Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Share Page

Trenton Times: Friday, March 7, 1890 - Page 1

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Trenton Times, The (Newspaper) - March 7, 1890, Trenton, New Jersey                               Yin. NO. A LAKE SHORE SMASH UP Fata' Wreck on ihat Road Near Buffalo. TWENTY-FIVE HUR1 Train No. 13 in Two, Heavj Pullman Can Crash Into a Coach Will Frightful force and Deadly of the Injured. March 7 12 on the Laki Short) from tho wont, duo here at 9.10 evemtg, and running very fast to make uj lost time, broke in two near Hamburg al about 8 50 p m The front part pf the train consisting of engine, smoker and two day coachis, was quickly brought to I standstill. The rear half, composed of fivi heavy Pullmans, came on dowu the gradi and crashed into the second day coach. The Day Coach Telescoped. The Pullman, being the heavier, lifted the day coach into the air, and they lie one on top of the other, both having telescoped the day coach. Both the day coaches and the Pullman, were full of pas- sengers, and the number of killed and in' jured is probably veiy large Ten are re ported killed outright No Reporters Allowed. A wricking train, with a relief party ol surgeoni, soon left for the scene of the acoi' dent. The railroad authorities and employei refnind nny information whatever to the press One reporter went on the train as t surgeon's assistant No reporters were al. lowed to go if known to he such. The flrsl news of the accident WRB brought to the oitj by the engineer of the wrecked train A call was at one sent out for doctors. Evi- dently the tracks are blocked, as no regulai trams are being sent out. His Arm Amputated. One man, J E Minnick, of Philadelphia was brought m on the engi ne His ai m wal Crushed and had to be amputated He wal at once put under the Influence of ether, anil consequently no are obtainable from him From the preparations made there ii all the appearance of a bloody A Lake Shore official at the train dis- patcher's office say that the tram waa mads np of eleven cnrs and ought to Carry from 100 to 150 passengers Officials Say Four are Dead. The wrecking train sent word to theFitcb hospital at half past 12 to be prepared foi ten patients, that they were then ready tc start back. The wi eck is one mile west ot Hamburg At 1 33 a, m the railrpsd offi- cials stated that four persons were killed, one fatally injured and ten less seriously in jured. The south track was cleared at a. m so that trains could puna Ten Killed, Twenty-five Injured. A later dispatch states that ten were killed and twenty-five injured. The list oi injured as near as can be ascertained is IT T Jaeger, Rochester. Charles J, Bice, Newton Falls, Mass. L. H Fisher, Boston, leg sprained and chin badly cut The Rev Thomas A Hall, Buffalo, leg badiy cut. F A Coombs, New York, head and chin cut and both legs sprained, Julia Haley, Boston, cut in breast, ovel left eye, and head. George E Allen, Buffalo, ankle sprained James D Barnes and wife, Boston, thi man not much hurt, the worn in fatally Injured Tak n to Buffalo. A great bonfire on the side of the trad thr jws a livid light upon the teriible scene A nassengjr says the coupling was defec- tive It broke precisely in the same plac  that of J Swan, a colored porter. More of the Injured. The names of the seriously Injured are: Rev Jofmson Myers, Cincinnati, cut il head and back. L. H Fischer, Boston, right ankle dislo- cated, head cut P A Coombs, 878 North street, Philadelphia, side ami cut. Julia Healey, Boston, head injured and co iar bone and rigbt ai ui fractured. J. C. Armstrong, 136 Fulton avenue, Rochester, head cut and leg injured. Mrs. J D. Baucns, Saratoga Swings, fracture of the skull (has W W Branch, Charlestowu, W. Vs.