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Trenton Times Newspaper Archive: February 27, 1890 - Page 1

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Publication: Trenton Times

Location: Trenton, New Jersey

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   Trenton Times, The (Newspaper) - February 27, 1890, Trenton, New Jersey                               VII1. NO. TKKNTON, TIIUK8DAY FKBKUAKY 1890. 'WO GKN'I'S A PAN-AMERICAN PLAN. An Important Recommendation by the Congiess. A NEW C01VTINEMAL RAILROAD. An Outline of the Gigantic aocl Interest- ing Chicago Another Tilt In the Senate Alleged Southern >ews. WASHINGTON, Feb 27 report of the committee on railroads favouug the con- struction of a continental railroad has just boon adopted by the Pan-American con- gress The report recommends 1 hat a rail road connecting all or the majority of the nations represented in this conference will contribute greatly to the development of the moral relations and material interests of the said nations That the means best adapted to begin and carry out its execu tion is the appointment of an international commission of engineers to study the pos- sible routes, determine then true length, estimate their respective cost and compare their reciprocal advantages A Commission Proposed. That the commission should be composed of three appointed by each nation, with the privilege of dividing into _Tniqaions, and to appoint as many other en gineers and employes as might be consid- ered necessary for the more rapid execution of the work. That the railroad, in BO far as the common interests will permit, should unite the principal cities lying m the vicm ity of its route That if the general direc- tion of the line cannot bo altered without great inconvenience, for the purpose men- tioned in the preceding article, branch lines should surveyed to connect those cities with the mam line Existing Lines to be Utilized. That eating railways should be utilized as far as is possible and compatible with the route and conditions of the continental rail road That the construction, management and operation of the line should be at the ex- pense of the concessionaries, or of the persons to whom they sub-let the work, or to whom they transfer their rights, with all due for- malities, the consent of the respective gov eiuments first being obtained. rlhat all ma" terials necessary for tho construction and operation of the railroad should be exempt from import duties To Bo Exempted from Taxation That all personal and real propei ty of the railroad used m its construction and opera- tion should be exempt from all national, state and municipal That the exe- cution of a work of suob magnitude deserves to be fuither encouraged by subsidies, ces- sions of land or guarantees of mitigation of interest In the Honse. WANUISGTON, Feb 27 Tn the house, im- mediately after the reading of the journal, the contested election case of Atkinson vs. Pendletou, from the First district of West Virginia, was called up It was agreed that six hours' debate should be allowed, after which the previous question is to be consid- ered as ordered. Mr. Rowell and Mr Lacey (Ta) championed Atkinson's onse, and Mr O'Ferrall and Mr Wilson (Mo advocated Peudleton's claims. The speeches were con- fined to a close analysis of the evidence Without taking aotlon and pending further debate on the case the house adjourned What Chicago Wants. The world's fair committee of {he house discussed Chicago as a site for the World's fair The general bill was taken up by the committee and amended by inserting the name Chicago, and then referred to a sub- committee consisting of Messrs. Candler, Hltt and Springer for correction The sub- committoo directed to report a bill that will cover the wishes of the Chicago people Mr. Hitt explained to the committee what the Chicago people desired He stated that Chicago and the state of Illinois were will- ing to conform to any changes that might be mnde in the bill in the house There seemed to be some disposition to cut out the appropriation The Chicago peo- ple would be perfectly willing to agree to this if it were accomplished. The fact that the money pledged to Chicago had been se- cured under a corporation charted by the state of Illinois should, said Mr Hitt, ba recognized Ilia Commission of One Hundred. The fair itself the representatives of Chi- cago preferred to hold under a national clmrter Concei mng the commission of one (hundred, Mr rrtttaaid that they preferred that half of its members shouldie nominated by the governor of Illinois and half by the mayor of Chicago, to be appointed by the president They also preferred that the two commissioners from each state woSfd be of the two political