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   Trenton Times, The (Newspaper) - January 2, 1890, Trenton, New Jersey                               VI IT. NO. KKNOON, JANUAKY 1890. fWENlY-SIX PERISHED. further Pai titulars of the don School Horror. A YOUNG HERO'S DEEDS OF DARIN6 He Dragged Bis Companions to a Place of Safety, and Wurked Until Driven Away by the Narrow News From Abroad. LONDON, Jan 2 later account of the flre horror at the industrial school says: In the fire at the Paupers' Industrial school in Forest Gate, n connection of the Whitechape] nmons, twenty-sir boys who were acleep in the upper'stones, were suffocated before they could be rescued. Fifty-eight others were rescued by the attaches of the institution members of the flre brigade amidst the most intense excitement at great risk Two of the matrons effected their escape by sliding down a water pipe. Some of the boys, emboldened by the example set by the m tbp sumo manner The Supeiintendeut'B Braveiy. The supei mteudent of the school exhibited gi eat bravery, and repeatedly dashed through the flnm.es, returning each time with the al- most inanimate form of some youngster. The school contained in all 600 pupils. When the flames had been subdued the bodies were removed to the main hall of the institution, where the pro- fuse Christmas decorations still depended from ceiling and walls. Origin of the Flre. The flre originated from in overheated stove. The girls' wing of the school, con- taining 250 inmates, was not touched by the flumes. The boys retired in the highest spirits, in anticipation of promised presents to be given them A NBW Year's fete was also to be held. The scenes in the death chamber, where the relatives and the school- mates of the victims are viewing the bodins, are very pitiful. Who the Boys Were. The school was filled with boys who hod boon committed to its care beMuse of their incorrigible habits; and altogether the in- mates were of a character from which little discipline or obedience might be expected In moments when both were imperatively de- manded. As a rule, however, the boysyield- ed readily to thedirections of their superiors, to this fact is due the safety of scores who otherwisfl would have perished. StupiDed by Smoke. Of the twenty-six who lost their lives only two were burned to death, the others having been suffocated in their beds. Many of the latter, were aroused with the rest, but be- came stupified with the smoke and crawled, back to their cots to die. A Boy Hero. The hero of the occasion was a boy who acted in the capacity of monitor in the fatal ward, himself a boy whose vicious habits had made him an inmate of the institution. Through bin efforts many boys were literally driven from the building, and he ceaacd his work of rescuing his fellows only wnon hs was himself driven out by the flames. Sev- eral of his companions he dragged uncon-- scious out of thn windows, whil e others he into the air in his arms t A ROYAL PALACE BURNED. It Near Brussels, and a Princem Had a Narrow Escape. BBUKJKI H, Jan royal palace at Tjiekon, a suburb of Brussels, was almost completely gutted by flre yesterday, and a portion of Tifie building entirely destroyed. The origin of the fire is not yet known. The flumes gprBail rapidly, at one tiine threatened to cut off the escape of most oi the inmates. The Princess Clementine had a very narrow escape from death, and her rescue was effected with the greatest diffi- culty. A young lady employed govemrwi to the princess was unable to follow her mla- And was buiued to death The only portion of the palace which escaped the rav- ages of the flames wns that in which the private apar of the king situated. Ehe royal collection oi works of the finest in Europe, comprising some of the most valuable paintings and statuary ex- tent, was entirely destroyed Will Portugal Apologize? LonuON, Jan. in official clr- :les profess to see indications that Portugal las decided to apologize to England for the uile ot Serpa Pinto, and especially hia in hoisting the Portuguese, flag on British protected territory and canning the British flag to txjhauled down. It Is cou- Sded that if Porf gal shall do thin England am insist upon nothing further without In- uiilug the suspicion of powers that the ntensible object of her quaiiel with Portu- gal is entirely foreigu to the real one, con- efiiing' which some explanation should be orthcomlng. Lord Oat of LOHDON, Jan. phy- icians report that he is bly and is out of danger. The