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   Trenton Times, The (Newspaper) - May 13, 1890, Trenton, New Jersey                               VOT: VI IT. NO. 9313. TRKNTON, AK'rrtKNOON, MAY 18, 1890. TWO OKN'i WHO FIREO I HE PISTOL? Fx-.'udge Masterson's Charges Against Alice Hopkinson. HE Is 11 HI (01 SIN LOVEB. And He slit Atttmpttcl to Vssassln- Hte Him In In I 1 hit slit stnteri That He Iliolu Dunn the Itoiii ami I I rod t lion Allalr Vih Mn IJ eldetlj man with in Ins !i uul accosted Police mau I I) t} of the Nineteenth prtunct at Biuiilwiij and Thirtj third street 1 ist iwl exclaimed A woman has ittunptul to kill me At the time lit, luiukd thn to the ofilcer how I had to fight for my life he (.ouUiiuul sJioHiug his baud, which biuised and bleeding I got those in attempting to take the oh ei ira n) from liei she had tried to murder me Come and arrest her Daj t( ok tht HIHU to the police sta tion here Sht Idon detailed Pohce men ullins and Vi irmr to im estigate the I In uent to an elegant apaitment in the Uraml Tentral flat at No 65 West IhitU sixth stitet where they found a j wemm in hjstencs She was pointed out as tht alleged murderess and was takiii with the mau tothestation house An fcx-Jiulge iiiul Millions Here the his name as Murah Mnsterson ludjie of Piescutt An? 50 years old mil dumed tobt worth A3 000, 000 Hisfuituut consists of ready money, gold mints it hihuahua Mexico, and on} tuin IRS told me all ou said darling I am truly bear! broken Just think of it My 111 treating the only n oinau I ever ti uly loved I cannot write flippaotlj anj apology I am too much heart weaned to attempt It Oh pity upon me if you can Jam beside mytelf f 01 M ant of you I have not slept two consecutive hours since that terrible oight I eannot visit your pretty flat that so ruthlessly violated in my awful temper I must suffer for my ungentlemanliLe conduct and I will do so But please say o my f I lends I f orgive him and my great guef will btop To thmk lever jbould i aib-a hand to strike you my little pet I eaunoL ttlite more Oh I wish you could un me ML RAH He Hroke in the Door. Ihe only witnesses to a part of the occur rences that aie said to have taken place in the flat are Tennie Miss Hopklrt ton's cotoied maid and George Bradley her husband Ihe maid says that the ex judge came to the flat at7 o'clpeV last night The maid w as in the hallway, and when the Jiidpje tried the doors he found them locked He asked the servant if her mis- tress in, and she replied that Alice was sick and my husband has the key to the doors Get me the kej instantly, or I'll break in the door'" declared Mnsterson The key waa not forthcoming and the Arizona man kept Ins word He put his shoulder to the door and it yielded with a crash He then dashed into the loom, and a moment or two after a pistol shot was heard The fright- ened maid rushed into the bedroom, fol lowed by her husband Miss Hopkinson WHS in bed, and the ex judge stood overhei with the revolver in his hand Feaied Exposure. Indistinct hints were made that anothei occupant was in the room, but if there as the visitor escaped The man and woman exchanged violent words, he applying epi- thets to her and she retorting Then he rushed out of theiousc Miss HopkuiHoii Has accompinied the ex judge to Europe and an out) parts of the United States and Mexico Sht has rented the flat in which last night's disturbance occurred for the past four yenrs, occupying it when in the city She admitted thnt the judge was hei lover as well as her cousin When Mr Masterson realized that the trouble would become public, he was terribly shocked, and, clasping his hands, out, "Oh, my God! will this be mode knowu to every body Dial! Inspector Blgolow't Illness. BOSTON, May Herald's Water- vllle (Me) special Kays that W H Blgelow, mail inspector for New England, who was stricken with paralysis Saturday, Is ntlll alive, but is in a critical condition Tele- giamn of inquiry have been received by family from Secretary Blame, Cuugrtins- nttn Boutelle, Hon J F Manley and iiiauy others Incendiaries Held for