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Trenton Times: Wednesday, April 16, 1890 - Page 1

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   Trenton Times, The (Newspaper) - April 16, 1890, Trenton, New Jersey                               VI IT. NO. TKIfiN'rON. Ap-rMKNOON. APltTt Ifi. 1090. 'WO IN I HE WORLD OF LABOR Miners and Operators in Con- vention at Columbus, O. A MAMMOTH STKIKE MAT KE8ULT If Obiu and Pennsylvania Operator. Adopt the Scale Illinois Indi- an. Operators Reject It, Serloui Trouble will Remit. O., April The Joint meet- ing of the miners of the United Mine Work- of America and operators was called to order yesterday afternoon by A Dempster, of Plttsbnrg, P. HcBride acting as secre- tiry, for the purpose of reviving the com- petitive district and agreeing upon of w.got. The chMnuan stated the object of the convention. Miners representing the of Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Pennsyl- vania and West Virginia were present The letters from Indiana and Illinois operators, tnying that they would not attend the con- vention, were read. After reading the let- ten, Mr. Dempster said: "In the absence of those operators, let common seme and pru- dence govern all your actions, The scale committee invited the Indiana, Illinois and West Virginia miners to hare representatives on the committee, and these wire appointed: West Vii8inia, J. W. Kirk and Jeremiah Mead; Indiana'' John James Andeison; IllinoU, Samuel Skel- toa and James Harrison. The Scale tbe Operators. One of the nigh official! of the United Workei dot America was asked con- cerning tbe proposed scale. The reporter t-ld: "Only the operators of Ohio and Penn- sylvania will be represented in the joint convention of miners and mine operators which meets this afternoon. W hat if they agi eo to pay the scale of prices pro- octcd by UM miners, and the Indiana and Illinois operators, not being represented, ret v--d to adopt it! Vv ould there be a striker "There he replied. "Unless the Ohio and Pennsylvania operators should adopt the scale and force the Indiana Rid Illinois operators to adopt the samn scale, would all refuse to return to work in the until our terms are conceded by nil. It would be the largest strike ever known. frill have no more- of thin piecemeal They will have to either accept it around or not at all." Tns Strength of the Miners. The official stated further, to show the of the miners, that there are 147 delegates in the convention, representing tally organized miners in the United States. The organization, the United Mine WorkviB, is in an excellent shape for a con- flict Nineteen weeks ago the Pnnisutaw- ney Coal company declared its determina- tion to crush out the union of miners when they went on a strike at that time, and set aside to do the work. Word was received yesterday that the company han been compelled to go to the wall and has told out entirely to the Belle Lewis and Yates company. Tbe failure of the com- pany the strength of the miners. Tbe Ohio Miner. Meet. The joint convention of the miners of Ohio continued in session. On the question ef or five the convention Toted as follows; For one BJ881; for fire districts, total, The vote made nnanimons for one state organisation. The report of the committee 011 constitution was called for and adopted by Muttons. It provides as f ollowji; ______ 8euUon Thta organlntlon shall be known as District 6 ot the United Mine Workers of America. Sso. The objects of this union are to unite the mine employes of Ohio and ameliorate their aouditlon by methods or conciliation, arbitration They waut from to more per according to the soma quarries and some rock being harder to work than others. Bunion, April IB. Not twenty stone- aftona of the hundreds expected to strike yesterday stopped work. It is said that a loading cause for the failure of the brick- layers and carpenters to support the is the fear that it would seriuDily affect the night hour movement to be inaugurated May 1. PuisnuHQ, April committee of the Brotherhood of Railroad Menv consist- ing of about twenty-five men from all the railroads in the city, a statement of their grievances to the officials of th  offer was accepted, and under the compromise the irork> will not be cloned. Morris L William., of Deli oit, been made trustee. Fatally Shot in the .Month. KKwYoBK, April Frank witte re- sides at 855 East Tenth street