- let) arm broken Charles Barch, New York cily, left sprained. H T Jaeger, No. 161 South Goodmat street, Rochester, ankle sprained, L F Haupt, No, 364 Summer str.it, Buf. falo, badly cut George E Allen, geueial nor them in- ger ag nt of Shore railroad, leg frac- tured Henry Uirich, Roobuter, knee sprained. J. D, Bancus, Springs, face leg cut Julius Siegelp-New York dly, left tool broken. George a Thompson, ankle sprained it jumping from the E, E. Stewart, of ISO State Roches tor, with his wife and 18-moiiths-old baby, was in the Hay coach when the Mr Stewart Was inntantiy killed. Wra. _ Stewart died before she could be fcatrm. fran the wreck The baby Was "..Injurod. A complete list of the killed cannot bt learned, but it is positively known that seven are dead, six of whom were killed. The of LATFU Swain, a negro porter of Cin- cimmti, has been identified among the dead, The hero of the nffair was Waldron, oni of the colored porters of the Wagner cars. He wns the fiist man to rush into th< Wrecked car and the lamp, whiot was burning m tho debris, and threw II from the window, thus preventing a terribll holocaust Conductor IW, r win loi of tho Wagner car, ftlso diKtingni'liPd himiHf for brnverj and prcs< nrn of nilml Tnlim KK   i L _ ,i_ t _ Illlhl >'h nil I1 nn to hi o Hive's Oongh (tare, samples of which now I belniiHstrlbnted In this city, contains no opium, I TKKNTON, FIIIDAY AUTKKNOON, MARCH 1890. TWO WHO KILLED BENWELLT Brakeuian Har Saw Ilurchell Near th Scene n the tutal Day NIAGARA FALLS, Out, Maich 7 J R Burcholl, the suspected murderer of Ben well, has been taken to Wellnnd jail his examination postponed until MarcL _ In the police court the case of Mrs. Bur choll came up Magistrate Hill said he dii not believe theie was any evidence on whicl to hold Mrs Burchell, and that if no neu evidence was introduced he would discharg her At the afternoon session, however, an order was received from the attorney gen era! remanding Mra Burohell to Welland jail The case of Burchell was then taVet up again and some additional taken, the most damaging being thai o Brakeman Hay, who swore that he sav Burchell at Eastwood, near the scene of th murder, about the time it was committed On Wednesday nextBurehell willbecallei upon to account very clearly for the twelv hours on that Monday, Pub 17, nt thebe ginning of which he and Benwell wentawa; together, ostensibly to visit the stock fari Princeton, and at the end of which h came back alone All the rest of his tim and his movements were accounted for in Pelley's circumstantial story of the party' trip from England and journeyings on thil side of the Atlantic By comparison of th clothing found" in Benwell's baggage wit] that in which the dead man's body drained, the identification of the corpse hoi boon completed and the careless ovei sigh by which that cigar case and its telltale m scription were left with the body, when al other clews had been so carefully removed has now borne its full fruit All portions clothing which had born< the dead man's name were carefully cui from the gaiuients on the body, and, in thai connection, since the cutting was jigged ant hnd evidently been done with a small instru ment, the finding of a little pair of scissors in a brown leather cose in a basket belong ing to Mrs. Burchell, is considered impor tent. The officers are still doubtful as to the part which the wife played m the procnaie of duping Benwell and Pelley The Dominion police entertain the stai t- hng theory that in England somewhere there is an association of some kind which makes Its ill gotten gains preying upon 11 erin lous young Englishmen, younger sons am youths in quest of building up a fortune mostly, and inducing them, under very much the same pretexts by which Reginald Burch ell is said to have lured Benwell and Pelley hither to coo the new world Secretary Farnham's Snioide. MTTWACKKE, March half past 3 p m William Farnham, secretary of tha Northwestern Mutual T.ife Insurance com pany, committed suicide by shooting him self with a 42-caliber revolver The tragedy took place at the company's headquarters corner of Broadway and Michigan streets. The ball, which caused Farnham's immi dlate death, lodged just beneath heart He hag boon in the employ of the company for over twenty years, and during that time he has not taken one vacation Mr T E Baldwin, assistant secretary of the finance committee, stated that there was not the gi ounds to believe that Farnham was short in his accounts Deceased leaves