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Trenton Times: Tuesday, September 28, 1886 - Page 1

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   Trenton Times, The (Newspaper) - September 28, 1886, Trenton, New Jersey                               VOL. iv. WHOLU xo. 1217 TEENTOX, TUK8DAY AFTKHXOOX, 8KFTKMBKU 28 1880. TWO CUNTS A 2 O'CLOCK F.DITION. DESCEND UPON TRENTON LAST NIGHT IN VAST CROWDS. The Prominent Statesmen of the Partywbo hela forth at the riotels and Got in their Fine Work under _ the n-laVP of _the Electric Lierht. HOW THE DELEGATES GOT TO THE STATE CAPITAL. A GOOD NATURED GANG. WHERE MIDNIGHT FOUND SOME OF THEM. The Scenes at the Headquarters of tho Factional Influences Brought to Bear on Some Delegates from Wayback. GOV. ABBETT HAS HIS SHIRT SLEEVES ROLLED UP FOR THE FRAY. lion Senator lli'l'lHTNon UccpUcrt liis Frlontts Homey -----VSSsri'utlCs llal.iliin. ill-, Till -Tho Ilooiiis of .lleMirs. llloiltfcft ami Cutler. SCENES ABOUT TOWN THIS MORNING THE ORGANIZATION IN TAYLOR OPERA HOUSE. nsr. oi-' TO Tin: THE PROCEEDINGS IN FULL. The crowd iu attendance upon today's Democratic Onbpruatorial Convention is the laigi-st, numerically, and most good- n.itured that Trenton's Oldest Inhabitant baa ever beheld. Every prominent Demo-i crai, fiom King Bee Senator John R Mc- 1'herson down to Hex.ekiah Sinitu'sshoiiter, I Little Johnnie Warner, is on deck ready I and anxious for the battle to begin. The j majority of them came to town by rail, but many of them walked to the capital. Where the crowds come from is a mys- tery, but where they are quartered is aj bigger mystery. The hotels were turning away would-be as'early A. M.I yestcrd.iy. In tact, every room in the larger hostelnes had been engaged a week or more in advance. By noon the ap- plicants weie willing to double and even quadruple up for the night. At C P. M. begL'ed _tYie pom- pous clerks for the privilege of sleeping on a mat in the hotel corridors. At the Tren- ton, American aud State Street Houses, the Windsor and United States Hotels the par- lors and dining rooms resembled wards iu the hospitals at midnight, so profusely were cots strewn about. The smaller hotels and larger boarding houses wire then be- siegeiaud soon filled to overflowing aud yet hundreds of the Democratic host wefe unprovided for and many were forced to walk the streets until midnight. It was a good natured gang, however. Early iu the evening the hotels were crowded. The "shouter" was very largely on deck and amused the throngs by his earnest exhor- tations in behalf of his particular candi- date. It was a purely Democratic gather- ing. Senators, Congressmen, State officers and ward workers mingled together and forgot their differences in political society as the situation was discussed. The dis- cussion, of course, was accompanied by the clinking of glasses. The night was waiui, in fact red-hot, and OB a knot of statesmen would eulogize a favorite candidate and denounce another the scene was so animated that even the surroundings partflok of a sanguinary hue. Delegates were surrounded and quizzed as to the strength of or Blodgett in their county delegation. Combinations were made, broken, reconstructed and broken again with unusual rapidity. The delegate from Wayback and the suburbs thereof wi.fi conspicuous the throng. That he felt his importance was plainly to he seen. He was "agin1 the 'State House he said to a confidential chum, but was afeard of that man Ureen be- as he whispered in his churn's ear, McPhersou was fur him, aud I'm dead sot agin' Mcl'herson, 'cause he's no Dem- ocrat." He finally concluded that Cutler, the farmer statesman from Morris, would about fill the bill, and went to ben in that frame of mind. This morning we saw the same delegate. He was shouting Green to his fellowrtlelegat.es. Why the conversion The political boss of his -'deestrlot" had in- terviewed him bright and early and brought n powerful influence to bear upon the hay- seed. What the influence was we leave to our readers to determine. The headquarters of the would he can- didat'S were thronged until early this morning. Governor Abbett, armed with a huge palm-leaf fan, held forth at the Htate Street