parties. Mr Hitt thought it would be well to prohibit the commission voting by proxy Mr Springer spoke briefly on the govern- ment appropriation. Before taking any ac- tion on this matter he thought it would be well to ascertain how much money was needed and then make the appropriation conform to that He offered a resolution requesting the sec- retary of the treasury to furnish the com- mittee an estimate of the cost of the build- ings necessary for the govei nment exhibits; the cost of placing the eihibitc in the build- ings and the cost of their care and safe re- turn to the places where they belong. Thin resolution was passed and the committee adjourned. News of the Favorable reports od several bills were made by the war claims committee, among them the bill introduced by Mr Cummings appropriating for the payment of the claim of the AMiguooo of John Roach (deceased) for work done material fur- nished in the construction of the United btates gunboat Peorln The house committee ou territorial hove authorized a favorable report on the bill in- troduced in the house by Mr. Btruble to provide for the of the state of Idaho The bill contain, the usual law pro- visions under which territories are admitted, and appropriates for defraying the expenses of the convention held in July, 1689, for the pui pose of forming a constitution. The urgency deficiency bill was reported to tho house by Mr Henderson It appropriate to make up for do- fldencies m the appropriations for this and previous years, to be available for service dnring the fiscal year ending June 30, 1890 In the Senate. WASHINGTON, Fob 27 the senate Mr Chandler pro euted a petition from Union county, Ark representing that at the state eltction there in September, 1888, n sys- tematic reiKn of terror prevailed, that armed mobs paraded the county night nnd day, terlnnrmg thewlntoa and shooting nnd pin; 1 voters, that schools nnd been demoralised and lull it- boxes onnifd olT nnd nuking for I ho p r liongimrfnf tl o constitution senator olii 1 to Mr. Chandler KM ili digest or li litun The Vi i 11 (1 ititomcnt hni nmdo by the senator froni New Hamp- shire ttmt the brief which he hns piepared ojt the petition I he cualr Is. ol tue opinion that th suiatoi has the light to complete the reading of the papei Mr Bony If it comes from thi acimt r himself I dou t think iteau mjmt eithei the state of Arkansas or its people Thei ef 01 e I have no objection The statement was then completed anil tlit petition referred. The following public bills weio passed Providing for a eteam vessel for usu of the civil government of Alaska for the vessel and UOO foi th annual ense) appropiutmg JlUOOUOfir enlargement of the public building atlo- peka apt re pi id ting OOd for a public building at St Albans Vt 1 he senate then took up the educational bill, and Mr Reagan proceeded to address the senate Instantly Mr Ingalls notiliel the senate that ha would insist the bill disposed of at the eaihest monunt possible Mr Reagan i> argument was di rected chiefl} against the constitutionality of the measure He made a statement in reply to Mi Blan to show that lexv was doing its full duty in tne matter of ed ucation Mr Wilson (lid also aigiud against th" constitutionality of tho bill wis as miifh danger from con upturn and lawlessness n-, from and if the eminent could seize the common school system thei e w as as great a noo s iitj for it to lay himda on the local police of the state Mr Blair replying to Mr Wilson spoke of the attempt being made m resti ict the school tax raised fi om hitt s 1 1 the education of white childi en aud showe 1 that undei one of the sections of the bill n stitp that made anv such distinction could derive an? advantage from the bill Among the bills introduced in the senate wein the following Bv Mi Frye (by ippropi jn in installments to pav Chail for the construction of a cli mm wide and 15 feet deep at nit ail 1  IflO BY A Sl Degperale Uttht for life of the Nau tlque'B CIOH Eighteen Days and Mghtf at the Kiivages of a Tornado Arizona 8 Honor Constantly Increases HALltAX, N b Feb J7 Allan lint steamor Manitobau from Glasgow has jubt arrh ed af tei a passage of nineteen da j s On her passage over to Glasgow she lost M cattle aud had her decks swept of evei j tiling including seven boats The Manitobau had on boai d Capt Dngorme and thirtj five ol the cren of the line steamer Nan tique, bound from Havre to Baltimore 1h< Nautlquo left Havi e on the of Janum in ballast She experienced all the great ocean storms, and on Jail '4 a ituiin ol water w is discovered coming thr thi bottom of the steamer below the c'ngines A Desperate Fight for Life The ordel was given to pump and foi eighteen days and eighteen nights tho cren worked without