Trial. BOSTON, May 18 the five men ar rested Saturday, on a charge of causing the fire in Cuilis' photograph shop wew arraigned in court, David Punch.was dis- charged, bnt F. E. Gillis, W J Murphy, C H Ring and J B MeDermott were held in 14 000 bail each for trial May W A Bind Dog Scare. CARTHAOF, Ills May 18 Aniaddog bitten several dogs in this vicinity and a general extermination of canines is in prognm The mad dog scare is at a fevei hent in Pulton, McDouongh and Hancock count us MammMtoherlttllolioj) Nmr, 71-nn If you'll bp f ood anil go to ftlcop momni i 11 Aver union nugar coated Pills Dflxt time yon need medicine inla, (rfeetly, dropped off to ileep TO SUCCEED RANDALL Ex-Btayor Klclmrd Jtoiulnattd bj tht Deiiiotru-cv PHILAM.LPHI u m liuhard Vau-v has been uuinin ited foi tougiew) by the Third district Deinoenitie convention to fill the vac mej cniihiil bv the ikath of Samuel J Haiidall Resolutions were unftinmouslv ulopteel to Ihe elite t that the great and varied industries of Philadelphia and the maintenance of tompeusiitmg wages for labor absolutely elemand that tariff reform that will give our luduatnes free raw mtitei mis guatly reduce tlu tost of the chief neeessaiies of life and over throw all trusts and eomhauea which etr tamly oppress tht masses Bath parties have Bolemly promised the people tariff re vision and revenue icduction and we de- mand that the pledge shall be kt pt bv (Oil gress b} free raw materials foi industius the removal of all uitdless taxes on the necessanes of lift and tht reduction of all tariff taxes which have hied and fostered monopoly coijibmes A resolution vvjis also read xegretting the death of the late Samvlel J Randall Mr was1 born in Philadelphia on Dec He was admitted to the bai at the age of X fehoitly afteiw ird he went to Filmland and was appointed by Minister btevens temporary secretarj ol the legation He remained as secretary until his successor Htujamlii Rush sent from the I lilted Mattfc th  of any kind he reined and published a volume entitled Recorded De cisions which is still regareled as a valu able text book He vvasdefeated formajoi in 184.2 by John M Scott, in 1845 by John Swift and in 1R54 by Robert 1 Conrad In 1856 he was elected mavor and in IMS was defeated for re-election bj Henry Mr aux is a member of the Ma sonit order and an grand master of this state He in regarded as a leading author ity on Masonic jurisprudence and two lodges in this city bear Ins name FIFTY-ONE LIVES LOST Wreck Offthe Vew our W hltei and fc ort3 -seven lilucku Lost SANFmseisto Mav was re- ceived here last night by the ate imer Zea landja that in a great storm on M irch 4 the schooner Flirn Maiy was driven on the reefs at Malhcolo in the Hebrides It was impossible to see anything through the blinding ram till just before the ship struck There were an board at the a crew of eighteen tw o passengers, forty four reu uits and fifteen returning labor- ers, making a total of seventy nine Tht first boat which was lowered was manned by four men and seveial of the black crew The boat was dashed to pieces while go- ing on shore and the four white men drow iied Those w ho remained on board the ship were saved beveial of the re truits swam for the shore and were eithel drow ued or killed after landing One boj had to fight his way from shore to the mis Bion station, distant ten miles He, with twenty of his companions, went with some nRtives to a village near the coast They were given food but while eating the ages set upon them and began tomahawk ing the castaways The boy ran and es- caped Tn all four white men and foily seven blacks were lost He Shot His Infant Cousin GTPSS F N Y May 18 12-year old boy named McDonald sljot and killed his 4-year old cousin at Luzerne The cir cumstances leading to the tragedy are pecu liar William McDonald died in an in sane asylum some time ago, leaving a wife and two children His brother then left his own wife and resided with the widow, taking his 13-year old son with him The house was so arranged that undthei family who lived in it bad to pass through the McDonald