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Trenton Times Newspaper Archive: May 3, 1890 - Page 1

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Publication: Trenton Times

Location: Trenton, New Jersey

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   Trenton Times, The (Newspaper) - May 3, 1890, Trenton, New Jersey                               Yin. NO. 9305. BATUlilMY AH-rKKNOON, MAY 3, 1890, rwO AN OCEAN MAIL SUBSIDY Senator Fiye's Bill to Rejuve- nate American Coaunerce AND BUILD AN AUXILIARY NAVY. A to Subsidise Kant Mall Steam- Which Can FawUy Bo Changed Into Cruisers In Time of War American Made and American Manned. WASHINGTON, May re- ported to the senate tmluy from the com- mittee on commerce t' e bill as the "Snipping league tonnage" biiralready favorably reported from the committee on merchant marine of the house of represen- tatives, with amendments. He also re- ported, vvith the sanction of the commit- too, a bill "to provide for ocean mail seiv- ice between the United States and foreign ports, and to promote which haa been known as the Frye bill, and which was prepared by him with a great deal of raire, and after consultation with leading fihip owners and builders in the country. What the Frye Bill Provides. This bill authorizes the postmaster gen- eral to make contracts for a term of years nitb American citizens for the can j ing of the United States mails in American steamships between ports of the United States nnd ports of foreign imtlorm. It provides that the steamships so em- ployed shall be built in the United States, owned nnd officered by A merican citizens, and, upon each departure from the United States shall, during the first two years of a mnil contract, take a erew, at least one- fourth of whom be American citizens; during the next three years one-third, and during the remaining time of the continu- ance of the contract, at least one half. It divides the steamships into four classes, the first capable of maintaining a speed of twenty knots an hour at sea in ordinary weather and of a gross registered tonnage of not less than tons; provides that only this clws shall be employed by the postmaster general for Dairying mails be- tworn the United States and Great Britain. The Second, 'mird and Fourth ClaMes. The second class shall be iron or steel steaniKhips capable of maintaining a speed of sixteen knots an hour at sea in ordinary waatiiT of a gross registered tonnage of not less than toni; the third class, Iron ur steel steamships capable of main- raining a speed of fourteen knots an hour at sea in ordinary weather and of a, gross registered tonnage of not less than tons; the fourth class, iron, steel or wooden steamships capable of maintaining a sjaced of twelve knots an hour in ordinary weather and of a gross registered tonnage Of not than tons. An Anxflialy Naval Force. It provides that all steamships of the dral throe classes hereafter built shall be constructed with particular reference to prompt and economical conversion into anTiliarj naval cruisers and according to plans and specifications to be agreed upon by and between the owners and the secre- tary of .the navy, and shall be of sufficient strength and stability to effect- ive .rifled cannon of a (-.afiberof not less than si T inches and be of the highest rating known to maritime commerce. It provides that; those heretofore bnilt and so employed shall be inspected by offi- cers in the navy, and that the secretary oi the navy shall report to the postmaster general as to the fitness of the vessel for the service required. The compensation provided for is 16 pet mile for the first class ships and per mils for the second class, by the shortest prac- ticable route, for each outward voyage; for the third class, tl.50; for the fourth 11 per rrjile for the actual number of miles required by the postofflce department to be traveled on nach outward bonnri voyage. American Boys aa Cadets. The bill also provides that each of these steamships shall transport free of charge a govtuiimeut mail messenger And furnish suitable rooms for himself and the mails It provides that contractors may employ naval officers in running any of these shipi with tne consBnt of the secretary of the navy; also that these vessels shall take aa ridets or apprentices one American b  ceivejmy other bonnty or subsidy from thi of the United States. A conUac for tea years is provided for and the lines are permitted to receive from the nations to which they carry malls additional pa; for returning theirs. New York Chamber of toiwtlon. NKW YORK, May 8. At a meeting of members of of Commerce the folluwlng officers, were elected to serve for earning President, S Smith; rice piesidenta, Alexander K. Oi Morris K. Jessup; treasurer, Solon Hnmphreys, and solitary, George The executive and nsdal standing commit toes were also appointed. The committee on foreign commerce afld the reported In favor of transferring the snue marine oorvlce froiu the control a the treasury department to that of navy. Their report was adopted. The Bnrt T.lbel Suit. BOSTON, May the libel ouit of Bnr vs. The Advertiser ex-Appraiser McMullan rf New York, testified thnt "Mr. Hurt been granted no privileges except thosojic- soMed to other brokers. Dr. Shensr, Bound and others gave similar tan llmony. Ex-Naval Officer Silas Hurt test! that he knew of no nndue privileges to his brother. After further kmlmouy both sides rested and the conr until Monday. An Immigrant lopor Ronton. feoSTON, May IR nottlcd beyond c ioubt that the Swedish ironi ecn arrested. There are men ol strike. The Strike Fever at Chicago. CHICAGO, May strike movement