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Trenton Times Newspaper Archive: February 18, 1890 - Page 1

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   Trenton Times, The (Newspaper) - February 18, 1890, Trenton, New Jersey                               VI IT. NO. TUESDAY AHvrMKNOON, FKBRUAKY 18 1890. TWO OKN'TO CHEERS FOR l.C.PLAll. l hey Closed the Cooper Union Fair Meeting. ME. PMTT MAKES A PROPOSITION Ho Docs Not Object to Mr. and tho Pro- posal U by Depcw, Miller Other Well Known Orators. NBW YORK, Fob 18 Cooper Union hag was densely crowded Imst night a hundreds of people were unable to gain ad- mission. The occasion of the throng was a mass meeting to protest against legislative delay in pAising the World's fair bill Among the prominent persons on the platform were Warner Miller, C M Depew, John H Ambrose Snow, Joooph C Hendrix, A M Twiney, James W Tappen and John Foord. Mr StJirin presided, and called upon Mr Foord, as socretn.y, to read a series of reso- lutions, which set forth that the original bill sent to Albany was drawu up by both Democrats and Republicans, that it was a purely business, non-partisan mwure de- signed for the benefit of all the people, that this non political character of the enterprise must be maintained or congress will not sanction the selection of New York as the site for the fair, that the communion named in the bill is non-partisan, that the commit- tees now in charge, which have been criti- cised as Democratic, cease to contiul the project after the commission takes charge, and that there Is no reason for dragging politics into the matter in any way The Resolutions Adopted. The resolutions were unanimously adopt- ed and the audience gave three cheers. Mr .Root then read a letter Evarts, sjxigatbizmg with theJftie objects of the E-l-ard Cgnlrfin read reso- lutions adopted at a meeSriSg of the Central Lubor union in accord with the ej-prcsood in the foregoing resolution Hon. Warner Miller Speaks. Hon. Warner Miller then made a speech laying he had thought for thii ty yean that ha was a Republican, but had suddenly fonnd that he was regarded by some as a Tammany Democrat because he was la favor of tho World's fair bill He fonni consolation in the fact that he had boon read out of the parly in good that of C M Depew, Elihu Hoot, C H Bllfi, V R Cruger and others. (Ap- plause f Mr Miller went on to deplore the of partisanship that had boon raised agalnut the bill Mr Miller further said that the commlttoe on legislation was composed of sevantoen Repnblinann and eight Democrats, and the sub-commlttoe thereof, which drew up the bill, was composed of two Depew and Root and one Democrat, Mr Wihatlf thej.il! plot, Depew and Root were the traitors Mr. Depew Explains. Mr Depew also spoke, saying that if Columbus had known what trouble this was going to cause he never would have discovered America. (T aughter) Mr. Depew appreciated his peril in coming to the meeting without receiving perminajon from the new guardian of the Republican party of New Yoik state, Hon. W E. Chandler, of New Hampshire He want nn to aay that everybody in St and Chi- cago Democrats, Mugwumps, Anarchists and on thin one point of wanting the fair It was reserved for New Yorkers to leave Washington and call each other bad names at home. Every man is entitled to his opin- ion without being charged with party A veny eminent and able Republican leader, with his friends, thinks that a fair in New York in 1893, beoanm of the machinery of the city government being in the hands of the Democracy, would lead to a nnmber of the vast crowd of visitors illegitimately vot- ing in the presidential election. I, on the contrary, believe that the gieat prosyorllj which would follow all over the cotmtjj from the fair would redound to the credit of a national admrniitLratlOQ under whofO it WHO halll thA eomA tltA 187tt unquestionably did. Each of us Is en- titled to a fair consideration without cull Ing each other's throats. The "Two-thirds Tote" Amendment. Tn conclusion Mr Depew aaid "I have, after consultation with as many of the members of the committee as I could with, formulated a suggestion which I think solves the enigma. That suggestion with the approval of a majority of the leg- islative committee and is to by the mayor of the city. I laid it before Senator .Hiscock, and he said it seemed to him to meet all objections, but he wished to sw hfa friends before expressing his adhesion to it. My suggestion is briefly that the original bill before the legislature and the bill before congrws be amended so that no