apartments in order to reach their own sleeping rooms in the second story Recently the two families quar reled, and McDonald compelled his neigh bora to use a ladder m reaching theii rooms McDonald went away from home, telling his son to shoot the neighbors i( they tried to get into his part of the house In handling the revolver during the day the boy shot his little cousin fatally The father has been placed under arrest Richard Croker'a True Condition. NEW YOEK, May 18 Hon William Stem way has received from Wiesbaden a certifl. cate by Dr Wilhelm, the government medi ml director for that district, accurately de- scribing the condition of Hon Richard Crofcer, who is under his care Dr Wil helm sajs that when Mr Croker flrst ar- rived he was suffering from pleuritic exu dution and a high degree of cerebral neurasthenia, the latter resulting from mental overwork The pleuritic exudation has disappeared under treatment, but the neurasthenia absolutely demands that the patient for a long tuna abstain tium everj mental exerllon and excitement, otherwlsi complete core is impossible The certificate Is dated April 28 Kilrain will Meet M'Aullffe. Nnw YORK, May 18 Puritan Ath letlc club's offer of a trophy for a glove contest between Joe'McAnliffe and Jake Kilrain has been accepted by both men Kilrain wrote his letter of accept- ance to Frank Stevenson from Richburg, Mine Jake wrote that he was well and Would be glad to Have a "go" with some one soon M he free Hla term ol Imprisonment will May 22, and ht intends to come north at once and go lute training for the match Two Shots at a Pi-lout, Jjsri'URflOHViitE, Tnd May at tempt wfln made to (wmssinate Rev E. Andran, rector of St Augustine's Catholic church Two shots were fired he was .standing on bta porch The perpetratoi missed his mark and vener able priest Is popular and was not knowt to hare an enemy Fur and NEWBUBIJ-OKT, Mass, May 18 Georgi B Ive.s, of Salem, nog today sentenced to six years and six months for forgery and to two years for emtxwlement, at hard labor, with two days' solita'y confinement .Imfnl for the MOUNTCAHMFI TheMonnl Cnrnul shaft aftor an Idleness tlmlun wifk-f has n med operat mp'm mi i miiieig SENA I OR JONES SPEAKS. 1 he Nevada Statesman Sup- ports His Silver Bill HEWAMSFUFF SILVtH (01NAGE Pieseut Decline in Prices IH titused, HA Says Ijj a Shrinkage lu Ylie olume of In World'! Money 83 stt in W rung WAUIIM ION Maj feature of the senatt proceedings was a long speech by Mr Jones of Nevada m support of his silver bill Seiiatui Jones spoke for three hours and claimed the closest attention of senators on both sides of the chember He uuult a strong argument favor of the free coinage of siheraudbi metalism Mr Hoar from the juditiaiy committee, reported back the house amendment to the anti tiust bill with an amendment. Messrs est and Coxe stated that as mem- bers of the committee thev did not concur in the report and Mr Hoar explained the effect of the action recommended The matter went iner Senate bill appropriat- ing 000 for a public building at Ogden, Utah was reported and placed ou the cal- endar Mi Jones Tukes the Hour Mr Jones thcu took the floor and spoke m support of the bill reported from the finance c omimttee authommg the issue of treasun notes on deposits of silver At the outset he spoke of the general unrest prevailing throughout the countrj The prices of all commodities he said had fallen and continued to fall a phe- nomenon failed to excite attention When a fall in prices was fount! operating on the products of all mitustiies- when it was found not to be confined to any one chine country or race but to be diffused over the not to be a thaiacteristic of an> one jeai but to go on for a seiies of jears it became manifest that it could not aiise from local tempo- rary or suboi dinate causes but that it must its genesis and development in some principle of universal application Ihe Legul Outlawrj of Silver What was it he asked that produced a geneial decline of prices in any country] It was a shrinkage in the volume of money relatively to the population