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Trenton Times Newspaper Archive: March 8, 1890 - Page 1

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   Trenton Times, The (Newspaper) - March 8, 1890, Trenton, New Jersey                               VI IT. HO. TKKSNTON, OATU11DAY I HE HORROR A l HAMBURG further Details of the Lake Shore Wreck. THE DEATH UST REDUCED TO SIX, The Heartrending Grief of Joseph Ban cua, Young Bride Kipired la Child's Parent) Killed. Corrected LUt of the Dead and Injured, BUFFALO, N. Y., March 8. General Su- perintendent Wright aud pivision Super- intendent Couch, of the Shore road, reached here early in the morning and ai once bogan visiting all the injured they could find. They visited the scene of the wrei-t near Hamburg in the afternoon. The men comprising the crew of the Ill- fated train remained on duty until late in the morning, after having told their stories to the officers under whose immediate charge were. A little light was thrown nn the cause oi the accident by this investigation, and II seems that the blame must be attached to some one in the forward part of the wrecked train. The train was equipped with the Westinghouse automatic brake, and when it first broke in two the air was automatically applied, bringing the rear end to a dead stop. The Cause of tbe Aeeldent. To release the brakes It is then necessary, if the oars are uncoupled from tha engine, to open a small cock in the air brake cylin- der under the far and allow enough air to escape to release the brakes. By closing the cock then enough air would still be left in tbe cylinder to make two stops by pulling the air brake cord in the car. The most plausible explanation is that all of the air escaped, thus making the brakes useless. And thi'explains their failure to act when the cord was pulled by Conductor Fest, of the Wagner car. Mr. John Robin- son, the master mechanic, did not care to say what his investigation showed. "It's a sad said he, "and much to be re- gretted. Mooney is one of our most careful engineers arid the confidence of ns all in his ability to act quickly in an eniei-genoy." Condition of the Injured. The bruised anrl wounded who escaped in the disaster are distributed about the at the Fitch hospital, the Iroquois hotel and the Tifft house. The most severely injured are at the Fitch hospital. The attendants there say, however, that they were all doing as well as could be expected. They were, of course, in too weak and nervous a state to talk. The only injured woman at the hospital who sur vlved Julia Healy, of Buaton, who is in very bad shape. One side of her head Vas manhed, a rib and her right arm broken and her left eye badly cut The at- tendants said they thought she would re- cover, bnt that she would be seriously dis- figured for life. Rev. Johnson Myers, of Cin- cinnati, will recover. He was injured about the head nnd legs. He is at the Tifft house. He Said Nonchalantly, "Cat Her Off." J. N. Nimick, of Philadelphia, was also at the Fitch hospital Hta right arm was am- putated. When the doctors intimated that his arm might possibly be saved, doubting whether he could stand the shock of the operation, he said: "Go ahead, cut her iu the most nonchalant way. Mr. Nimick. is now getting along comfortably, A corrected list of .the dead and the in- jured is given below: The Death Boll. Baucin, Mrs. Joseph D., Saratoga Springs; skull fractured. Flynn, J. w., Canton, 0., traveling agent for l.antz Bros. Co., Buffalo. Power, John T., traveling agent for D. M. Collius Co., Pittsfield, ukull frae- tured. Stewart, E. E., Rochester, N. Y.; inter- nal injuries and shock. Stewart, Mrs. E. E., Rochester, N. Y.; in- ternal injuries and shook. Swan, colored porter, N.Y. A Lint of the Injured. Allen, George E., Buffalo, general north- ern passenger agent of the Erie; ankle sprained and cut about left leg. Armstrong, J. C., No. 136 Fulton avenue, Rochester; head and leg cut. B.'irtsch, Charles, New York; left ankle sprained. Havens, Joseph D., Saratoga Springs; in- juries to head face and legs. Branch, W. W. Va.j left _ erui broken. Coombs, F. A No. 878 North Twonly- llith street, Philadelphia.; tide injured and cut about head. Los Angelas, Cal.; en route to Hunger, Me.; back hurt; injuries