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Trenton Times: Monday, February 17, 1890 - Page 1

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   Trenton Times, The (Newspaper) - February 17, 1890, Trenton, New Jersey                               VI IT. NO. TKHNTON, MONDAY AVTKliNOON, FKBKUABY 17, 1890, JACOB'S TRIPLE CRIME. He Shot Two People and Then Couimitted Suicide. A DIAMOND SMUGGLER'S REVENUE A Maw Tort Traced? In Wbloh Treachery, Lore, Deipair, tatributluB and Revolver Flayed a Prominent Fart Two One Dying. YORK, Feb. 17. TSUSC Jacob, iged 46, and killed Herman of M Hirtga- street, about 5 o'clock Bimdnj then shot and perhaps wounded Koyozinsky's wife, and finally ihol hlmnelf dead. The tragedy was the result of aii old quarrel between mea It If ild Jacob onca smuggled worth of diamonds Into this country, and, becom- ing frightened, placed them in bands for e keeping until it should be to of them but he mitred Royo- rinaky for them the latter refused to account for them A Disappointed Lover, It Is also said that Jacob, who was a man. man, made lore to Royo'lnnlji's niece iMjtil he was forbidden to visit the family more. Despite these events, however, Jacob Royozlnsky met occasionally and ti-d business Early Sunday morning Jacob called at Royozinaky's roomi in tiie tenement 54 Ridge street and awoke telling him to come out to the stable, as some one was trying to steal the houo which used in .Aprcoaman. Royozinsky accompanied Jacob to the stable, which is In the ol Ho. 47 Ridge street Re Shot Husband and Wife. When the men reached the stable yard Jaocb drew a revolver and shot Royozinsliy through the heart. He then went back to Ho. 54 shot Mrs. Royozinsky, who wai Just coming out of the house, having because her husband had gone nith Jacob, whom she nislrusted. psi-etrated her neck and lodged in her back. ran down the street screaming, and did not full nntil she reached the Delancey street polirtfl ptAtlon IVfpnnwhile her son, Otto, 18, had sprung out and pursued Jacob, who fled nntil he reached Broome street, he turned and aimed the revolver at Otto. The Last Shot. boy dodged behind a wagon, ooeing two puUcemen iimnipg up to au __ t him, placed the revolver to hin o fired and fell dead iu the gutter, Flayed Him Fain. OB person was found a long, rambling to the effect that Royozinsky and everybody else with whom he had had thing to do sioce he came to this con" try cheated and robbed him; that the he had engaged to look after hij in. taruts played into the bands or Timiiiea; that Ma owu wife had robbed him, aold him out and throrvii him into the street; that he was sick, destitute and del perate, and had finally decided to take the law into his owu hands Atthehospitnlitisnot yetknoviu whether Mrs. Royozinaky can recover or not. Hei wonnd is very ssrioiiR, and she will probably dlB, Sawtelle Tragedy. KOCHBMIT.R, N. H Feb. Thousands of people have vis- ited the locality where the dfameor bered body of Hiram A was nnearfh There were no startling develop- ments during the day, but manj minor matters have boenbronghl to light, strength- ening the chain of evidence The body was fully Identified by Mrs. fjtwlelle, the murdered man's wife. Th< that the murder was committed in Hew Hampshire is supported by the state meat made by John loggin driver, who says that he pained a nai, d to contain Hiram and Isaac, in th  Mlllinj, rompany'n flouring mill 1ms Imrp-d, a low of TALMAGE'S NEW CHURCH. He BU Congregation How to Bulie the Hecessarj Fundi. BBOOKI.YN, Feb. Dr. Talmage addressed his congregation yesterday on the ubject of the new Tabernacle, and said would be needed in addition to the now in the treasury. "We pro- be added, "to raise it iu this way: I vre become editor of The Christian Herald nd neit week I tate that chair. The first subscriptions to that paper will be paid to the treasurer of the Brooklyn Taber- icle, if obtained this year, or as m- ny of hem as aro obtained, and that is tl o way will build the church." He urged his learers to subscribe and to induce otaers to lo and continued: "As for myself, I subscribe a year of serv- coa without any salary. I do not propose o beg and implore and beseech as ministers generally do when building churches. I Lid that for the two previous churches we built in Brooklyn, and