Stows from day to day. The black roac n the vicinity of McCoimick's reapei works had much the same appearance thil morning as it had four years ago Nom rat strikers could be seen, and they hac entire possession. Every hand in the malle able iron works, Twenty-sixth and Kock II streets, of them, have gone out All the founders at Griffin's, Barnum Elichardson's, and a number of those ai VfcCormiek's followed the precedent of malleable iron men. The entire numbei of employes of N. K. Fairbanks Co., or RHghtocnth street, about 550, will go out Monday The number of moldera out is estimated at Eveiylhing was quiet at thestock rards yesterday afternoon. The butchers aborers aud coopers "did not go out, anc lence the 250 special policemen stationed ;here had nothing to do There were som< mutterings of discontent, however, and 11 is still thought that if the strike fevei spreads it will reach the stockyards possi oly before the day is out. A number of non-union molders wbx were being conveyed in a wagon to Me Domiick's harvester works were attacked by strikers at Blue Island avenue anc i'hirty-second street. The windows of the bus were broken anc several of the occupants were more or less injured The driver dodged the rocki which were aimed at his head, and, lashing his horses, succeeded in escaping. Fighting at Barcelona. BARCELONA, May strikers wen very riotous throughout the day and greatli obstructed business. The civil guard hav ing failed to quell the disturbance a state of siege has been declared. The rioters se fire to a tool hut on the streets The guards charged upon the mob and drove them away, wounding several. Another mot attacked the printing office where the proclamation declaring the siege was beinj printed, and the troops were called out tx protect the building. Similar outrages are reported from Sara- gossa, and Alicante The mob made another attack on printing office with such violence as fxj compel the inmates to flee for safety, tak ing with them copies of the proclamation. Thef sought refuee in another printinj office where they resumed their work nnde; protection of a strong body of troops. In Other Cities. HIA, strik ing i-arpenters here are firm. They are en conraged by thejact that the journeymen bricklayers decided to aid them in theii strike. May 3. One thousand car- penters went on strike here yesterday. They want eight hours a rlay nnd no redaction ii wages. BOSTON, May general olrike in building trades is threatened. Over carpenters struck work. M'CALLA ON THE STAND. The Enterprise's Commander Denies of the Charges Against Him. NEW YORK, May the McCalla tria Secretary Windom has grantor! permission to both sides to sum up orally. Comman der McCalla was then sworn and said h desired to assume all responsibility con cerning anything occurring on the Bnter prise. The crew he considered an averag one. There were many tough character! who had never before been on a During the entire cruise sixty-three men de- serted. About 66 per cent, of the crew aliens. McCalla assumed the responsible ity for Fitzgerald's punishment (the Ja- cob's ladder 'f he ironing of Walk er and Hennessy had been done under hi direction. The marching of the men up and dow the alai deck ax to sober them. He deniec depriving the men of their ham mocks. Th ironing of the men at Bouen, he said, was necessary. Their punishment consisted o exliti duty and deprivation of liberty fo from one to three months. The chaining of the men at Rouen am at Villafranche was for safekeeping ani not for punishment. He did not thfhl there was anything hi the story of men ironed at Naples. He acknowledged omii slons in the log book, but explained thai they were not intentional. He knew of n Instance where a moinber of his wfi maltreated by bin orders. Tn regard to th Btraitjacketing of Snndblad he said h thought the man crazy from alcoholism He ordered two straitjackets. They were intended for Walker and Snndblad. did not Intend to, and did not, Snndblad by BO confining him. As to SvagHch's Incarceration at SteUI he bad had no knowledge of it. It hm never been reported to him He gav Svaglich a bad character. He had deserte the steam launch. Witness had known nothing of the straitjacketing of Ross a Lisbon 1888, nntll the sittln of the court of inquiry. CommannVr Mc- Calla then told how when the ship a Antwerp he had came on deck arid fonn it derorted. The officer of the deck wa asleep in the pilothouse and the other e absent from their posts. He had con? flnorl ot the men and suspended th officers of the deck. He Investigated th matter thoroughly, but not until five da, later did he know that the quartet uiastu had received mission of the officer of th deck to leave his post. He then ordered th qnartflrnifuter released. to Gloucester HAi.rFAX, N. S., May patch says that the customs collector, ac ing under Instructions from Ottawa, has issued licenses under the renewed modua vivendi to the Gloucester fishing schooners Mist nnd Thetis The greater part of th American fleet has sailed for Newfonnt innd and the Magellan Islnnds before th Instructions wre given or the license re- ceipts at Cons') would have been abou Inrgor All fishermen nfrree that th liinl od (Mm-; cmimit lio carried on sue i IIMIIVI; the Canadian bai Children delight In Hlrrs' mrli Core. It't go pleasant to tnka and absolutely "Sill" n" n no fear t i till" niof' cliiM lielng ontlrcU'lroo do u nil dangerous effects are due M the JERSEY BANKS CLOSED. 1 he MacFarlane Rumors Shut Up Six Institutions. MANY PEOPLE ARE MOURMNS. The Fidelity Surety Trust and De- posit Company, of Camden, and Itl Branches, and the Mercantile Bank, ol Atlantic City, Have Stupeuded Payment. CAMDEN, N. J, May S.