Freeman's ouriial states that it ban learned from ellent anthority that Lord Salisbury him in ontemplation an early dissolution of par- ament and an appaal to the country oil the ot's new lonos. An African White Book. I.IM, Jan The Gei man govei as completed the compilation of an African 'bite buvk, which 11 -will lay before the sichstag oftthe roniooiablrag of that body. he book, it is said, contains document" of reat importance which have not hitherto een alluded to in the prnm, if, indood, their ristenop wnq The Caldwell-Mnrat Lonixnr, Jan. 2. The says that the larriage between Miss Gwendoline Cald- ell, of America and Filnce Marat gam autmged. Prince Murat, The lys, will accept allowance that MV 'aldwell may gi Ant him Fnrragnt'a Statue Krwnsr, Jan. The committee of the i council having charge of the of ii" of Grant, Sheridan and i K'fteil all the models thus far 'i for the Grant and i o approved Henry Kitoon's i Tor the Fnrrngut "nd awarded mtract to execute the statueof heroic i 1 ion ?o for lit K, r ij' AlrKlnnoy Vn Jnn. P. W. m inniipnrated yesterday, of tlio niprnmo court, admin- nnjr thn oath oC if n.1 onc-n to his ofhc m onllri-i. The If i >1 crowded Tlio The governor "i a he received !vo hall vtnre convened mirt on Btrlfci'. i'1'" i' IIP Thewen puno null u-u nek for an i ven swl imif i i-uli por cuA TheT t pajr is fifty cents cut r pros- DEATHS FROM INFLUENZA. The Still Spreading Killing Ita Victims. NKW YORK, grippe claimed several more victims in this city yesterday and the situation is becoming serious. have boon over 100 deaths from pnenmonin In this city since Saturday, over 20C deaths from bronchial troubles. Many oi these are directly traceable to the prevalent influenza Among those who have died il United States Osborne, oi Brooklyn. Commissioner Osborne was born m OHs- ville, N. J in 1837. In the sixties he was made clerk of the United States district court, where he remained for five afterwards being made commissioner. There were two deaths from pneumonia among the members of the police force oi this city yesterday. Patrolman Thomm Eflbride, attached to the East Twenty second street station, after an illness of only twelve hours, and Patrolman William of the Thirtieth street station, were the victims Tn both instances pneumonia was the outcome of neglected The Disease Abroad. BERLIN, Jan. rapid incieasein the number of cases of influenza at Wurzburg, Bavaria, has rendered necessary the erection of several temporal y hospitals. Ihere are cases of the disease in Munich. Thf epidemic is spreading m Uftsden. ROME, y influent is spreading in Italy. It has appeared at Cerona, Mcs sma and Modena. The pupils of the militar j school at Modena have boon sent home. MADRID, Jan. mortality herefrons inn influenza is very but there are in diestions that the malady is decreasing, Gayarre, the tenor, is not expected to re- cover The disease is spreading in the pro- vinces, and has assumed a very sev form at Barcelona. DUBLIN, Jan 2 Sixty of the officials of the Dublin postofSce are afflicted with in- fluent Legislators Suffering from Influenza. BOSTON, Jan 2. The legislature of 1890 began its session yesterday. There were many absentees, owing to the prevailing epi- demic of influenza The organisation of the Iwo branches was effected without any fric- tion, and is the same as m 1889, with the ex- ception of the presidency of the senate, to which office Senator Hemy H. Sprngue was chooou. Speaker Barrett was re-elected in the house. The clerks are the same as pre- viously. Editor Fitch Has It. RomiiSiitK, N. Y., Jan 2. Charles E. Fitch, editor of The Democrat and Chroni- cle, is suffering from an attack of influenza, which has confined him to the house for several days. A DESPERADO'S CRIME. He Kills pOne Man Fatally Shoots Two Ofnere. MKKMLL, Jan. terrible New Tear's tragedy occurred here in which David Bar- vis, a well known saloon keeper, was killed; Robert TniaT, chief of police, in- jured, and Frank Hotz, 'flight watchman, dangeronsly wounded by George Heudler, a drunken, dissolute character. Hendler had been refused credit at Sarvis' place. After buying several drinks and paying for them he whipped outa revolver and shot Sarvis in the back, killing him almost im- mediately. Chief Truax attempted to an est him and wag shot through the lungs, and is not expected to recover. Holz was shot in the shoulder and arm Hendler held the crowd at bay for a while, and when attempt- ing to escape stumbled and dropped his re- volver. He was pounced