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Trenton Times Newspaper Archive: April 3, 1890 - Page 1

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Publication: Trenton Times

Location: Trenton, New Jersey

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   Trenton Times, The (Newspaper) - April 3, 1890, Trenton, New Jersey                               r VOT- Yin. NO. THU1WDAY AU'rKKNOON. APKIT, 3 1890. TWO A FA I Al. GAS EXPLOSION. Five Men Killed in coke Mine. a Nanti- WERE INJURED. John Griffith'! Flpe Mas the Causa of the Terrible Be Opened Bll Safety Lamp to Enjoy a Smoke and the Took Fire. WTI KRHHARKIT, Pa, April 3 Gas ex- ploded in slope No 3 of the Coal company at Nanticoke yesterday Four men were killed qnd five Injured. The names of the dead are James Adams, aged 35, leaves a wife and six children. John J Griffith, aged 24, died after being removed, a wife and child, Jamea A, Williams, miner, aged 84, leaves a wife one child. John Zubovage, aged 38, instantly killed. Morgan Price, aged 38 died last evening The injured are Michael Barlnskl, slight- ly injured Joseph Barinski, seriously in- jured, John Buddick, slightly injured, George Elmy slightly burned How the Explosion Oconrred The explosion was in a branch of the main gangway in No 6 lift of the colliery The chambers are all connected by narrow pmt sages, called headings, which are driven for the purpose of ventilation When the fire boss examined theme chambers in ths mom- Ing he found gas in one of them in danger- ous quantities When men came to work George filmy, the assistant fire boss, was sent in with a carpenter to clear out the gas, He notified the men not to go into the chambers and made an era ruination He decided to have one of the headings closed Another opened, which would send a strong air current into the breast where the gas WAR He sent tfae carpenter, Griffith, up in the heading to do the work and told the ethers to stay with him in the gangway All obeyed except Adams and his laborer, Zubovage, who both, went off into their chambers and began loading coal They and Griffith were the only men in the cham- bers, and one of the three must have fired gat A Frlghtfnl Concussion. W hen the explosion occurred the flames rushed out of the breasts and ran along the wrapping in their fiei y embrace all who were there The shock blew donu doors, brattices and timbers, and several that stood on the gangway were hurled from the track broken All through the mine the concussion was heard, and from the mouth of the slope, feet aWay, a cloud of dust was driven Rescuing the Bodies. Instantly eveij man in the mine fled for the nearest exit, but inside Foreman Turner General Inside Superintendent Reese got together a rescue party and started for the scene. At the turning into the branch they met Elmy, who was gj oping his way out Within three feet of Elmy W A James was sitting when the explosion oo- uuried. Vlmy escaped with slight burns, but James was instantly killed by a falling prop. Griffith, who wan found Insensible, hart Inhaled the flame and was burned In- The body of James was found just at the entrance to his chamber buiiied and ciushed nnder a heap of fallen coal and rock. The body of laborer John Zubovage was found driven so tightly be- tween an overset car and the roof of the gangway that the car had to be moved be- fore he could be extricated. A splinter of wood was driven through the eye Into the brain It Wai a Fatal Spot others were fonnd in the gangway, where they had gathered waiting until the gas was cleared away rescue parly succeeded in reaching and extricating all of the men before they were forced to return by the after damp At this spot an explo- sion occurred one year ago and Uric C Schaufusft, one of the loading minjng gineers of thin dty, was kllUd, and two The place nasonly reopened a few months ago Fire Boss George Olney is of the opinion that Griffith removed the cover from- his safety lamp to light hjg pipe, and that the exposed flame cauMd the ex- plosion. F. B. Totusend