be lot, no Taeanoy in commlrmion n tor poration filled and no executive offiner ap- pointed except by a two-thirds vote of all the 103 commissioners. (Applause) This evening I received from Washington a giam in which Senator Hucock tayo: agrw heartily with your an amendment to the 'air bill It meets eveij- difficulty.' Eveij man with whom I have spoken agrees with me In iti entire acceptability to Republi- cans and Now let all, with- out regard to our parly lay our differences and come together upon lines upon which sensible men gg.jj unanimously, pan this bill at Albany, go, the Empire State should, to ton to claim a heritage which will benefit not only ourselves, but redound to the glw j of the republic and to the of the whole people of the nation." Mr. Pl.tt'. Proposition. Other npwchesof simN-r import follonni Finally Mr. John F. Plnmmer OU the platform and that if Mr, "two-third." propc- 1 or compel mlie was indorsed by the nuatii.g, Mr Would agree to it In making bin announce ment MY Plummer Mr. Pl-tt had for him that evening at Fifth hotel and told him he was to the fair in New York city, and that U Hr. Depew's proposals wtue indorsed, no doubt it could be c-.rled In tHe latura, Mr Depew made a few remarks compli- menting Mr Platt and laying that that the criticUi.n on his were unjust. The "two-thlnfe" wai luree Cheers for T. 0. Platt. Tlw question was put and the proposal wu heartily Indorsed Ibis had the effect of bringing the meeting to a sudden with three cheers for Thomas C Platt While the meeting was In progiess within the hall, the thousands of people outside, who had been unable to get inside, were holding and overflow meeting, presided Over by Mr R. Fulton Putting, and ad- dresocd by Citpt Ihomas B Cullora, C C Bhayne.J WnldoRm th and others. J uotory Soorchrt! BROCI TOV MI Fel> il pmpbolln by fiio last night, last, WHy insured Sixty art thrown out I TO RELIEVE THE COURT Report of the (.ouimlttee of United Stall! s Bar BOSTON, Feb 18 committee of ths bar of the United States court, conbistmg of Hon. John Lowell Hon Cbarles T Rus- sell, C Austen Brone, Hon P A Collins, Hon. Thomas W Clark, L. 8 Dabuey aud Henry W Putnam appointed to present some plan to relieve the United Mates supreme court of its business, has presented its report, which was accepted Its recoin mendatlous are as follows, and are contained in one or other of the bills upon tbe sub- ject now before congress First The adoption of tbe general p'au of transferring all original junsJi lion to the district courts here ulillie at least two additional urvuit- courts m each circuit quistion of fact should be parried to the supiemt. court ex cept by permission of tbe intuit couit judges should be assigned to try causes in the district court whin the presiding justice or judge Qndfa such essigu ment necessary appeal or of error should be granted as of right when one circuit court differs from anotbei upon a question of law essential to the merits of any cause fiom tbe district to the circuit court m criminal cases should be allowed only in these districts m which such appeals are allowed lu tbe state courts In all other districts tbe lemedy should be by writ of error Appeal m such cases after a jury trial is unknown m mam districts. is not expedient to inciense the amount necessaiy to'glve tbe supreme court jurisdiction, if it cad be avoided. 1 be effect of the new legislation should be first tamed, in the hope that this method may prove unnecessary Trumps Cause a fatal wreck WicuiiA, TTan Feb 18 engine and baggage ear of the plunged through a bridge creek, six miles south at 8 o'clock. passenger left on the of Newton, was Wand Fireman Smith each had a leg broken, the messenger had both arms broken, Miss Cam of Udell, four ribs broken Josiah El icson, of Topeka, arm broken Edward hitnej of St Louis, fractured collarbone, aud several other passengers suffered from cuts and bruises. The support of the bridge had bcon burned away during tbe night by tramps A posse Is looking for the miscre ants. New Tork'i New Court Building. NEW YORK Feb 18 morning the sinking fund commissioners awarded the contracts for erecting the new criminal court building on Center street The successful bidders are Dawson Archer fortheniason work, at JSJO.OOO the Jackson Architectural Ironworks for the iron work, at 0 TT for the carpenter work, at and Jnmes Fay for the plumbing til, i ft The total cost of the building, mi der those contracts, will be When completed it will be occupied by the criminal eourjtit.wjtu offices t or Mio district attoi uey and the