upon by the crowd and taken to jail He will probably be lynched. A Professor's Royal Beceptlon. BAT.IHTOBTC, Jan. has boon re- at the Johns Hopkins university from Professor Merlwptnor, who recently accepted the position of professor of English and histoij' in Tokio university in Japan Upon ai riving in Japan he was received with great ceremony. A special palace was given him as his residence with more than fifty sei v- ants, A stable containing some of the finest horses in the kingdom was placed at his dis- posal, and in every war he was treated with royal splendor. While at Johns Hopkins Professor MeriwetherwasasBistantoocreta-y of the American Economic assoHarinn A Daring Newark Thief. NEWARK, N. J., Jan nnluoiVu man entered E. D. Andrews' jewelry store at No 350 Broad street at 10 o'clock Tuos day night as the jeweler was placing his wares in the safe. The man leveled a four- barreled revolver at the head of the pro- prietor, shoved a gold watch and chain into his pocket, and walked out of the store. Mr. Andrews gave and, aided by several officers, almost succeeded in capturing the daring fellow at Clay and Cliff streets. The however, dropped the pistol and booty, and disappeared over a neighboring fence, after which it was impossible to find him. More Trouble at Barnwell. CHART KdTON, 8. C., Jan celved here indicate that there are probabil- ities of trouble in BaiawelL Teleg.amshave bv'fl received at BlackvlUe and other neigh- boring town" asking for aid, and a special Imin left Bhvkville with reinforcements. It is mid the negroes intend to buiu the towii. The trouble is by no over, and the whole county sooma to be np in af ms. A conflict between the whites and blacks imminent. He Stabbed Two women. Naw Yow, Hitter, a baker, aged 45, became as a result of too much liquid refrMhmnnt, and while catling on two young woman at 83 Cherry Btcwt, a kjilfe and badly cut them both, and then ran amuck through tene- ment house, creating a guiall panic. was finally captured, and the two girls were taken to a hospital. One of them, Kitty IV. likely to die from iujm IBS, Deadly Kleotrlc Light Wire Pii rribURo, Jaa 2. At 1 o'clock a brokeip telephone wire fell upon the drawing a Plenwnt Valley .Inset car in Allegheny City. One of the honre was killed iiAtantly' and the other fatally injured. The driver andpe received slight, shocks, bat rrsi e not seriously hart. The broken wire had Crowd with an electric light wire, Green Mnst Hanfr GKOBOB.IOWW, Ky., Jan a Jofcn Orson, the coluied farm laborer, who butchered wife in a shocking manner in the streets of thfa oily in broad daylight ou Aug. 31, ban- jiiwuced to hang Jan. 15. Two MABI.BOKO, Md., Jan. engine house ot the Southern Maryland railroad at Brandywine has boon burned, together with two locomotives and a large amount of machinery. Loss, 130.000. A TypholcT RKADiNa, Pa., Jan epidemic of typhoid fover has prevailed in northern Berks county for somo weeks. Many deaths hnvo orcnn oil Thn is attributed to thn pollnf irm of th" of Maiden crook by niraws of. ratlin fhnt Imn died of a rnni igious cftttln cnniplnint now provrxlont tttv iinllnji to obtain drinking ivnttvr froni fliaf Hlieam, official inauiry into tho matter will be made. HER ROMAN MC SUICIDE. Pnd of a Young Ai list's Un- happy Love Affair. DESERTED BY A LOVER, SHE DIED. The Tragic End of Pretty Ober- Killed Herself with Her Lover's Revolver New Year's Pathetic Letter to Her Brother. NEW YORK, Jan 2 Oberbauer, an artist, 29 years old, who been living with her brother Otto at 210 Wghfy- flrst street, committed suicide yesterday afternoon on account of a disappointment in love. She shot herself through the Hhe was an attractive young womnn. and hail received instruction in the best art schools in the city. She had boon also a pupil of Smlllie, the landscape artist. 'Jihe Engagement BrAUcv- About five years ago Miss Oberbauer opened a studio at 10 West Fourteenth street Will- lam Brill, whoso glove store was on the Sionnd floor of the same bm'Wing, saw the young artist and fell in love with her, and they were eventually engaged to be ried. Miss Oberbauer's family opposed the mar- riage, and about two week's ago Mr. Brill's brother called upon her and said that Mr. Brill's family wished him to make a wealthy ma, ilage and had forced him to break the engagement Prostrated by the Shock. Oberbauer was prostrated by the shock and kept to her room She scorned to lose all interest m life, and her brother Otto thought that her mind would become