intermission Ihe fires wen put out and for ten days the steamer drifted at tho mercy of wind anil waves On Sun day the It th, tho Manitoban was signaled and bore down to them The suffering sail ors had about given up hope, as the Nau tiquo was fast settling down, having twe'lvs feet of watei m her hold and gaming fast 1 hree trips placed them all safely on biani the Manitobiu Squared of Buildings Unroofed MEMPHIS Fob 27 A crcloiie sHuck Brownsville a town six miles northeast ol this city on the Louisville and railroad, at 5 o clock, and unroofed half ol of tho business houses in the town 1 IIF cotton compress was unroofed, the Isiith em Met ho list church was demollbhe I and a buck mill was umoofed Three square of buildings weie unroofed One KiUcu, Two Injured Following the cyclone came a gi sat flood of rain that completely drenched the good in the various uni oofed houses, causing al most complete destruction most cases The onlj of life leported is that of Mrs James Coojier, about thiee miles fioni Brownsville who was struck by a falling troo anl mstimtly killed. Mef tnochildioi were severely injured It -hook I'p the Scholms At Morianna, Ark., the new Chiistian church was completely demolished, Lesser cotton shed was blown and the roofs of sevei al other buildings were lifted off About three miles west of this town a negri school house with sixty-five childion m it was blown from its foundation, but no one was hurt Mne Chlltlrou Injured. Considerable damage was done to build ings and fences nt Little Rock and Alet ander Neat the latter place a school was blown down and nine children injured At Marion Ky the court house was un roofed and paitly blown down aud the records badly damaged The Opera house was unroofed and several big houses were more or less damaged Left to an Unknown Fate. NEW YORK, Feb .J7 steamer Ems, which has just arrived f i om Bremen, ex peneuced very severe weather during the entire passage On Feb U lat 43 54, long 42 6, she sighted the dismasted British ship Hebe, which was drifting at the mercy of tb.e waves A boat manned by a volunteer crew put off from the Emq to rescue the six men who could be seen on the Hebe's decks A heavy wave swamped the boat and one seaman, Martin Weii iickhoff, of Bremen, was drowned The others managed to cling to the upturned boat until rescued by the Bma The attempt to tnlre the men off the Hebe was then abandoned The captain of the Ems thinks the Hebe will keep anoat until some vessel comes along in better weather and is able to assist her Run Douii by La Champagne. NEW YORK, Feb The steamship T-a Champagne, of the French line, while off Shinneeock, ran dowu the schooner Belle Wiggins. Ihe steamer was feeling her way under one bell, when a light was soon about fifteen feet ahead Capt Boyer ordered the engines reversed, but It was too late to pre- vent the collision Mingled with the sounds Of crashing timbers were cries of "Save usl save us 1' from the schooner Many of the steamer's passengers rushed on deck in alarm, but La Champagne was uninjured and their fears were soon allayed Mean- while boats were launched and Capt gko- Seld and his crew of eleven men taken off the Higglns, which had boon cut almost in two The Ohio Raging. CINCINNATI, 0 Feb 37 All the elements of a disastrous flood in the Ohio river seem to be now present ,From the Kentucky side, Big Bandy river comes in a volnjne al- most unparalleled, while Knnawka river further up is also terribly swollen The Scioto, Hooking, Muskingnm, in Ohio, as well as the two Mlamis, keep the river bed full, while a rise is coming dowu from head- waters The for twenty-four hours is over seven feet, and the gauge now shows (urly-nine feet six inches In the channel Flood is inevitable One Hundred and Fifty Perlihed. PRESOO-II, Ariz., Feb Chapter after chapter is being added to the horror Tho death list hat gi own until now it is known that no less than ona hundred and fifty persons lost their lives in the ware that rushed from the main dam of Wal- nut Grove Water Storage company One hundred aor.a of ralley land were laid bare, and not a plank remains of the bouses that stood along the bank of the stream Four People Drowmd. CAMBRIDGE Cur, Ind Feb 27 cloud bunt caused Martlndale creek, near thlg place, to rise so quickly that a woman and three children of the Hall family were drowned. They belonged to a party of gypsfes encamped nrar the stream Principal Action Upheld. Pi ELD, Mass., Feb The school commitlbtrbave sustained the action of Prin- cipal Welsh, of the high school, in dismMng pupils who declined to study in the hiu- toij class because of way the Reforma- tion period was treated In the textbook. The book committee however, act- ed to investigate the alleged unfalfDcK of