House. His parlors were visited by upper-ten of the party, who kept, Hia Excellency informed as to I the Warren sheet battle. The Governor's course in taking an active fight in the struggle was condemned on every hand. "If hia irian Green is defeated in the con- said a Hudson county wire puller, "hia chancea for a seat in the United States Senate are mighty slim." And so I'nited States Sr-natoi John K Mcl'her- sou came to Trenton eaily in the afternoon. He was driven to the Trenton House, and went immediately to his room, pallor No l.'i. After Htippei be received bin fneniN, assisted by Congressman Billy The Senator was a soil ol cuiiosity timing the early evening. Hnmble Demociats ap- proached the Goliah ol the party with timidity. The St-natm attired in a suit of black aud wore a Spinola-like collar. Hia usually stern features relaxed somewhat as his visitors increased in num- bers, and later bis face was wreathed in smiles. "Go in and sluike bands with whispered a Fifth Ward w orker to his friend. "With queried the latter. "Not much; he's too much of a Republi- can to suit and the pair walked down the corridor to No. where Andrew Al- bright, the Essex Labor candidate, was lo- cated. Here the anti llcl'hersonite was more agreeable aud shook honest Audiew by the hand anil wished liim success in the conil'ct for Gubernatorial houois. Albright's rooms were with light. The pictorial candidate stood inTFie center of the room aud gieeted hi- i1 tilers with "How goeth the battle, "Are you with me in the fight V' etc etc. No one would suspect Andrew of being the candidate of the wage-workers. He was the best dressed of all the would-like-to- Ije's. H's suit ol black broadcloth aud huge diamond piu e him the appearance of a millionaire bondholder. His constitu- ents were mostly laboring men, aud during the entire evening not a piounnent mem- ber of the several i ings v Kiled his cham- bers. Hoiveverthe Newurker was confi- dent of success and was sanguine of his ability to captuie the political plum. Superintendent Uulus IJIodgett was on baud eaily in the afiiruoou. Flushed with presaged victory be approached the clerk's desk at the Trenton House, a pen aud dashed off- "Ken s Ui.ijiMiErT, Manchester, N. J." A (ireenite was the next man to register. Noticing the di-liuguislud name his own he examined it closely and calling his chum, asked "1 say, I thought KlodgeU was a Mon- mouth county man." "So he replied his friend. "Well, don't the would-be Governor know wheie he lives? lit-re he's register- ed from Manchester, aud any Kjhoolboy knows that hamlet in no; in Moiiiuoullihut Ocean county." The Ureeuite and ins i hum c.inieil the news and .sought to make politic.il lapital of the Hup-rinUrident'-i fipigetlulut.-n, hut soon afterwards a Mnnmouth county editor came the slip ol the pin and nylitid the wrong by (halving a pen thiouth and locating iilodgett by the sea-bore at Uic Snmintr capital Branch. The Democratic Chairman him hut iccentl.v moved to the l.ittei place tiom county, iiuice 1m mistake. Kul'UH, surrounded by Secietary of Mate Kelsey and ex-Clerk M.'ll Little, was at home in room No. Ill He was pointed out as the "dark lii-r-e' and judging horn the liiilroad smile, he wiibol the same belie! bimstlf. Hr.s room was crowded for hours. he had a pleasant word for everybody who called upon him. As a TI.MKS repoitir wa.s passing the open door oue jubilant adnuier ciied out: "Three cheers lor Knlus i'.iodgttt, the workiiigmau'.s This was greeted by an exeiamiLuiu of "JCii.s Irom snini- oue iu the looiji ai.d tin (heeis were so handicapped that the propusci had a monopoly on the whole busiiii-s-s. Miles Koss, looking moie like a well-to- do Middlesex county larmer than a Gov- ernor ajwept ion in_ropm No, 14, adjoining that ol Senator Mcl'hersou. The New ISiunswick svnemer had dolled his coat and rtciived his guestsin his shirt sleeves. He was confident that Bob Green would be nominated ou the lirat ballot, and was so enthusiastic ou the subject that many a doubting Thomas retired to rest thinking the same way. Ex-Congressman Cutler had rooms in the same hotel. To the strangers and sight-seers he was pointed out as the "man who beat Willie Walter Phelps