At Co. AldgU. Haw YORK-, April 8. F R Townnand ft Co commission woolen merchants at No 78 Worth otroot, bavo mrido an to James F Young, of Philadelphia, giving preferences to John and James Dobsojl, of Philadelphia, for The firm consists of Frederick R. Townagnd, William M Richards, Jr and Charles H Wade The failure is attributed by the assiguee to the of warm winters and the coma q K'nt on in trade and also mill in- vestments on mill produc- tions. The assignee eald the outlook was very orablt to the creditors. From an. otbur source it was leaiaed that Mr Towu- Eend m an officer in a mill which or is ii bout to go into the hands of a receiver. He h >s made, it is said, overadvances to that mill The firm of F R. Towusend Co. was ratid at Dunn's igenxiy at f i om to Two Jersey Ruffians Arrested. KFD BAKK, N J April William Buck- ley aud John Calltthan, two notorious young iiiui from Tinlon Falls, have been ar. Ud cinninally assaulting Mrs, Jr Be: w 11, aged 50 years, residing at South Eat iilowu Her husband answered a knock at the door Wednesday night and w is knocked down by the two men Mrs, Raswell went to see what the trouble, w je n sLe wan attacked and vV the ruffians were arraigued la court Mr who was preset, greatly excited, and was barely retrained from shoot rg the Bd wards committid them to the county jail to await the action of the jury, Acalnut Senator Paddock's Bill. WASHIVQTON, April 8. The offloex. of the flsh art, KfUong ef- fort to defeat the bill which Is now panning (or the transfer of the oononMlon to department of turt. A number of protests ha boon received frum all of the country and an active opposition to the bill is being generated which may i_ult In ite defeat Train wreckers Foiled. HALIFAX, N S April 8 attempt made to wreck a passenger train on the Intercolonial railway Two logs were the track on the Hornbrook bridge, which Is ninety feet high Fortunately was not derailed, but threw the oh- Aiuctlins aside There nn unusually la.g. nnmber of passengers on the train Pennsylvania Colliery to MT CARMEL, Pa AprU 8 Ortlorn for tha resumption of work at the Pennsylvania eolliery hnvn been Issued Tho minors who have I con Idle since Jan rare rejoiced at the good Tinv s "Whentlmp fnrtlncrn s J-T oro-- 'Md iTlnff f and slnnjlih stKto of the blood. To rem- PI A.> ERS IN CONVENTION Becbley Mulvey and Delehanty Relu Baseball News NEW YORK April 3 meeting of the delegates of the central board of the Play era league to act on the cases of Beckley, Mulvey and other contract jumpers, and to consider the advisability of changing or re- taining then present schedule, convened shortly befoie noon The different clubs were represented by the following delegates New York E. A McAlpm and W Kwmg Boston Julian 6 Hart M J Kelly, Buffalo, James L White, Brooklyn, John M Ward Chicago F H Brunnell Cleve- land, A L Johnson Pittsburg, John Tener, Philadelphia, J M Vandersllce and George Wood. The opening dates were changed so that the seasons of both the National league and the Players' league will open on the same day, April 19 This action of the Brother- hood in selecting the same opening day as the National league makes the fight more aggressive than ever and effectually silences the National league people, who were confi- dent that the Brotherhood was afraid to clash with them in their dates The ques- tion of taking back deserters from the Brotherhood was settled without much ar- gument It was decided that Beckley, Mul- vey and Delehanty be reinstated under a resolution requiring a unanimous vote of the board of directors for such a purpooe Tn the case of John T Pickert, the short- stop of the Philadelphia Players' club, whose services are claimed by the Tfannas City club of the A merican association nnder the rcoorve clause, it was decided to allow Mr Pickert to stay with the Brotherhood Affidavits from that player were produced to show that he had returned the advance money (1300) given him by the Kansas City club and obtained a receipt for it The action of the Cleveland