a widow and one child, a son, who has actec as his private secretary for several years. Nervous derangement, brought on by over- work, is ascribed as the cause Henry R. Hoffmire's Decease. B-ITII BANK, N J, MB rob Hoffmire died at his home here, March 6, from a complication of diseases i 77 years of age, and a native of New York city, where he began business as a baker, and afterward became prominent in loi politics. He was alderman from to 1868, the clerk in Judge Spier's court, then three years a member of the public works board and then deputy internal revenue collector He was a member of "Big Six1 in the volunteer fire department He has lived many years here m retirement A Murder at Philadelphia. PMM A tret March 7 DomlniokTaney killed brother, Michael, here yesterday by stabbing him with a sharp case knife The tragedy occurred iu a m the rear of No South Ninth street, where the brothers lived with their stepmother Doml nick, while nnder the influence of liquor, came into the house and began quarreling with his stepmother On being reproved by Michael he became infuriated, and, catching upa table knife, slashed and hacked Michael until he fell dead Dominick is under rest A Death Bed Confession Story Discredited Pan ADFTPHIA, stoiy from Norrisfewu of the death bed confession of J. G. Henderson that be murdered Dr. Lev- ering twenty-four years ago, is discredited. Henderson died four years ago, and no one be found who can testify to the al' leged confession. The story is a revival of a long-current but unanthenticated rumor One man was seen who declared that he and Henderson were in the latter's store When the fatal shot was fired, so that Henderson could not have been the murderer, Gold and Silver In Pennsylvania. SeoiiuAT.F, Pa., March If the report of the geologist who has examined the field can be relied on, gold and silver in paying quantities has been discovered on the farm of Jeremiah Stanffer, near the Mount Ver- ncifl ore mines. will begin next Monday and a thorough test made. Stan- tou, the geologist, states that the rock as- says about in silver and from 1090 to in gold to the ton. Twelve Moonshiners Arrested. An Ga March 7 States marshals have made twelve arrests in Ficbens county of moonshiners who have bean banded together under the nBma of Honest Men's Friend and Protector, for the purpose of driving away and punishing in- furiiie'rs. One of the members gave away the gang, which centrists of twe nty-suven ffloiaberR. A Mine Foreman Rilled. SBAWOKitt, Pa March 7 Wnln- hart, a foreman at the Cameron mine whieh has boou on flre for several days, was over- by black riamp wkile in the mine yos teiHlay Ho-was taken out alive, but died soon after. But little progress has been made toward eztlngninhing the flre. Dropped Dead In the Jni, Box. turn YORK, March 7 Thierman, of 801 Hudson af-nue, Brooklyn, who been JPhxrii asa juror, fell dead iti the Kings connty supreme court while lifting in the jmy box awaiting tho roll call Hitrt eaae is the supposed cause. He was about 90 yours old. Greene Mast Hang, NASHVILLE, lenn Marnji su- preme court has aflli the death sentence of John Greene and Hied May 3 as the date of execution Greene shot and killed Ova Davis in Putnam county, in June, 1887, be- cause she refused to marry him. Chin cod with Mull Robbery, Pi Mnnh 7 I ni I lihm, of tho Philadelphia i hnr nil in I hn born arrested f m, r11 h i ol bing the malln l Avotd worthy gentleman, NEW YORK Si ILL HOPES Is the Fair an Flephant on Chi cago's Hands? HEB ALI.HJIU hMBARKASSMENT Ibe Belief Seems to Be Gaining Groan That SlifC innot Raise Sufficient Fands Mr. Depew gays She Has "Bitten O More Than She Can Chew NEW YORK, March impressloi hat Chicago will not be able to raise (undo sufficient for carrying out the World's fai project and that New York will finally given an opportunity t6 slip in and take th alleged elephant oft the Illinois metropolis hands is constantly growing more and mor vivid. Congressman J J. Belden, who wal in this city yesterday, very emphatlcall declared it to be his opinion that if an Woi Id's fair is held it will be in New York, The World's fair committee