with wife. Philip Conger formerly boarded with Witte, but the latter became jettloot Of Conger's attentions to his wife and put bin. out of the house throe or four ago. Conger returned to Witte'i house and fatally ihot him in the mouth. Conger WM To Keep John Chinaman Out. SAM FHAHCIBCO, 11 18. The of the treasury hat revoked the privU heretofore extended to from China of transferring Chinese pstsongeri tit for Mexico and Central America on reaching this port. This action is rapeottd to prevent furthur smuggling of t into this country from Mexico, OtiKhflri n Cnr. OKEKNSBURO, April William Moore and Scott Johnson, of wore, it is thought, fntnlly injured in tin atono quarries on the railroad by beinfx tlirov. n under n ni-( vitich over t IHMII, rm m in n. Ah'-olntoly ftnin jir.lManK, iiili. rojfnln in It'i cflTecti (o prndlritnacold mid Ktopo. cough. THE LOYAL LEGION CELEBRATES. A Distinguished Gathering of Vetarmn Officers of tbo War. PHILADELPHIA April W.'At the Acade- my of last night the ceremonies inci- dent to the celebration of the twenty-first anniversary of the Loyal Legion were held. Seated on tbe stage were number of distin- guished men, including Secretary Tracy, Gun Bchofleld, Gen. Hoffman, Rear Admi- rals A Imy, Smith and R" 'H, Gens. Beaver, Howard, Slocum, Porter, Rawley, Miles, Fairchild and Marshall, Commodore Mel- ville, ex-Governor Curtin and many others. The building was uiowded frtm pit to dome with an audience compose! of companion! of the order and invited guests. Gen. D. McM Gregg, commander of ths Pennsylvania commandery, delivered an address of welcome to the visiting compan- ions, and then introduced ex-President Hayes, commander-in-ohief of the order, who delivered an InteruM-tg addresa The ex-president was followed by Gen. Charles of Massachusetts, who spoke at some length. Next followed a fantasia by the Marine band. This was heartily en- joyed by the veterans present, who rose tc their feet and joined in the singing of some of the songs as they occurred in the piece. At the conclusion of the ceremonies the members were escorted to the Union League club, where a serenade was tendered them At the afternoon session ex-President Hayes made a speech, after which Maj. Gen. Wager Bwayne, commander of the New York commandery, offered a resolution, which he read. It provided thtt upon the application, made in writing, of twenty companies of the first class residing outside of the United States, if approved by the commander-in-ohief, a charter be for the establishment of a commandery at such place outside of tin United States upon the same terms and conditions as the state com mnnderies, subject to the approval of the commander-ln-chief. Gen. King supported the resolution, saying that action should be taken at once. The application of twenty officers from the state of Washington for a charter for a commandery was favorably acted upon. A committee consisting of Gen. Merrill, Paymaster Barton, Maj. White, Gen. Tuttle and Gen. Fairchild was appointed to con- sider the protest of the Michigan compan- ions against the proposed changes in the constitution of that commandery. The changes propose the abolition of the first and second classes. A Fatal Railroad Accident. CINCINNATI, April after 1 o'clock a switch engine on the Cincinnati, Washington and Baltimore railroad was traveling northward with a train of six or seven freight cars, when one of the cars in the rear of the train jumped the track, the wheels catching In a frog of a .switch, up- setting tho car. Standing on the top of the car were Ellas Bennett, the foreman of the braking crew, and Edward Berg, a young brakeman. They were hurled to the ground and before they could arise the oar came toppling over upon them Berg's body was found to be cut completely in twain. Ben- nett was removed to his home, No. 97 State avenue, in a patrol wagon. He is fatally injured internally. Incendiarism and Murder. JAUKHON, April 16. Governor Stone has been notified of a horrible murder in T.aurence county, thirty miles from this city. The stable of Jen j Bass (colored) wag set on fire by unknown parties, and when Bass and his son Charles came out of the house to extinguish the flames they were fired on in the darkness. The boy was killed and Bass badly wounded. Their dwelling house was then bui'ued to tbe ground. No clew to the Identity of the murderers has "boon discovered. To the