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Trenton Times Newspaper Archive: April 22, 1890 - Page 1

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Publication: Trenton Times

Location: Trenton, New Jersey

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   Trenton Times, The (Newspaper) - April 22, 1890, Trenton, New Jersey                               VOT- VI IT. NO. TUWNTON. TUK0DAY AKTKKNOON. APKIT, 29 1890. TWO PASSED BY I HE SENA IE The House World's Fair BH Approved. CONSOLATION FOB NEW TORV Amendment Froildlug for at the Metropolis In April, 1893 a Part of the Measure Statue for Colambaa. April the senate the World's fair bill passed by the house was called up by Mr. Hawley. The only amend ment reported by the senate committee was a new section providing for a naval review tn New York harbor in April, 1893, and foi the unveiling of a statue of Christophe] Columbus at Washington Mr. Vest opened the debate in opposition to the bill. At the outset he protested against the nxmimption that the ot the house in the matter of location to the fair waa coercive on the senate. The fact that the city of St. Louis had bcrm an anpirant as a site for the World's a post-mortem proceeding, and he did no intend to introduce ghosts to disturb the tranquillity of the city of Chicago. He ha< always opposed all legislation looking to an exposition in 1802, and the law shonlc not be pnKsed which called it into exist- ence. He did not believe that the people of the United States favored any such position. The agricultural people of thi country had neithertime nor money to give to a national circus such as was proposed It had been said of him in a Chicago news- paper that he had declared that In a contest between hades and Chicago for the fair he would support hades. As Chicago news papers never lied, it was unnecessary for him to say in a mild and not too emphatic way that he made no such statement. he did say was that in a popular election among the people of Missouri for the loca- tion of the fair it would, be a very close pol between hades and Chicago. Chicago Venua Hades. (As between these two localities in such i contest he would be strictly neutral. Th population of Chicago waa active, energetic Degressive, not troubled by those mora and conscientious considerations which a late interview had characterized as "Iridescent dreams." He had been. tol( that the population of hades was ot similar material. Chicago, besides full of trusts and combines, and, the the latest authentic infoi mation from hades waa that they were foiming there a Uiist on sulphur in order to bear the mar- ket He questioned whether there hat boon anything in the whole contest for the fair that elevated or dignified the American character at home If the idea was to illustrate national life or the four hundredth anniversary of America, why, he asked, was it not done in the name ot tbe people of the United States without contesti and jwjpftbbles over localities? Why had the location been put up at auo- tinnf If it was to be a national affair, why did not the nation itself, with an flowing treasury, take upon itself the BT. penaef The whole matter, he declared, from the begiifhing had bonn simply advc.-tslng scheme on a basis of mirnicipa] rivalry letween the great cities ot the conntiy. The MlUlu.ialre and the Anarchist. He declared that if one-tenth part of what had been said by those cities about other were true, not one of thnm should be peiuiitted to control the destinies of an exposition in which the character and honor of people of the United States nM involved. Tn.no place in the country were the extremes of the national life so thoroughly developed as in Chicago. There the palace of the millionaire stood side by side with the hovel of the Anarchist; there could be fonnd the rushing, roaring life ot legitimate business and all unweu but deadly methods which had come upon onr overgrown young civilization. If hia con- would go to Chicago they would discover in the gieat stock yards the