convention in allowing to each club 2 per cent of all the tickets issued as complimentaries was reversed and the figure increased to 8 per cent During the season each club will be known by a flag as well as by a uniform club will be provided with eight flags, and on the daj of a game its owu nng fly from the flagstaff with thnt of the visiting team. The league also adopted resolutions permitting the clubs to give exhibition games between themselves prior to the open- ing of the championship season. This per- mission is only for the present season. No exhibition gomes will bo allowed on Snn day The convention then adjourned after passing resolutions of thanks to Judges Howland aud Bacon, of New York, and Moore and Vanderslice, of Philadelphia, for their work in the recent legal difficulties between the National league and the Brother- hood The KamoEed Snle of Columbus. COLUMBUS O, April he rumor of the sale of the Columbus Baseball club to Indianapolis or Detroit is still going the rounds The latest one is to the effect that Sunday games are to be stopped here and that no money can be made without them and that the team has boon weakened so badly by the loss of Baldwin, Orr and Daily that it is not much stronger than a minor league club, and will not draw the crowds during the week that it did laat year While there is considerable talk of stopping the Sunday games, nothing defi nite can be learned just now, but it is evi- dent that the directors are uneasy from the fact that they are flooding the city council and others m authority with complimentary season tickets The club is making soch a poor showing in the exhibition series that the people are becoming disgusted, and it is haid to tell what the outcome will be unions It is greatly sti engthened. Yesterday's Ball Games. At New York (N 12, Yale 5 At (A 12, U heeling 15 At (N 8, Metro- politan At Pi 12, Princeton, o Basehits Athletic, 12, Princeton, 9 Errors Athletic 3 Princeton, 6 At Ccrlnmbua Columbus, 28, Basehits Columbus, IT, Wheeling, 15 Errors Co umbus 8, Wheeling, 9 Bat- Widner, Huston and Bligh, Bishop and Fitzgerald At Toledo Toledo, 18, Dayton, 8 Baoo hits Toledo, 18, Dayton, 7 Frrors To- cdo C, Dayton, 9 Batteries Abbott, iSjjmgue and Rogers, Staulutou, Wilson, Ouppy and Williams At 7, James own tS 3 AFlER LIFE, A Nearly Successful Attempt at His Destruction MANY STUDENTS AUREST. Universities Closed, Plots Unearthed, Peasants In Revolution, Mhlllsui Ramp- ant and TarlouH Interesting; Incidents Cause Trouble Tor Rutsla a Despot LONDON, April 3 Berlin corre- ipondftnt of The Chronicle says that a par. ially successful attempt been made ipon the life of the cznr The name of the would be assassin and the kind of weapon jaed are not Irngwn. Students Under Arrest Fifteen of the students arrested at Mos- 30w will be tried oil the charge of being po- litical revolutionists Forty-two have boon axpelled from the university Of this num- ber thirty-seven have been allowed tha right to enter other nniversities Forty- Tour will be subjected to minor punishments ind the remainder will be released The iisorders are considered to be a sign of revolutionary plans, in connection with the igitation in f01 eign countries regarding the treatment of political prisoners in Siberia ind the recent letter of Mine Tshebnkova to the oKir Sixty seven students at the Charkoff uni- versity have boon arrested aud eleven ex- pelled. Wholesale Arrests Made Count Ddlianoff, minister of public in itruction, bas refused to receive the petition recently prepared by the students at the 3t Petersburg university abkmg for a re- iuction of the entrance fees tha unrestrict- ed admission of Jews, and the equality of male and female students. Ibreo hundred "XCited university students assemb ed, in tending to march to tho ministry of public instruction, but the police mteivenel aud uroted 175 of them. Three liu i iro 1 stu ieoty of the Technological institute and many pupils of the School of Forestry and the Academy of Medicine have been ai rested for taking