the anxieties aud worriments nearly took my life. I canuot do it again. If the people want me to preach in Brooklyn they will build the church. If they do not want me to preach in Brooklyn they won't. Why build so ex- pensive a church! Because nothing is too food for the Lord, and because it is to be in immense building, holding people, in the main auditorium, and a lecture room and adjoining rooms, which will hold more, arranged so as to be opened into rhe main auditorium A FATAL AFFRAY. loBghi Break Dp a meeting and Shoot One Man Dead. JjcrFKKSONVIT.T.K, Ind Feb. 17. A Farm, irs' alliance of three adjoining counties was organized and entertainment given last night in the little town of Lexington. Some of the of the surrounding country attended with the intention of breaking up the alliance, and they interrupted the speakers by letting windows down with a crash. William Bolles stopped their pro- ceedings. Sheridan Stoner aud others of ;he crowd went outside, but returned, Btoner having put a pistol in his overcoat pocket The gang stood around Stoner with pistols in their hands, and taunted Tollns, who finally broke a bench leg off nd struck Stoner, who retreated shooting. A wild panic ensued, ladies fainted and several attempted to jump out of the win- dowsand over the banisters. Bolles fell, shot through the heart, while FFanlt Wells, of Saluda, was shot through the elbow. Mrs. Bolles went into convulsions, and dur- ing the confusion Stoner escaped, after knocking dowu George Shea, a pi ominent teacher, who interfered. The strangest thing is that he passed through Kabb in the moi uing and to a crowd of forty related the affair, yet he was al- lowed to go on unmolested. He is still at large but a sheriff's posse is after him. Mra Bolles is in a condition. Did the Mormons Do It? SAT.T LAKE CITY, Feb. few days before Christmas the Utah commission's offlco ifAV ttjttii ed b> H and HII un- successful attempt made to steal the books and papers. The Utah commission is the body having charge of all election matters in this territory, and keeps all the records pertaining to elections It was generally supposed that the Mormons were at the bottom of the attempted burglary, for they were desirous about that time of procuring the registration books if Friday the Mormons began their contest in the Third district court to compel the Utah commission to to their candidates for the city council from the Third and Fourth precincts of Jhii city certificates of election. have the majority of votes in this pre- cinct, and if the court decides that precinct connt for councilman instead of the general vote of the city, the Mormons would have six out of fifteen councilmen. The case was set for today for a hearing, but the opinion prevails that the old law is still in force and that the precinct vote will not connt Friday night another attempt was made to steal the records, but as the im- portant papers are all in the safe deposit vault of the Union National bank, nothing of consequence was obtained. The burg- lars, however, stole the gold watch of Gen. McCler.ivid and To walk Miles. WABAHH, Tnd., Feb. agieement for a notable pedentrlan match was dra in thto city, the parties thereto being J. S. of Boston, and J. W. McDonald, of New York. According to the term> Haj rlman proposes to start from any city in Indiana which he may choose, wait to Ran Francisco and retni u, a sufficient nfn- to make miles, the trip to be completed within nTty-five No losl on account of sickness or accident to be deducted. On bin ability to perform the featHaulman ban Jaid a (vager of with Mr. McDonald, and forfeit hag boon deposited by each of the men nith C. A. Buckstaff, of Miiwanlmo, The specifics that Rvriman must start leu ffrfu Ajull 15, au.uw. nied by two guards selected by himself and McDonald. He expects to use the public highway! where practicable on the trip, but through the will take to the Indlani Dying by Wholesale. Bninviotfi, Minn Feb. 17. Reports from Mllje lake, in advance of the visit commtalon headed by Dr. Howee, are of a vo-y alarming character as to destitution The latter largely the grip, but boon, it is aald, (ingdlarly quite equal to an epidemic of pox. In some" cases whole Ancampmente hafw boOudOwU and not enough well Indiana to feed the sick, even if they had food, which they have not The hesd chiefs wer aid from the government in. to sent to Washington bu none hud yet come. An estimate places the d.atha at forty or fifty. Mo Says tiie Minister. Nmwiwr, N. J.? Feb. 17.