for Con- gress." His abiding place was all anima- tion. The lawjcr-slattsman was all bustle himself and by his personal magnetism scooped in many vvaveiing ileK'gatis to his fold. Assemblyman John Van Bussum, the silent Bergen statesman, arnved late iu the afternoon from Corona. On nis breast he wore a huge bouquet of gieeo. flowers, in honor of the candidate he championed. His appearance at the Trenton House was the signal for vociferous applause from his numerous acquaintances. Buttonholing was the order of the night. Wiry Henry C. Kelsey was here, theie and everywhere, aud bomted to bis friends that Green was distanced in the race. CongTess- man I'ulcock forsook Hie hotels early in the evening and took up bis position in the middle of the street, opposite Peter's, where he greetul his friends and enemies, and predicted his re-election by an iu creased majority. city and ward officials sufged in and out of the hotels, held impromptu caucuses in the bar-rooms aud on the sidewalks and en- deavored to impress the uninitiated with their wonderful wire-pulling powers. It was nearly daylight thw morning when the streets about Hie hotels were de- serted and the noises had ceased. Many never sought a conch at all, but put iu the wee ema' hours doing the town. This morning they may be designated by their wilted collars, peach-blow eyes and the whisky-sour tone of their voice. The sul- try heat had somewhat wilted their en- thusiasm too, and those who were the noisiest last evening are the quietest to- day. Such is to be expected. 1 he.y came for a good lime, with a latce srpply of red paint. They had their inning last night and only ceased when the paint was ex- hausted. This morning a new colerie were doing the carinimng. At eight o'clock thisi morning the seems of last night's struggles were quiet ami serene to a consnleinlilc extent and some- what resembled a HHi-odi- rc-ort in Septem- ber, after the season hail closed. The evi- dences of last night's wind battle were noticeable everywhere, hut the contestants were out of sight. An hour later the scene changed Mid the adjourned struggle wan renewed. The Green t -s were ns confident M.before, and more to, and their opponente by wearing badges of ribbon. Congressman McAdoo was thus a'iorned, and his appearance in the lobbies of the hotels added strength to the (Iieiu contingent. The Iriemls ol lilodgi-tt woie no badges, but were distinguished by then s.irguine couutenanc'is aud tious ol vutory. Fiom ten to eleven the several county delegations went together in caucus anil elected their officers. A canvas shown! that there were no changes m the situa- tion every f ction was lirm and decided in their choice. Room No. 100, where the State Central Committee was located, was surrounded by a motley mob ot perspiiing delegates and heelers who clamored for tickets to the Opera House. The door was guarded by a blue coat and admission into the Stai Chamber was only gained by players and political influences Abe. Naur, a State House attache, frowned upon those who condescended to ask for a paste board, anil endeavored to convince the crowd that rite success of the lovefeast BOOT to occur de- pended on his individual exertions tickets were scarce and, as one old-time Democrat snappishly declared They're about as hard to get as a political ufli e under Cleveland's Administration." Taylor Opera House began to lill up with CITIZENS MET AGAIN. THb PA K COMMITTEE OF THE HOROUCH M-KE TH> R REPORT. Till'} Suggi'M That thu TiniB Has Not Ar- i-Ueil lor tlie Furcliane ot u 1'ark aucl IMt-liIiitc the Matter to an Long Discussion. A citizens' meeting to receive the report of the committee appointed to investigate us to the lability of purchasing a park lor Hie ol Cluimherahurg, was held at the JtoroiiKh Hall last evening. The meeting was liy the election of Captain WithiugtiHi as Chairman, and Charles Hewitt as Secretary. The chairman ol' the Park Committee thcu read their report in which they stated that in their judgment they thought the time had not yet arrived for the pur- chase a -park and thought the wjrole matter t-honKl he left to a general election by the people. The report was adopted and the Committee discharged. As .soon as the report had been received Mr. Jones arose and suggested that an delegates and spectators as early as elevi 11 j amendment should he made to that part of V-TTT j the report referring to jTpublic election so o'clock. The stage and proluaely decorated with American The stage was set with' a Chinese scene. To Abe. Naar was assigned the arduous duty of seating the delegates as they arrived. His' Name your counties, report refeiring lo a publ: that the question could he referred to Council fust and if they think that the finances ol the borough will warrant it then let them lecommeud a general elediou. Mr. Egleton Hanson stated that it was repeated continually rel'evcd the sentiment of the Committee that it was the monotony until Petermanu'.s hand took not the ttmejust now to purchase a park, seats in the balcony and enlivened the They thought it would he better to put the proceedings by rendering a lively air. same amount of money ou street improve- The stage was occupied liy Democrats and the proscenium ditto Mercer's delegation occupied mid- way in the right parqnette. HinNon and Kssex wereat the extreme stage en. I of the right and left dress circles. The gdlciy was reserved and occupied by spectators. Once seated the delegates ignored deconnn and divested themselves oi their coats and plied their fans with vigor. It was just 1230 P. M. when Chairman ments and Mich things. James D.ikin was not more in favor of the DeC'ou Itrm for a park than any other place but he thought some place ought to be pnichfc-.ed. It would not be any loss to the boiousih at any rate to invest iu the DeC'on t.irm. He then explained the chances ol its increasing in value. Jaiiit-s followed in somewhat the same strain alluding to the rapidly in- eieusmg value of land around the borough Blodgett called the convention to order, and sanl that the property would double His ippearance was greeted bv cheers. "I in value in a lewyeais. "We want to have been Mr. Ulodgelt said, show the City of Trenton that we can buy "to present the name of Judge John S. WestcoM, of Caruden, lor temporary chair- man of this convention" Mine cheers greeted this announcement, and as the Judge was introduced an in the gallery proposed th_ree cheers "lor jhe Governor." The cheers with a vim. During Judge AVestcott's speech round after round of applause greeted his refer- ences to the late Samuel J. Tiidcu and Govemoi Ahbeft. The Judge said, 111 part Gentlemen You may expect that no matter how much my n mils ate we iki tied by loss of sleep or anything! Ke t'i perlorm the duty which you havp imposed upon me. I have no doubt lh.it I be iiHtd by the manliness of the in1 The intensity of feeling which uiovtint: on all ".ides out of this meeting a-id its olj ct is perhaps without paial'el in the lustoiy of New Jersey. Now it is not unwise in the struggle to cast about IH and see that we do not forget the object vilmh brought a he continued. Thomi'i Jameson spoke several times in an manner against the park. He 1 mtlly denounced the idea of increasing t'leir taxes tor the purchase of a park which they did__not need._ Two public squares would do more good to the bi'ioii'-h tlian n such farms as the DeC'ou He did not wont to see any such prnpcitv smuggled on the borough. .Mr. Bullt-r made a motion that the icuininiend to Common Council that if in tln-ir they thought the linaiin ol thf b warranted it, they ;t ji.uk within the borough limits or ]u-t nn1'! !e the limits. Mi. D.ivid butterine fame, said thai Ilif Inril'i! iiiilcliltilness ol the wai The paik would I'D-' s KMKio lie was told by an able engineer that it would cost to level the gmuinls and them up iu any kind ol shape "II yon want mnie taxes, buy a paik together, to wit--lhe best iiileu-st.s of iit-nrhhnis, but 1 have all 1 want lo the Democratic party. It is but a sboit he-ail. step to the charges of corruption and dis- honesty and to ultimate ih-leat, aud it be- hooves us to go at things Mioderiitely. We must not be governed by boi-sism but by Democracy in the tine sense of the word. The speaker thrn referred lo the mag- nanimity of Samuel J.Tllden, [Applause] the great, dead chieftan, aud how when the laurel leaf of power was laid upon his brow, rather than be the cause of any dispute he laid his honors down and went about his daily O'cupation. 