not seri- ous. r' Fisher, L. R., Boston; right ankle dislo- cated and chin cut Haupt, W. E., Buffalo lawyer; arteries in left arm severed; turn) will be saved. Healy, Julia, No. 48 Fabian gb-oot, Boa- ton; side of rib and right ariu broken; left eye haJly cut (B Jaeger, H F., No. 181 South Goodman avenue, Rochester; cut forehead ou the neck; ankle dined, Llewylen, A A., St. John, Neb.; left foot bruised. Martin, George E., Boiw City, Mah0; wounds in chest. Myers, Kev. Johnnon, of Ninth Street Baptist church, Cincinnati; cut in herd nod leg bruited. Nimick, J. N., Philadelphia; right crushed and amputated. Rice, Charles L., Newton Falli, MM.. in- juries to chest and legg. Julius, New York; left arm fract- ured. Uirich, Heuiy, knoo injured. Honghtallog'. Alleged Mistake. Coroner Tunkar and his jui'j returned tat evening from the scene of the wreck. They found that the Vvaguer car the rear Tjike Shore coach WMO iplin. tered wrecks. No evidence taken. The inquiry will resolve into this; That whoever was responsible for starting tbe disabled Lain in responsible for the Aieck. It la con- ceded thnt the five Wagner cars left Dnn- kirk attached to the rest of the train only by a coupling. The aif and steam pipu wore not connected. Conductor ing, who ought to have known this fact, pulled the nir brakes on tho forward motion when ho discovered tho third break. The first section wnn-hi-oiifrht to n. dead stop. Or- dinarily tliis wnulil Jin.vr> boon the right thing to ilo, I ni. v.itii flvn Wagner carscomhiK bel.ii'.l :iiir..-ioof forty miles an hour, with W.M- (0-05, except' hand brakes, it Tire Wnrnlni "My God, Mnoii. i bo mnshedl" Bhoiif ii u, iri engineer ns ho jnm] wiird nnd f down. h; M.. to tho nir b: full .if i Hire's Oongh Cure, samvlis Of which are now KY rtlfirllrUUd In eitfiOouUini no opium, made the wreck before the engme could move the train. The Wagnercar conductor in his eicitouu-ut, tried to set the useloi brakes in three cars before he tried the hand brakes. A Husband's Anguish. The most pathetic thing about the acci dent was the fatal interruption to the brida trip of Lawyer Joseph D. Baucus and wife of Saratoga Springs. Her skull was fract- ured and t.he died on the relief train iu the presence of her hubband, who bore up undo] his own injuries until bin bride was dead. While she lived he watched her with little regard to his own painful.wounds and oulj constant but misleading reports from the surgeons kept him quiet. "She's doing said one, nodding b. Baucns, who was propped up in another sea across the car. This soothing announce ment had the contrary effect of that in tended. The husband jumped to his fee and, pushing through the group of doctors flnrig himself down beside bis wife am clasped the suffering woman, to his heart. "My God] she's cold, she's coldl" cried he turning frenzied and reproachful looks 01 the physicians. "No." said oue of them, ''she still livea Be a man. While there is life there is hope. Kissed Her Bleeding Lips. But the loviug heart discredited .the sur geon's kindly sophistries. "She is dying, said Baucus, tragically, and stayed close k the loved oue till death released her, kissing the bleeding lips, and to the lust begging the Burgeons to save her life. The end came as thft train was entering Buffalo. Baucus' grief was terrible to be- hold, and it was only by the greatest effuri that he could be coaxed away from thi body. Mrs. Baucus was Miss Oluey, o; Rome, N. Y., aud her futhc-r-in-law is ex Judge Baucus, of Saratoga county. Her body is iu the morgue. Another piteous episode was tho killing ol Mr. and Mrs. Stewart, of Rochester, while their baby girl, clasped in tho mother's arms, escaped uninjured. The baby kep Citing, "Mamma, Friends are caring for the luckless mite. A HEAVY FAILURE. Monroe Eckstein Co the Staten Island Brewers, Aligned. NEW YORK, "March Eckstein Co., brewers, who do business under the name of Monroe. Eckstein at Four Corners, S. L, have mad'j an assignment to Benjamii L. Wertheimer and Louis Adlor, giving preferences aggregating They were rated at from to The firm of Monroe Eckstein Co. is com- posed of Monroe EoksEuw and Leo Wert- heimer. Mr. Wertheimer is the head of the firm of L. Wertheimer, ol San Francisco, wholesale tobacco