reason vJiy the meat products of the great states of the- west were so depressed, that the cattle raiser did not receive pay for corn and oate grass, and how their profits were.lost. In concluding, he declared that lie did not believe that the exposition could ever be a success. The Naval Review Mr. Gorman offered an amendment to strike out the naval review provision and Insert in lien of it an appropriation ct a building in Wash- ington as a depository of Equities of the hemisphere. This ww rejected. Mr, Stewart opposed the naval review an he doubted whether the United States wuuld be in condition to make a guod naval display in 1898. Mr. Chandler thought the naval review would be a great benefit to the exhibition and would give it a seud off which could not be as well attained in any other way. United said, would not bi ashamed of ita Vftsaols at the review. Mr. Evarts favored the amendment. A Chleagb Advocate Tallin. Mr. Cullom aaid the verdict of the In favor of locating the fair at Chicago boon obtained -without Undue without coiruptlon, and withoutany special struggles. There no purpooe uuthe part of Chicago other than to carry out the very letter of the pledges already made. n On the other hand, Chicago would make the fair a grand success and would test her appreciation of the great houor which had been confened upon her. When the name of Chicago won mentioned, id Mr. Chjllom, the senator ..om Missouri (Mr. Vest) seemed to be seized with a kind of hydrophobia. The senator had said people of Missouri were in doubt whether they would go to Chicago or hades and this raised the question which senator represented, but the people ot "Missouri would be at the gieat exposition by tens of thouaands whether Mr. liked it or not Senator Blair ou Peace. Mr. Blair opposed the proposition to hold a naval review as fostering a spirit of war and said that "accursed institution, infer- nal war. tlie badge of savagery" nhouM be abolished, and he thought this country to initiate the era of peace. Mr. Blnir oli< red nmcmlmente authorising the president to hold an exhibition the public schoni'i -iid review of the public unhobl chiVl n in CMr-Km, nnd to provide for the inn of Mntiie In memory of Queen i Ufjcrtert Mr. that tho n show. hibitlon n 1 Ii i vast bi iiffit to tlio ,t H on i, 'ilin Oupon I'inlirlln i opposed by Mr lej on 11 there w< n historicnl i k he wuuld ninku no cum think had am is To Oppii siutt- nmlt Anul 22 -Mipcuntt-ndiMit H nun has oider tho Kue Hliu k 1 1 1 uud canals to In optMicd for n i% igatlon VpuNSund tin h unplain i -iini on Mu} 1, completing ot inmts the latttr biuntli l.tlcropt-n ing da) than the other hues An Fx-Mnyoi FITCHBUHK, MUMS April Eli Culley, who has icipntl} quite un well, went to ride ahoiU 1U u in ami had not since been seen It is fuiml that he has met itli some ae  (nil linn of Pilk and Lisle Gloves and Mitts, Children's Lace Cips.Oor- Undtr J-v-; Celebrated Spring now on 11 ATT I-R, Wast Bought hi. pant, of AURkrOArT AND oo, would lot x how mtwb whiitiad hi. coal  ld QMMr-i iul_4 BE8I IAILOR-WAOE CLOTHING Atmnnk tVi PhllxIclnM. n. PhlWalphU p.- Ow-.ll an OVKCCOAIV fu R US, vd H hi ukllditnt Boll IKta, V'OlULtfQ KAOX BJ Wlll, right to A M tlA 54 II A n TRIMMING AND i iMipUy of Trimmlnn Ko- Undbwwr befoio "tiowii In tbd of et wj thing tfc-t gOM to make Up I fl.st as F-n an. Powders, Soaps, All the 1- ling makei at Indndlng tie a P. Cv. 4 f bill Yfll.U for T All the moat of OndejueM for Chlld.cn Om.v H.tr, Natural wool th-t win be aati-taW; to Oo'ibi, Hall -iid Tuoil! S 5. and 135 N. Greene Street STKWAKT HAMMOND AKK WUKKKKS. N2 MaihoHi. fnj NO i. it. o at tif he ShoithanH I )epai tnient l ad. XUOMA8 J. ftt'EWAHT, PBritou-n, BOX J. to and 19 loath IJOOK OUT FOR BARGAINS We have purchased the store North of us and intend to build on the two lots llie lines! 'Jloro in Ireiiton! we m-rt tit Hd of oar to do "ik, v- RliADY-MADIi rAH OliING BB 10 NOKlII GREkNK K Advertise YOUR "WANTS TN THC TKHJNTON   

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