'ihis should be Hirsxsrmple niWeiT the spiaU-r, to lay aside all personal consideration lor the public good. There has come before the American people two very difficult problems for them to solve; namely, taxation acd tin- demands of labor. You have had a man who understood that this was the subject of the day. Leon Abbett [applause] has introduced the best system ol taxation ever introduced in New Jersey and this has brought great honor on hia name. And, if the condition of labor iu this Stile is brtiir to-day than formerly, we can u-li r name of Leon Abbett as Hie man who brought it about. In regard to the Mihjt-c' of capital and labor I he speaker said that the problem needed the attention ol every man in New Jersey. That the laboring m m i.s becom- ing better educated is the icasim whv he is demanding so much nttcn'i'in. He hoped that this convention would elect a Governor (ind the nomination means election) who will carry out what h.ul been begun so well. Freedom, equality and unlimited expression should be allow- ed hfre. Not uutil the wns made should any one be proliiinlfil fiom being heard and then after the iionnnali'ui was made no one should be anything but satisfied with the result. At the conclusion of the address Judge Smith, of Sussex, a member of the Stale Committee, presented the following nnmefi for pennauentsecreuiric.s S'ltoncl Scmplr, of Oniden, Jacob C HendrirtKi-n, ol Burlington; Frank 1'. McDorinoH, of Mon mouth Levns J Martin, of Sussi x W. J. St. ol W. T. liirrc't, of Essex, and George liouten, of Hudson. Tr.ese gentlemen were elected. Secrctaiy Barrett then called the i uni- ties lor nominations lor peim uieiu odic, M. Those chosen will appear in lull in the next edition of which i be issued directly afici the nominil.on is made. Op nlng the. Hepto-i her Term. The September Term of the I'lnli il Circuit unit wns opi'm il at tl.r I i ITIHI nt lluililiiif; this morning. Tlp-rc u a largo attorn] inci- of Utwren, was a conspicuous fit SCIICM nf pnum ncnt Democratic li-pi] lights. 'I he tion nndonlilcillv- t! many. .hulgcs MrK'-nim HIM! wen mi t'ic bench mid tin- list of ho li law (iml i ipnl v coses woro culled. Veiv tin -ISM veie re ported ri-'dy for tnul :nnl mrich il fliiu'U is i xporie.nccd in lUirrr; .ialc- f.-i tri.ls, owinr lo the illness and cmo ol Judge Nixon, thus extra duty on the part of Judge Wales, of Di'lawinc- _ r The ncrl edition of THE Ti M us mitt roiif-im the fttll of the citnrailion, trill if intuit dtrettiy ifter Ihi Jion it natle. Mi J'.uks thought that they should not think so much annul taxes. The indebted- ne-s ol Trenton v as 11 per cent to where it was :i per lent, in the borough. With the put on a park the indebted- u 'ss ot tilt- boioujjli would not come up lo that ol the They ought to have a park ol' sonic kinil Tim- tin- HIM iiAsum went on fiercely, though Captain Withinglon was very rigid in hhuttiui; oil peisonalities. At length a motion to carried- before.any- action was taken on the motion which was belore the house. 1'olllriK r IU-CB designated. i il meeting la-it night Mr. il the following resolution. llic P.lllslnld vvhn h wi v Jt Thai I lie following-named places hit' liei'-liy as tlio polling place-! in tho H'veial election districts in the city of Ticnton lur the (.....ling fall election First ward -1st district. City Hall; ai 1 district, Tri mont House lid district, No. Soullntnl sttt-et. I Second ward 1st dishict, No. 1 Chancery stiiTt i-M di-tnct, No. West State street, IH-.U Willow 'ilniilWaid 1st district, No. 21h Brnui stni I -M cIMrii t, I'.aglo Hotel lid district, Libcity llonsi oilier ol' (Vutrc and Feny sfiecls, llh distiMt, I'lilkrit's, corner of Centie and I'Vdrra! streets. Kouith -1st district, Marion Hotel- 2rl ilistrur, M. l.ca'- Hotel. Fil't'i nanl- 1st rtisiiii t, No. 211 N. Greene street i'l district, olhi'o of Frank Binder, IViry stK-i'l, iicar Stockton 3d district, cor- ner ol I lintun and Kossuth streets; 4th dis- tiiit, i oi HIT ol Clinton street and Porrino avrnur Sixth 001 street, corner of LairliriR Sevint W.inl Isl district, No. N. W.'irnn