in the bouse o representatives of which ha is a member will not, he said, report the fair bill wit Chicago named as the seat of the expositio until that city gives full assurance that 1 has the requisite money to carry it on An Injmtioc to New York. "I am not disposed to crowd Chicago, continued Mr Belden, "nor are the othe congressmen from New York, but we help feeling that a great injustice has boo done New York in ignoring our geuerou offer to favor a city which has no site ti offer, no money in view and which is no now as far along with the arrangementi necessary for a fair as we were last summer "I cannot but sympathize, however, wit the predicament in which Messrs Hiti Springer and Adams, Chicago's congres- sional advocates find themselves by reaso of the failure of that city to respond to their repeated entreaties to demonstrate it financial situation as inadequate for a fair Dr Depew'a Views. "What is your opinion as to the proba bihty of Chicago being able to raise th needed meoeyfer the-fatrf" wus asked o Dr Depew "I answered Dr Depew, "tha Mr Modill, of The Chicago Tribune, is righ and knows what he is talking about when he says that without an appropriation b congress that city cannot provide the meam Now, Mr Medill has a wonderful capacity for saying what he thinks, and he ought t pretty thoroughly understand Chicago Bu you can depend upon it that the people o that city will make superhuman efforts be fore giving up the struggle No Aid from Congress. "We must certainly have such a fair. Ii I am any judge of the drift of public senti- ment, the desire for a grand celebration o the discovery of America is growing every day We have advertised our intention to that effect over the wide world, and then has boon amazement expressed at the vote of the house of represontatives If, after all our talk we should abandon the fair pro- ject because Chicago has, in vulgar parlance 'bitten off more than she can for eigners would at once jump at the conclu sion that, after four hundred years, we hai not been able to make money enough tc celebrate the event We cannot afford tc rest under any such imputation, nor can congress afford, in view of New York financial offer, to appropriate public monej to carry on the fair. That is the presen situation After awhile New York will be asked to take the fair in order to save the national honor and preserve us from being laughed at by other nations New York the Waiting Widow. "All that we can do is to wait until con gnss and Chicago recognize the inevitable. Congressmen whose votes for Chicago are not easily explained to their inquiring con stituents, who are giving vigorous sions to their displeasure, must be allowe( to extricate themselves from their embar rassment Legislative bodies are proverbl ally slow to take affirmative action excep when political emergencies scorn to demanc promptness, and, with reference to this ex position enterprise, an attempt by New York to force matters would solidify agalnat W all the opposing elements "So you think we may be happy yetf' "If I were a widowand lonesome, 1 wouh just seat myself by tho window 4s the wel grounded expectation that before long Mr Fair would make appearance at thi gate Chicago Denies the Allegations CHICAGO, March the World's promoters are to be believed they cap gel along all right without drawing on Unolt Sam for a few million dollars to put their show on its legs They are sure that tary Windom will recommend a liberal ap- propriation of to to cover the cost of a national governmenl exhibit, and it is said not to be the intention of the delegation which just departed foi Washington nor the poliqy of the Chicagi congressmen to contend for a big govern- ment grant in addition to an appropriation for a national exhibit The published installments of subscrip- tions aggregate The finance committee assert that they can show sub- scriptions actually paid in to the amonnt of over Only 2 per cent, of the total subscriptions to date is required to bi paid in at tbe time of subscribing, thongl many men of mean" paid in the total amonnl of their Since the vote in house of reprcsontlUives