-Rev. J. G Hammer, Jr., pastor of the Winkllfle by lerian church, a circular to oongi cgatkm decrying the of ohm el The circular .JU forth hi belief that the church ought to be ntiHwd the conversion of souls. The circular ci eated gteat excitement amonf memhei. of the church, ao< people is Imml A Tag Collides with a whale. NORFOLK, Va., Feb. 17.-The ocean tug O. Ward, Keon, runoita run- ning into a school of whales when off Qrea Wlcomlco river, while coming dowu the bay, cutting in two a leviathan about tot long. The bow of the tug was .a out of the water by the and over the carcam of the which In ttantly sank. The tng was not injured. The Panama Canal Commission Arrives. NEW ORLEANS, Feb. steamahlp California, from Colon, yesterday brongb Messrs. Oormnin, Chapport, Cousin, Lora- gout, DnchnteiichnndPioche, of canal commission. Korfon. 'I' C' i ..-Tom Bextop, or I! Hlfiul, (.pinii'i owl .iiiiimy Norton, in Ihroo rounds near here Sit- urday. Thev are light A BO 11LE BREAKING BEE Missouri l emperance Woiiien Ransack a. Saloon. AIDED BY THEIR MALE FRIENDS. The Story of the Remarkable Anti-Liquor Crusade In Lathrop, Ran with Whisky and Beer The Ardent Wai all Promptly Salted. Mo., Feb. temperance crusade in this village is the all absorbing topic, for the good reason that nearly fifty of the best known women in town are liable to be called before the grand jury to answei a charge of trespass and riotoua conduct Their social rank will uot save them, as the next grand jury will be drawn by offlclali who are terribly Incensed at the recent out- break, "There will be bloodshed here said one gentleman. "Just as soon as Pros- ecuting Attorney Cross issues the warrants jhe fun will commence, and any attempt to jlace one of those people under arrests will met with a resistance that will teiutinate, n a riot. There are a large number of men conuected with the temperance people who will kill any man who attempts to serve a warranj on their wivea and daughters and who have already made threats to that ef- fect" Not a woman's Crnsade, Says Crou. Yesterday John Cross, the prosecuting attorney, said: "Tha mistaken impression las gone abroad that this is a woman's cru- sade, when it was really started and engi- neered by men, and during all the disturb- ance there was present a man for every woman. There were present and actively engaged in the disturbance J.' T. Carml- chael, a Baptist minister; Jacob Bohart, Sr.; Dr. Mnndy, who had an ar and want- ed to smash the billiard tables; Editor Mc- Kee, of The Lathrop Monitor; B. F. Coeh- ran, an keeper; E. Q. Kinney, a former gi and juryman; Charles P. Jones, cannier of the T.athrop bank, and twenty others. The editor of The Monitor is re- sponsible for the outbreak, as he incited the outrages by attacks on the city officials in his newspaper." -How the Crusade Started. The crusaders offer the following as hav- ing formed the basis for their actions: The immediate cause of the outbreak was a stab- bing affray on Jan. 27, when John L. Brooks, a resident of T.athrop, was severely cut by Abe Scruggs, a faiuier, while both were in- toTirated. Tn discussing the affair one day Brooks' wife remarked to a neighbor that if she had any one to help her she would break into every saloon in town and pour the liquor into the street The neighbor replied: "I will go with you and can get twenty-five other women to go." The women Organize. It was then that a public meeting was pulled, paper asking the women of IMhrop to pledge heuiselveb to exterminate the liquor traffic in their town. The day of the trouble the women gathered together at the Opera house, and, headed by the Rev. Mr. Car- michael, marcbed down the street. When tha women reached Ward's saloon they stopped on finding the door locked and a crowd gathered inside, and had they not been urged would have gone no further. But they were, and being ashamed to back out, thoy, simply wont wild, und nmanhing the glass in the door unlocked it and7 went in. The crowd in the saloon had partially vanished, but Ward, the proprietor, stood guard. He made a futile attempt