Trenton Times, April 22, 1890

Trenton Times

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Publication name: Trenton Times

Location: Trenton, New Jersey

Pages available: 40,290

Years available: 1883 - 1906

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Trenton Times, The (Newspaper) - April 22, 1890, Trenton, New Jersey VOT- VI IT. NO. TUWNTON. TUK0DAY AKTKKNOON. APKIT, 29 1890. TWO PASSED BY I HE SENA IE The House World's Fair BH Approved. CONSOLATION FOB NEW TORV Amendment Froildlug for at the Metropolis In April, 1893 a Part of the Measure Statue for Colambaa. April the senate the World's fair bill passed by the house was called up by Mr. Hawley. The only amend ment reported by the senate committee was a new section providing for a naval review tn New York harbor in April, 1893, and foi the unveiling of a statue of Christophe] Columbus at Washington Mr. Vest opened the debate in opposition to the bill. At the outset he protested against the nxmimption that the ot the house in the matter of location to the fair waa coercive on the senate. The fact that the city of St. Louis had bcrm an anpirant as a site for the World's a post-mortem proceeding, and he did no intend to introduce ghosts to disturb the tranquillity of the city of Chicago. He ha the nm pire will enforce penalties provided In such I beg leave to the umpires that will see that they are sustained In their actions to their directions herein given. 7it.aFH.ivs, President American Association. Mew York T.-WS. April 22. The following have become laws without tbe governor's ap- proval: An act to amend chapter 84 of the laws of entitled "Anactto incorporate the city of Jamestowu." An act making in appropriation for a state armory at Ma- lone, N. Y. An act to increase the com- pensation of the county judge and surro- gate of Queens county. An act allowing the supei v isors of Otsego county to borrow on bond to pay certain rlnbts. An act relating to vaults erected underside- walks in New York city. Amending the act authorizing the Buffalo park commis- sioners to locate parks in the Fifteenth ward and the towu of West Seneca. An vt providing _f or the erection of an armory for the Fourteenth regiment in Brooklyu. An iict authorizing Batovin to money pay water bonds of said village. Rev. McDowell Elected Chancellor. Tlitis, 0., April 22.-ftev. W. F. Mo- who baa the Methodlnt Epis- copal church in this city for the past been elected chancellor at thi University of Denver and president ot Colorado State seminary, and will enter Upon bis duties in gspteuibor. Mr. Mc- Dowell is a gindnate ot tbe udi. versify of Delaware, nnd of the Boston Theological seminary. He is one of thi most successful preaches is the church and is but 32 years old. Ti.e PnrltanV Bad Nil w YORK, April Fall Blvei trie steamer- Puritan, which grounded IID .he rocks at Hell Gate on Saturda- ias been placed on the dry dock. It is nun' Bright that it will Cost between -id WP.QOQ to. repair the steamer, tiers s a great hole 100 feet long andinsomt wide as five feet on the port side. Catcher Cahlll's Ambition. NKWHAVKK, April Cahlll, i catcher on the New roucrve ias been suspended by Manager Burnham 'or not reporting for duty and for failnn to sign a contract. Cahill is attending medical lectures at the UnlvonHy of Penn- sylvania in Philadelphia, and money than last year A Hundred for R FTimlT. JUniMonr, April 20- Tho thud nM of 1Tiliiini W for 111'1 mnwl'-r oi 1' T1 I nTUC Mimim ii ird i H hn p! nt fciiiifv i Ml H I il of II 1 i (i For trmrtrti-nfofll'if i nil I'l 'm n the vital current is ImpoverlsliPd f Ayro's Sarsaparilla li the Very bent fonlo. It restores tbe w'lted tlwues and to I IT neftrlv Jiali p nti remedy in the world, Creasing demand for thla remedy pro' AllACKEDBY SlRIKERS Non-Union Men at Chicago Ar Roughly Handled. SAMUEL (JUMPERS INTERVIEWED He Expresses His Sentiments Regarding th Eight Hour Trouble at FltU Crittia Is Undoubtedly Approach News from World. CHICAGO, April 32 small riot and Be' eral savage assaults upon non-union car. penters served to enliven the monotony o the big strike The strikers created a dl turbanee in the northwestern part of th city, when a delegation of them went to new building and urged the foreman t stop work. He was receiving forty ceni an hour and working eight hours, BO he fused to leave the building and worl men under him followed suit. Arm in themselves with clubs, brickbats and bi