part in seditious meetings Blood Already Shed The peasants are rising in Kiazan and blood has already been shed ihe agitation is spreading to Finland and Poland and jindarmes and Cossacks have beeu sent to imell the disorder The excitement is in- tense Everybody sympathizes with the students Sflrvia and Bulgaria at OdtU LONDON A[ ril 3 Servian agent m compliance with his government's insti uc tious, it ft Sofia today A rupture between dcrvia and Bulgaria is imminent The trouble is said to hnve bean fomented by Ruisia Harry Defeats Gteofell April 3 the parliamentary alectlon at Windsor Barry (Conservative) received votes and Greufell (Liberal) tfil In the last election the Conservative candidate was returned without opposition A BIG FAILURE Vlght Ended. PHII Aprils flghtagalnst "resident Corbin, of the Reading railroad, ias been amicably ended. Mr Corbin con- euted to the request of the discontented liarebolders for a representation in the >onrd of managers. Messm Ihomsj) Bolan lid Henry C Gibson were proposed as the iew members, and Corbin promised hat they should be elected at the meeting a.'ic Wednesday it is thought that Mossri. u> ckrnn and Antelo will retire to mata loom for Messrs Dolan Gibson Tius- co Walsh says the settlement was made bo ocuse the contest hud injured the credit of he company, and it was dooiaedgood poliuy to make all interests identical A repre- rfntative of the party haa trie ar- ruj against Mr Corbin (hat more and been achieved by the settlement thun the people engaged in the struggle had ever Hoped to accomplish. The polio; will hanged at once, and hereafter the entire ,11 opprty will be solely In the in- of the company. A Protest from Gloucester. OLOUCFSICB-, April b a largely attended meeting of tho board of Senator Paddock's bill to place the nub. coin- mission under the depaHnient of agrlenl- was strongly condemned, nod tlons were adopted that snoh a would be a serious blow at the -fflciancy of ho commission A urotwt adopted against duties on flsh landed from American Austin Corbln's Game NEWPORT, N H, April Bins. Mountain Forest Park beau organized, with Corbin The aasoclatioo secured about acres of wild land mountain range in this vicinity, and will stock It with buffalo, elk, antelope, moo.s, Ash, etc. The capi'-l is object is sport and thepiosorvationof of American game. La Grippe Canti. Another HTANHIS, April Alu- ander Crocker, a prominent eirlcnn of this place, has coinmltted S'jJoide at hitkM by a pistol shot in the htnd. He bad iripps early this winter and suffered a left and Indus I despondency Vonng Abhott's Unaccountable Bnlolde, BOSTON, April 3 Abbott, third, ntfpd 20, son of Samuel Abbott, chief of the protective department of the Boston fire de- nirtmont, committed pmloide yesterday by phootlng himself No cause for the act is it V o A r n n Try r-fo nn T rl M i JpiTTTwt ftto rfttlpf TMn r T-nM-y allnyn Jnfliin TQstlon, heals tho pulmonary orism, Inducts Rhodes Brothers, of Delaware County, Pa., Kinbarruftsed PHILADELPHIA April rf Broth srs owners and operators of the Aston, Rnowlton and West Bianch mills in Aston township, Delaware county, manufacturing doeskins, shirtings dometts and jeans, and employing persons, have made an as- signment to the Delaware County Trust company Mr John Rhodes, who since 1881 has boon practically the sole proprietor of the plant, attributes the failure to general shrinkage in the value of all textile fabrics, and to lack of a market for manufactured stock, of which a large amount Is now stored up No statement is published, but the assets are large, and it is believed that if reasona ble terms are made By creditors the con cern can ultimately resume business. Samuel Rhodes, who was bought out by Johu m 1881, holds judgment notes to the extent of and other judgments amounting to were filed yesterday prior to the assignment Tho credit of the bouse has been of the highest grade, and John Rhodes was regarded as the leading business man of the county The failure, therefore, causes, much surprise The mills and