statutory reward Governor Stone has added for the capture and conviction of the fiends. Against the Bnttentorth Bill. YORK, April 1ft The members of the Cotton Exchange, nlth President J. R Parker in the chair, met to protest against the passage of the bill offered by Mr. But- terworth, of Ohio, defining "options" and "futures" and imposing special taxes on dealers therein Tha ahairman explained nature of tbe injui> to the trade which the passage of the bill would cause. After a general rfiscnssion Mr. J, O. Biles offered a series of resolutions, which were unanimous- ly adopted, declaring that the enactment of the proposed measure would be detrimental to business in general, A Democratic In Montana. WAArtiNGTON, April Maginnlss and Mr. Clark, the democratic contestants for the Montana senatonhips, have receiv- ed several dispatcher from friends in Butte announcing that a city' election just held there the city had gone Democratic by 400 majority. Mayor xinyou, who signs one of the dispatches, says it is a clean sweep for the city government Butte Is in Silver Bow county, where famous precinct 84 is Situated. In Anaconda the Democratic candidate for mayor was elected by over 400 majority. Ourc It you hive made up your mind to buy Hood's 8 v nap-Tina do not be Induced to tiVe other. A Boston lady, whose example Ii worthy imitation, tells her experience belon: In one store where I went to buy Rood's Sanapariiia the clerk tried to Induce me buy their Onutnsteid of Hood's; hetoldraetheir's would longer; I might ft on ten 10 Cct days' trial; if I did not like It I need not pay etc, But he could not prevail "i me to change. I told'ilnj I f ten Hood's knew what it was, was satisfied with It, and did not writ vy other. i began ttklng Hood's I was feeling miserable with so at times I conld h.tfdljr llood'o I looked like a person In consn.np. Hon. Hood's Biruparllla did me so much food that I wonder at myself somHlmes, v4 my friends frequently of it" A. (l Boston. 0. t ROOD CO., ipothKWIii, I--.W.H, IOO Dollar I JR. KDWIN WBOIIER, r' IX sr i-irt Without poln, unfl without tiwof gm, etner, etc. Bemove4to 81'AiK To Report Hill Favorably. AI.HANY, April assembly com- mittee on railroads held a session and dls- cimcd the Fassett rapid transit bill. A telegram was received from Corporation Counsel Clark, of New York, stating that the city authorities desired to be heard on the bill Thursday afternoon. Mr. Fish also asked for a hearing on behalf of certain property owners. The committee decided to report the bill favorably without amend- ment with the understanding that it should be recommitted for a hearing on Thursday. McCalla Must Stand Trial. WASHINGTON, April Tracy appointod a general court martial to meet at the navy yard, New York, Tuesday, April 23 next, for the trial of Commander UcCalla. The detail of the court Is as fol- lows: Rear Admiral David B. Harmony, president; Capts. Henry Krben, R.V. Meadv, L. A. Beardslee, E. O. Matthews, R. L. Phythlan, Commanders B. F. Day, Merrill Miller, W. R Brldgman, W. M Whiting and Lieut. Perry Garat, judge advocate. Welsh Knocks Oat Fltigernlil. LOUISVILLE, April Charles Fitzger- ald, of St. Louis, and Charles Welsh, of Buffalo, N. Y., light weights, who wen- matched to fight fifteen rounds, Qiii'rus- oerry rules, for a purse of J500, met ut Llederkranz hall, this city, last U'elflh forced the fighting from the fifth round, when he scored first knock down ind won the match by knocking Fitzgerald in the eleventh round. Shellenberger Been Again. DoYLESTOWN, Pa., April former "itiZMj of this place has telegraphed from Tacoma, Wash., that Bhellouberger, the de- faulter, was In that city. Word was re- urned to have the fugitive arrested. Dlnrdered by Bobbers. MADISONVII.I.C, Tex., April John Richardson and hi) wife were mur- dered by robbers last nigtii at their country vsidence near hero. A Rnautiful Russian Girl Arrrstcil. HT. PETERSBURG, April beautifu' young girl of high family connections wru arrested here for attempting to bribe a cltrk of the general staff to procure for her acopy of the new scheme of mUitnij mobilizitlon, The parents of the girl were also arrest d and all charged with being agents of a for- eign power. A Boy Fatally Hurt. CoNNELLSVILT.it, Pa., April shift- ing engine and four loaded coke cars on II e branch railroad of theDunbar Furnace com puny ran off a bridge fifty feet high yebt i- day. The