stones, the infuriated strikers attacked th men, and before the tatrol wagon arilve( the foreman was knocked down and ser onsly Injured The rioters were locked u by the police. lieaten Into Insensibility. Another mob of the strikers savagely at tacked two carpenters at work on an AT milage avenue building, and the victim were taken home in the patrol wagon wit scalp wounds. Thjir assailants fled before the police came to the rescue A carpeu ter who was working for Contractor C W. Clark on a North Sheldon street bulk ing was stopped on his way to work by mob of thirty strikers, all foreigners o anarchistic education Half a dozen Be upon him, cut open one eye with a ring knocked hini dowu and kicked andbea him into insensibility The men the mode their escape before the police amvet Gompera on the Hour Idea. "The eight hour day is the sole idea be- ing considered by the labor sai Samuel Goinpers, president of the Amer can Federation of Labor. "In the history of the social and economic movements the world there has not been one which re- ceived at once and completely the aam sympathy and support that has been ac corded to the eight hour movement. It hap covered Europe, and on May 1 the workin population of that continent will deman the eight hour day. We have chosen th carpenters as the first craft for which ft win this benefit When the carpenters sha: have won we demand it for the miners and mine laborers. Then other trades wil be taken up and pushed -forward In this way the entire change of the industrial sys- tem to the eight hour day shall have boon accomplished with the least effect on th country's business. There is no doubt o the success of the movement." An Eight Hour Parade. The labor organizations of Chicago hav appointed committees to arrange fora mon ster eight-hour-day procession on May They expect to have men In line. Ni progress was made toward a settlement o carpenters' strike, tn fact, a settlemen sccmR further off than ever. The Trouble at Pittubnrg. PUTSBURG, April 22. Grand Master Wt] Wnspn, of the Brotherhood of Trainmen was in consultation with a mass of men Knights of Labor hall for several hours The men have grown bolder in the prosonc of their leaders and say they can stop al trains from New Yorjc to Chicago unless the sixteen points presented in their grlev ances are conceded them. The railroads have conceded all but five of these points but the most important wages remains to be settled. Though all lines entering the city are running smoothly the men an becoming defiant over the strenuous efforts of Bailroftd Detective-John T. Norris an BARE the SCOTT li EMULSJ -u CUU- CONSIIMI'IIDN In Its First Stages. He ItffU Bos i ON V at X. a Htatt'ineut of t but ht- u hiHul to di al itli t l find mix iscd them to Ki't >i k he wuuld ninku no cum think had am is To Oppii siutt- nmlt Anul 22 -Mipcuntt-ndiMit H nun has oider tho Kue Hliu k 1 1 1 uud canals to In optMicd for n i% igatlon VpuNSund tin h unplain i -iini on Mu} 1, completing ot inmts the latttr biuntli l.tlcropt-n ing da) than the other hues An Fx-Mnyoi FITCHBUHK, MUMS April Eli Culley, who has icipntl} quite un well, went to ride ahoiU 1U u in ami had not since been seen It is fuiml that he has met itli some ae (nil linn of Pilk and Lisle Gloves and Mitts, Children's Lace Cips.Oor- Undtr J-v-; Celebrated Spring now on 11 ATT I-R, Wast Bought hi. pant, of AURkrOArT AND oo, would lot x how mtwb whiitiad hi. coal ld QMMr-i iul_4 BE8I IAILOR-WAOE CLOTHING Atmnnk tVi PhllxIclnM. n. PhlWalphU p.- Ow-.ll an OVKCCOAIV fu R US, vd H hi ukllditnt Boll IKta, V'OlULtfQ KAOX BJ Wlll, right to A M tlA 54 II A n TRIMMING AND i iMipUy of Trimmlnn Ko- Undbwwr befoio "tiowii In tbd of et wj thing tfc-t gOM to make Up I fl.st as F-n an. Powders, Soaps, All the 1- ling makei at Indndlng tie a P. Cv. 4 f bill Yfll.U for T All the moat of OndejueM for Chlld.cn Om.v H.tr, Natural wool th-t win be aati-taW; to Oo'ibi, Hall -iid Tuoil! S 5. and 135 N. Greene Street STKWAKT HAMMOND AKK WUKKKKS. N2 MaihoHi. fnj NO i. it. o at tif he ShoithanH I )epai tnient l ad. XUOMA8 J. ftt'EWAHT, PBritou-n, BOX J. to and 19 loath IJOOK OUT FOR BARGAINS We have purchased the store North of us and intend to build on the two lots llie lines! 'Jloro in Ireiiton! we m-rt tit Hd of oar to do "ik, v- RliADY-MADIi rAH OliING BB 10 NOKlII GREkNK K Advertise YOUR "WANTS TN THC TKHJNTON ;

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