 1890. TWO CWN1B McKiiilej's Farious Measure Goes Thiough the Senate. FINAL TARIFF SPEECHES. TUe Closing Dcbutt >lus 11 Ur) Inter- Uue. iluar, Uittcock and Iniies, of Nevada, Give the Hill Ito Cloning Eu- logy from the Republican 8ldc llHter WordH from the New Legislator Able Speeches uu tlie Democratic Side by Messrs Turpie and -Others Mr ftQgar -Sched- ule nnd the Decline of American For elgn Commerce Chaigea from Mr Vance That the South Had Keen Great- ly Discriminated Against fu the Male. Ing of the III11 Sept tariff bill passed the senate by a vote 40, nays 29 at 5 30 p, m ednesday soon as the vote was announced the senate adjourned The in detail was as follows The Vote on the liHL Yeas Aldrich, Allen Alltaon Blair, Cameron Ct aodler Culljni Davis Dawos Dliot, Frjt Huwley H gKiua HltKOck IIoar liiKalU Junes tViv) McVllllan Maudenton Mitchell Me oil) Paddock pteret I latt 1 lumh. Power Quay ban lers, ba VT bl e n au Spoouer bquire Stewart Htueltbndge Teller VVaahburu, Bate Eerrj Blackburn Blod (jell Butler Carlisle (oekrell Coke C Iquitt Daniel lanlttier Oormau Orav Harris Hearst, Jones (Irk) Ketma M Paseo Pugh Ran soul Reugan Turpi Vauee Voorhoca, Waltliall Wilson (51d 'ihe following pairs were announced, the first named in each couple being m favor of the bill Messrs Dolph and Browu, Edmunds and George Harwell and Payne, Hale and Morrlll and Hamp- ton, Stanford and Gibson Pettigrew and Call The Senate s Gonferrees Mr Aldrich moved that the senate insist on amendments to the house bill and for a committee of conference the con ference to consist of seven on each side The motion was agreed to and Messrs Pherson Vance anl Carlisle were appoint- edfconferrees ou the part of the senate Mr Boar's W hen the six hours' closing debate com- menced Mr Hoar s )oke first Referring to reciprocity hebtnlthe Lnited States should break down if possible the practice of for eign nations imposing an export duty products used here i hese goods should be excluded altogether if they could not be supplied from Senator Hiscock hpeaks. benator Hiscock made a bitter axsau.lt upon the Democratic senators who he said, had with the aid of English, French and Qertiijin made an qpe-n fight to degrade American labor and bank rupt American capital There never Ijad been a time within his knowledge when foreign agents had such a free access to committee rooms and were so active in furnishing aid to American representatives In order to retard the progress of wise legislation And yet the representatives -of the Democratic-party, with an unparal- leled audacity, proclaimed that the motive which actuated them was the elevation of American labor and the prosperity of American industries and of the common Country Senator Gibson then took the floor He claimed that under the tariff bill the whole sugar crop of Louisiana had been sacrificed for the benefit of the sugar trust The to be nearly tl Senator Turpie on I abor Mr Turpie spoke extensively upon the relations of laboring men to the tariff He admitted that the laborers of Europe were often very Illy paid in some lines but in the United States they were also often very wretchedly paid. If American wagi were superior to wages in other countries It was a subject for rejoicing but it was no reason why the American laborer should be subjected to unnecesoaiy exaetloub or to unjust taxation Wages in the United States might be much higher than In Europe and yet be much lower than jus- lice or equity required They did not depend on tariff legislation, protective or prohibitory They did not depend on any legislation. The influence of the movement of John Burns and his dockmen of the Thames was not confined to London, to England, or to the United States It had been felt by free labor everv where AnolviDK his remarks to tha tariff bill Mr Turpie said that that bill was a bill of attainer against wages It was a bill calculated to dimmish tha means of the laborer's subsistence and therefore to