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   Trenton Times, The (Newspaper) - May 24, 1890, Trenton, New Jersey                               ftfrettimi YOU VTII. NO. 2323. TKKNTON. SA1UJKDAY AFTKKNOON, MAY 24, 1890, TWO OKN'18 RAGE OF iHEELEMENlS. Pennsylvania Swept by a De- structive Stoim. LIUIITNINU CIAIMS TWO ICTIMS. Towns ana Cities Hooded, Homes De- molished Uulued, Bridges Swept Away iiid Knilroudi Blockaded by the Storm Khijf a Plunks A Hood Feared Pi I May heaMest rain and electrical storm known in years passed over a large seetion of western Pennsyl vam i last evening doing great damage to propertj and resulting in the loss of several lives Iho storm struck Pittsburg about 5 o'cloek In the East bnd the wind played havoc Houses were blown dowu trees up- rooted and small buildings demolished On Winebiddle avenue li-re, new frame house's vv ere lifted from their foundation and destroyed Another house on Black House hill, occupied by John Miller, was lifted from the foundation and blown a considerable distance The family were in the sitting room at the time, but were not injured At least a score of other houses m the vicinity were unroofed A large number of persons received slight injuries, but as far as known at this time there were no fatalities The loss is estimated at from to Hailstones Caused Runaways. At McKeesport hailstones as large as walnuts fell while the ram poured down in sheets for a full half hour The heavy ice sinking horses caused a number of run aw ij s The lightning struck sev eral build ings m tins vicinity, and considerable dam ago was done The greatest injiuy was done by the water which came down White's Hollow in a stream seventy five feet wide The water was five feet deep on Fifth avenue at a point below Center street, and a number of houses w hieh were below grade w ere submerged Ihe water reached the second story of the Berktolder residence canning great damage to that place and also the place adjoining It was by far the heaviest and most unexpected rain storm of the year Killed by Lightning. At Greonsburg, Joseph Fry the gardener at St Joseph's academy, was struck and instantly killed by a bolt of lightning A cow standing near him was also killed The heavy rams caused great damage by the flood m the lowlands in this vicinity Cellars and basement kitchens are flooded T ightning also struck Col Huff's palatial residence, the First Reformed church and other buildings, doing great damage in every instance Near Washington, Pa lightning struck a derrick m course of ereetion on the Col Robert Miller faim, shattering it and kill ing William Fuiiuan, single, seriously in jurmg William Gates and stunning two others Railroad Flooded. In Fayette county the ram fall was ex teiisiv e and did much damage to the rail roads Tn the Third ward swamps the Southwest Pennsylvania railroad tracks were flooded several feet deep and trams were held several hours The Baltimore and Ohio is a heavy sufferer At Bradford the tracks are covered with water A heavy landslide occurred at Oakdale, and as it was being cleared away a still heavier one came blocking both tracks The flood in Mountz creek canied away many small buildings Almost a Cloudburst. At Layton Station an immense amount of mud, rocks and trees came dowu on the Baltimore and Ohio tracks about 5 o'clock The east bound track was clear at 9o'clock, but it was again covered for a longdistance by more of the hill coming down The ram there amounted almost to a cloudburst Trainmen say the streams from the hills flowed over the track The west bound track w ill not be cleared till late to-night At Scottrlile thestoim was particularly destructive Cellars along all the principal streets are nearly filled with water, and the goods that many of the merchants had stow ed away are saturated The creek is rising steadily, and the safety of two of the railroad bridges between Scottdale and Fairehuoee is endangered Oil City In Danger. A dispatch from Oil City, Pa received last evening saj s heav y rain falling almost steadily since last midnight raised the water in the river and creek to the highest