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Trenton Times Newspaper Archive: May 30, 1890 - Page 1

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Publication: Trenton Times

Location: Trenton, New Jersey

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   Trenton Times, The (Newspaper) - May 30, 1890, Trenton, New Jersey                               VOU YTII. NO. TKKNTON, FKIDAY AKTHKNOON, MAY 30, 1890. TWO CKM18 IN MEMORY OF GARFIELD Dedicating the Monument tc the Martyred President. CLEVELAND'S STREETS THRONGED Sonic Secret History Itegitriliiig the Trunn fvr of the Body fnmi Luke View Ceme- tery to the Safe Deposit Vaults Tlieiifo to the New Monument. CLKYKI.AXD, May 30.-It is some fivi years since the remains of the martyrec president, James A. Gurlield, were secretlj removed from the public vault of the T-nkt View cemetery to King's Safe Deposil bank, on Euclid avenue. And all this timi the public has believed that the bod] lay where it had been taken on thai greatest day in Cleveland's history wheii it was escorted to Lake View ceme' tery from the catafalque in the publit square. There the body was placed in tin 8cb.olii.-ld family vault, and from there, ii was supposed, taken to the public vault Never before had there "been so large i throng of people in the city, and never be- fore had so many men of national fame been here at one time and on one errand To the last hour of his consciousness ever) Clevelundcr who saw that event and wai old enough to even dimly understand il will keep that day in vivid remembrance The Military Guard. During many years the dramatic interesi in the spot was enhanced by the presenci of United States soldiers. Night and day, through the heat of summer and the wet and biting cold and snowVof winter upoi the lake shore, armed sentinels paced tc and fro before the door of the vault in which the remains of Guiteau's vie tim were supposed to be peacefully rest- ing. A narrow and deep path was worn in the turf, traces of which are visible ever now. During all of President Arthur's ad- ministration the soldiers remained, and their dreary vigil never once relaxed, and it was not until after the inauguration ol President Cleveland that they were with- drawn. Thus it was that this yreat event in Cleveland's history Was in a manner pro- longed by a solemn sort of military pa geantry during a peribd of four years. Taken to the Heart of the City. And then it was deemed necessary thai the sacred remains should be more care- fully secured thnn in the public-vault of a KINO'S SAFK DEPOSIT BANK. large cemetery, and the transfer to the vaults of the hank in the great- est sucrecy. Here they have been stored away amoug bonds and stock securities, and family plate and jewels, and other precious things, and thousands of passing feel have hurried by within two rods of tlii'm every day. The portion of Euclid avenue where the Safe Deposit and Trust bault is is one of the busiest spots of Cluyeland, and there is quite a roar of traffic about it during every work day of the week. It is a tall, handsome structure with marble and granite trimmings to its front. On one side of it and at its mar are alleys. Oponing upon the rear alley are heavy double doors of iron, barred find studded so that the walls themselves would offer ft more promising field for burglars than would they. A Jealously Guarded Secret. The secret of tbe transfer has been most jealously Indeed, to Mrs. Garfleld and a very limited number of the dead president's stanchest friends. Mr.1 King, the man most interested in the bank in question, is one of these Iwt, He is a member of the Christian church, an Garfleld, and had been Garfleld's lifelong friend. It is barely possible that the bank cashier knew the fact. No one else about the .building did. The watchmen who night aud diiy kept vigil over the strong boxes of the depositors as little sus- picion that they had the remain? of a one- time president of the United States in their keeping as that they were watchers over dead King William of Germany. Considering how difficult was the tank, the transfer of Garfield's body from the A VIEW OF THE MOMUMKMT. cemetery to the heart of the oily wlthuUt awakening K suspicion was really a .a markalily well planned and CAreful piece of work. Three CofflnA. When it wan decided that the only way the remains could be spirited away was by jutigliiiK with coffins the report was indus- triously cfrculnfM that the original casket