diminish his means of resistance to the opposition and injustice with which he was always threatened by a reduction of wages As the bill was the worst of tariff laws, so K would be the last that would under the giitue of protection to the American laborer taY bun- for ill pxrluslvn priv- ileges anoT strip labor of its earnings and finally of its rights He believed most firmly that the law would not be perma nent either in Its administration or its principle Mr Vest H Respects to Mr HlKrock Mr Vest was the next speaker He said he would not emulate the1 example of the Benator from Ixew (Mr Hiscock} and follow him into the domain of epithet and vituperation That senator hstl charged the Democratic paity with party of ruffianism and crime and h ul charged Democratic senators with being charltans demagogues dialiouest pretendirs and fcabftiinl (.in-rf'-T. TI r, HIWU! II Absolutely Pure. A of baking puwder High lit of In XT. B. 17, lOP, >arty anu every gentleman in u could it that senators aaseitlon th eon .empt tor a centirrv in peace mid in war n sunshine aud shadow Its had loated in everv towuslip countv au I state n the Union anil would contln ie t float until the country itjelf euaed to exist Mr Vest characterized the bill as the culminatit u of what was called tl e pro .e the i rmeiple in this u 1 a-j a glaiiug illustration of the hist tie u ith hat class legislation never leee led He congratulated the eouutrv ou tl e i f the I ill because he believed tl it tie soouer tht crisis was reached the 1 eUer it would be for the couutry aud all it, male rial industries Tht Decay of American Comimrte He sail the decay of the foreign torn meree of the Lulled States was due to tlie party, which refuse! to per mil the American people to pure) use their where they could purchase them cheapest and put them under the stars aud stripes Mr est went on to denounce the action, ot the finance committee and of Hepubli can senators on the sugar schedule, aud declared on the authority of a statement of Mr ATTlBou In 1888 that the reduction of the standard on free sugar 16 to Id aud the increase of the duty above No If from 4-10 to 6 10 eent a pound, would put a j ear In the pockets of the sugar refiners Ojniing- to the question reciprocity Ml Blaine s market was in the wrong plate Ihe English were bound to have the wheat aud corn and meat products of the west The South American people dldxiot want those prod ucts and would not take them Mr est opposed the reciprocity amendment because it committed to the president powers which were abhorrent to the priu ciples of the government Store Charges of Sectionalism Mr Vance said that the alleged purpose of the bill was to reduce revenue but It was not to reduce taxation It was In tended to increase taxation while reducing revenue, aud to-divert that Increased teiu- tion from the treasury of the people to the pockets of private parties He said the bill v as intentionally and scandalously sec- t onal It made sugar free and sugar was asouthern product It made the machinery for making beet in the northwest free and It maintained duties on the cane sugar machinery of Louisiana. Rice was a southern product aud the duty on rice wnsjc It red Buuling twine fir the west, fields was made free but the duty on cottou ties was tripled. He believed that the western farmer would be ashamed to Ijokmthe face of his brother farmer of the south after that unjust discrimination Ihe bill hud but one redeeming feature and that was its Intense and naked selfish cess which would be the means of arous ing the conscience of- the American people of lending to -its Men Not Machines Wanted. Mr Jones (Isev made an address In com the pohcv of this protective He compared the free traders to robbers aud pirates of the middle ages and taid that free trade would result in the destruction of industry Free trade, he said would bring the watch protection would bring the watchmaker Men con fctitutcd society machines did not