dealers, for the past twenty-five years and has sup- plied money and credit for the brewery business In June, Monroe Eckstein died aud the business contiuued without change. On Monday last the widow of E. W theimer applied for a receiver for the prop- erty of li 'E. Wertheimer in order to liquidate the affairs, on the ground that the continuation of the business after" the death of her husband was not authorized. This receivership was unexpected blow to Leo Werthnimer and cut off his credit and that of the brewery. In consequence of this as- signments were made, including the copart- nership property as well as the interest of Leo iu the San Francisco concern. The in- debtedness of the brewery is about andthat.of individually Louis Adler, one of the assignees, will furnish an indemnity bond and continue the brewery business. He says the total amount involved is between and the most of which is commercial paper. The amount of tha assets cannot yet be given. Business of the Grand Lodge, A. O. U. W, ROCHKSTEK, N. Y., March. Grand lodge of the Ancieut Order of United Work- men at its final day's session selected Syra- cuse as the place for Inn next session. Benja- min Franklin, of Orleans county, was elected grand guide; P. A. Spitz, of Kast Bloom- field, inside watchman; W. R, Butler, out- side watchman, and R. C. Hill, of Olean, grand trustee. Hon. Leroy Andrus, of Buffalo, was appointed legal adviser of the Grand lodge, and Dr. Driggs, also of Buffalo, was reappointed grand medical examiner. The committees were appointed: On laws, George W. Mexon, G. W. Stevens and J. S. Wilson; on credentials and returns, B. G. Mead, H. B. Dickinson and John Sawyer. A resolution was adopted prohibiting the institution of lodges in cities having a popu- lation of or lew, except when there are fifty members present to take the degree. These representatives to the Supreme Grand lodge were chosen: Nelson Randall, of Rip leyvCjHJUtauqua county, who is bldest past grgnd master workman in the order; J. H Norton, of Plaiuville, and 8. A Schoon- maker, of Brooklyn. The Asbuij Park Bank was Used. NKW YOBK, March Evening Post Mys it has boon learned that Pell, Simmons, Wallack and the other bank wreckers used the Anbury Park (N. J.) National bank in their check kiting operations. Sigmnnd Meyer, whose connection with the wreckers haa boon alleged, was interested in the Anbury Park concern. It does not appnar that the bank lost anything by the opera- tions of the wreckers, but the fact that there ware business tranaactiona of the kind re- tailed to led the national bank nramfner to inquire into the condition of the bank, and thin resulted in the discovery that the presi- dent, George W. Byram, had loaned the bank's funds to himself for use in real estate speculations to the extent of The bank's capital Is and the law permits only 10 per ueut of this amount to be loaned in the manner that Byram had loaned it, Is making the amount good, and the bank tvill doubtless beallowed to continue businoon. The Late Ex-Ooreruor English'! will. NJJW HAVES, March will of the late ex-Governor English gives to the New Haven hospital, to Yale college for a chair of mathematics, to the Yale college library, each to the New Haven Orphan asylum and St Franrfa (Roman Catholic) Orphan asylum; the-residence, fiirnltura, plato anrl property to the widow, and the remainder if estate, valued at to the only son, Henry F. English. it is un- derstood that there was an ante-nuptial agreement that the bulk of the estate should go to the the second wife waiving her righto. Drowned In Trough of UNTO, March Freeman, a fighter and worthless character, killed a man near Rcsevllle by holding, the man's heiM in a trough of water until he was dead. The victim was a cook on a ranch. Freeman was drunk at the time, and attacked the man without provocation. A Train Wruckt 'utcnced. WATUIH, Tnd Mnrch the Wabnsh niif. f AVillinm M >rquis, tho youthful >i" to jail for onn (n io! n H'ubnsh 'll. U'-foh'ji fit, worthy K in onnsunllT red was lane sns- a tippler on ibe sir by those not KANE'S HUMAN lARGElS A Desperado Shoots l hree Officers and a. Woman. VIOLENT DEATHS IN MANY FORMS Three iin.ln Woman Burned to Death Two People Mangled by the Peniuyl vanla Killed by Other Fatalities. CHICAGO, March