-The Fidelity Surety, Tfust and Safe Deposit company, of this city, closed its doors yesterday The suspension of this institution was expected when the announcement of the failure o) ;he Gloucester City National bank wafl made. The concerns were very closely ai- led Charles R. Work was president oi both, and Charles C McNaughton was g director in both institutions. Cashier Sam' uel W. Stokes, of the Gloucester bank, also a director in the Fidelity President Work Talks. A reporter saw J Austin Ellison, treas- urer of the Fidelity, but he declined to make any statement When asked whethel the depositors would get their money, he said' "I decline to say anything President Work said- "Under a raid no company can stand We are all right if are given a chance to realize without sacri- fice on our assets. This has all come from the report that I had stock in the Bank ot America I sold out my Bank of America stock over a year ago and since that timg have had no connection with it whatever. Scarcely a Ripple Caused. The company was organized under the state laws. The capital is announced as but it is claimed that but a small portion of this Is paid In. The company has been doing business less than thirty months Its suspension caused scarcely a ripple in Camden financial circles. The Boy's Check Wag Not Cashed. President Work and Secretary and Treas- urer J. Austin Ellison conducted the en- tire business, and early in the morning they assured depositors that the conceru was able to meet its obligations The ap- plication of Richard Deer, 14 years old, for the amount of his savings on deposit, was the last straw Secret a, y Ellison in formed him that the company was unable to pay the money at that time, but woulc do so in a few days. The boy was the final to be refused, and left the office with tears rolling down his cheeks. A Poor Man Cried. PI.FASANTVII i P, N J May 3 Pleas- anlvllle branch bank of the Merchants bank, of Atlantic City, situated at this place, has gone to the wall Cashier Dnnkle, of the main bank, said: "Tb.e Merchants bank is not a branch of the American bank ol Philadelphia, and has had absolutely nothing to do with the American for thi last eighteen months. If the depositors wil be patient for a few days we can pay every one back dollar for dollar." The whole towli is excited and up over the affair, and one poor old man was standing out in front of bank building crying as though his hear break, moaning for his hard eariiet savings to come back. The bank had a capital of Cashier T.afce, of the branch bank, threatens to make things waim for the papers that have caused the failure. The bank atMullica Hill, which is also a branch of the Merchants' bank of Atlantic City, also closed its doors. The depositors of this bank are mostly farmers and are ignornntof the suspension of the parenl bant The Egg Harbor Bank Closed. Eoo HABBOB, N. J., May 8 o'clock yesterday afteiuoon word was received o the suspension of the Merchants' bank ai Atlantic City, and soon thereafter the key was turned at their branch in this place The news spread rapidly, but the deposit- ors were satisfied by the assurance of thi directors that no numey would be lost, as over in good notes are reported held by the branch above their deposits The branch has over 100 depositors, rang- ing from to tlOO each, while a gavini fund at 8 per cent, interest carded amuiinting to several thousand dollars. Tn an interview the directors state tha formerly these banks were controlled b; the Bank of America, of Philadelphia, bui severed their connection with that inxlitji Won over a year ago, and tne suspension was not cauncd by their failure, but is gole- ly based upon the erroneous statements o gome Philadelphia papers, which caused The Fort MOiiig Bnntr GlONd. BBIDGKTOtf, N. J., May g Port Mor rig bunk, a branch of the Camden Fidelity Security company, closed it doors. Its deficit of deposits fa an< this belongs mostly to oyster men and uinal merchants, upon whom the logs falls heav ily. The bank wag established about year ago. The Cumberland bank at Bridge- ton sent Its cherts down for collection b. special cairler just before noon, which were promptly paid soon afterward. th check presented it was armwerec that only twelve cents remained In th bank The poor people of the village became frantic when they learned tbattheirall hm been lost. Many became very despuuden and others riotous. Ine B-nh OlcgH ATIANTJoCilv, N. J., 3. A notice was posted on the doom of the bank In city, yestonlny afteruoon, no- tifying depositors that the bank wonl suspend business temporarily. Owing to the fact that the statement had cirou that the bank was connected with the defunct Bank of America, of Philadelphia the depositor" made a hnavy run on it the funds ran out. A meeting of the holders hag been tailed to arrange the Alt fluulty. 'i'he statement of the connection with the Bank of ig denied by the eaqhter O. R. Dunkle, but the main bank, with It branches at Pleagantville, Mnlltca Hll and Egg Harbor City, have all been ordviei clcocd. Invited to Drink and to Die. WAIKUBUBT, Conn May 8 Flannl gan went into John Russell's saloon yester day afternoon and asked Mike McDerniOtt aged 35, whom he found there, to have i drink with him McDermott consented The barkeeper Iniil the beer on the bar, am McDermott Innt plnonp; tlio glass tc his when pulled a revolve Me Dermott tried to inn, lint linfnre hecmili get nwnv tlirro bull' i'i pi< rml his face nn< neck, andonp (lio i piling. Flan nlKaii imrwrt Mr n 
                            

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