Not onlj fiee tmde deluwrc as a theory 1 ut it was in fa t falling into discredit v here it exited In conclusion Mr Jones taid that he regarded the pending bill as one of the most benehuent measures that could be enacted into legislation, unless indeed the duties were made higher MORE ALLEGED TRAIN WRECKING A MUplaced Switch ut Albany Damages Central Rolling Stock ALIUM Sept misplaced switch at I umber street In this city sent the night boat expreos fr >m -the north--eb the ware and Hudson road crashing Into a freight train last night Verj fortunately thetnlnwas going but slowly it having Hopped a few blocks beyond for some reason No lives were lost a few persons 1 eing thrown from their seats and bruised ihe switchman rrank Hatch is a Knight of Labor man who resumed his position yisterday He sajs he left his SH itch for a few rnmutes and it was tarn pered with Both engines were smashed 1 idlv and the passenger engine was de- r tiled Ihe bumpers of all the freight cars were mashed by the collision and a few of the cars badlj damaged The passengers were I reatlj extlted but only one young woman I ad her face cut John Heed one of the train wreckers, ind who Is supposed to have turned state s vi isnt'p tukon to Troy lust night and oeked up because it was intimated that a writ of hibeas corpus had been issued. He sajs he was arrested on Saturday with ut a w-ur int and locked up in Supenn teiitlent liissel! 8 office The road de- leetives sav they will have the other two trim wreckers today Strikers have ap- phe 1 for work In numbers and many were taken back by the friends Ceremony Pun inFipiin Sept wedding f exPrtsident Andrew Dickson White, f Cornell university and Miss Helen took place at Swarthmore yester 'av The Brtends' ceremony was used Miss Mafeill Is the daughtefof Dr Edward I1 ex president of Swarthmore olh She w as graduated from Swarth uoie in 1875 und from Boston university In Ihen she went to England and t lueved the distinction of being the only --Anjerwjyi wjiman to he fr hall Cambridge The bride and ,rnom eutered the parlor, and after re n iiniiie, for a while m silence the groom t )ok Miss Mtigill s hand and repeated the few words of the Friends' marriage cere nonv I Andrew White, take thei Helen Magill to be my lawful wife, inoMlMttu with divine assistance, to be untotlieea loving and faithful husband until de ith shall sep irate us The bride repealed the words also and they were mairied The certificate was signed In the Hresence of the guests and all passed into tlie dining room for the wedding fust couple will make their homo In Ithaca N Y It floats liver Mount McGregor Cottage SMUTOOA N Y Sept M Wheel er post G A R of this village unfurled a fine silk flag over the Drexel cottage on Mount McGregor yesterday where Gen Gmnt died Ihe post, accompanied by the Saratoga Veterans' association pro ceeded up the mountain by train at noon, nnd after unfurling the flag held a camp flre Martin L. Stover, of Gloversville, de- livered the oration Gen W B French of Saratoga, and others also spoke A Challenge for a Road Race BUFFALO, Sept 11 Ramblers' Blcy cle club has Issued a challenge to any club (n New York for a 100 mile team road race from Erie to Buffalo, to take place Saturday Oct B, six men to compose a team Ihe contest will be for a costly tronhy Ai the rfm.u weather approached the nnt nrftl orarlnn of humanity call for somethlni cooling to drink Boer la a delloloni article, A 28 cent will en- able "ny one to MANGLED BY [A MAD DOG I he Frightful Experience of Miss Maggie Quenzer TEKIUBLV. IOKN IHL AMMAL. A HuKu Nuvvfoun Maud Dog Creates a Panic at a Suburb of Flatuneld, N Aiilmala Were liitten. Queuier H Condition Is Critical PLAIMILLD N J Sept 11 loraperiod of two hourb yesterday tie residents of Nethejwood a suburb of Plamfield were terrorized by a mad dog I he savage animal the owner of which is unknown, ran through the streets with foam necked jaws One woman had her drtss torn from her