point since 1883 The river stands now at 14 feet 9 nine inches, a rise of six feet since 10 a m Reports from all points up the river say it is from five to eight Inches higher, and it is expected that ft will be at least fiv e feet higher here On account of washouts no railroad communications can be had with Buffalo or Warren The ground floors of the lower portion of the town are flooded, including the basement of the Oil Exchange and The Derrick press roorrt At Wheeling, W Va about two and a half inches of rain fell in twenty minutes, deluging the streets and flooding a rpimber of business houses in cellars and first floors There are apprehensions of a big river. In Pittsburg the heavy rain is likely to swell the rivers to flood proportions At all points along the Allegheny, Youghiou- gheny and Monongahela riven the rainfall was unusual The stage of water here la 13 feet and rising Tli rough a Bridge. A special fruiu FVie says, A In this vicinity yesterday flooded the roads and burst railroad culverts on all lines of railroads A west bound freight on the NicKIe Plate railroad went through a bridge at Crnytou, nnaT the Ohio state line Fngi ueei and Firemim .Nicholson, with Head Brakeman Johnston, went dowu in the mass of engine and twenty-five cars. AH came out alive, but the engineer will die The bridge was a wooden structure ISO feet m length Four Killed Lightning. PI118BUKO, May 24 special to TIM Times from Alliance, O, says George Patterson, his wife and two children, of Salmeville, O, were instantly killed by lightning while standing under a tree last evening To Test the New IfW. BOSTON, Maj 24 Judge Foreaith, of the municipal court, has granted a warrant tor the arrest of C W. H Sanborn, of North Market street, on a charge of vjo- latinp the conditions of his license 'Ihls ta a test case under the law abolishing public-bare and was sought by Sanborn as an excuse to test the constitutionality of the act. A Fatal Colllglon. NKW LONDON, Cwun May 24 trains were in collision at South Ljme on the Consolidated roail yesterday afternoon Ono Italian was killed and three severely injuied One locomotive and seviral cars were wreclvi il Never Jin l approprl atenAmnt! an Ayrvr iHlrVirnr. When tho flaplllary 11 1niJi1iei'oinnonfwfolPil by dlRpasp, tills dressing Imparts renewed lira to tho sculp, PO that the hair awhmes moon oi Its fullDT" and beauty. THE BASEBALL WORLD National League IfewYork 0021 1041 2-r Htt8burK 00040080 8-10 Hasebits Sew irk 10 Plttsburu 11 Errors New 8 Pttolurtf 10 Battenua and Murphy bchuuclt aud Millei Attendance, J16 At Boston 10201000 4 Cleveland 1 00200000-8 bits II st n 1' Ib Errors Boston Utvclunl 10 Battt i cs Lincoln and Zimmer Onrkfaon and Shrllbasfaee Attendance TO At Brookljn 1 Cincinnati Hasp hiu Brookljn 5 Cincinnati 11 Priors Brocklju 5 Cincinnati, 12 Batttrua Turj and Dalj i lu and Keenan Attendance At 1 Philadelphia 400120010-8 Chicago 00080401 Babe h ts 1 hilailelphia 11 16 Lr rors Philadt Iphin Chicago d B atenes Vickery find bhrnsr Hutehiuhon and Kittrldg Attendance 1 500 Players' I At Boston- Boston Pittsburg Base hik B ston 9, I ittstmrg 8 Errors Boston 0 Pitkhurg 11 Bitteiies Railbourne and Kellej eJalvm und Carroll Attendance 835 At Plillndelphla- Pulla it 1] lna Clevelau 1 01201032 Babe bits Philadelphia 7 Cleveland 18 Er rors Philadelphia 3 Cleveland 2 Batteries Cunningham and Milligau Blakelj and Attendance 009 At New York- New York 81801128 Chicago 2 1 1 1 0 0 1 i 1 9 Base hits New ork 23 Chicago 19 Errors New Chicago Batteries 0 Daj and Ewicg Dwyer and Farrell Atteu lance At Brooklj Brooklyn Buffalo Base hits Brooklj u 10 Buffalo b Errors Brooklyn 2 Buffalo 1 Batteries Krock and Mack Atttulanci 502 American At Syracuse Columbus 4 Base Syracuse 4 Ci lumbus 2 Eirors 8vracu.se 4 Columbus 3 Battenes Morrison and Bnggs Widner and O Ccnuor At Philadelphia (First Athletic Toledo Base hits Athletic Tole lo 7 Errors Athletie 6 Tirlwln 4 Batteries Esper and Rob inson Heal j and RL gers Second game- Athletic 0263100 Toledo Bise hits Athletic 14 Toledo 10 Errors Athletic 4 Toleli 5 liatteius ciieen and Rob inson Abbott and