s'rcct 'M dishict, No. 1111 I'onnliiK- li.l .lis'ii.'t, No. Willow St.; In'! dhoun at reel. Three Disorderly FIoiiflflH. About thrrf n'i lock this morning Licuton- urit Lane and i rgeantSwi i-nny, with monad of in.iiie a raid on Nos. li, H and ISarncH si i ei t, of which com- p'.iin's h.ul on ricijvoil Great dicordor had be. n on in thoso bonnes up until niter :nnl the complaint was iimdi; Ihis tun" 1., .limes (nioilwin. Tho houses kept In- Matlie day, Kitty Smith nnil COWHIDED BY A GIRL. llow the Wealth) Minn Caimoii ij Man Wlio Maligned Her. JEKSKY CITY, Sept LJ7 About a week ago the Jouiifil, at this city, pub- lished a story alleging that two society belles living uot a thousand miles fiom the Post-oflice had laised two checks which their lather hud given them fiom jHlo and from S-10 to J100. No names were mentioned, hut everyone knew that the story referred to'the Misses Gannon, whose father is one of the wealthiest men in the city. Saturday evening liay Gilchrist, son ofj Ex-Attorney Gilchrist, met George Lenhart, the repotter who had written the story and gave him a severe thrashing. He was arrested for it this morning ami placed under JIOUO bonds lor assault and battery. Jjt'ue meeting of the Board of Public SVorks opened at H o'clock to-night and Leuhart-was present to report it. Before any business. Jiad been transacted Miss Mamie Gannon, the older of the sisters, rushed into the room, and, going up to Leuhart said: "Are you the man who wrote that stoty If you did, take that! and she struck him a blow in the face with a heavy cowhide whip which she carried in her hand, "and that and slip con- tinued as she plied her whip again anil again. The janitor of the building finally pulled her away, and she was led down stairs. A moment afterward she ran up again and before anyone could stop her she lashed Lenhart five or bix times across the face, each blow bringing blood. Lenhart cried with pain, and running toward President Reynolds' desk, said- Remem- ber, sir, I hold yon responsible for this." Just then Commissioner Kearn moved that the board take a recess of ten nnmiUs to see the thing out. The motion was carried by a vote of four to one. Commissioner Keain then stepped up to Miss Gannon and advised her to whip Leuhart again. She needed no more encouragement hut rushed at him and strmk him in the face. Leuhart tried to draw his revolver. The crowd saw the motion, and with one ac- cord rushed forward, broke down the railing which surrounded the reporters' stand and would have killed him had not three stalwart policemen pushed them back. Miss Gannon seemed satisfied anil walked down stairs amid the cheers of those who had witnessed her act. At the door she met her father. Well, did you do it YPS, papa, and I did it well, she replied. "Then go home dear, and Pll stay here and kill the d He was dissuaded, however, by fiiends and went home quietly with his daughter. The news soon spread around the city and a brass band was hired and nearly a thousand peisous marched with it to Miss Gannon's house, when she was serenaded. The young Lilly is oue of prettiest anil most popular young gir B i i the city and has in lur own nght. it is the general opinion that the story that was published concerning her wasan outrageous lie and that Lenhart deserved all he got. Alter the meeting of the Boaid of Works adjourned, nix policemen, under command ol Chief Murphy, escorted Lenhart home. He will probably leave the city before moining, as it is not safe for him to appear on the streets unprotected. i'oltee 1'ickingH, Peter Frank and James Malnin were arrested by-Special Officer Lindley last night in Ihe t'nited States Hotel for dis- orderly conduct. They stole rides on freight cars on the Pennsylvania Uailroiid, which was contrary to their rules, and on landing- in-this city-weLt Btrunre hotels whe're the crowds were. They were remanded. Samuel Mitchell was arrested by tin- same officer for drunkenness, and as he re- sisted he was lined Samuel Layton, a colored youth, was fined for drunkenness. A Pleaxant 1'nrty. A very pleasant masquerade and water- melon party was given by Miss Maine Allison, at No. '.12 Centre street, last evening. About forty young people were present and they had a merry, merry time, dancing and singing and eating watermelon until a late hour. STOCKS. Reporter! by J. C. Hasbrouck, Broker, corner State and Ureene streets, Trenton, N. J. NEW YOBK STOI'KS. OFENIMB. Lackawanna......................... lux Reading................................... si. Jersey Central........................... 