favoring Chicago for the fair site subscriptions hare boon coming in from New York manufacturing fli MM and business men from various of the country having interests in Chlcagc 0 r contiguous territory. Chleacoans at washlncton. March 7 travel stain ed Cblcagoans reached here last night in re sponse to appeals from Conginnunen Hlti and Springer to show how much theil city could put np for tbe World's fair. Thi Chicago people were escorted to the Riggl house by Senator Charles B Farwell, wher babl> di> The attention of people tho houi was attracted by hearing gi lau-i inside A officer broke open the doc r and founu th three persons in theli sleeping unconscious It is known that Gibuey wont hnmo at a early hour iu tbe morning bonsultrably un- der the influence of liquor 1 thu suppob tion is that he nu.ideiitullv -hiiik J tho ga on after having put out tho light Th three persons had U.iu bieathiu in the deadly gas all day 1 Iu pin biclau have very little hope of the iec.oM.ry of au one of the three A Reward for Cashti i LOUISVILIK, March 7 The Louisvlll City National bank has offered a reward for the detention of Pope tbe defaulting tefler, and 10 ptr cent of u the money recovered, and agrees to pay fo any information That may serve to thro any light upon his whereabouts. The ban will prosecute him to the foil extent of th law if he can be captured If he has gone t Canada he may perhaps be extradite 1, a hln case is grand larceny The stolen mone consisted of greenbacks of vaiiousdenom nations, including and bills Nothing has been learned far to throw any light upon the direttio taken by the defaulter Electricity Runs a London Train. LONDON, March 7 he promoters of th scheme to substitute electricity for stonm n tho motive power on the underground rai way system of London are enthusiastic ovi the successful test of one of their motoi which has just been made on the Clnphaui line The motor drew an ordinary train a the rate of twenty miles an hour withui the slightest difficulty, and the fact that th work was performed seventy feet banoat the surface and imolved passage thioug the tunnels uuder the river showed the fu. lacy of the objictions of those who hjv contended that the of electricity uude ground is impracticable New York's High License Bill. AIHANY, N Y.March high 1 cense bill was up for discussion be fore th senate internal off urs committee High Rev William C Doane, of Albany, spok for the commission that formulated the bil He said the bill was opposed by three classe who want cheap liquor, Prohibition ists, who are fanatics, and liquoi manu facturers He thought the bill a move i the right direction Editor Ihomann, o The Brewers' Journal, spoke against the bil Another hearing will bo given on Wednes day evening next at 7 JO o'clock Clement llatler Dead PHILADELPHIA, March 7 Clemen M Butler, D D, died in Ucrmontowu March 6, aged 80 years He was at one tl rector of Trinity church, Washington, and chaplain of tho United States senate Du: ing the rebellion ho was employed by th government in several important and deli cate missions. Afterward he resMed 1 Rome and was chaplain of the American embassy there He was an intimate frienc of Webster, Clay and Calhoun in their day The Burning Minn WILKESBABRE, Pa March 7 situa tion at the South Wilkesbarre shaft remain unchanged. It will be a week cr more-be, fore enough water can be sont down tc quench the flames Slight explosions ar occurring as the water rises, ami moi o seri ous ones ore expected later on Ihedamag from flre, water and explosions will bo enor mous, and it will be a long timo before coa can be mined at this shaft again Two Games In tho South. SAVANNAH, Ga., March 7 Brooklj( and Philadelphia Brotherhood clubs playe< here, the "Phillies" winning the game by a score of 19 to 7 The grounds were bad an< the game was loosely played Thetwoclubl left for Mobile today CHART VSTON, a gam; here resulted as follows New 9 Charlestons, 2 New York furnished bat teries for both Insane Asylnms Overcrowded. ATBAHV, March A Jetter received in city from Dr G A Bloomer, of tJtica Lunatic asylum, says that the institu- tion is overcrowded