Rogers Game called to catch train At Rochester 001 8t Louis 00400001 5 Base hits Rochester 6 St Louis 5 Errors Rochester 2 St Louis 5 Batteries Barr and McGuire Ramsey and Munyon At Brooklyn Louisville l a Base hits Brookljn 6 Louisville 6 Errors Brooklyn 2 Louisville e Batteries McCuilough and Toy Meakin and Hjau Atlantic Association At C, Washington 8 Base hits Hartford 4 Errors Hart- ford, 4 Washington 2 Batteries btalb and Morris Phillips anil Riddle At orcester 9 Wilmington 1 Base hits 12 Wilmington 4 Er rors orcester 2, ilmingtoo 3 Batteries Stafford and Guinnaso, Sworback and Corcoian At lew Haven 9 Baltimore, 6 Base hits Nen Haven 13 Baltimore 6 Errors New Haven 4 Baltimore 6 Batteries Doran GUliland and Hofford German and A PRESBYTERIAN BATTLE. Plans for Revision of the Faith Discussed in Saratoga. SARATOGA, Y May 24 amended report of the committee on revision was taken up in the Presbyterian general as- sembly Dr Pattou pleaded for harmony He was willing to make concessions, but he insisted that "there must be no change in the Cah mibtic character of our stand ards This was greeted with great ap plause He wished that the popular mis- apprehension that the church believed in infant damnation conld be dispelled He offered an amendment to Dr Me Cracken's plan providing for a committee of revision containing not less than fifteen, of which not more than two shall be ap- pointed by any one synod, and to report to the next assembly alterations to be sent duwu to presbyteries, said committee to be restrained from proposing changes such as will alter the Calvlnistic character of the standards, and to propose only such as will remove popular misapprehension Mr Day of New York, read an amend ment to both Dr McCracken's and Dr Pat- terson's plan, which provided for a com mittee of revision of fifteen ministers and six elders, the moderator of this assembly to appoint one member of this committee from each synod to act with the moderator as a committee of uciiiimttliciii of this com mittee of revision, said committee to meet not later thnn Oct and report to the next general assembly On motion of Dr Johnson it was voted that all other orders of business should be laid aside until a final vote was reached in the appointment of a committee of re- vision Mr Day, of New York, the Rev Dr Van Dyke, of Brooklj u, Dr Howard Crosby, of NewYork, and Robert M Patterson, D D of Chester, continued thn debate Dr Pat- terson made a vigorous attack on any ten dency to call the pope anything but "anti- Christ He was opposed to revision Dr Aguew, of Philadelphia, said that it was a slander to say that the church believed in infant damnation He thought that if re- vision came now it would postpone fpr a generation a union with the southern Pres- byterians now so promising Dr McClel- land, of Dubuque, opposed revision, and said that Dr Patten admitted that revisiomsts were defeated Dr Hernck Johnson, of Chicago, mwle -a long address in favor of revision, and pleading for a compromise an one of the three plaps before the assembly for the ap- pointment of a committee The subject Will be further considered A temperance meeting, presldedT over "by Dr Cnyler, of Brooklyn, wm< held in the evening 'Ihe recent "original package" decision of the United States supreme court was de- nounced me Inside Ceninred. WILKESBAnRit, Pa., May coro- ner's jury which Investigated the explosion that took place at the Fmpire mine last Saturday night, by which Hemy Kriegund John Thomas lost their lives, have com- plete their labors Their verdict the inside bosses of the mines for criminal negligence with failing to keep the flreUws with them while the carpenters Were en gfged in brstticing the mine and changing the air current A DannvToni TORONTO, Ont, May 24 ahe son of John Allen, of this city, shot and fatally i ijured by his T-year old with a riffe which had been left loaded within hci icnch n i ,1 if WooA tliii mrnnmHlfiinotion of the I i fn tticio troubles nothing can approach flnarwapftriila i tho blood. Ktrcnffthens the stomach and I Ml dfaorderi of the liver and NO I CRUEL AND UNUSUAL Ihe Empire