back while her arms and legs were lacerated In a shocking manner She was Miss Maggie Quenzer a popular so- ciety young whose father is very wealthy bhe is at present in the care of a physician at Plainfleld who has grave doubts of her recovery Besides attacking the young lady the animal also fastened ila In an3 dogs Every oae is IIVVF alttttuud thatr hydrophobia may have been communicated to the lat- ter, aud that in the near future a perfect reign of terror will exist There is serious talk In order to such a calamity, of shoot ug all the animals He Fiotblng at the Mouth It was about 10 o clock when Miss Quen zer left her home fur a walk down Terrell road hen a little distance beyond her father s house she saw a big Newfoundland dog frothing at the mouth dashing down the Front street highway from the direction of Scotch Plains Several hun dred yards behind were a crowd of men and boySjjrnjijd wit! iiib-hfork-iand other weapons Attacked by the Maddened Brute The girl   our Hours. Ihe lower IMitn t the eity ore juder witter aud muol U done Ihe Delaware I t i v i i a i d estern rauro id is stoi 1 I 'U water at Kauoua 1 he Lrie is b 1 I at Noith Hmira and N in i have come from the west sinee 1 mum ug Ihe Vrthern Ceuti 1 t 1 1 as a bridge aud a long piece of tra k wail d out at where tie waicr fr m comes dowt v I 1 st let foree Ihe tracks of tie IJ i ll i 1 Mdred uud road I ll and Couderaport hue are vv i 1 1 i x rs are moving cuttle 1 1ft in the interstate fair grpunds i n ei[ uioii of the flood A Fair Drown.4 d l ITHACA >t 'i "Sept i II run I is fallen steadily in this clu f r i tj f ur hours and is still fillnu M t i) stuets J vaiUa ire II 4 tl e of boats The Tompk t n fur which opened Tuesdaj is t nun ie four davs but the entlr f is four feet under water C s 1 t il It dill cujty k Ui g out Most of the a d er si all stock swum ashore Ihe rest veie 1 ed The exhibits In the Uiti u 1 hall-, were greitly damaged an 1 ar o v 11 removed with boats autl rait-> lit ur will be feiven up Ihe dan it[ proximate Bath Gets a Hath T i BATH N 'V bept 11 V 1 iv ra n has prevailed here for twentj fo ir 1 lie Couocton river has overll vi 1 banks and is us high ns during th J i 1] 1 of 1889 The Lackawanna rr id 1 a i I0c near here They have al i 1 1 tl eir freight truu s and art rum i i MeiiL.tr trams west over the Erie I he 1 e lias MiVera} washouts below hue tir have been swept away and i s lerible d n mage has been done to tue i trvrutls The Camstco vallej is flood In 1 the hrie has been unable to get an} ti t thr lobacco raisers along the n t 1' ts will be heavy losers Wellsvllle All >t NY 11 1 be rcsi dents of Hroatl on t s le of tins village weie com] ell 11 r to flj from their houses on W i I tv in rn Ing to save their lives anlwlt st ort time the water was ruslu f tl the hollies several fiet in dijtl II dele gates to the Gene-al n i Knights of bt John ai 1 M n session hen are ULtible t in form ition is to when i _ t SV5HV O'uc the 4111111 ul 1 1 ilkr ntllsv ille the towns of Alfie 1 V r It n terand Umoiid are report a ill lull 1 I H MJJVlltP 11 1 one ilnrl f tne etty is 1 1 i 1 great rt in i his result 1 i ramin, sie tdilv uniuwjr I re 1 l l e H r H r 1 s miple tl u THEY LISTENED TO PO.VDL LY The Famous Knight s it tie (.en n Tnln Wreeki t STRAUSF N sept Ivvo thu sand peoi le viei t to tl Uhautri rink amid a torrent t f ram las i to listen to an address bj ei eial Vastei orkn u: Powderly Ihe UIMUI [resided at the meeting Mr Pou 1 rlj s address vv largely devoted to u exposition of the principles underlvin, the orgauiz nion the Knights of Laboi hostility to lain monopoly, tax refori (.overnment ovvuer ship of railroads the rrevention of chile labor, equal pay for both sexes nnd arbi tration between emp over and employe Speaking of the strike on the Central IK said that it woul 11 t eease to make itsell felt until a law had bun written upon tlit statute books puttn j, organized labor 01 an equal footing with orgamzed