de- ranged from brooding over her troubles. Yesterday afternoon she seemed to be some- what better, and about 4 o'clock she asked Otto to cai i y a message tooneofher friends. As he left the room she asked him to return as soon as possible. Shot Through the Heart. Half an hour later Otto entered the room and found his sister dead on the lounge. She had shot herself through the heart with a 32-cauber revolver which her lover had left in her rooms when he called uponier some weeks ago Mr. Brill had taken the 'evolver from his pocket and left it on the bookcase. It was lying on the floor beside the lounge, and Hiss Oberbauer's brother thought that she was sleeping until he touched her hand to awaken her. Her Puthetlc Letter. On the table were letters to several friends, and this one addressed to her brother. CHKISTMAS DAY DEAR OTTO I thank you for your devotion to ine !n this time of need I legret that I ulll never be able to repay your kindness Go to our mothei and tell her hou loudly 1 have thought of hei and the girls and Alma They will forghe me if I have wronged them, foi I did not do it willingly J hnve respected Tilue foi her to the one she loved She will believe that I have lovt-d hei in spite of all our tooublo My heoTt has often ached for them all, aa I know then n have for me Tell them to forgive him also for w hat he has done to me They all have kmd hearts, and do it for my sake Dear Otto, tell mother hoi, closely our troubles have united us and how hard It seems to me to leave you Only the thought that this will unite the family once moi e gives me a hope that 1 not lived and died in vain Be to mother as you have been to mp, and sho have gained a good oon and lost, alas I nothing She Forgave Her Lovei. Go to W B and give him my lettei remember how I loved him, and forgot all else He K ill perhaps, be glad to know that you are not his enemy. The poor man will ncod some one to confide in, and perhaps he will be gmteful for any sign of friendship Look after him, I beg of you, and be as kind to him as you can Remem ber how be befi tended you, and also that this will be as great a as he will be Dear, dear a comfort to your mother and beg her to open her heart to you as she did when she cabled you in her aims twenty- seven years ago. Remember me, love, not with sorrow, for I am at rest and feel no grief Your own loving sister, GADRIFI t u He vfas Making Calls. One of the other letters addressed to her former lover. It not opnnprt, was sentflealed to hie homertOQ East Sevonty- flfth street Mr. Brill could not be found last iiigbt, and ib was said that he was making calls. Miss Oberbauer's family for several years have boen alienated from her on account of ber mode of life, and the brother Otto was the only one who stood by his sister. It is said that she was onoe married, but resumed her maiden name after her husband's death. One of her msters is the wife of Charles Goldtfer, a lawyer at 206 Broadway, and living at 25 HoratiA street, She Took Bat Little Food. To a reporter last night Otto Oberbauer that his sister had tAfeen but little food since her engagement was brokea She talked vei y little about ber disappointment. Others who 11 iu the same house say that she was on nnusnully all, active woman. She bad a in painting, and found very little difficulty in of her own work at good prices. She wan in Germany, but had lived in thfc cou ntry since she was 7 years old. IN NEW YORK'S FIttibnfg and Allegheny Clljr without BlACtrlc light. Jon 2. The Peder- ationof T-abor him iwued an order calling out all its members working for the Alle- gheny County Light company. Oakland and East Liberty a.-e nllll lighted but Pitts- burg proper and the Booth tide and Alle- gheny City are In rtwkii.- This County Electric Light company has practically elected to test its that of united labor and their sup- porters in Allegheny comity. Recently the joint Rnmrpittn of the Electrical nuJ united labor representing a strength of in the county, to the company for iti consideration an ngroement which pur- ported to regulate the condition" under i which the employee of the company would remain at work. The returned by the company wai 'by no meons satisfactory to their cinployes. The Electrical union met and resolved that a strike be ordered, and that all of the em- ot tlio company bo called out effect of the call will be the creation oi work by mochinisto, engineers, dynamo men the electricians of the Allegheny Connty T'ight couipauy, the Bad Eloctric Light