policemen wer fatally and oue painfully shot shortly after 8 o'clock last evening by a young desperado named Joseph Kane, from Davenport, la. wfio paved the way for this slaughter o ofiici-Ts by stealing a diamond ap shooting a woman iu the arm. ITanevisitec the house of C'irrie Wutsoo, of No. 1418out Clark street. He remained there till nigh' and before taking his departure next morn ing was asked for money by Annie Hal His reply was the display of a revolver i hinking ht  track and the entire train passed over him, cutting his body in a hundred pieces. The remains were collected in a basket and taken to tho police station. Lennigan leaves a wife and two children. lie Fell Down H Mine Mi aft. SOBAIMTON, Pa., March 8. A pump runner named Michael Malia fell a of 400 feet down the Cayuga shaft, in this city, and was instantly killed. His body was lit- erally mashed. Malia had been hoisted up the shaft and signalled Engineer Rogers all was right The engineer accord- ingly let the carriage down again, and Malta was flung down the shaft with great force. The quivering body fell in a heap among a number of workmen employed at the foot ot the shaft Two Dead, One Injured. i; Va., March Summit tiill sand pits ou the Norfolk and railroad, about two miles from thin city, a sand bank gave way and buried three colored man, John Dawson, LewisStewartand Algie Jriflin. The first named two wtfo killed and Jrlflln's leg was broken. A VVomau'a Horrible WILMINGTON, Del., March lence of Alexander Stokes, noar Ridgely, Id., was burner! to the ground. Mrs. StokM, who was in the building at tho time, wai 'lurncd to a crisp. Tim loss is An Alleged Fovrjnr Kutrndttod. DENVER, Colo., JTornh -Tim governor IOT honored n.r.'tini'lti'1'i imni-Nntv York or 0. K orrery jn t'mt 1- i-w-i- ii Pimeni'inr tint Aycr's Olnry i'eotonil ini no qunl flu a Breclflc 'or colds, concbi and all aObc- lons of tbe throat and Inngn. for Hi' a centnry it been to wr any A Warrant for Dnnnam's Assailant. ALBANY, March warrant has Lw tiwued for the arrest of W. H. Carsey, th pretended who struck Curt Dunham, The New York World reporter, the corridor of the ou Tuesday afte noon at the close of the hearing ou th weekly payment bill. Ckrsey was at th hearing to oppose the bill aud pretende that he represented labor in bo doing. Dun ham was accompanied by Assemblynu Rice, whose face is still iu a badly bruise condition. The warrant sworn out fi assault, although one was iiHktnl for oousplr acy ou the ground thnt Carsey and h crowd had come there for the purpose o whipping Rice. Dunham snys that Carse will be punished to the law's limits, aud a expose of hisjilleged labor connections made A Oaradeu Letter Carrier Arreated. CAMDEN, N.'J., March H._Ueorge W BUnck has beon committed to the count in default of buil for robbiug th United States mails. Blanck is a letter car rier of this pity. For soino time past nu merous nave been made to th postmaster of missing letters, and the case was placed in Inspector Unird's hands. Th latter mailed a decoy letter aud when Blanc was arrested the letter was found on h person. Other letters that he bad abstracte were also fouud on him. To Populate Vermont. MONTPELIER, Vt., March B. Valei tine, commissioner of agricultural an manufacturing interests, has returned fro Vershire, whore he made final arrangi ments for settling a dnzun Swedish familie this spring. The citizens' committee offe the new settlers farms of from seventy-flv to one hundred acres each ranging from I to per acre, and ulso agree to loan i: cash and furnish a cow for a stipulate! period to each family. The farms contai good buildings and orchards, and the soil productive. The Attorney (ii'niTul's None Tweake. UISMARCK, N. March Representa tive Walsh vigorously pulled Attornej General Goodwin's uoso in one of the coi ridorsofthe capitol last evening for hav ing mentioned his name in connection wit] the receut lottery scandal. Goodwin madj no effort to retaliate. To-night there" Kvef reports-that a duel would grow out of th affair, but it is nut generally believed tha the attorney general, though not lacking i courage, will attempt to get even accordin to the code. Clilcnco'i Millionaires Speak. WASHINGTON, March J. Gagi representing the World's