capit 1 With regard to t'e lecent attempts u wreck Central (ran s he asked for i s is pension of publ e j 1 i tnt until the tn tl should be brouLht ut m the courts pressing the utmost confllence that th responsibility of them w uld be traced uoi to the Kmghtsof Lab r buttothe thieve' and thugs hired bv tl e railway compatn under the name oi Pinkerton detectives Ihe following reference was made to Chauncey M Depew Mr Depew ai lived in this countrj tod u I hope that he vv il have the good senbe to speak to the uuu in the old time spirit He is on record as savmiz that the settlement of labor ques tions lies in arbitrati u e will see now whether he is pn pared to square his ac tion with his words Au admission fee was charged to the in etmg and the rnone; will go to the They Call on the President CRESSON SPKIN Pa Sept 11 president has cm i siloned P J McMa hon (Rep and All house Leduc (Dem al ternate commissm irs to the World s fair for the state of 11 nsiana By an error the governor of S ith Carolina recently nominated to the presi lent commissioners und alternates to tht World s fair from the A Js that Impurity of the Wood which produces unsightly lumps or spellings in the neck, which causes running sores on the auus, laga, ot winch develops ulcers In Uie eyes, ears, or nose often causing blindness or deafness, which Is the origin of pimples, cm cerousgrowths, or which fiiUn Ing npon the lungs ciuses consumi tion anil death It Is tha most ancient of all Jiseabt s and very few persons are entirely free from it How Can It Be By taking Hoc 11 Sarsaparllla, which) 1 y the remarkable euros it has accomillslutl has proven Itself to I o a potent and porn II ir medicine for this dibc ise If you suffer fr nn tij H 11 "Every spring n y wife and children Invo been troubled wllli scrofula, my Hit P boy, three ycira oil 1 Ing a terrible fieri.r Last spring he 11 o mass of sor s frnm head to feet Wcillt okHoodsSar i u u and all hive been our 1 of the scrofula My little boy Is entirely fi e, from sores 11 il ill four of my children 1 k bright and he ilthy W B ATHKRTON 1 isiiicCity N J Hood's Sarsaparilla Rolt! by Alt druggists gl slxforflfl I repirctl nly by 8 I HOOD (O, Apothecarioi Lowell Main. IOO Doses One Dollar The largest variety or SUPERFINE CEFAM CHOCOLATES Ruarantcod tobetbefinest made In the U 9 will be foil ml fit CAMERA'S Fine Confectioneiy Store, SOE BO w j. BSO OJ..R TBBNTON, N J Pftnoy Fruits. Ice Cream, Soda Water loo Oream Sodafl, Milk ShakM, Lemonade Ac always on band and the beat that cnn be had and m_4a are facts Prices convenl for all llo atten i, I i n ealle 1 to r 111 uu niua 1 e il parties it 1 as f llovvs 1 issl ner lu h i un n ated 1 i t ate in plaee 1 n i mated 1 1 tl at the i t in 1 1vione tl fit it tets to it 13 I! I tu 1 1 1 u0 fancy 0 1 M k l it Ihlrd ei u 1 llu I u 1 1 wcnty tiftli si II I t 1 is ning lei l e )1 1 HH) It l I- ll 1 l U a I lau en i lojed ili tliH hi VV IS 1 lilt 1 Ull Mil U I Ir Ir I lilt, 1 INN Miss s n William r Mur 1 k tl v it u i 11 wlo i lace 1 the rail on tlu t i k f ill 13 st t an I Mai e rail r 11 Ht st I MII h is pit i le 1 L.uilty to vv llfullv n i t tl e na ks.uf t_hu rail r a 1 i 1 1 is 1 e hel 1 m ?o for the biptrur rt K lit I til it (ate In 1 HI v t 11 hile diKgmg a well tt sireet it caved in at ri I ir t I s Mtf WJ. to his Wit t 1! I iMien ntlenrpteu tc rt s ie I It an ther eive in buried h m tit I r t 1 tons of earth I) n t, I 1 s i I it ii onct k rel 111 ct t tu i I UiniM If In a Pond i [til K Knoll 1 t x clerk of the or l 1 suicide last even i If in a pond neai v Is 1 rf He was 6, J i Sit at 1 Ilierty 1 1 1 n M f I tik break rs 1 1 n M mlrtv aft oore wae ter ft 1 N t n arw He had rk He is 66 v ej is 1 1 1 L. II Ul an 1 lessed a is 1 L. a lesse tern i it l w 1 a 1 an h i tst life he utur dtt OHI '-T I s n t t c, f the f ll i jnr i Vttl H t f II VV ilmiti 11 tl e lirst ann 
                            

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