and business Thewoild had never bad a propel system of money Piospenty and speculation hac been stimulated at times bj great yields from mines and when those mines were worked out then, came revulsion and ad versify He wanted to speak of the natural ratio between (rold and silver existing for or iOOO ratio of Inl- and said that it was only since the legisla- tive prehcnption of silver in Germany am the United states and its banishment from the mints of Lurope that anv material change in that ratio took place and thai the present divergence m the relative value of the two metals was directly due to legal outlawry of silver, and not to natural causes It had always been the object of the creditor class to enhance the value of money by reducing its volume, so that when the gold mines of California an Australia w ere producing the largest yieh it was proposed to gold The motiv e of demonetization in the case o: gold as well as silver was to aggrandn-e the creditoi class of the world and to con fincate, so far as practicable, the rewards o the hard) toilers Demonetization In the Past The demonetization of silver by German; after her war with France ho said, inflict- ed greater evils ou her people than her aimies had inflicted on France and when this evil began to have its effect a veritable hegira of the Geiman population began tc take place The demonetization of silve bj the United States m 1875 he regarded as one of those historical blunders that were worse than cnmes It was the child of ig- norance and av arice, and it had proved th prolific parent of enforced idleness pov erty and miserj No better remedy couli be applied than the absolute reversal o that legislation, and putting back th monetarj sv stein of the country to what i was before 1875 Silver Versus Gold If the monometalhsts would compare gold and silver with commodities in gen eral they would see how the metals hac maintained their relations, not to eacl other, but to all other things, they wouli find that instead of a fall having taken place in the value of silver the change thn had reallj taken place was a rise in th value of both gold and silver, the rise be- ing relatively slight in silver and beln ruinously great in gold Discussing th bill pendmgjbefore the senate Mr Jonei declared himself at all times and m a places a firm and unwavering advocate o the free and unlimited coinage of silver In view, however, of the great diversity o opinion on the subject and the possibilit that by reason of such diversity the sessio of congress might terminate withon affording the country any relief from th baleful and benumbing effects of the di monetization of silver, he had joined wit other members of the committee in repdV ing the bill Snpport Prices with Silver Dollnr Returning to his argument Mr Jonei said that m order that prices might be kept from falling the number of dollars out should not be reduced in the piirrlinstng power of each dollar d pended on the whole number out Th larger the number out the greater th value of each To avoid too violent change, in the purchasing power of monay, cause by too great abundance or scarcity of i society for years had used the tw metals, gold and silver, so that the mutua osulations of yield from the mines migh Sei ve to correct one another Should on of those be discarded deprived of th power of legal tender, all the money wor of society would be thrown on the other whose value would therefore be great! increased He the Silver Miners. Mr Jones dwelt with emphasis on th fact that the creditors did not care whic metal was demonetued, provided mone was made scarce and dear Gei many and Austria demonetised got in 1857 but failed to secure the England Geimany, in 1870, elated wit victory over France, and expecting ti further cripple it, reveised her policy an joined England in discarding silver an adopted the gold standard Mr Joni warmly defended the silver miners the charge of selfishness in desiring the r monetization of silver The silver miners he said, were as enduring, as eager, as vi, orous, as adventurous as the