fair people o Chicago, receded the following telegrai last night from that city, which was pre- sented to the World's fair committee today The signatures represent from t wish you continued sue cess in Washington. We will stand by yo aud the committee in everything. Cnioag will now, as in the past, prove equal to any emergency. You can count on our hearty supiort." The Wound U Mortal. HAMILTON, O., March B. Harding, tx-captaiu of police here, shot Michael Re gun, u Incal politician, at the Cincinnati Hamilton ami Dayton passenger station The shooting was provoked by Regan, wh struck Harding in the face without caus and immediately commenced blazing awa at him without effect. Harding, in self de- fense, fired two shots, the Inst taking effec in Regan's abdomen, inflicting a morta wound. Khode Itiland Enilmrraased. PROVIDENCE, R. L, March action of the house in tabling the appropriation bi! because it contained a provision for the state home and school, whose superintend ent is charged Win cruelty to children leaves the state without money for currtn expenses. Considerable embarrassment wil result to courts and various institutions Over SWW.OOO is involved in the deadlock and no further action can be taken untii next week. Leased for 809 Years. BALTIMORE, March West Virginia and Pittsburg railroad, which is the collect- ive title given to ex-Senator Camden's new system of 175 miles for developing West Virginia coal lands, has filled a mortgage of at Clarksburg, W. Va., in favor of the Mercantile Trust company of A lome of the West Virginia and Pittsburg road for years to the Bal- timore and Ohio railroad was filed at the same time, She U 101 Tears Old. BALTIMORE, Maroh 8. Mrs. Elizabeth Sands, widow of one of the' 'Old Defenders, celebrated her 101st birthday yesterday. Sh., spent tbe day ojaietly at her home, Division street The old lady is still vigor- ous and her memory is pregnant with the events of the days long gone by. A large number of visitors caljed upon her during the afternoon. Bishop Bowman Deponed. CHICAGO, March Bowman, ot the Methodist Episcopal church, was de- posed from his position and expelled from tte church of the lilal com- mittee at the Sheffield Avenue Evangelical church. He was charged with un-Christlan conduct in uttering falsehoods and in speak- ing ill of his brethren in the minority. All the charges were sustained. The Phillies Chicago. JACKSONVILLE, Fia., day's baseball game resulted as follows: Phila. delphia, 10j Chicago, 3. Ine Importance of purlf jlng the not be overestimated, for without purs blood you cannot enjoy good health. At tliln sl-ason nearly every one noedg a good niodldne to purify, vltall70, and. enrich tho binrai, nnd Hood's Sarsaparilla Is worthy yon-.- i-nriflflnnpe. It Is peculiar In that It ptr- nnd tones tlio (llKostlon, whtlA r i rial. 1 "oil's Sarsapaillla ii cold bynll .1 'pared by C- L Hood Si Co., Lowell, IOO Doses One Dollar MA1KJII 8. 1890. KAMPF PAYS THE PENALTY. A Double IJnh kly Laiiuche Int.i Ktfrnlty. CHAKLKSTOX, W. Va., Mnrch 8. Kel Kampf, who umnlered hin ilmiehter, Mar aged 20, au.l bis SUM, U'lllmin, wna hauge in the jail here. Kiuiipf luudu tt statomel in which ho he was greatly provokt when the deed done and t-xpresst-d feet williiifruebu to He nsked the slieri not to tie him, anil at he left the Jai accompanit'll by Fntlu-r Stcnucr, of tl Catholic church, tlie enmity "Ilirmls and a tending physicians, led by the rity police who kept back the crowd, llu took the an of Sheriff i'u-ken.-. uu.l mounted the scaffol with a flrui step. 1'iekensii Ijusted the roj around netk aiwl Urn trup waa spr Kampf fulling with a prayer on his lipn All occurred so quickly the crowd about people scarcely realized wh was going on. The execution took place iu the cour house yard, about 150 foot from tho jai He died without a struggle and life wi pronounced extinct in a fow minutes. Th floor of the through short! after the drop fell and several of tho spe tators fell to the ground, hut no one woi hurt. Valuable Trotters Sold. NEW YOKK, March 8. At tho third day1 sale of trotters at the American Institut building the stock sold was owned by O Valousiu, of Pleusantou, Cal., and the Pleas anton Stock Furm company. Among th horses sold were: Bontou to J. T. Bur