111% Krie.......................................... H5U Delaware Hudson................ New York Central................... HolihiiH. Nini vvoni'Mi wi ro arrested anil two nu'ii. .histiic Mathoson held thu t rec ]iioi 11! ti esses in bail each to ap- ju-Ht-lii'toii' (Jiii'il Jury, and fined the follow iuj.' women r.u h f-'usle Jones, Hattie i.M, Ilnt'ic Idonn, I'rcttun, Fannie Moon- .mil Aildii- Smith. F.inma HixrL'r'r nnil tho two men il tin1 s'lni'- as the wfinien. .-r if wan euroi] hy i I 11. ncs, llcllexllle, i Is f-n'merl'lifmlcal N Y. 11n1 am nn 1 nrs T> by thoH'1 wbo are n'H inn mill iln.i' p-l-. iriilc'crlUble. I'm- il Mi' iol 'In- nn.; ism iileil or mirpitMfd by the coniiunn mil of the mlrul, thus mi-'t li'i; il1; vict nn sill Monlile flfflli-tron The roii< f which I1, (iivi-'i by Hood's Siin-apariila him rftiiiicd tboii'ftinls to I.-- tlianliful for this frrcnt meiltclni-. It iJinpl'N this cauiinof dyRpeftfln Anil tones up the illRCStivo organn. Try Hood t Bar- vaparllla. Get fonr Umbrella from Dobbins, Hit- P.M. iwv, Lake Shore tuitj Western Union......................... St. Paul.................................... Union Pacltlc............................. Clik Puclflc Mall.............................. N. P. preferred........................ Oregon Trans........................... Louisville and Nashville......... 1'J K. 4 TexM................................ SS Omaha...........i.......................... 0. M. preferred............................. Northwest................................ 117U Oil V% '.wo I1UICAOO OBAIN ANO PROVISION MABKH.T. OPENINH. Wheat. (torn. Pork. Lard. Oct....... SllK 1117 Nov I'M 'm% 20 CLOSINH PRICKS 2 P M. Wheat. torn. Pork. Oct.......n% M% 2su Mr, NO? 7ft Die...... ''ay, VlctJiry al Consumption, the Kieatest curse of the ago, tlui destroyer of thousHtiils of our brightest and hist, is conquered. It in n longer in- rnrablc. Dr. I'iorco'n "Oolden Medical covory is a certain ronu-dy for tins terrible disease if taken in time. All scrofulous dis- Is a BcrofulouH niliction of the bo mired by it. Its effects in diflORHCK of the throat and lungs nro little losi than miraculous. All druggists have it Derhyu now rondy. Dobbitig hatter. Something new In 19-cent Box Paper Brcurloy Htoll's. Vfio Spring Ice. Telephone 14' ITY HEALTH MATTERS. S TYPHOID FEVER CAUSED BY IM- PURE WELL WATER. Vn lletwee.il Mr Cloke ami Dr. Sliuphurd-----The Oreiit Amount of Filth Whlrli Is Held by Wll- HOII'H Djim In the Creek. luspectoi Messrs. Fnrmau, Oloke aud Chambers were present yester- lay afternoon when the Board of Health vas called to order by Dr. Shepherd, who iccupied the chair in the absence of Presi- lent Vroom. The Inspector's report was read. In it he called attention to the irevalence of fevers iu various parts of the city. Eight cases of typhoid had been reported aud il seemed to be almost epi- iemic. Shepherd objected to having the iort published in that way as he thought here was no epidemic at all. There was no use of frightening the people iu the jity and those who wish to come here by uch a report when we have but a few comparatively. The report also iJie of an epidemic nf fever in the Third, ''ourth and Sixth Wards, but as uo reports lad been nude by physicians the Inspector bought they could not he typhoid iu He attributed the cause to un- lealthy well water and Mr. Cloke moved -hat wherever the Inspector found any inch wells he be authorized to close them up. The Inspector further staled lhat most f Ihe complaint of fevers were from jamberton and Centre streets, aud there veils lire most used. Dr. Shepherd objected to taking the iction called out by Mr. Cloke's motion as 'ie thought typhoid was not caused by inpure wells. Three-quarters of the were caused by hydrant water rallier well water, if caused by water at all. Mr. Clokcsaid theie was no difference