Sfckte Electrocu- tion Law Constitutional. KEMMLtE'S HOPE FUTILE The United Supreme (.ourt Kefusea to Grniit u W rlt of Krror, ami the Mur According to derer Must Be Kxecutt T Keiumler s Only iSHINOTON, May M Kemm lermubt die bj the Empire bttrU uutlhid o! capital punishment. The judges of the su preme court of the United Mates have unanimously denied Attorney Sheruian'e application foi a writ of error The court revitws the history of the en actmeut of the law, beginning with the statement contaaned in the annual message of the governor of New York, Juh 6, 1885 The section of the constitution of New York relating to "cruel and unusual punish ishments" is also quoted 1 his provision had its origin In the act of parliament oi 1888, declaring the rights and liberties of the subject and settling the succession ol the crow n The Opinion of the Court "This declaration of rights says the court had reference to acts of the execu tive and judicial departments of the govern ment of Eraglnml, but the language in ques tion as used m the constitution of the state of New lark was intended particularly to operate upon the legislature of the state to whose control the punishment of crime w as almost wholly confided "So that if the punishment prescribed for an offense against the laws of the state were manifestly cruel and unusual as burning at the stake, crucifixion breaking on the wheoj, disemboweling or hanging in chains it would be the dutj of the couits to adjudge such penalties to be w ithm the constitutional inhibition And we thmk this equally brae of the eighth amendment in its application to congiess Punish ments are cruel because they imolve tort- ure or a lingering death but the punish ment of death is not cruel within the mean ing of that word as used in the constitu tion It implies there is something inhuman and barbarous something more than the mere causing of dissolution What the Hew Tork Courts Held. "The courts of New York held that the mode adopted in this instance might be said to be unu mal because it was new but that it could not be assumed to be Lruel in the light of fthat common know 1 edge which has stamped certain punish ments as such, that it was for the legisla- ture to say in w hat manner sentence of death should be executed that this act was passed in the effort to devise a more humane method of reaching the result, that the courts were bound to presume that the legislature was possessed of the facts upon which it took action and that by evi dence taken ahunde tbe statute that pre sumption could not be overthrown They Indeed went further, and expressed the opinion upon the evidence the legis lature had attained by the act the object had in view in its A Plainly Proper Decision. "The decision of the state courts sustain ing the validity of the under the state constitution is not re e.taminable here, nor was that decision ngumst any title, right, privilege or immunity specially set up or claimed by the petitioner under the consti- tution of tho United States Treating it as involving an sxjjudicatibn that the statute was not repugnant to the federal constitution, that conclusion was so plain ly right that we should not be justified in allowing the writ upon the ground that error might have supervened therein The Fourteenth Amendment. "The fourteenth amendment did not radically change the whole theory of the relations of the state and federal gov era ments to each other, anil of both govern ments to the people "The same person rani be at the same time a citizen of the United States and a citizen of a state Pro tection to life, lib- erty and property rests with the states and the amendment furrtinites an additional guarantee against any encroachment by the states upon those fundamental rights which belong to eveiy citizen as a member of society, but whkh rights the state gov emments were created to establish and se- uure The privileges and immunities of citizens of the United .States as distin- guished from the privileges and immuni- ties of the citizenq of the states are indeed protected by it, but those are privileges and immunities arising out of