den, of this city, for Valousiu to 1 U. Fowler, of Moodus, Conn., for Gold Leaf to J. H. Schultz, ot Brooklyn, to Saccharine to E. T. Truvis, of Ch cago, for Navarro to T. U Fowler of Moodus, Conn., for Aldu H. t Charles Roberts, of this city, tor Lady Guy to F. Daly, of Mount Cisco N. Y., for TbibUeto John A. Bchultz of Brooklyn, for Erect to H. Kirk oudell, of Helena, Mon., for Pheas auton to E. T. Travis, of Chicago, for 500; Jet to Marcus Muusell, of Hartford Conn., for Lady Critteudeu to IJr F. E, Fowler, of Moodus, Conn., for Diana to H. Kirkoudell, of Helena, Mou. for Hattie to Jacob iiuppert, of thi for 'fhB'; total'received fo twenty-flve horses of" the Pleasanton Htoc Furm company was 115, an o each, and Iho total for twenty horse of 0. Valeusin brought an averag of each, A Southern Opinion uf the Blair 1111 MONTOOMEIIY, Ala., March Ad vertiser, which was referred to in Senate Blair's speech as an advocate of the educu tional bill, will say to-day that it was one willing to accept the terms of the bill, bu Alabama has gone ahead and increased he appropriations for schools liberally and th people now prefer to depend on themselves The article continues: "Under a federal at ministration that had proper regard for th rights of the states there might be no ha: to come, from the measure, but with suol bigoted and narrow mnTdetfmen to admin ister the laws as those now in control w prefer, for our pint, to let it alone. When Mr. Blair said h.> and urged tin to build up the. Republican part in tho south, Tho lost whatu'vc uterest it r, loutiy felt in the bill TWO Presents in the most elegant form THE LAXATIVE AND NUTRITIOUS OUIOE FIQ8 OF CALIFORNIA, Combined with the medicinal virtues of plants known to be beneficial to the human system, foiming an agreeable and effective laxative to peima- nently xmre Habitual Consti- pation, and the many ills de- pending on a weak or inactive condition of the KIDNEYS, LIVER AND BOWELS. It ts th jtnost excellent remedy known to VFKHSE THE SYSTEM En-ECTUALLY When one U Bilious or Constipated SO PORE BLOOD, REFRESHING SLEEP, HB4LTH and STRENGTH NATUFtAl I Y FOI inw. Every one is using it and all are delighted with it, ASK VOUH DRUQQI8T FOR URED ONLY BY CALIFORNIA FIG SYRUP CO. SAH FRANCISCO, CAL, AT HftV YORK, H. 1." JUST AT A l i .is A Assort.. of NoTtlttosin KMRROIDKKIKS Among whlnh entlrelj ilgui never nen before, which we jurt received through the tmpoillng In New We guirtntea no finer nor bat- -ter-mMe tn In the market, tbove we are to Mil thus btintiful new yrii.-, New York re'-Her li tble to offer to yon, no who they for we th- A for ovh, tble to gife mryiM to TOO. compare onr with ethoki and prjxi P.B. -Notice. We hereby glToipe- elkl notice the old TJmbrellM frOui inQO, Idft hn, for coTeflng reMln, mut be Hied for within 80 rth date, or will be wld for -j 18th. WAMJS', Unibrella Celebrated Spring '1 Styles now on Sale. R HATH'-H, 16 State Stucot DELICIOUS, STRENGTHENING TO I HE NERVES. Tea and coffee cheer but do not nourish. They leave an injurious effect upon the nervous system. there is no beverage like Indeed VAN Him "BEST GOES FARTHEST." It stimulates and nourishes as none other, leaves no bad effects and is a flesh-former of the most approved type. trVA.V HOI TFVM A Tfce .tron, may takr, It pleo.arc nnd ,vnh Imp-nlty. The exelllnt ftffct. ot leu und nro ohvlutv.l by Iu n.-uily u.e, and ncr.oui dlioruenarc n lleveil and prevrntol. UHlrloun to the tn.le "La-.t.! In the world.' FOB VA.V M STMWAItT HAMMOND YOUNG and GENTI.KMfcN IUVKliTATJS in COUNTING-BOOM. ITS d EFjflui KH-I- WOKKKKS. OF OF M, M.thorl-, 8accw.ro] NO fa, lto The Shorthand Hepai Uncut Wr' boit facU'tte for .kill in St MOHDAx, RAPID ANu "4 3d. THOMAH J. STEW A KT, PnimjlPAr, Box KTl, H, N. J. 10 and 13 Booth Qr.xine IIARGAINS We have purchased the store North of us and intend to build on the two lots l he lincsl otoni in Ironloii! rnoit rid of our stock to do x RliADY-MADH ,N I'AH 10 NOKT1I GRKKNK K MAN Bought of AMKRIOAN -Tli l vu Antf) would not how whbtM thiongh the Child BE8I lAILQR-MADE (UOTHIN8 At much It _ ,i i 1 4l fcrfiw, I, twl ..HT. -UMl'l.K ffllUrt wl Hi 919, 111. fa, far I'uto Suite TO Vx OWWf, b _ vw tki N iiji jiii .a   

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