company, the Keyitoae Conaiivctlon com- pany and the Wotlnghouse Kiectric Light company. It is aim stated that the flght will be car- ried into politics, and the influence of the labor orginfuitlons will be brxxght to bear against the candidates for city council! fa- vorable to the company now set np in all the wards of the city. Ins Connty Light company has a monopoly In supplying Pittsburg and Allegheny City .with light Their private an numbered by the hv boon miido in this section for a long t'me IB being negotiated here Tho stock is the ahai ea of West Virginia Central railway, held by Maj Alcrnnrter Shttw and ,family Besides this block tbere are shares outstanding, among the holders of which are ex-Senator Henry U Davis, Sec- retsiy of State James G Blame, Secretary of the Treasury Wmdom, UuiU'd States Senator A r1 Gorman, Stephen B Elkins, the heirs of tho late W H. Barnum, of Con- necticut, and a few others The olllclal re- lations between tile pi esent management of the company and Maj Shaw is understood to be somewhat strained, and it is hinted that certain stockholders aie desirous of getting control of tho majoi 'a holdmg ou this account. The interniediary between Maj Khaw and the gentlemen who wants his shares is Mr. Enimons Blame, assistant to President Davis. The first oiler made for Maj Shaw's stock was or a share, two weeks ago, but he will not let go for less than for half a million. The negotiatious are still iu progress A BlK New York Flre Nsw YOBK, Jan. five story brick building, 017 to 025 West Filtj s-ecoml street, was partially burned yesterday Losb, 000, as follows Building, owned by Jacob New, Liberty Silk works (H A Van T.lew Co SIW.OOO, Mahler Co silk ribbons, Persian Carpet and Rife. Company. J J Morrison, plaster ornaments, Eaton Coal Compound Manufacturing companv, The losses are well covered b} insurance There are usually about 330 men and women oppratives in the building, but this being a holiday the only persons on the premises were the watch- man, Smith, and his family, who made a narrow escape fi oin the top floor, and the engineer, Charles Fechtler, who also escaped The flre originated m the dye room near the engine room Robbed of Victory by a Trick. MINNEAPOLIS, Jan 2 first of a series of skating matches between Alex Paulseii, of this city, and Hugh J McConnick, of St Johns, came off at the Palace rmk McCor- mick trailed Paulsen the entire distance i until the shot was fired announcing the last lap. Then he spurted, gaining about ten yards when a cham was thrown across the track, causmg him to sustain a teinble fall. Paulsen won by a couple of feet. A protest has boon issuo-l against paying over the stake money, Time, five miles, 20mm. 18 ooc ten miles, iO mm 55 sec fifteen miles, I hour, 1mm. jr sec. The Wrook of tho Commonwealth. SHA IsiuCITV, N J., Jan. 2-Thesteamer Commonwealth has on the bar and is full of water, the sea washing over her at high water. The vessel and part of the cargo will probably be a total loss The brig North America has been sent for, but the high sea ents any work being done on the wreck There is an insurance of on the vessel and the cargo is partly by insurance Capt Enoch Town- of the Atlantic and Gulf Wrecking company, has taken charge of her King's 100th New Year. MtnoLKTON, Mass., Jan King, probably tho oldest man m New England, who will be 101) years of age on Jau 15, cele- brated tho new year by a family gathering, forty of his descendants being present. Mr. "King was boru near Quebec, and was the lait of a family of ten sons, one of whom reached the age of 110 He has a good memory, and is lii good health, except that ha Is troubled somewhat by asthma. Another vvllkesbarre Cave In. W ILK PBBARHE, Pa Jan. 2 noon yoo terday the ground under the Lehigh Valley railroad locomotive shops, which are located directly over a coal mine, caved in. The foundation walls of the building cracked, and some of the machinery was badly in- jured. 