to ex- postulate, but he was swept from the field, and the door which separated from the back room oF harroom from the billiard room was burst open, A Bottlini: Smashing Bee. By this time the women had provided themselves with various instruments. Some had axes, others hatchets, and still more stones. The sight of the bcor bottles and whisky barrels incited the women to ri? newed action. The whole thing developed into a each woman vying with the other in Boeing how much damage she ld dn, woman boasting that aha harl smashed Over a hundred bottles. The stuff was brought to the edge of the sidewalk, where some difficulty was experienced in smashing the bottles, so the men were on to carry up stones and lay them on the sidewalk to hit the bottles on. An they broke the beer flew In every direction, deluging the women and covering their dresses with the liquor. The Liquor Promptly Salted. "Did yon too howl smashed that barrel of asked a pretty girl as she stood talking to a group yesterday aftemoon. "I tell you, it did me good to use the hatchet." W hen the whisky was being poured into the street it formed in little pools, and a brisk can trade was begun by boys and men, eveiy sort of tools being pressed into use to scoop up the whisky. Whon the womon saw what was going on they appropriated a ban el of salt from a neighboring grocery and, knock- ing in the- head, sprinkled the salt in the liquor. Crnaaderi Sned. The situation now may be said to be quiet, hut It In thn quiet before the storm. Thomas Ward, one of the saloon keepers, has filed an Information making a criminal charge against every man and woman in the crowd, and they will be arrested. Ward has" also begun suit on a claim fur for the liquor destroyed. City OffiolaU Divide Vp. It has beon openly charged that the city officers were bribed not to molest the saloon keepers. An examination of the record in the mayor's Office shows that an arrange- ment was entered into between the saloon men and the officials, whereby the former were to go to the mayor's office once a month, plead guilty to selling liquor, anc be fined. This arrangement has car- ried ont for the last six months, the men being fined each, which was divided bo tween the mayor, prosecuting attorney and marshal as foes. THE WEEK IN CONGRESS. world's Fair Legislation will Come Dp in the Boat. Other WAHHiKOTOR, Feb. 17. The Blair educa- tional bill will absorb the senate's atten- tion during the latter part of the week and its oonilderation may attend into the week following. Menntime the calenHai will be during the morning hour and at odd Intci vals. In the early part ol the week some time will be devoted to thi consideration of executive business and the British extradition treaty, and possibly the Russian treaty will likely be disposed of, The cuiumiUoe on finance will take up al matters relating to silver coinage on Tnc; nay nnd possibly dispose of them. The commit too on privileges and elections wll give some Attention to the Montana elec- tion case durin? tho week, but it will be aouie time before a decision is reached. There every rooson to boliove that thi COntrovel sy over tlm solfction of ft sito fo: the WorMVfmr v. iH tl BU fnr iif tli orted. Some debate on the resolutions of Mr. Canouer and Mr Hit! irovidiug for discussion aud otmg on the wo World's fair bills. "Mr. C indlur's reso- utiou iets apart Tuesday aud Wednesday 'or disuussion and Thursday for voting, while Mr. Hitt provides only for one day ol discussion (Tuesday) with voting on the next day. A majority of members seem to )eiu favor of having at least twu days dis- cussion, aud for this leason Mr Caudler's iroposition has the better chauce of being agreed to. There is a possibility of a deadlock on the question at issue, and in the ovout of this it cannot be said with accuracy how the rest of the week may be consumed Friday it jrivate bill day and naturally will probably devoted, as Saturday was, to the eulogies on deceased members. The appropriation committee expects to have tho pension ap- propriation bill ready to report to the house on Tuesday. The Mod Vivendi. WASHINGTON, Feb. 17. Secretary Elaine and Sir Julian Pauucefote, the British min- ister, conferred on the subject of the expira- tion of the modus Vivendi permitting Amer ican fishermen to enter Canadian waters. It is understood that Secretary Elaine is in no aaste to renew the agreement. By the time the fishing season begins in May it is be- lieved that a satisfactoi v settlement of the controversy will have been concluded. The secretary insists that rigorous measures shall taken to prevent a repetition of the out- rages perpetrated by Canadian vessels upon American fishermen. Until such a stipula- tion is secured from the English government there is no likelihood of a resumption of the modus Vivendi. To Try the Vesuvius. WASHINGTON, Feb projectiles for the new trial of the Vesuvius have arrived at Newport, to ba filled with gun cotton The navy department has decided that o full compliance with tho terms pf the con tract demands that each gun throw 200 pounds of actual explosive one mile. The test of last October was made with that weight of sand and sawdust. The ordering uf fiplusive gelatine from Glasgow wjuld, consume several months' time, and gun ton has bcon submitted. The_ final trial of the Vesuvius will take place in a few Troy After a Building. WASHINGTON, Ftb senate com- mittee on public buildings and ground lots had under consideration the bill increasing the appropriation for a building at Troy, N. Y., from to but la waiting to hear fnim Senator Hiscock as to the necessity for the increase. Tho appro- priation for this building was increased last year, and tho committee is disinclined to establish the precedent of a second in- crease. SHE SANK IN TWO MINUTES. A Steamer Scuttled by an Obstruction. Onn PuNHengnr Drowiitd. JACKSONVILLE, Kla Feb steam- er Ijouiso, of tho Jacksonville and Mayport line, ran into nn obstruction early in the morning near Hunter's Mill, on St. John'! river, and was sunk in two minutes One man was drowned, and the other and crew barely escaped with their lives. Th'o run from Mayport js only twicor thro; hours, and the passengers wuro all lying asleep about the cabin, with their clothes on. About half-post 1 o'clock the steamer suddenly crashed into some obstruction, supposed to bo a sunken lighter. Capt Floyd gives the following account of the disaster: "When the boat struck we rushed to the cabins, and called to the pas- sengers to make for the lifeboat The water rushed in so fast that the boat could not be reached, and we finally got on a life raft and cut it loose. This was on the hurricane deck, to which we had retreated. There wore ten persons on, the raft and myself and B. Hood in the water. I threw my arm over a stick of wood, which aided me in keeping above the surface. Wesley Evans, a young colored passenger, went down with the boat and was drowued. We were not in the water very long, for tho schooner Jesse W. Starr came to us and took us all in, The Louise was valued at A wealthj Citizen Blackmailed. Feb. success- ful attempt at blackmail, of which AmazHah Mayo, a wealthy citizen, was the victim, has just come to light. Last November Frank C. Algerton, who professed to be a enticed Mayo to his room, and nnder the pretense of receiving massage treatment Mayo was placed in a compromis- ing attitude. Alfjerton's confederate, George A Mason, broke in the door and, claiming to be a detective, put Mayo under arrest. Mayo agiood to settle the matter for half of which amount he paid. Algerton and Mason have bcon arrested. Mew Jersey's' Latest HOBOmn-N, N. J., Feb. Flattery walked along Harrison street, near Second street, yesterday, he discovered the body of a woman lying between two large rockfl. Tha face of the woman was partly buried in the mud and water. The body was that of a woman about 30 years of age, five feet three inches in height, and weigh- ing about ISO pounds, She was dark com- plezioned and had dark hair and gray She wore a black cloth jacket, white black waist trimmed with white braid, striped stockings, buttoned hue lately bcon repaired, and a black felt, nith velvet bow in front. She wore aboul her neck a scapular, indicating that she was a Catholic. Onto If yuU made up your to buy Hood's ftaiaparilin do not be Induced to take any other. A Boston lady, whose example Is worthy imitation, tells her experience below: In one store where I went to buy Hood's the clerk tried to Induce me their 
                            

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