innrte for Gen. Garflold wns not satisfac- tory. A second one must be made and_wns mode. Thus the public knew that there two Gnrficld caskets. Tho public, Tibwevcr, did not know that thorn worn three Garfleld ciiskcts. When cnnkH No. 2 was made a secret casket No. a WM nlno made. Tho with thn tlirc'i wns ilouo al t tiittt! of trnnsfrr of (ho Tho of f Wood In moro unlvrrmithpn A Wftro. Indeed, but, fow porRonfj'tiro free 1'rom it. Fortunately, liowovor, we have in Ayor's tbe most potent remedy ever ,froin tho Schofield to the public cftmeterj vault. Others besides those in the secret wen present when the transfer was made, bul only those who were identified with thi little plot remained in the vault and saw the body lifted from one coffin to another The comu which actually received tht body went secretly to the bank; the otliH in which '.be body had bc-tm went to Northern Oliiu Historical society, where il IB now kept; the new coffin into which tin remains are supposed to have been placed remained an empty shell, publicly exposed to view in the cemetery vault. The Flnnl Renting Place. Only a few nights ago, while Clevelanc was sleeping, the body was again quietly secretly aud expeditious removed from th< bank to its final resting place the mouu l'HH STATUE IN THK MONUMENT. ment which has been erected, at a cost 01 nearly a million of dollars, to the memorj of Ohio's distinguished son. This memorial day was chosen as the oc- casion for formally dedicating the monu- ment to the lamented dead, and Cleveland hftfl never seen such a vast concourse ol people as were assembled in the city tc witness the dedicatory exercises. For two nights lodgings have been at at premium, and hundreds have contented themselves with such accommodations as could be found in railroad waiting rooms and hotel offices. There are strangers in ths city. The Parade. The parade was all that had been ex- pected. And as regiment after regiment passed through the crowded streets the visiting statesmen from abroad were re- ceived with salvos of cheers. The streets and houses along the line were as crowded as were the New York Directs the day of the funeral of Gen. Grant. The crowd was almost as solemn as upon that occasion. Gen. James Bar- nett was grand marshal of the day. The procession was started for the cemetery at a little before noon. A grand stand several hundred feet in length at one side of the monument held but a small proportion of the great throng. It was decorated with flags and Masonic emblems. The cemetery trustees, antici- pating a tremendous crowd, had issued an appeal to the public to do no injury to the flowers and shrubs. At the cemetery gates a duplicate has been erected of the soldiers' memorial arch at Hartford, Conn., which is also the work of George jDeller, the def igner of the memorial. The memorial is placed on the summit of a hill commanding a view of the whole city. At the Monument. The cavalry, richly uniformed, formed a line around the crowd. Then massed in- side the line were also the It made a most beautiful scene, while a score oi bands filled the air with music, while a choir of 600 voices led the singing. Kr-President Hayes opened the dedi- catory exercises. It was after 8 o'clock when the ceremonies of unveiling the statue began. All the distinguished gen- tlemen who appeared in the parade occu- pied seats in the center of the stand. In his address Gen. J. D. Coe gave elaborate review of the life and character of Gen. Garfleld and the events of the war tn which be participated. President Harrison's Reception. President Harrison, arrived Thursday afternoon and was given a hearty welcome. He was accompanied by Vice President Morton, Secretary Rusk, Secretary Win- dom, Attorney General Miller, Postmaster General Wanamaker and Congressman McKinley. In the evening a public recep- tion was given the presidential party in the reading room of the Stillman house. Over people attempted to pay their re- apects to the distinguished but less than a third of the number succeeded. For two hours the handshaking continued, and at 10 o'clock the doors were closed. Rioters Resist the Sheriff. MAT'S LANDING, N. J., May Thurs- day evening Sheriff Samuel E. Johnston was telegraphed for to go to Bichland, Atlantic county, immediately, to qnell a riot among Italian laborers at that place. who, not receiving their wages for several weeks, have struck and built across the track to prevent trains from run- ning. The Italians are armed