the nature anil essential character of; the national gov eminent, and they do not embrace the and of- the cltirnns of the state Concerning "Dnn Piocegg of "As due process of law in the fifth amendment referred to that law of the land which derives its authority from the legislative powers conferred upon congress by the constitution of the United States exercised within the Bmita therein pre- scribed and interpreted according to the principles of common law, so in the four tcontb amendment words refer to that law of the land IB each state which derives Its authority from the inherent and reserved powers of the slate-exerted within the limits of those fimrlnmental principles of liberty and justice which lie at the base of all our civil and political institutions Undoubtedly the amendment forbids any arbitral; deprivation of life, liberty and property, and secures equal protection to all under like ciruumatsJlces in the enjoy- ment of their rights, and In the adminis- Uation of justice reqmres that no different or higher punishment shall be im posed upon one than such as is presulbed for all for 1 litre offenses, but it was designed to Interfax with the power of the state to protect the lives, liberties and property of IU citizens and to promote their health, peace, morale, education and good order The Law It "The enactment of this statute was in tt- lelf within the legitimate sphere of the legislative power of the state and in the observance of those general rules prescribed by our system of jurisprudence, and the legislature of the state of New York deter- mined that it did not inflict cm and nn imial punishment, and its courts have sus talned that deteumnntion. "Vie cannot perceive that the state has thereby abridged thfc privileges or immunities of the peti tloner or deprived him of due process of law In order to reverse the judgment of highest court of the stnto of New York should be compelled to ho   no heaitRtion m that tins we do upon the record bofbre us The Order Will He The order of Unitecl St itcs Oicuit Judge Wallace 'vhich or i iuil s of Hires' Boot Beer la a temper- ance drink, and, as such, onght to flnd a place In every larder In thn mnd It III so cheap, too. A 26 cent paokoKfl rnattpn flTe galloni Do--.ni.TVVl u tht Kcmmkr uisi intil thi IniUil Mutts SIJHMU (ourt ill i jf ill n tin i untuti nal qiuMl hi 1 N uttirj n! i n tlit Ihtltl Mnnd I HI I be un 1 t nidii] 1 id at tl t I i tl l  lull HI st It courts tb it it must mussiml _ i III til tin mliitiim 1 1 M th it lu In n man I I is ti i t i u I) iisti n ti I i! wit! lit d Hi his Ins inn 1 u i 1 nj to die au i 1 h s that the ik stuunit lit cu i i 1 it THE NEWS OF CONGRESS Vll lit to I'll small lull! r Mm 4 In tin ntuiiti Mi r iii'kiiit iiotRt i f an anun EI i it! tin 1 ill III itlim tl liqlins l ipmtt 1 HI pn lui it statis pri i In L; th it su 1 llqil l s sh ill 1 c MSI U n I is nil oipul it as p trt if the c mini n uuissif pi M w itliiu tl i statt u t su! j t ti ui coil 1 1 il au 1 t it i ninth c iclst i f tit statis piliti p Mt (all offi i li r s >luti n i on tlu p sident fi i in foi in ttion as to tlio Ian lnu of an niniii font from tin uvtniic tultci Me Lam a Cidar K I la tin I nihle uitiv o houses an I tin utsiiu if utuins in t! i inntij and ibked foi il 'lidopti in Mr I ct it Id n t th t i stall tin tin h Ihi ns In tion w tnt i 1 hi i i i It r it n f t h i n al appr 1 1 atloti bil' u SH a n lanltlu imindintnt of tin (Oiniilttie in ijMiriatt us t stnkt ut th it in! is i IIIKI for n ui of tin div d ck at tin li Ion ir was ujHitil 1 hi aim n Inicnt tistnlt out tin a{ I pll itn n f l UK) f >l in n sLructing tht bull In s 1 stioyul In Im at till P >rtsm inth I 1! varl i also d s (1 tt as H (tin an end i units i j u ti 1 I t h com mil ti i in apjiit pn i l )iis to sttiki i thiritinis I ir the sium inn u Is II s n it bill f i i public building at nit n the cost not toixtud M KIIHIO was t iki n from tin c il endai an 1 p isst. 1 lh tuift bill n li fio n tht hoiihi in In fund to the coiumitti i i n hnani i Mr st imlfml allris 1 the soinl in i of tin b 11 inn hiced b; Inn somtuijsruo i loins, bj