engine men escaped by jumping -Abraham McQuigan, a boy on tbe truin was fatally injured Presents in the most elegant form THE LAXATIVE AND NUTRITIOUS JUIOE FIGS OF CALIFORNIA, wOinbined with the medicinal virtues of plants known to be most beneficial to the human System, fouiiing an agreeable and effective laxative to petiiia- nently cure Habitual Consti- pation, and the many ills de- pending on a weak or inactive condition of the KIDNEYS, LIVER AND BOWELS. It is tlwtnost excellent remedy known to THE SYSTEM Eft-ECTUAUY When one is Bilious or Constipated PURR BLOOD, REFRESHING SLIf P, and Y F0> nw. Every one Is using it and all are delighted with it. ASK TOUR DRUOCU8T FOR MANUFA01UHEOONLY BY FIG SYRUP CO. FRAHCI8CO, GAL, KY MCW VORK, H. t. CONFJtUTlONlSBT, 1TWJ.-O, --to. ChocoUtaa a specialty. An immense of Cachons, Lozen- Drops, Cough Nat O.ndiw, Car- Hlilutej, Penny Goods, Turkish Ondies, French Ircams, French Oliues, etc. Prlixe model ate. 206 SOUTH BEOAD STREET, NETT TO BBOAD bTBEET BANK. ANGELO CAMERA, Pier OPPOSITJB HATJ.. we control the Paruol t.vle of Tienton, and we fully cuarantae that our Flu and Dmbrellu are made of the very ohtalnable, and also of the finest workmanship. All of onr goods at whlrh cannnt be beaten In the large cities nor any where else. Also opened, a bc_nUfnl ntocK of flnn Kid Qloves In all shades prices, warranted for their dnnblllty, to- gether with a fnll line of Bilk and Qloves and Mitts, Children's Out- lets, Under d T w Notio-i, Celebrated Spring Blyloa on Hale. 10 MADE BY SPECIAL PROCESS- 1 HE BES l Cocoa is of supreme importance as an article of diet. Van Houten's has fifty ptr cent, more flesh-forming proper- ties than exist in the best of other cocoas. "BES i GOES FARTHEST." The tissue of the cocoa bean is so softened as to render it easy of digestion, and, at the same time, the aroma is highly developed. HOUTEN'S COCOA tried. nwd ii the ordinal, pa. ble Cocoa, Invented, patented and mnde In Holland, toil ii belter ud mor nil nntrttlft in tLe world, lor ViJ) Hotus'sind nootber. U NO MAn KK WIIKTHKK YOU AKK A of goods or not you can shop here with the utmost con- fidence. It is not necessary to be versed in UKY GOO'iS lore 'o obtain what you want, neither is it essential that you should buy what you do not desire for the sake of appearing courteous. THIS IS A NATUKKII KSTAHLISIIMKNT, WITH HKOA.J, TjHKKAT- and its proprietors always take pleas ure in showing what immense values they can give for small money considerations, whether one wishes to buy or not. ANOTHER RIBBON FLURRY. Unprecedented o 'portnnities are presented this morning in a special and important RTBBON SALE. As a hint of the remarkable prices we name: No. 18, ISc. a yard. No. lOc. a yarl. Complete varieties of colors and black and white. ALL SILK Satin Edge Ores-Grain. TWO-THIRDS OFF. Onr great sale of REAL LACES AS inaugurated last week will be continued to-day. Dnohflsse, Point Applique, Point Venlse, Black Hand-Bun Marqnlse, Guipure, Nets, Flonnoings, Trim- mings, etc, all go at a discount of 86} Per Cent. Off regular ticketed prices This is posi- tively the gieatest occasion ever seen in this city. SOMETHING NEW Under the sun. A BEACH KOBE of GINGHAM, The Robe in a box consist! of 12 yards of Gingham, a handsome Parasol and a JAUNTY CAP to oatch, for the insignificant sum of Do not put off securing one, FRENCH DRKSS PATTERNS. By a fortunate stroke of busing policy we obtained a small collection of th.-jo Pat- terns in beautiful colors, with effective com- binations to be used for Border or Puiel de- sign. They were imported to "II at We offer the lot, ot fifty robw, at Do yon want to save mouey FURS And Fur of all kinds are taken on STORAGR During the Ssmmer mouths, and Imrared against fire aid moth at t ver> MODKRArR COST. If yon contemplate repairing, altering or re dyeing, money can be wved by having the work done now. A or verbal urfer left in the For will receive pioiupt attention. BT.ACK WOOT- 46 Inchee wide, which has, nntil beon selling at one dollar a yard, it upon oar counters thii muming at 85 Cents. An fabric of superb Silk finish. No mote at this price when the piuant stork ATM i) LOOK OUT FOR BARGAIN We have purchaseH the store North of us and intend to buiM on the two lots iliovlincsl otnrc in liciilcnl KliADY-MADIi l J I t IT .MI4IC1IANT B" Mi: 1 xo NORi'll GRKKLN"   

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