coroners, and its completion will bo marked by the removal of the unsightly brown stone court house from the City Hall park. will Sawtelle Confess? ROCHKBIKR, N H Feb 18 coroner's inquiry into the death of Hiram Sawtelle was continued at the Blaisdell Corner soiool house Several witnesses were examined, but no new facts were brought out The inquest will be resumed at Berwick It is rumored thiit kaaoSawtollo io proparmgaoonfunnion. A dispatch from Dover, N H says that the search for Hiram Sawtelle's mining head was continued in the woods of Fnnt Lebanon and Berwick, but no traces of itweie dis- covered. The recent snow fall may preclude all possibility of prosecuting the search A man, supposed to be the suspected Dr Blood, left here Tuesday morning for Port- land Boston's vievated Rnad. BOSTON, Feb first gun in the elevated railroad campaign was fired. The petition of the West End Street railway for authority to build an elevated road in Bos- ton was heard by the legislative committoo on street railwaya President Whitney and D Hyde appeared for the West End company, with ex Oovfli nor Long and President Bruce, of the senate, no ncsociflte counsel. Gen. Butler was present to look oat for the interest of the Meigs elevated road. C A Welch, Hon John H Butler Hon, Thomas J were counsel tor the remonstrants. A large crowd filled the committee room Alabama Iron for Plttsbnrg. n, Ala Feb 18 first ship- iron from Alabama to Fittsburg Just boon sent from here It consists of and goes on nine barges via the je and Ohio rivers, in tow of the Percy Kelsey The freight charge toWGOper lower than the rail rate. A contract for another shipment of tons has bcon made A banquet was held lant night, at which prominent bnnf- men of thin and other southern cities celebrated the event. Visits New OBTBINB, Feb 18 Yesterday after- noon his most gracious majesty Rex rrom the royal fleet at the head of Boulevard canal with hm gay retinue of courtlAi., and was greeted with an -ovation from subjects as he made hln triumphal tour to the City hall, where the mayor de- llye.od to him tha keys ol the city. The grand parade today promlnea to be the most imposing ever witnessed hare. A Big Offer for "Buck" Swing. CISUIKHATT, O Feb John B Day, of the New York League Baseball olnh, is here negotiating with Catcher "Buck" Ewing, who is prominent in the Brotherhood. Mr DaydeHinesto talkon the subject, but it Is reported that apiary of a year, with a throe years' contract, bteii offered as an Inducement to Ewing to return to the League Secretary Tracy KenumeB. friHHiTOTOH, Feb. 18 -Secretary Traij to the navy department for the first Umg iltioe the dreadful calamity at two rrceks ago He at once entered tijxm the active discharge of his duties considerable business, much of irtfeh bad toon held np during his absence Two Bobberies at New Haven. Feb 18 -While a party was inprogree. evening at the house of Mrg. a E. Benedict, No 11 Homeetreet, burglars get into the second stoiy and stole About the same time A'a Rood's hntue, Ho 109 Meadow street, -rt robbed of worth of jewehy, Prolilent to Visit Plttlburg. WASHINGTON, Feb The president, Becrotary Blame and Private Sojietary Halford will leave here Wednesday at 13 o'clock for Pittibtirg, Pa to be prooent at the oppmnp; of the Camegie library. The president nnd pnrty will return to Washing, ton llmiFlftv niaht A j rmhnirnflfteri. i mm Pnh 18 The Boecher V> i Ootmnif rnmj i iy, mnl ore of car- hnrdwnro, Imvo rallc d n meeting ol creditors for Fob, 24 Liabilities are about IN SENA IE AND HOUSE. Democrats Still Opposing the Speaker's Stand THE WORLD'S PAIR STAR 18 A ROW The Speaker Counted a Quorum in the Uaaal way, Which the Democrats Claimed Wag a Violation ol the New of the Senate. WAHHINGTON Feb 18 The house yester day spent almost all of the time until ad joumment In a warm-debate uveraruhngof Speaker Hoed After the reading of the journal Mr Carlisle arose and said that since Jan J9 the Democrats bad been pro- testing against the approval of the journal, on the ground that It contained au enli y made by dictation of the speaker, showing the names of members present and not voting Last Friday a code of rules was adopted w hich gave the speaker that right Against this they still protested and would continue to do so, as an unconstitutional practice But this question could not be de cided in this house, and whenever proper arose, it would go to some other forum, it could be finally and decisively panned upon He saw no reason why the journal should not be approved In the form which the house had a right to prescribe