iu ipinion among intelligent men that wells 'u large cities, where they must be sur- .muded hy lilth, were unhealthy. He thought they ought to be closed up. Dr. Shepherd contended that there was .00 much jumping at conclusions in regard ,o the injury done by drinking water. He isked Mr. Cloke lo tell him what the germ typhrfd was. This was u poser to that which be refused to answer. I'm- Doctor culled up several incidents in Ins practice where the fevei wits in oue Umily which drank well water, and iu iinother which used hydrant water. There were other causes than this, he thought. The discussion lan'ril for some length of :line and last came, to a conclusion by the ulnplion ol Mi. Cloke's motion tu close up the wells. Thu Inspcctot tnilhcr staled in his re- port, that the seweiage Irom the Coin I House was emptied into the creek, anil not only that, which was bad enough, but the Freeholders were selling rights to others along the line of the newer to con- nect with it. On motion a eommitlce was appointed consisting ol Messis. Cloke, Mi-Outre and Chambers to look into Ihe matter. Mr. I'm man thought that S.miuel K. Wilson, who owned the bed ol the stream, could pit-vrnt the county or anybody else fiom sewering into Die creek it he wanled to. Mr.Cloke agreed with Mr. Furman in this and thought they ought to hold Mr. Wilson responsible loi any nuisance thai he permitted. The Inspecloi spoKeoflbe fearful amount of stun" lhat was in the creek aboie the lam. Mr. Wilson was going to open tin- gates to-night, and wash it out. Dr. Shcpheid thought Hie dam srioulii be got clear ol altogether. Councilman Snedekcr, who was present, wanted to nay something on the subp-ct, and was given the llnor. He said Unit hi- did not think that laising up the gules was the hettt-thiug to do. It lowered the water and lelt the rocks above bare and thru the matter that was left there was worse than ever. Mr. Wilson should shut down his mills and let the water get high enough to run over on the dam and then it would wash everything out al) the time. Mr. Cloke said the lime would Dome when the stream would have to IMJ walled up and made a fnnl-running stream and all impediments taken out of the way, and the sooner it was done the better for the city. The report spoke iu a general way of malarial lever and several nuisances, hut the Hoard took no action as they thought that the Inspector should do his duty and they would stand by him. In regard to an impure well on the property tit No. 1'21 Temple street, a motion was adopted that the necessary steps should be taken to have it cleaned out or closed up. Several of the nuisances reported at the last meeting hail been abated and Washington Market was now in a splendid condition. There was nn more cause for complaint on Hamilton avenue, where the dumping of night soil had been going on. Quite a discussion followed on this subject, both Messrs. Cloke and Shepherd thinking that some place should be provided where ihese scavengers could unload without affecting the comfort of anybody. It wa thought that the Inspectors judgment iu the mutter was sufficient and thatn motion passed at the last meeting gave him authority. No further action was taken and the lioard adjourned lor two weeks. I'liysleiann, Lftwyi-rn and Hiislnom Men are en tiiiihliiHtlc In tbulr onditrfpnient of Hnlvation Oil t cures the woint canon of rheumaitim. 2ft nut on tho piano stool with her hands lightly damped, anil miserable eoiilil not sing n note 1 Kcntly supgenttd Ilr ''nil's Cough Hyrnp. Tlie next day she nlng Ing anil trilling like tin; lirat tilrdn In the Hp.mg "Psoriasis, IN years' nothing oU i ould hi'lp r -Hi ffed hy I'liluu-i's 'Hkln-Hucei-sq.' A YOIIIIH. Newpirt, li. f. Boyn' Olotli IlntR. Urtiat variety. Dub- bins, hatter. Fall and Winter Dorby. Dobbins tho Ilnttor. Try my flno Derby, fiobblns, Hatter Sec Scudiler ft Dunham'B advertino ment on fourth page. Oot yonr printing done   Hoiith Warren street. F1UR The itoro No. 107 North street. PomMslon given October 1st, Four aud cellar. Apply to E. V. RICHARDH, OB nod dog, on Cb.-tnM avenue, near the Penna. fi-Hrond Owner on have the dog by u 29   

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