the chapters objected to Under the Cruel tVheeli. PouoHKEKPSIf, N Y Fob 27 mnson named Welch attempted to board a passen- ger train on tho New Yoiknnl Massachu- setts inilrodd nt Pine Plains Hi foil under aonrnndnis ill 1 fli ni VM, dornileel and th o un i 1 Tlir o wjn I of r o f i ti Itlfli into than tho rt fmirtlrni nnfl MPMoMle Ayets Cliortj i'octoml.on tho contrary, while It euros tha rough, clow not in- Mt Are with the of eithei itetnaoh or HANLEY BESTS MITCHELL Tlix I'lilliult Ipliiun Knt.c k I TTiliiFtTir Will BmAl N leb T eou test between Jink Hanley l 1! itlal and Jack Mitehtll if I 11 t k ilnce before the I lit County Athl i Inl lust foi a purse of tit) Ih lasted j ist ene hom Up te tl in h i un I Mitchell had tho best of it Un 1 laid on the es to inoltl puillshin nt In the ninth II inlt j it h n Ihst blood, anl a seeoud latei a swinging left hau ler knoeked the 1 hiln hiini of! his feet The tenth an 1 eleventh n un Is n spar ring contests but in the tlm let nlh and foui toe nth i ounds there w is II re lighting, in whieh Hauley bad the In toe latter ho drove Mitchell all u un 1 the ring and dually with a sunn t ieo bl w, sent him to the floor covered with bl t d Mitchell was unable to lesj nit) tho eall of time, and the ILjht was lo 1 to Hau ley La maiiche will Meet Denijsoy BAN FRANCISCO Fob (mrgo La Blanche w h dufeato I Jack Demi at the Califomia nthsago has just published a letter In which he offers to give Dempsev aioturn battle on certain conditions La Blanche snys that after he defeated he established himself m a profitable li [uoi business in this eitj and intended to retne at least tempoiaiily from the ring La Blam ho also accuses Dempsey and hit friends uf shown mg taunts and denuueia tions upon him until ho has finally conclude i to accept the Nonpareil b' challenge for another contest The conditions which la Blnnche Imposes are m the following Ian guage "My busmes-s I estimate to be worth 810 000 but in 01 ler to to Dempsey that I aui not afraid of him I w ill sacrifice it for half that sum Let Dcmpwy or his backers put up in some se  takes- I at k the 000 and I retain the sal jon L ntler these conditions only I vvili consent to meet Dempsey before one of the clubs for a purse of not less than Flte Rounds with Hare Knuckles ADAMS Mass Feb has jubt be come kuowu pullicl) that James Ryan, of Boston, and James Case> of Syracuse Y fought five louiidb with bare knuckle' Tuesday night for J-iOO Ryan was the vie tor Ihe battle took [luce in a saloon iu this town IS IT A CONSPIRACY? A lirttdclock (Pn) Man Claims to Be WiongfulU Conniud In ftu PlTTSBcRt Feb f last Mondiy Mr William Mlnniek a well known resident of Braddoek was committed to the Dixruont Asylum for the Insane under very peculiai circumstnnet s Mr Minnick had clmiged Rev J 1 Riltij a Methodist mimstf i of la lt> witli paying inipiopei at tentions to Mis Mlnniek during a pen d of six year's Mmmck also accused his wife with loceivmg improper attentions from several other men, audlmd addiossed letters to certain mdmduals thi eatenmg to shoot them it their attentions to his wifo did not cease at once Dr Sandels, of Biaddock, and Dr Me. Cord, of Pittsburg, signed tho commit- ment stating that Mlsnick wns Insane from unwarranted jealousy While ou the train en routo for Dixmont Minuick vigorously resisted tho officers in charge, pi otcstmg that he w as not u azy but was the victim of a conspiracy to get him out of the way Seveial pioimnent cit- izens of Biaddock, neighbors tf Minnick, were mtei viewed yesterday an 1 agreed that Minnick is not insane Some of them openly charge Rev Mr Riley and ethers with in- discreet actions with Mrs Jlimuck Rev Mr Riley says that he has not been guilty of any mdiscietion, that he hntl nothing to do with sending Minnick to Dlrmont, and that he does not know whether he is insane, but he does know that he is unjustifiably jealous Rev Mr Eaton, of Braddock states that Minnick engaged in prayer in his church last Sunday evening, and that his prayer was not that of an insane man 'Squire Lewis and others of Braddock are taking measures to have Mr Minim k examined, and, if possible, removed from the asylum Braddock is all excitement over the event. A Murderous Jersey German. CiMDLV, JT J, Feb J7 ithm two miles of the Leconey farm is a small place owned by Frank Oenther o murderous looking tieriuan He went homo late, and as his wife did not open thf door quickly enough to suit him, he burst it in and seiz ing a heavy stalk knife began hacking her face and head He cut off two fingers of one hand, and while the othei was raised in defense, split it between tho two middle fingers to the wrist She rnn from the house pursued by her drunken huabaud, but was protected by a neighboi