The journal was then approved llle World's Fair Start! a Dlicumiou Mr Candler then reported the resolution for the dlsoiiMion of the World s fair bills on Thursday and Friday and balloting on unless the house shall have deter- by a vote that the World s fair shall held Tellers were appointed and the 114 nays, 8 Mr ide the point of no quorum The speaker that members were lore than a quorum After fur- ther protests from the Democratic side, which the speaker calmly ignored he de- clared debate on the motion was m order Still Fighting Speaker Reed The Democrats strenuously resisted this decision Mr McMillan contended thatthere was no rule that permitted the speaker to count a quorum except during the progress of an yea and nay call Mr Dockery (Mo said that the rule cited by Mr McMillan did not seem to provide for aconntby the speaker at all, but only by tellers The speaker replied that the rule provided for the count of those who voted The had resulted 114 to 8 that seemed to be a majority There were 172 members present by actual count If members did not desire to vote the presumption was that they ac- quiesced in the result of the vote Mr Carlisle maintained that tho moment the tellers were ordered by- take their places, the power of the chair to count, except upon their report, ceased Tho very purpose of ordering tellers was to prevent the speaker from making a count, and put in the hands of gentlemen chosen oiie from one and one from the other side When their report was made to the chair that the vote was over, and if the tellers resumed their seats there was no remedy except to take it over The Advisability of a Fair Questioned. Mr Peters said that be had refused to becauwi he liitd u Ji some doubt as to whether there should be a world's fair at all (Applause on the Defno- oratic side But he was perfectly satisfied to remain in his seat and allow persons in- terested to settle the matter If the theory of the other side was right, he should have thus accomplished more than if he had unnatural result The trouble was that thiB house had boon wrapped round and round by the cords ef legal fiction until it was as lifeless as a mummy (Applause) The Speaker Defends His Position. The speaker aald the question was one like that repeatedly paexed upon by the house. Under the constitution a quorum was necos- saiy to tisnsact business Whether it was necessary for them to acfe was the question BlnceJthad boon decided-here it had boon rlisciiBsed from one end of ihe connu-y to the other, and precedents without number had been cited on each side In thin house the question was settled that if a majority was present to do business their presence was all that was required to make a quorum If they declined to vote their inaction could not be in the pathway of thooe who did their duty The idea that could be stronger than a negative rote ooemed to have bocn unknowu to our ancestors. It scorned to be a modern parlia- mentary fiction which had never boon able to stand the decision of a court. Urging Speedy Action. Mr Candler (Masn immediately took the floor and in a few words announced his sat- isfaction at the conclusion of the committee's work, and hoped that ita report would be Riven tbe iniinedlflte Connlrlflratirm tho pop. pie of the countiy demanded Mr Flower (N. Y) recalled that he had promised a fair and complete report from the fair commit- too said that it was now ready for the Mr Hitt (Ills) said he had urged spoody action all along and urged it upon the house now Wherever the fair was to be held tho people were determined that it should be a success and a credit to the country The question was taken on the motion to suspend i ales and make the special order for the bills, and resulted in a vote by tellers yeas, 209, 66 and the special order was made The call of committees having bcon concluded, the bill for the relief of the Indiana at Devil's Lake was called up and under suspension of the rules. The bouse committee on reform in the civil KI vice has decided to begin investigat- ing the charges "gamut service commmnioii on Wednesday next The house committoo oiwioinagc, weights and measures has authorized a favorable re- port On the bill introduced in the house by fir McKenna to discontinue tho coinage of three dollar and one dollar gold p.cces and tbe three cent nickel piece In the Senate. ________eb 18 senate listened to a continuation by Mr Blair of speech on the educational bill Mr Dawes pre- sented more than 240 petitions from Massa- chusotte stating that more than gal- lons of Intoxicating liquor are annually exported from this country to Afiica, and praying that under that lection of the con- stitution which authorizes congress to regu- late commerce with foreign nations this liafflc should be stopped The petition was referred to the committee on education and labor Mr Frye, from the select committee on the Pacific railroads, reported back adversely the two Pacific railroad funding bills re. 