Argonauts o old. They had never asked any favors government and they asked none now In the House. WASHINGTOV May the house th McKmley bill was again discussed andse proposed amendments offered b ts VVH r  cenW only THE BAbEBALL WOULD 1 1 111 IN 1 AiN i k w ik 1 l 1 (I u (1 C tilt, U 1) 111 1 1 I li Ila I I N k I! i I I rmii in II "I i I Hit I a) IV (uiilbtrta Is l ueu 1 U 11 tlu I li 1 i lula I I] I ui 0031) It lu Uji 01.1 H Bit I 11 1 1 1) lila 11 111 re I I i I i i 1 l Bi i kli 1 r s in I is i I Haiti v lii Jl At I I v 1 u I III! I II 0 I) Ittsl irt, lies Hits I u Cm 1 1'itt 1 liv lull 1 I Hist Hit; 4 bill ujJel s nl i Httiull I Ik Vitioiml Ituniu it V s Dll V Ik 10000 U 111 iost i (1000) i i e e Da I i N t -I li I Ills rk li si u 4 But U I u and Buiklei Null I an 1 Hlllllie U 1 n u At Hnliulfl! Ina lulu foil dm O'O i oio l But. hits 1 h !ij Ij L ll li kh II 1- irs 1 h In Id] lu Hi I lui 1 H It il s a! hi n an 1 lull I. luis i m 1 t li 11 M t UK ntiuti Illtll nut 0 1 0 J 0 0 0 I 1 lit I li t, 0 0 t 0 0 4 0 1 I o HIM lilts tlrtlmuU I) lltlshurKC Vn s 'llieniiiuli J I'ittslnnj, Bitlenes Snl.is itl 1 llbon 1 ult iiiuu an 1 liallwiD UUuilm 510 M I h la III) I m Ullille I 0 I 0 0 1 1 0 8 lil il I) n Has h Is vilil tk H lit tljn f it s UlUtk J li illvn I Butanes McMuhii ml U tin Mel ill ml 1'ltz At R 1 t client i 1 l (I 0 1 0 1 0 i i at liast h t HI >-v unite J I nuis i L! 1 SMI Hilttrks Ikl in I as j an i I> i I V 1 I Ij Fi I lu 11101004 St I IMS 100200 I Di hits 11 si l uw In is T lu st 1 i in itl, ilci H alj un 1 U s its Vim j i At t inlill us Oliniil us U 1 i 0 0 0 0 0- I Lou su h Hi i I ts 1 i tn I I j nsville 4 I ir is In 1 us 1 i i I] I Butterus ist n au I U t iiuui I-1 u t an I in Ulanllc VSMM hillon At VVushuii.tiu tlr t Kt" VV aslill tl I u (I Bi I i n I mi n i trr is vv i 1 u u linit j, toi 1 I'lttdies II i ai I Kiildlt si in nil I o reoi ut R i 1 tin si 1.1 8 Ilaltnii i i Basi I I" VV 1 11.1 lullliuoii J I n us n Hi l h Batteries 1 Illlllus an 1 Hi Itlli ii ai i I uns nd I i VV K i ill hen Hinun Hast lilts i HI UN Huvtn 1 i is H t 1 N vi 11 iv i 0 Battciks liuiun an I ill tsv" Ilia I ill fTur 1 All utuei I, in s i si n 1 ITS LIABILITIES lie Iron Cut Cmnpanl IK tu Hi Tilt (Kdttorn ion Mas ainiitiiiK "f ereditois of the Iron tar eompanv tlanim amounting to beniK itpiesenttd Hteps vvfn t il i n tn Ihe eom pan> and a cotnniitti i c oinposed of tlie fol lowing houses vvus uppomti i toconeludt tht us HnnisburK it (otnpnny Consolidatt 1 lube (otnpanv Hi ulj Metal compiuv Iioj Mnlleable li n compiinv and I d (xi i-Stivvniti Wofidtotd ot Ainoux Kitcb oodford attormji sud that the gem nl !i ibililies of the tomptii} would amiunl to about itoin others it vvaj. leirnedthu thisumountintlu I dtheduim of sullj forfe'tOOOOO llieri were in assets mcludinn us against which >J ear trust bonds had been sold Ihteur trust bonds had been taken bv bankers but on Jan 1 the bankers de timed to longer recognize tht s (tiritv uud 000 (XXI of tar trust certifnates netumii lated on the eompany s hands President sud the whole trouble wan on Hoeotmtof tpitalists becoming Hissitisfled with Mr Sullj and that thi (ollnpse was hastened bv a seheme of Mr Sullj to get up H new company to take the I ir e and to absorb contiol of the Iron e ir eompany Mr FiHke of Ainoux, Ritch i oodford stated that there was no truth m tht teport that the Iron Car companj hud some time ago assumed the liabilities of tht Minui sota Car lomp my THE ALBANY DEFALCATION The Sale! to lie I p In It Arrested Maj bank defaltation 18 developing extraor linaty fatta The denial of William Gould Hint he had anything to do with the mntti r is disproved by the fait thut the flrm to wlneh ht he longed has just emifessed jiKlgintut in fa vor of the b ink for .iltnost (XX) This is is divided it is said, about eiuilj among the firm's mtmbtrs The b ink holds the paper Gould, fount il> retorder of Albanj, for Gotil 1 has lived He m a hi othtr m law of hitney William Gould h is paper to make good amounting to 310000, and the other is divided between two othet biothera Whitney has again licen