Vim Oeuther is in a precarious condition nt the Cooper hospital and her husband is in jail Oenther is 70 years old and his wife H about 60 Trying to Oust toibln PHILADELPHIA, Feb 27 to the common pleas court are being circulated for signatures among the hold rs of Reading ruilroad securities asking that the voting trustee ship be annulled, or that Austin Cor- bin's membership thereof be abrogated, on the ground that he la interested in a rival Jei sej Ceuti aL The anti Corbin party are very e and claim that they are on tho i oad to vict try Ghoulish Pliynlt luim Indicted. NEW ALBANY, Ind 1 eb 37 grave Wiatt und Blackburn, of LOUI-.V.HC uu' Uillii i Mukiap. :i Makes the lives of many people miserable, causing distress after eating, stomach, ilck headache, heartburn, loss of appetite, a all gone" feeling, bad taste, coated _. tongue, and Irregularity of Distress the bowels. Dyspepsia does Alter not Bct wc" it requires carefal attention, baling i remedy like Hood's Samparllla, which lets gently, yet efficiently. It tonei tho stomach, tho diges- tion, a good ap- ftlolf petite, Danishes heaeliche, i i. and refreshes the mind Headache I have been troubled with dyspepsia. I hid but little appetite, and what I did eat llanrf- distressed me, or did me iT little good. After eating I DUrn would have a faint or tired, all gone feeling, as though I had not eaten anything My trouble was aggravated by my business, painting 'ait spring I took Hood s Sar- c. sapirllla, which did me an Stomach Immense amount of good It give mo an appetite, nml my food rellihed and mtlsfled the ciivlnp I Ind previously cxperlenoei" GFortf r A FVOE, Watortown, Mill i "arsaparilla IhynUflnipgllM Jl.ilxforp Prepared only i I IOO One Dollar Imvu us t I ill J til fiul liouefiui 11 1ii  the tittde I ill n Haw adopted urging the preal lent an 1 -leiiatois of the bnlted States t i u o then best eMideavors to the ort 1 s fan h Id in New 01 k 1 ound Dead In Ited JFHSM l I eli 21 Claude Lhaffau ton tlu jr niliient mlk niaeiufacturt r was found dou 1 in led at his iwddenee No 17.' S( nth stnil jesttuday Death is supposed to hftve b tn euuso 1 by heart disease AN EXCITING SCENE A Woman Hei na- tinitr In tho Ontario House UTIVUI (Jut tub sensation was i nisei in tht i in lira of the house of oom- ni us M 1 ul khilcks coniiug from a room e ltd 1} tht 1 reueh translator of debate M nil i un I senators rushed from the oom in ttte i ins and in a few moments tke i o in nn 1 i in lors ei e thronged with curl 11" tit 1 ho scene which presented it It nns Itudelly iiitemistlng An able- I 111 i li ladj Mis La 1- rani be rz, was It i i t t tiifi ti uimlator Mr Demeise, i n i u Mn i us inaniur Iho translator "sin L 1 ut und retned from the place in i i 111 i[ i tiitt) 1 c million It t ai lit 1 lut r ou tint the cits-usbdli Mi I) musts se luetion of tlm la Ij s 1 iLjht i 1 lie IK now m a lying in h I ttU in thu --ul ui N of tho tity lie in i i-. 1 i th i ol the r for a (Ju 1 t n ntj 1 tgd uotn n la ttutitt- n 1 u il ss the guilty utllcial makes the girl I is Mile 1 In' Sunti llo Lrlil-u I M N H J7 cor n i r jui) 111 the santellu ease has agree 1 U( n n i diet In substance it declnrt t at th b ly f u 11 in the Marsh road i ols u is that ot iin un that lit eaine, tolls 1 ullilij nusotiof bullut woun Is nlh t 1 i I-ii te S nvtullo while lu a cai I1 tn llffir Nutlti b w jods- on Monday, reb i 1 ho th oi j is tltnt Isnae dlovu the team u 1 seeing n letaclutl bain on the edge of Nuttti b woods ashoit distance from tin load theMO tominitt tl the murder lliero hits bfen no heft re tbo jury to slui th ition of an accomplice m the (.nine Iho diet tho trial of lane Sawtelio m htrafford N H, for a muidei ctuniiiitted in this state 9> ft Presents in tl e mo l Hceant form THE LAXATIVE AND NUTRITIOUS JUIOE FIGS OF CALIFORNIA, Combined with the medicinal virtues of plants known to be most beneficial to the human system, fomiing an agreeable and effective laxative to penua- nently cure Habitual Consti- pation, and the many ills de- pending on a weak or inactive condition of the KIDNEYS, LIVER AND BOWELS. It is tJ most excellent remedy known to THE SYSTEM EFFECTUALLY one is Bilious or Constipated -SO THAT- PURE BLOOD, REFRESHING SLEEP, HEALTH and STRENGTH NATURALLY FOLLOW Every one is using it and all are delighted with it ASK YOUB DRUGGIST FOB MANUFACTURED ONLY BY CALIFORNIA FIG SYRUP CO SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. iv vntf v. JUST ARRIVED AT A, I .1 I A Grand Assortment of Very Lmtuit Noveltiea tn IIAMUUROS, FMBROIDKRIKS Among which are entirely new de- signs never seen before, which we have jnet received through of the largest importing 
                            

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