thi goMinii nt in un nil n il lands I lit prnif ipi it t! L. 1 1 ntni nt h in n upoijpiop m In su! H n will be held it Chhago It was to make a formal dim mil for the hour daj on M ir h 1 1801 IHni'l At MIJ The granite cut ters' tronb t lure is being settled, and work will n ruined soon BLFFUO May 14 The principal feature in the null linn K strike was an impoitant accession to the rinks nt the strikers of thirty men from Lee Holland Co 's sash and blind nulls The sinkers arc highlj elated over tluir success in rdloivinp; contingent 1 he situation at the mills is just the samp no new men being reporti d Fecnliir in combination, proportion, and preparation of Ingredients, Hood's Sarsapa- rilla rnKsesses the curative value of the best known rcme I dies of the vegetable I lOOU O kingdom. Pectill r In its utrength and economy, Hood's Sarsaparilla Is the only medicine of which can iri'ly be "aid, One Hundred Doses One Dol- lar Peculiar in its medicinal merits, Hood s Sarsaparilla accomplishes cures hitherto iin- knowii, and has itself tho title of The greatest blood purifier ever discovered" Peculiar In Its "good name at there ls more of Hood's Sana- parllla sold In Lowell than of all other blood purifiers. Peculiar In Its phenomenal record of J _ abroad no other I CCU II ill preparation ever attained 10 rapidly nor held so the confidence of all classes of people. Peculiar In the bmin-nrork which it represents, Hood's BarsaparlUa com- bines all the knowledge which modem research ln medical science has I O llGCIT developed, with many years practical In preparing medicines. Be sure to get only Hood's Uareaparilla SoMbynlldniRglstj. Pre only I One CrolKr M I M i CM I I I I 1 IS I HI I I I I Illll I 111) I I u 1 U I H 1 I Illll I ll tr n 1) I 1 i in th i i n i in I II 1 I III! Ill qui r II I I III! Ilk in i Hi i i iu tut 1 l i liili uid u i ml 1 11 ll II HI t, Ha l i THc. MUl iriOUSJtHCE r IGS OP CA1 TOP i A, 1 I 'l liR 1 1 Illl! "1 i 1 II II t ot 1 II 1 mo I U K i i il to I1 i huinin t i i I i i nt; ii c il L 11 c i 1 'i i in i IIL II 1) i il C iMi uul t! L i i ill (k on i ,Mnk tr iiuitue a i f tl L KIOFYS, LIVLB m BOWELS. IM tl n toxtcl it r n ul) kroivn to "LHHSE TrtE SYSTEM EFFECTUALLY VVIienoiuislM rLouitjated PURE BLOOD, REFRESHING SLEEP, HEALTH and eTRENOTH NATURALLY FOLLOW ore it md all are vith it ASK VQJfl DI UG ST FOR J TUPi-DQMLYDY CALIFORNIA FIG SYRUP CO Sf> 't CAI ANGK.I.O CAMRKA'S GFNFEA.L f Jr-'Jri'Cri J. i-'tO. Superfine Cream Chor latoq a specialty An immcnTO RKiortmn t f ael oni ges t ongh andips Nut and is ar ftmelB, Mixtu ea P nnj (loodl lurKlsh Frci ch rianiH French etc Prices modi ra'e 205 SOUTH BKOAD STRLET NEXT TO BEOAD S-TErEF BANK ANC1ELO CAMEEA, Paop Tho latest novelties out in Ladies' and Children s fast co'ored, best quality hose among which please note following famous alsolutely fast dyes The Y S F tho Star, the Daisy and Gloria Dye winch chal lergea the whole world for its opal in quality and eitrcme'y low rices The reduced pr cos are 10, U 15, 20 and 35c ami upwards Our next novelty fire row stylos just out in Children's Hats and Caps, to which we pay especial study and always had tho ramo of selectit g the prettiest, hands inirstassortnent of Infanta' and Children s I aps and Hats Handsome Hats reduced to 25o and upwards fans Fans 1 Fans' All styles made, along with Buck les, Po( ket books Corsets lh e ain bnc Underwear Underwear Eihbors Olovcs of every desenp tion, Mitts, Parasols fine Umbrellas Is our grand specialty Wo kipp only the very best madn I arstols and Sun Umbrellas aloug witli Umbrellas and are daily receiving ncwstyles at lower than truly city prices Look at them Call and be convinced l .1 l ri, OPPO-ITE ITY HALL The Real Estate, Safe Deposit, Trust and Investment Co., 2S STA JL. i TEENTON, N. J Transacts a general hanking bnslnms Allows interest on cash deposits, subject to check at sight Bents boxes of various zos in its Ore and burglar proof vsnlta, the renter exclusively keeping the key Acts u agent for collnoting rents and for pnrrhaoo or sale of real estate Executes trusts of every description, as