the 200 dwellings of the employes cover 400 acres of ground and in fact comprise the whole settlement of Aston The agents in Philade phia and New York, through whom the products of the mills were marketed, are Chapman Martin Mr Chapman, the senior member of-the firm, expressed great surprise at hearing ol the failure, fie said his firm had acted ai selling agnntg in this city and New York for Rhodes Brothers for several years, but he knew nothing as to their assets and llabili ties. It is stated that the business in recen years amounted to from to 000 per annum The real estate owned b; Rhodes is worth aud the machiuer; In addition to this there is a larg amount of manufactured stock on hand. To Investigate Immigration vV AHmHaTON, April 8 sub-committee of the honae and senate committees on imml consisting of ReprcooDtatives Owen Brewer and Qates, and Senators Hale, Mc- Pheison and to New York to Investigate the immlgiatlon question Tha committee will probably remain in New York for several week" and make ai thorough investigation of the matter as pos- sible. The board of immigiation and th of the various steamship and ral road companies will probably be first ex ainlned, and then the investigation will be extended to all parties who wish to be heart! "Dune Dp" by Editor Myers. COLUMBUS, 0 April 3. Allen 0 Myers, editor of The Cincinnati Porcupine, an Representative Pennell, of Brown county engaged in a quarrel and came to blows 1 the 001 rldors of the Nell house last evening Pennell Was badly worsted, a id bears a ugly cut over his right eye Friends inter- fered before the tight resulted in either o the combatants being seriously injured. The trouble out of an Imputation made by Myers The Porcupine ag Penuell relative to the late senatorla Campaign M.nofactnrers Protest. WAIHIIOTON, April 8 from the boards of trade of Key West and Tampa, and representatives of theNowYor manufacturers of Havanjt cigars appeared before the ways and means com mittoo of tb and entered protest against the pro fnoresje in tho duty on Havana to- bacco contemplated in the f.rlff bill ICx-GoTemor Pollock 111 LOCK HAVPN Pa Apr'l 1 Kx-Governo James Pollock in ill At home of his son in-law, H r H n 11ni city, and o account of hi n A nil 1 udo IR felt NEWS IN BRIEF. Fresh Tips from the tflres Carefully Culled. Henry Llnti In alias James been Indict d for killing James Hi Her in Fast Hampton Conn last January Dr nnrl Mrs Norvin Otreeu celebrated the uftleth anniversary of their marriage at Louisville Ky April 1 August Bander, a single mat) aged 40 employed at a Leroy malt house went to Batavia, NY and put up at the Park hotel In the morning he was found idead with the gas on at full head and not turning Mrs Phillip Tiley, aKed 68, committed lulcide at Silver Creek, N Y Vy hanging In the cellar of her residence. Sfce was tern porarily Insane from continued aickness Jerry Lynch, of Syracuse, N Y was lied by a cave-in of a sewer in process of instruction in the Eleventh ward an was injured At the coroner s inquest on the body of erome Baker, who was found with his hroat cut at Homer, N Y the jury brought In a verdict to the effect that Baker ame to his death by hln own hum! by out- ng his throat with a razor W T Wardwell, Horace Waters, W J roo, Clinton B Flsk and other Prohibition ts have formed the Prohibition Trust 'Hind association a corporation intended receive and administer any funds or prop- rty devoted to the prohibition cause At the annual commencement of the Jef erson Medical college the degree of doctor of medicine was conferred upon graduates. At Duryee a quarrel occurred be- ween John Pryor and John Butz. During he progress of the fight a shot was fired, struck Hugh Graham killing him istantly Pryor and Butz are in jail The pope has decided to recognise the re- ubllc of Brazil, provided that the rights of le church are respected Emm Pacha has entered the German serv oe at a salary of per year, and will eturn to Victoria, Nyanea The English r ess is veij angrjr It is oald that Secretary Windom, owing