with pickn, atones 'and clubs, and will not allow the company to do any further work until they are paid. The sheriff went to the scene, but was unable to do anything with the mob and returned to Rlchland for re- inforcements. Trouble la anticipated when the sheriff with a large force of men goes to the scfine toijisperae the rioters. Empire State RONDOUT, N. Y., May 30. The conven- tiuu of tike Ancient Order of Hiberniam adjourned Thursday after a continuous all night arnsion. A committee was appointed to investigate and repuit to the state of- ficers some feasible plan for life insurance. The officers were empowered to call a spe clal convention if nectary to consider thin subject. John A. O'Reilly, of Byracuse, elected state delegate; P. H. Nolan, of Poll Jecvls, secretary, and John Cohen, of New Brighton, state treasurer. Tbe nett convention will be held at Yonk- Vermont's Democratic Vt, May 80. following nominations Woia made by the Democratic state convention: Governor, H. D. Brig- ham, of Bakersfleld; lieutenant governor, George W. Smith, of White River Jnnn, tlou; secretary of state, G. O. Kimball, of Vergennea; treasurer, D. A. Pollard, of Proctorsvllle; auditor, May, of 8t.u Johimhury. Smmhecl His Rival's Skull. May Rin- pldo Rinashed Luigi Corundo's skull with c. cobble stone Thursday night. Corundo '-ill h..weil i: l he i. -T.'I'.I. i M 'I'lif UKI chill. n.'-., :l Ii I l rants iiinlfi t in- n...I, ;n i ill a ..ii.li: mn Heal I'm j.., -.ei Sr PAI l, Minn i den an.I .1. 11 'lull, pal- in lln- i rlri.i i r il tlary inr t.-n ami .'i-ji! .'at ParteUn, t hi1 tlnnl in' thr -elllflH-c.t last Mnii'li. rcieneil eiuht ami live mouths. All three were tn.-.l ecm- viett'.i 1 hell' ruse- llj.ji.'.'ilr.l [Jl'enie eiMU't, lint the jmU'ine.i; uriv ai- linnL'il. Tollkh .Jeu, Left I a.....mills- -An ex.'hun.-.-lir-.krr nauu'd at -IT 'lli-n.iiln.i.v. I. i-. peared, ami itlmut lili) Jew-, allege that he has taken t.i them wliirli tiiey intru-teit t.i hiin l.n-tbe purpose of wni'iii nd on col- lateral. for Cheque of London. Cheques for good in parta of the world. HjbH H. HiMILL, HIKBT 8. LlitLi, Vice Preaident. AHA F. SKIKM, BKIB GDMIBB, Treuarer. T.T.nv G. MOOBI, T. N. Adams, Dogers, James Owen H. Lonke, L B. J. B. Oasklll, Edmund C. Hill, Hngh H. Hsmlll, BarkerOnmrnrre, Barker Gnmmere, Jr., A. Boebling, H. 8. Little, 8. Meredith Dickinson, Umurd Grunt Cook, 8. KING OF COCOAS-" ROYAL COCOA FACTORY." Kings are but men, but all men are not kings. Therefore, when the King of Holland says, as he did by deed of August 12, 1889, that he is greatly pleased with "BESl GOES and, entirely unsolicited, grants the manufacturers the sole right of styling their works the Royal Cocoa Factory, a sig- nificance attaches to the act which would not were he not "every inch a king." IN THE 0'ITX, 1 'Or' YOU-ISDB' Celebrated Spring Styles now on Sale. IIATTliH, 15 State HIE ALMIGHTY UOLLAll Was never so mighty as it is this season in purchasing Cloth- ing. Our and Suits are cut in the latest styles and made in our usual neat and careful manner. They are great bargains at these prices. A! C. Yatcs Co. Y'ATES} 6th and Chestnut Sts. STORKS Ii3th and Chestnut Sts. HAD THIS MAN Bought hi. pautaof tht AMKKICAN OLOl'HipQ AND TA1LOEINO CO., wobld not how much wind -hiitltd th tough hii Wt an clothing iht Uta, Bora and but B'ESl TAILOR-MADE ClOTHIM At ranch im than Fhiladdphii Onr U Itadan to-day an 8A MPT.E OVERCOATS for worth 112, {13 1, uur SAMPT.B Blum worth (12, f 13 and for HttdqnarUn for Ohildrto't Knit Snite aid Ortrcoiti. ULOTHINQ MADE TO ORDER. oun ii but honn hi with, ud right along to So 8 Rail Statn. Car. warren TRIMMINGS AN n Qrnndeet display of Trimmings, No- Fttioy Goods, Qloyei TTndeiwear ever before shown In this city, connlotlng of thing that to make up i rtore, such ac Wool.amoDy, Floss, Plbboni, Chenille Fringe, Tidioe, Buttonn, Gimps, Collajs, Onfft; E.nbroiderlw, Face Powders, PeiftimM, Conibi, Brushes, Toott BroBhei I L All the leading of Including the celebrated 0. P. Corset Ferris for T-Hies HI All the most dwindle gf Undeiiimr for Onto Children Hair, Mefllntod Natural Wool "d Goods a fall "rortment and at that wUl be aatinfactoi; to 8rS. J -oo, and "N. Hroad LOOK OUT FOR BARGAINS We have purchased the store North of us intend to build on the two lots l lie lincsl Olorc in licnlonl g.t rid of OUT rt RliADY-MADIi MbHCllANT l AH OiWNU BB iMOl'! GOiNf, 10 NORTH GRKKNf   

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