'erred to it, and in lieu of thnm reported an original bill on the subject with two reports The bill was placed on the calendar, and Mr BVye gave notice that bo would call it up on March 4. A resolution of Mr Chandler, calling on Hif attoi ner etnoral for Jnfor mation regarding ino i i mr of W B finimilnrn, United Mntfi deputy mnrnhnl fortbo Northern dirhictof Florida, wont ovor undn objection Mr Beck presented tlio PI edontmli of Mr Uackbura for '.h.n term l in ntair March i 1R01 an I tboy wtie placed uu flit num b-M of I ills wore passed, am tluui th follonim, To enable tbo sin t i) of tho iutin r tu locate Indians In H i Ida lands 111 smeralty appropri itlnt, ?XMKIU for a sttitu of James Madlsf n in U a In ton autlionziug tbo prtsikit t nfcr lank on officers of tbo I uikd Stutis army f i gallant services m In ban cam paigns A number of bills making pr prmtions fc i rutrs and harbors woit i li hi among tbmn tbe following By Mr Iti Appropriating (I IXXJ to improve tin. Indian river, Delawait. By Mr tbe sui of il miugtou harbor and the and Ntinderkill rivers, Delawan IHIO en h and tlu following appropr I u-, lu lit la ware improvements Chiihti i a in d ilmmgtou barbor, Utto mini mink 000 Mispllllun nn 1 Nun lei kill livers, 000 each, Bioadcitfk and Duck creek (KM) each Ibe stuute coruinitte on ju Iki lias au thonz d a favorable lepoit 11 tli 1 ill in tioducol m tbe senate by Mi ul Iowa, to establish a pension I 11 uu Among tbe bills introduce i m the senate were the following By Mr tbe sulai it s n local appraisers at Boston and fbilu Itlphia t 000 each and of tbcir assistant appraiser- making tbe salar> of tbo lucul up puisei at w (XK) and of hit, HI sistants VK) and establishing a deput) appraiser at OJO IT WAS A WARM RECEPTION A Uurulnr Shot Dead and His Companioi Put to Fliglit. CRJSTLIVE 0 Feb 9pm theie came a rap at the dooi of F J Frengle, ai aged farmei aud bis wit who leslde one mile east of here A demand to know wbo knocked and what elicited tht reply tbat they had u hspatcb for Fren Frengle opened the d tor and immediatel) two men rushed past him into tbe room an diawlug e in i inded the couple to Keep silent under ptm Uty of death One of the men gmM ed Freugle ant when bis wife Kturtel to lus assistance she was seized by tbe othti an 1 in the strupgL which followed Icth IMingle and his wife were thrown to tbo flooi Frengle rtachec to bis pocket and got his revolver, but btin prevented from it on the man wh held bun down be leveled it at the one who held Mis Hongle and shot him through the heart 1 ho wounded man staggered to his fott reeled out of tho room, but fell doad a few steps from tbe house The man who beld Frengle then released him and made his esrnpe The body of the dead man was brought to Crestline It is that of a man from J0 to 35 years of agi, well dressed as also w is tbe man who t scaped On the body of the dead man was found a registered let- ter receipt bearing date of Feb nnd the name of Mrs Anna M Daviny Beaver Falls Pa Fiengle has been in the habit ol keeping considerable mon< y in the bous anc had at th i time of the attempted burglar} about mX) in his Wheelmen in Session fceb national ossom bly of the of Ameiican het-lnipn began then annual nit at tl t Oti nn Union hotel About sixty momb is weio present when tbe meeting was called tt order James R Dunn of Ohio wasilettt president Dr W H Emoij of Massacbu setts flist vice president George R Lid well of New York second vice piesident and W M Brewster, of Missouri treasurer The action of tho retiring i it si lent, C S Luscornu, in removing ibiiat H fjtter from the committee on priv il ges and In interfering with state bodies in matters ol legislation was disappreved an 1 a i esolution was adopted that each statt ifjamzation shall be allowed to work for its legisla tion It was decided to drop 11 Dcpcyster bill pending at Albany and iiducate the Coggesball bill A peisonal lebnte ensued over charges by J H Potter that C 8 Butler had acted m i egard to these bills It was decided that section 4, article 5, of the bylaws, shall n fir to road racing, aud each state was em powered to have its own uniforms made The next annual tournament will be beld at