o delay in congress on the Ellis Island mat- er, has decided to use Bedloe s Island for je immigrants' landing The bill providing for care of the insane y the state passed the senate at Albany, N T by a vote of 21 to 0 Sullivan says Jackson will bealiardman to conquer RHODE ISLAND'S ELECTION nanguratlon of the Australian System of Voting PROVIDENCE April 3 to the in- uguration of the Australian voting sys em, returns of Rhode Island's elections will be later delayed than usual Full re- urns from fourteen towns and eight dis- including none of th cities, give jadd (Hep for governor, Davis Dem J, Last year the same districts ave Lndd 1 558 Davis, 3 u ntrue upi nti, t in rtiis conforente t t i lull t It t to thh retommtiuUa ii U 111 il (ill ni t in ttshlugtou a cuiu iun 11 s I f unu ui niuiu Uelegtttos uiu ui i n id u ul d m tins i jutor it u i s i i un t i juuutity tlu u 1 o ui i nt) tin, us s it ahull have unii ilue .u i [r poi un of the interim ni silvei cum or coins an I their rtla nx to k Id that the g vernmeut of the n I 1 Mitts bluill iuvito the coimuituion inttt in Hsluiioton withlu a ynai tu be u t I 1 0111 tho Into of thy adjournment Ih s unfi.1 uKt, Ti unto liiiHtlalo Scared >tu oiu Vpi ii J J he LOiumittee ap unit d 1} tho boaid education to invea g Uu g it insinu itioua made by tliuol Ti ustaj Ti is lalo tifftctiag good imo   i esigued ho should ave botn exj elkd m disgi aee 1 he report oes furthu and uys a high mpliinent to Ljwitj piaoofilly and offltially, txj TOSS s full confidence in Mr Buthtr und 1 he report was adopted unanimously, 11 that l-o ninissiouor Agnew re- 11 d fi ni vt tmj: Presenu in the most elcgint form THE I AXATIVE AND NUTRITIOUS JUIOE i. THE FIGS OF CALIFORNIA, Combined with the medicinal virtues of plants, known to be most beneficial to the human system, foitmng an agreeable and effective laxative to pemia- nently cure Habitual Consti- pation, and the many ills de pending on a weak or inactive condition of the KIDNEYS, LIVER AND BOWELS. It is tl mo't excellent remedy known to "LEMSE THE SYSTEM EffECTUALLlf When one is Rilio is or Constipated PURE BLOOD, REFRESHING SLEEP, HEALTH and STRENGTH NATURALLY FOLLOW Every one is using it and all are delighted with it ASK YOUR DRUGGIST FOR -sjs" MANUFACTURED ONLY BY CALIFORNIA FIG SYRUP CO. SAN FRANCISCO, OAL, KY new nan n i. WRAPS FOR KASTKR. Have you made your selec tion We have a most pleas ing v ariety. We are showing a large line of Jackets, both plain and jaunty, at prices ranging from no to oo Ihen we have those stylish and convenient shoulder capes, cloth, lace, beaded New shapes and styles not shown last week. We have t Id you about our Peasant Cloaks, made of Fnglish waterprool serge, a most useful garment for wet weather, dry weather and traveling. One of these will prove a very satisfactory investment The children have been well looked after in our prepara- tions for the spring trade We are pretty well satisfied that you will find you want for them in our stock. COT-E KuNSMAN, II North ShM'-, ARK ARRIVING AT WAUJS1 1-ANCY STORI Bret j day, among which an new itjld of Hwiery und light Under- ww. Our Hutlcrjr is o poisononn itniTB, which U gtronatotha inferior We oar goods to glre both in qnmllty we reoeiTcd complete TnfaiitB1 Goofr, si fine Oloaku, Tloboe Br n ETerytWng for w Oc. It! -id Kid G107J onr in the iwt mude. Bring yonr flne breHw now for eoTeriagii befbre tt-t Goto FANCY WILLIMANTIC SPOOL For Sale by OH MRD WON. Leading Dealers. 34 Union Square, New York City, Aug. 1889 Afttr a sent! cf at our Lhzabethfortfactory, extending over a penod of sn iral months, u f hit e decided to me the 57Y CORD SPOOL COTTON, helming it ti> if the best thrtad nmti in the market, and strongly recommend it to all UL, pur hast rs an t users of the Singer Machines THE SINGLR MANUFACTURING COMPANY Ui.ibrella and iriane' Oeleb-ated Spring Styles now on Pale STKWAiiT HAMMOND Eqoipi YOUNG GFNll.FMKN In IVfMK-lUAus 4 HPRVIUK 
                            

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