Kiecntor, Administrator, Guardian, Tius- t'e, etc Loans money on mortgage and on col- lateral. Agents for Cheque Bank of London. Cheques for sale, good in all parts of the world. HUGH H. HAMILL, President HENRY S LIT-H.E, Vice President ASA F SKIHM, Secretary BABKKB JB, Treasuier WIITTAU 0 HOOBK, Cashier. DIEEeiOEI. Hugh H. Famlll, Gommere, Esq, Barker Onmmern, Jr, WMh'n A. EoeWIng, H 8 I-Htle, S Meiedith Dickinson, Mnard Grant Cook, d.lHv.B Ta.d. THE T N Adams, Harry PojcrS, James Bnchanan, Owen H Locke, L B Blsdon, J B. Gasklll, Edmund C. Hill, Clarion. TJmbrella and Youmans' Oelob-ated Spring Styles now on Hale HAD State SUoot. i MAN fiongbt his panta of AND TAILORING 00, wonlrl not hafi how much thi wind whistled thiongh coat Wt art clothing "d wiih BEET TAILOR-MADE CLOHIING At ranch lua than pric Oni ti to-ilay an 8AMPI.P OVK.KCOAfH fytti, worth and OBI HAMPl.F SUllfi, worth and (14, for for Okildnn'i KBII Halts me) OvircoaU CLOTHING MADE TO OKUEK is i t is tht oonitrj u nitk, aid right (Jo-ig tl A 1I1I1I CD, Oer. B'ark Ores" Goods ror Fuiamer wear, In Batiste, ChalHs, -t-itc, Nun's Veiling, CanKlhair Grenadine these are In all wo( 1 In silk and wool beautiful Grenadines, Mohairs, Glorlnsa and Lace Fh uncing Lace stripe wool Batiste. A choice PS oran -nt of styles la the fast black T-ace T-awns, Sateen'-, G'nghams, Chailies and Cambrics In great variety of I lAl tl k> WK IIAVK SHOWN YOU HOW TO SAVK MONKY ON DKKSS GOO US, and we know that our suggestions have been heeded, because of the prompt and emphatic response '1 o day we ask attention to our remarki able prices in the Furniture Department, upon the third floor. Prominent among the matchless Bargains there are Porch Rockers at Tables at g8c. and Ladies' Porch Rockers at Ihese articles of Furniture are above reproach, and the prices are below the lowest in the market Nothing exclusive except our unequaled values. BRIGHT, BREEZY BARGAINS In furta n Goods, especially suitable for seaside ahd country Your choice of BIX designs of Etamino, 7o a jard usual price 12jc Choice of eight des gns, 8c a jard, 15c va no The best denjus and qualities, lOt a jard. Three very rare ofloni gs FUR And Plush Garments of every description and India Shawls are takon on STORAGE During the Summer mouths, and Insured firo and moth at a moderate price Such repairs as may be required can be made during storage season at a trifling cost GAUZE VESTS Wi h Lace Trimming, such as have been soiling elsewhere at are on sale tbn morning at 15c Each The asportmont is somewhat limited and contains only small and medium sizes ThlB is a very rare opportunity and one that may not occur again during the pres ent season All the Newest HOOKS Received as soon as published. ICE CREAM FRP-EZRR Tbe most economic) freezer In the world. Wbite cedar tab, galvanized hoops and run- ning gnur and protected cogs. 2qts 3qti. 4qta. 6 8 91OO Both can and atu.er jevolve, but in op- posite directions, thai doing work SNOW-WHIlE Linens, delicious vmnria, polite attendant! and Are making onr Cafe one of the most popu- lar lunching places in the city, 1'he phere is purified by whirling fans a It.ge steam exhaust, which pumps In of cubic feet of freah air minute- ENTIRRT.y Decorations are shown this morning for the first time in a handsome KNGI.ISH DiNNtK Stsf Of 112 pieces The shapings of the dlnhes are especially desirable, while the orna- are much above the Oar low price for the whole Mt il Well worth ihe Best Ice-Saving KFFKIGH.AIOI.S From up to STKWAKT HAMMOND .1- YOUNG LADIrS and nmieoTATJt BEKviUli in tlii OOUJNJLlixO ROOM 1'rf A.UH NO SMAriPRTNO, NO NON-tWflENriATfl, NO OF rKAINlNQ. Mode.u 8nto rol HR H A" The ShorthanH Derailment Offm for Monlrlng .Mil Im B1 M BAViii PWXJftltHS atfAHANfitfcii: M Afl 'V X. B OMt-K. Fti add, J. H. 3, 10 Oiaone   

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Introductory

$9.95

10 page views for 1 month Learn More

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Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 10 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

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