Niagara, Aug 24, 26 and 27 A Wife Beatei Whipped WKWTOWN, Conn, Feb Jihn Cnmp- boll, of this plaoo, hoj bteu in riio imbil beating bis wife, an amiable young woman, and has once been confined in jail for thrashing her Sunday afternoon he struck her on the head with a blunt instrument, making a dangerous scalp wound Mrs Campbell fled to a neighbor s house Late Sunday night four citizens disguised and masked entered Campbell s house and dragged him to the street Campbell's night shirt was torn off and in a nude con- dition he was lashed to a telegi apb pole The four men then whipped him with raw hides until he became unconscious Ihe man's back and limbs were covered with welto. He was carried back to his house and placed in bod. His cries aroused the neighbors and brought a crowd to the scene, but when they found Campbell was being A Death from Smallpox MFRIDBW, Conn 18 ick Higglns, aged one of the smallpox patients quar- antined at the Fleming house died yester day afternoon This is the fiist death since the disease made Ita here The patients in the pest house are reported as doing well Higgms was burled late last night A Montana Senator In Mew York. HEW YORK, Fob C W Hoff- man, one of the eight fugitive Democratic senators of Montana, arrived in this city on Saturday evening and is stopping at the Fifth Avenue hotel. ill A Is that Impurity of tho blood produces unsightly inmps or swellings In the neck; which causes rmhilng sores on the arms, legs, or feet, which develops ulcers In the eyes, ears, or nose, often causing blindness or deafness; which li the origin of pimples, can- cerousgrowtln, or ing upon the lungs, causes consumption and death, It U the most ancient of Jineaies, few persona are entirely troV from It. I low Can It Be By taking Hood's SarsaparlMt, which, by the remarkable cures It accomplished, has proven itself to be a potent and peculiar medicine for this dlxease. If you suffer from scrofula, try Hood's Sarsaparilla. "Every spring my wife and children boon troubled with scrofula my little buy, three years old, being a terrible sufferer. spring ho was one mass of sores from head to feet, we all took Hood's SarsaparUla, and all have been cured of tbe scrofnin Hy little boy la entirely free from sores, and all four of my children look bright and healthy." n. B AJfliKHTON, Passaic IT J. Hood's Nareaparilla FreparedoBly byO I HOO CO., Lowell, IOO Doses One Dollar A PROMISING PUGILIST lounc (oilxtt M< Iiufor< I ik. Kll ,1, (Jin us II h J I ilwtt tea h r f tl i (1 it pi n I ut sm 1 us I st d Juk K i i six i mi i ttst l i ti ins t MI s utli n Ulil ti In! ill i K h n 1m ih1 1 n I l 11 i ii i urn! t ut is ul i I 1 it i l I I U Is i i ml l i mil I i ut d i I i u u 1 i ill in tl Us I h I I 1 I Hilj 1 H hiis n i 1 11 t 1 it i K li in i tin ti nn t t llns i t I ut tli duith f I i i s it II In 1 x uiinmmi him si in h it t. i 1 i t ilti I n I! t i I 1 i li nt 1 in th JniiKn all ur liluit J J hi u m f i on n is Mik l 1 in 1 Smitl tl uu inn id h u lit in tu i m 1 I'll 1 ll 1 1 isj 1 lltt I 1 I til in it h ml i num! ti f sj ti t i [its nt w on tht 1 ri m h 1 i nt Iniiiniul D! in li II Ih lb I II letUi ban UP 11 Ifum I linn i j M Ikj v ly U Hli ul p u t i t I liu tl It J Ullllll Ill I [Uistthll I act as d muni i if tli nut pi n t i 1 by th i si 1 lit I tli ty of tl SHIS it llii 1111 1 u ti n nluclii t  In the market, and, above all, that we are enabled to sell these beautiful new at positively lower prloM than any New York il able to offer to you, no matter who they are, for we bought for evh, and are able to give inrprlnlng to yon. Gall and compare orir Embroideries with any athctt and compare PS Notice. We hereby give cial notice that all tha old and Umbiell-- from 1889, left for covering and moat be for within 90 Aay. from this data, or will be sold for 16th. WAU4S, Book Job work done tt vail.io nne' Celebrated Spring Styles now on Sale. IIMTI'-H, 15 Stote STKMTAKT HAMMOND j AUK CAFAHT.K, OP Pr NO NONBi-iWE to It. ftU T IndiTidn.l The Shorthand Department B addi lilOMAH J 81KWART, Box J. 10 and 12 gouth Groone OF DONKIM A FIRST-CLASS MAHHER, AMD AT SHORT NOTICE AND FAIR PRICES, AT THE Trenton Times J C) rrinting Department WASHINGTON MARKET BUILDINof Ctnner of front and South Streets. LOOK OUT 1'OK IJARdAINS We have purchased the store North of m and intend to build on the two lots l ho lincsi Sloro in iron Ion! mart rid of oar stook to do 'h1-, tl- RliADY-MADIi CLOTHING I t 1 1 x 3 t MUltCIIANT TAUXMINU Wu.T. BH 10 NORTH GRKKNK Advertise YOUR "WANI us   

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