and that something mus be done to relieve it No transfers can bf made to Binghamton or Poughkeepsie, ai both asylums are full It is suggested tha the only way to obtain relief is to have tbl different counties take back some of theil Insane and care for them Violently Insane on a Train. CAHIOK, O, Match lady named Alexander, accompanied by her daughter, became v iolently insane on the east bonne express on the Pittsburg, Fort Wayne anc Chicago railroad She was restrained wittl gieat difficulty, and for her own safety wi placed in charge of physician of this city. The cause of tho lady's insanity is not known. They were bound for Tyrone, Pa. Thirty-one Killed In a Year. AMrvkio, March report of the commissioners appointed by an act of legis- lature to l epresent the city of Buffalo in iti efforts to secure relief from the evils anc dangers of grade crossings, shows that dur  nus a dresM, 1 U i (livilnil s th I ov Anilron J H honti J I a tor auilctlitr gentium n Th good of tliuliliurj nus tuuiuiende< and i tiik.n tho ustfu neis ot the in-tituli i In the couise of h speuh Mr Ui lun 1 sni I "In i lighten, I ouiitiy the valll of popular n is fulh no only as a duet t bt lit lit its redpicnts bu asau elemint of and safety in or gntil7pil s IPH r m., l m-thiBu nspoct It should non IK re be b tti r than in I nd of flee institutions cc nsi. crated to the wolfure nn 1 happimss of iu citizens and deiiuug its unction and it power from the pt e Hero tin iJiniaiter of tho people Is in ovitably impi s, cl upon tho govunmen and here oui public life cun no more b higher and pun i than the life of tho people than a sti cum e in use above its fountain o be purer th in the spi ing in winch it has ii source "That ne have not fulled to realize thes conditions is dom miti alt <1 by the i stablisli ment of fire public nlnols on every side where children are net only united bu often obhgtd to submit thimsohts to sui instruction as will b nd are able to give sorprinlng bargain! to yon. and compare onr Embroideries With any ethon and compare prices. P.S. Notice. We hereby give spe- cial notice that all the old Parasols and Umbrellii) from 1869, left here for covering and repairs, mast be oiled for within 80 day from this date, or will be sold for 16th. WAUJS1, City KlfWAltl) We will pay for any MSB Jrer Sick Hr'l'che, In- AianUon, GousUpaUou or rimUren we cannot with vegetable Uvt. when the itrlcuv wniplltd with. an poitly to nUe -t'-'to- llfll. 8U.4I K piiii, cejti. For -le ail bi.if.Ifl, ware of and ImliiHon. iria) ssat of a III ib-. J, lOiD, DBOTOi-i J.' UlnnOX nUU A of AH Kinds done In r m Strut, KOKiil WABRM I. Umbrella and H i.anB' Celebrated Spring j Stylea now on Sale. IIAll'I'-lt, 16 State Stroot is AND NO 1 IONS. Gmndjdt display of Trimmings, No- Hosiery. Gloves Undo, near ever befoie shown In thin ciU, conif.Unf of almost thing that tomake up flrst-clu  Modern Method., Sncc- ftil T-ohing, Indiridnal Attention, jr The Shoithand J Department for acquiring ,HU in 8tei.ou.aphy. RAPID M0rningl Per Oa'ilogu BEGINS MONDAy, THOMAfl J. (j-liSWAliT, 96. BOX 637, J. 10 and 12 South Qroone Stroet.' f JOOK OUT FOR BARGAINS We have purchased the store North of us and intend to buiM on the two lots l he lincsl Ulorc in ironlon! We get nd of oar stock to do thu, KliADY-MADli CLOTHINffl L 1 i i 1 i i rsj c J i 1 1 I- MKUCIIANi lAHOIMNO: BB 10 NOKlII GRttKNK SIKKKI. v IIAiJ Jim; MAN Bought hi. of AMKRTCArJ ANl> TAllXtRTNG 00, he nonld Dot how whistled Ihrongh onat M i v we are with Ns BE8! Atmnchl _ thai ,n.i 111 ,n.l MI-IK 119, imfl lor for 'kiMr.n. sun "ill lUHi Vii M A.DF TO n n San N   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 155+ million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

10 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 10 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 155+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 155+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 155+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 155 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 19 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication