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Trenton Times Newspaper Archive: February 12, 1890 - Page 1

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Publication: Trenton Times

Location: Trenton, New Jersey

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   Trenton Times, The (Newspaper) - February 12, 1890, Trenton, New Jersey                               VIII. NO. R. LINCOLN IN NEW YORK E VISITED THE METROPOLIS OF AMERICA BUT THREE TIMES. TUKNTON, WKUNKSdDAY AFTHJKNOON, FEBRUARY 1880. TWO CU Speech at Cooper Uulon Proof with Amos Story Tell- ing with Judge Truuibull Talking of Crave Subject! with Dr. Guthrle. Very little has been said nliout T.in- iln'a visits to New York. One of these sits certainly rnside his nomination for IB presidency possible, for after it he jcame the second choice of the greater ii't of the seaboard states, Seward bo ig the first. 1 have been able to learn some facta aout these visits, some of which, and erlmps most of them, have never been lit in print before. INtRODTJUliD BY BRYANT, Mr. Lincoln made three visits to New fork in his life, and his body waa irought there after his death. The first risit must have been made while he was i member of congress in 1847 or 1848. Ul- that 4s known nf it is that be said, at he time of his second visit that he had >ccn there once before. But if he came and went obscure at Irst, IIP was well known the second time, or then he was almost a His 'amo had precedetNhuja as the long, ank, country lawyer of Illinois who had net and floored "The Little Stephen A. Douglas, in a series of joint lebates upon the slavery question in Illinois. The fame of that intellectual :onteat, its uniqueness, the revclation- that it made of tho astonishing gifts of tho plain lawyer, and the excitement that the principles discussed had already 3reatcd throughout the country all this ;aused the name of Abe Lincoln to x frequently heard beyond the bor- lers of Illinois. Douglas was then at :he zi-nith of his power, and was re- jarded as the inevitable candidate of Uio Democracy for president. TUtrC 1 rlnli in York in (lie winter of 1860, and eomo body in it suggested that this new giant of the west be asked to address it. A suspicion afterwards arose that some of Lincoln's western friends had inspired this invitation, desiring that the east should sec and know who was to be Illinois' candidate for tho presidential nomination. This seems not unlikely when we come to understand the genius of political management, which, extend- ing through several years, wholly unsuspected by the general public, brought at last the nomination to Lin- coln, although Mr. Seward had scorned" to be the inevitable candidate. Mr. Lincoln accepted the invitation, and the speech was delivered in Cooper Union on the evening of Feb. 27, 1860. William Cullen Bryant presided. The great hall was packed and many of the audience were women, the wives and daughters of eminent citizens. Curiosity to see and hear this wonder of the prai- ries unquestionably brought the larger number to the hall. But curiosity de- parted after Lincoln had been heard, and in its place came tho homage that pre-eminent ability commands. When Mr. Bryant introduced Lincoln the audience, according to Henry J, Iluymond, did not know just what they finffht rn Hn Lincoln's grpat hpight, hid bony and loose jointed figure, his swarthy and smooth shaven face, all made the greatest of contrasts with the dignified mid-learned Bryant. Besides Lincoln's voice was peculiar, pitched on a high key, but lie had not spoken five minutes before he commanded the audience, and they perceived how it was that "the Lit- tle Giant" had met his superior. The speech, Mr. Raymond aftei ward declared, "made Mr. Lincoln the second choice of the great body of Republicans of New York, or the candidate of the party for the presidential canjpalgu of 1800. In less than throe months he bo came the first choice, for he was nom- inated in May, and in jnut one lucking one wcrk, he again visited Nrw York, this time president-elect, on way to Washington to tike the office. Two or three hours after T Jnooln made this speech in Cooper that is, about midnight, he went to office of the Tribune, where the manuscript of Ilia speech was in the banrla of ths printer. He Was vefy .anxious that there should be no errors in the report, and a young compositor helped him road the proofs. He chatted with the young fellow, nnd being planned with him put the manu- script of the speech into his pcsnefttion for flnal reviniuu. When the paper printed the young compositor tossed the manuscript away, a printer would be likely to do with the manuscript of a speech after in type, the com- positor afterwards served in congtess, and last fall was re-elected from one of the New York districts without opposi- tion. It was Amos J. Cummings. Had he kept the manuscript of that speech he would have had a valuable memento of great pecuniary-as memorial value. For a day or two the speech New-York, staying at the Aslor (Tonsc. Ho was (lelitrlitod with tlio lown, .''inl when Bfriend tltnprincipalf.ights. fn one plnco ho mot an old acquaintance, Mr. Raymond has told the following "WCdota of m'n mil1 diwnfr to the old "Well, how nave you got along since vou left "Well, I have" made and lost it; and how is it with you, "Oh, pretty well. I own my house in Springfield and have got in cash. If they make me vice president with Senator Reward, as some say they will, 1 hope I shall be able to increase what I have to and that's as much as any man ought to want." So Lincoln was worth about when hp plPCtPd prPR'dent, and hp regarded UK euuujjh fui any Mr. Raymond also is authority for another anecdote. Mr. Lincoln was taken to a photograph gallery on the corner of Broad way and Bleecker street, where ho sat for the only picture that was taken of him in New York. Here happened to be the historian George Ban- croft, and the two men were introduced. "The contrast between the men was striking. The one courtly and precise in every word and gesture, with the air of a transatlantic statesman; the other awk- ward, his every utterance an apology for hia ignorance of metropolitan mannei a Iglrts pleasure.' Dr.'Cfulliver wan'fm- ressed with the sadness and earnestness rith which Lincoln Talked of loud that was beginning to lower over le country. When Dr. Gulliver learned aftei wards jat Lincoln bad spent the night with he local wits he could hardly believe it, or it seemed impossible to him that a man who talked with the solemnity find aruestness that Lincoln did to him could ave just come from a night's yanjing ith the story tellers. That wax a phase of his nature that afteinard revealed to uiauy, ftnd 30tns almost A year or two later, when In the tfiroofl )f the civil war, and at a time when jincoln waa especially downcast, hetmd- ;enly remembered Judge Tnirnbull. Ha .t once sent, begging the judge to come to Washington and tell him gome more Judge Trnmbiill went I-in- oln received him with delight. They the greater part of tbe njght In ing to each other, and wheri Judge went away the president de- ilared that the visit had raised a ton of depression from nig hearV i TherAin ia, probably to be found the secret of Lincoln's for anecdote. He turned to it might ease the strain which he peryetd- ully bore. E. J. A BRACE OF "STORIES. They were Told to Delegations wno via. Ited Lincoln. A delegation called upon Lincoln from NeW'York. The members wanted the president to adopt different tactics to conquer the south. They suggested that a force be sent by sea to strike In somewhere about South Carolina or Georgia. He listened to atten- tively and said: "There was an old crooked hollow ran through a fence into a field. A sow and her piKi were in the habit of crawling-tlmtogh the hollow of the log and having a good time routing in the fleld, PBOOP am'on my way to said he to Mr. Bancroft, "where I have a son at school, who, if report be true, already knows more than his father." This son was at Harvard, and he ban since followed the example of Bancroft in becoming a cabinet minister and the representative of the United States al the court of one of the principal Euro- pean nations. Oil this trip to Mawwchusetts Mr. T.ln. coin made thrco or four stomp speeches, One Hartford, whars a club ar- rayed in waterproof capos and caps and bearing torches escorted him to the hall. This was a new form uf the Ui parade which long-been im- portant feature of political campa-igim. He also spoke in Norwich, Conn., am after the speech he eutertained in hia In 'mutable way a little company 
                            

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