arrested it being found that two of his bondsmen had over- drawn their L Thomas in the sum of Lelvvard Taylor PmiBil StuU s District John h Smith has ainvel in the city and will determine vvhethri or n it to prosecute Tho sum stolen will itith encrflOOOOO, but his alluulv been made good It is stated that tx Ket irder Gould has left fhe citj Pcoiilinr Peculiar In comblmtlon, proportion, and preparation of Ingredients, Hood's Sarsapa- rllta possesses the curative value of the best knowu J'ji TCgetnnle IIOOQ C-klngdom. Peculiar In Its strength and economy, Hood's Sarsaparllla la the only medicine of which can Iri'ly be One Hundred Doses One Dol- hr" Peculiar In Its medicinal merits, Hood's Sarsaparllla accomplishes cures hitherto un- known. ..SI and has womor 11 la the title of "The gieatest blood purldereter discovered" Peculiar In Its "gdod name at Is more of Hood's parllla told In Lowell than of all other blood purifiers. Peculiar In Us phenomenal record of i no other I CC III I it I preparation ever attained go rapidly nor held go Steadfastly the confidence of all classes of people Peculiar In the bralu-work which It represents, Hoods Sarsaparllla com- bines all tho knowledge which modem research science has I O llGCIl developed, wllh rmny yeari practical experience In prepirliiR Bo Biiro to got only Hood's Pollhyallilnifcglsti Jl.elxforfS Preparedonly I Tllti lull Vltil llllf latrong 1 nil III N I Mull V I u, er wd of pi in HI i nt t us I 1 I i! t! w is sumimmid 111 m U I ml tistlf) aa tti what (hi v knew ah it thi i i tiaeks and I 01 I stllinu 1> t i- i i I mils 1 iw jers tind h rt huu IntiMi t s u ti in tin ith enug 1 ht jui i it is s u I II t t l i tsh its lulu is tu in ntl u 1 ui It i in Id statuti tl nil tl ui vi us i an millet am pits nwli I its i i i i us well as tl e 1 kinalii li s si 1 thit aoint (f tht jui i n u (in In i lit 11 t latter t otiisi u I u II i i t 11 i Is triniuiati u I I ill t i f t In ludietiiii nts it il it il l i u t m fortitl to Iht liliii si, ill I (Ins U il ut lUllj IS 111 tills lltl 1111 It 111 dlttt i V 1 It i toi Woman sutli iu furphj IM w Mav 11 Uistiulian Uillj will pn I al !v haie a fight hi it btfott he it I m us holm Iimnii I ukins bajs lie is willing t) meet tin ftuthtr weight of tht world in n lluht to a finish tor >sHX) n side Ijurkms has p isttd a forfeit to show that he menus business In older to make the eolitist mttristing tht I'untun Athletit tlnb meiit has detuled to put up a ptuse of ixxt lutiil Hlou from u H-t lAUossh Maj H Hevvii englneel at Dav idson s mill and P islmaster Oliver Olsen ot Mtilwa) had some dilltt ultj Hi a saloon in this t itj and Hi wej stun k (Msen with his list kill mg htm instiinlly Ihe rnuiiliiet made histsiape b' t wjis rnptuied at (Jnalask i The I'opo I'urtial to 1 iiKlanil I IIM Maj li Ihe bliii boi k just IsMitdhi tht gut i mm nt sh vis that tht negotiations of Inn Simmons with the Vatit an rt guiding tht stittisof tht Kom in tatholie i hm th in Malta wtie sintessfnl in tvtri patticiibu the pope ti lilting anxietj lo pie isi 1 nglun 1 ah lit slim tn IHVIN Mull Atisti'i K Mtn denhidl of Diilnth Minn aimmlnrof tht ale In shm in 11 iss has lititi missing sintt Ihnisini Ht wan in his usual spmls in 1 u is stipphe 1 -vith money I s I on nre is kuowu Prcsenls in the m t t form THE t AXAT1VE AMD NUTRITIOUS OUIOE Of f IGS OF CALIFORNIA, Combined the medicinal virtues of plants known to be most beneficial to the human system, forming an agreeable and effective laxatne to perma nently cure Habitual Consti- pation, and the manj ills de- pending on a weak or inactive :ondition of the KIDNEYS, LIVER AND BOWELS. It is ti most cxceilent remedy If nown to CLEANSE THE SYSTEM EFFECTUALLY When one is Hihous or Constipated Til PURE BLOOD, REFRESHING SLEEP, HEALTH and STRENGTH NATURALLY FOLLOW Every one is usmg it and all are delighted with it ASK YOUR DRUGGIST FOB MANUFACTURED ONLY BY CALIFORNIA FIG SYRUP CO. 8AN FRANCISCO, GAL. KY YORK N 1. FAKASOT.S i i i OPPOSITE CITY HALL. We control the trade of Trentoi ind We fnlly gaanmtoo oar and TJmbnllu are made of the very matetUl also nt the floes workmanlhlp. All of oar gooda lit price which rmnnot be benten In the large citle nor anywhere else Also opened k betntlfn itflck of fine Eld Glovfs In all shades an prloM, for their durability, to Ketber with a fall line of Silk and Lial Olovcl and Mlttn, Children's T ate Cipt, Our taU, Fine Horiery, Under OatmenU, and T Ooodt, TldlM, Notions, etc., etc GENBKAL CONFKC'HONEBT, jt A-A'O, IT O -J.