'Ihere was considerable excitement among the 400 workmen in the shops, but no one was injured. Manager Gault Resigns. CINCINNATI, Jan. 2 John C Gault, gen- eral manager of the Queen and descent his resignation to take effect Feb. I. He will succeeded by Richard Carroll, the present general super- intendent Mr Gault's resignation was caosod by the directory declining to release him of the traffic department. Died Flaying the Banjo. NEWARK, N J., Jan 2 John Hopper, a wandering negro minstrel, twanged bin banjo a few minutes on Market street and then sank to the sidewalk in an exhausted Condi- tion. He died in the city hospital a few hours after bis admission. Bogardufl Kills Sparrows. PHILADELPHIA, Jan. 2 Capt A R Bo- gardufand J F. this elty, shot a sparrow match at the Philadelphia Driving park Each man shrrf at 25 cparrowo at 30 yards rise, five traps. The match resulted in a tie, each killing 16 birds. A New Jersey Suicide. JimSBY Ciitf, N. J., Jan. Sould, aged 60 years, living on the turnpike road between Caldwell and Koseland, com- mitted suicide last night by hanging him- self from a rafter in his barn Desdondenc; ever business trouble is believed to have boen the cause. He leaves a widow but no children. The Lockout. PHII.ADBLPHIA, Jan. locked out piiaters of The Prow have been placed on the Btrikn benefit list per week) until they obtain employment elsewhere. It Is said that The hasjwcured noarlja fntt couipla- meutofmen, and that they will experience little or no difficulty in issi'tag the paper. A A BIG RAILROAD DEAL. Kmrnonn Illnlne After Hair a Vltglnln Ontril Stock, BALMMOBE, Md., Jan 2. of tho 'arjirtit in railroad that Is that impurity of the blood which produces nnitglitlY lumps or swellings in the neck; which casses running sores on the amii, lejn, or feet; which develops ulcers In the ears, or note, often catting blindness or deafness; which Is the origin of pimples, can- (teruusn.onum, or which, fasten- ing Upon the Inngg, causes consumption and dea'n. It Is the most ancient o( ail es, w person" are entirely bX bom It, B; taking Hood's which, by the cures It hM accompiijhcU, proven itv" to be a potent and peculiar medicine for this disease. K yon suffer from try Hood's "Every spring my wile and childfen have boon troubled with scrofnla, my little boy, three years old, being a terrible T t spring he was one man ot sores from hearitoleet We nil took Hood's all have boen cured ol the scroMa, Hy llUlB frcn from and all four of my children luok briglit and healthy." W. B. ATHICKTON, I'assalc City, N. J. Hood's Presents m the most elegant forrn; THE LAXATIVE AND NUTRITIOUS JUICE FIGS OF CALIFORNIA, Combined with the medicinal virtues of plants known to be most beneficial to the human system, foiming an agreeable and effective laxative to peima- nently cure Habitual Consti- pation, and the many ills de- pending on a weak or inactive condition of the KIDNEYS, LIVER AND BOWELS. It is tl _ most excellent remedy known to CIEMSETHE SYSTEM frrFCTWUr When one is Bilious or Constipated THAT- PURE BLOOD, REFRESHING SLEEP, HEALTH and STRENGTH NATURALLY FOLLOW. Every one is using it and all are delighted with it. ASK YOUR DRUQQIST FOR MANUFACTURED ONLY BY CALIFORNIA FIG SYRUP CO. SAN FRANCISCO, CAL, totllSVILLC, M NEW YORK, N. i. HOLIDAY PRESENTS OI 1 1-4 And Seal-'ikin Caps.- Turbans. IIATTI-'H, State Advertise YOUR "WANTS" IN THE T Equips YOU5G LADTHS SRHVIOK in COUNTING BOOM. far A II We being in the Fancy Goods Um- brella trade, one of the oldest flm.j In Tren- ton, believe we know juat the very thing that the people, like to inato others a Holi- day Present in oar line of baalnwa, hereby mention B few of oar leading items, namely. Onr grand stork of eastern-made fine Umbrellas, with silver gold or beau- tifully-carved natural handles, at each sur- prisingly low prices as to bo snre of appre- ciation. Onr Fancy Goods aie too numerous to mention In every particular, but we call attention to our assortment of Gents' Bilk Mufflers and Silk Gnnts' 811k Mufflers, largest tize, from 50c. np to Todies' All Styles of Handker- chieffl, frotn FinA T 8bnmn, Luce other Tidies, Bureau Cov- ers and Bc-arfs, Children's Caps and Infants' Full, Complete Supplies. Also, the very made Hoskuy, Gloves and Fine Underwear for eveiybody. Onr DOLLS! DOlTJd are the veiy best. Handeomest assortuinnt in the whole State, and all our goods at prices to defy any competition. Look in our win- dons. Opposite Cllj Hall, PEERLESS DYES H, H. J. M, Md OMllrWl'l Hair anil Bang> oat curled. Ing mi) H, HIKKKi', 1-KHWiON, H. J. Of ry Of i Pmio low p ove .wr Liver Bink dlkOitlon. Co'i-UrjUon or CoeUven cure ulth Wit's VeesUble Liver P We will the above .eward 'or any StfA In- ven- we c- mot Liver the itrlctljr complied with. are purely Vegetable, and never Mi to (five aim, boiw, confining 80 Bin, cent.. POT filo b, Bo- ware of ootintorfeln and TIM tent by mall on routfpt of a i'-nnp. Bold b, V TIDD, DBDOOIBT. (M BAMd and Of OllntOb, H, I, 
                            

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