-O, to Bnperfine Chocolates a An Immense assortment of Caebons, Drop" Oongh Not Oar niels, Penny Goods, Tnrkl CmdlM, French Frenc Frlws 906 SOUTH BROAD STREET, T( BBOAn 8TRFCT BANK. Umbrella vaitne 16 Hftat STMWAIIT HAMMOND YOUNG LAD1HS in tht GOUtf! ING-ROOM 1'S ud KMUCATOKS, WOKKK-KS. NO SMAn BRING, NO NON-ESSFNl'IAIJl, NO NON8KNH3 in ito OF TRAINING Hodim MtihoH., Bacc fal Ttvhing, AtUntion, ij Progr _. The Shorthand Departnieiit Offcn the very betl fodlitiil for Kqniring ilrill in RAPID AND UL PBOGHKje dJARAMfKn. Homing, AfUruoon 01 -M la Shorthand.! BHIOTNS MONDAY, SHitr. ad, Fir iMOMAH J. Box 53V, N. J. .T c f H 1O 13 Mnntb AND dlraUy of Trlmtnlngs. No- ttonB, OoodB, Horferj. Glovei ever before inoiui In hie oily, exjnulotlng of almost eroi j- thing gooa to up a tore, ranh u fool, Shetland Ribbons, ewolrj, Chenille Onumonta, frinf 6, Fancy Tidlm, Onffa, T Krobroideriw Face Powders, Paxhmei, )ombi, BrnahM, and Tooth i i All the of Ou.sit Inolading the celebrated C. P. Cu. Jt Foitls wai-lj for T Hlee Ml All the moet of rjadorwwr for Qentl Hair, Bnmrlet Natural Wool >nd Metlno Goodn a fall Jrt...ont and tR.t will be to all, S. S. TJCIC, 123 ajiH 125 N. C-reene Street ALC ORDERS PROMflLY ATTENDED TO Jr' 14O HiMrluN N. J, SIX HUNDRED PIECES OF THIS SEASON'S CHOICEST PATTERNS IN AT LITTLE OVER HALF PRICE. NEARLY ONE-THIRD BELOW REGULAR PRICES. EXACTLY TWO-THIRDS MARKET VALUE. Without exception this Is the most surprising bargain that has been opened this season It came, such things usually come, through a mercantile mislortune, the sacrifice being made to reach quick cash, with which we are always ready when any pronounced advantage is to be gained for our customers The SATIN ES are the very finest French Cloths and French Printings the very latest productions of the world-renowned houses of 8CBURER ROTT CO KOECHLIN BAUMGARTNER, FREREB KOECHLIN and ORO8 ROMAN, and cannot to-day be bought at wholesale except at a very large ad- vance upon these remarkable bargain prices. We have carefully classi- fied them into three lots, w follows 1 FINEST FRENCH SATINF8, embracing a great variety of Stripes and Figures, small and large, with upwards of forty shades in plain solid colors all marked 12jc per yard. Pre- cisely the game kind and patterns jrhinh have been sold by us this season and are still selling elsewhere at 25c. and 30c. Lot 2 NEWEST FRENCH 8ATINE8, in selected styles. Very lus- trous and elegant, superb colorings, at 15c. per Yard. Have sold up to now for 30c. and 37Jc. Lot 3 NOVEL FRENCH BATINE8, all high art fsnacs, embrac- ing Bordures, toned effrcts, new Unto, handsome combinations, black and white alternations, etc at 2nc per Yard. The exact counterpart of styles which have all Spring retailed at 37Jc 45c, and 50c. HANDSOME TURKISH MOHAIRS. 38 inches wide, thoroughly per- fect in every way. A complete line, in all the new Spring colors, including Glace and Melange Mixtures. Favorite, seasonable and fashionable textures, at 30c. per Yard. Until the opening of this Bargain sold elsewhere at 50c. CHOICE TURKISH MOHAIRS, 38 inches wide, superfine cloths, colorings, 37Jc. per Yard. Until now sold at 65e. Also at our CHINTZ COUNlKR, yards PRINCESS CLOTHT, 24 Inchon wide, a beautllul Striped Flannelette, nice for Wrap- pers and Houoo Dreosco, at So. per Yard. All along sold at 12jc. One Lot FINE ZEPHYR GINGHAMS, In all the new shades, at 18c. per Yard. Regular 26c quflity, One Lot DRESS GINGHAMS at 8c. per Yard. Regular quality; Granvillc H Hajncs Co. Buccoocore to A CONARD. xtanei sneer, teuw nreiFiH A. Advertise YOUR "WAN 15 IN THR   

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