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Trenton Times Newspaper Archive: August 24, 1883 - Page 1

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Publication: Trenton Times

Location: Trenton, New Jersey

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   Trenton Times, The (Newspaper) - August 24, 1883, Trenton, New Jersey                               i   Twelve years ago the length of time tin- house has been in existence the site occupied by the various buildings comprising the estab- lishment was devoted to agricultural pur- poses, and the surroundings gave very little promise of the busy population now inhabit- ing that portion of the city, which is due en- tirely to the rapid development of John Tay- lor's modest venture in the pork packing and wholesale dressed beef business. THE OK THE ESTABLISHMENT. The site referred to is located along the Assanpink creek and the Bulvijlere division of Railroad, with a frontage oil 1'errine ami Assanpink avenues Taylor's packing-house refrigerator building, slaughter- ing establishment enttle yiiril and to- gether with'fifty-eight brick tenement-hoiiM'.s, erected by the proprietor principally for the use of his employees, cover three and a half acres of ground and represent an investment of over The main building is a substantial structure of brick and stone, HO.v feet in dimensions, and the interior raugement.s combine every feature that inge- nuity and long experience have been able to devise for the rapid slaughtering of cattle and hogs and the curing of pickled and preserva- tion of fresh meat. The building is provided with two slaughtering departments, one for slaughtering-hogs and the other for slaughter- ing cattle and lambs, and a power engine, located in the basement, is one of the more important adjuncts that tend to facili- tate speed in this branch of the business. An idea of the magnitude of the enterprise may be gathered- from the statement that the hog slaughtering department has a capacity for slaughtering and dressing hogs a day, and the hanging room has a ca- pacity for hanging HOU hogs. At this season of the year the slaughtering business is con- lined to cattle and lambs, and about 75 head of the former nnd head of the latter are slaughtered every week, and about head of cattle on the hoof are sold every week to butchers in this city and vicinity. The num- ber of hogs slaughtered during the Fall and season amount to over head. And in the IIOUHO euros Irom to tierces of hams annually, which are purchased green from the block in Chicago. The dressed beef business is rapidly increasing and in order to meet the demands of trade a new building for thr stuiagr rmd of fresh meat hiw just com pleted, which w a model building for the pur- pose intended, and represents a large outlay ol e-apital. This building is UOx'iO feet in dimen- sions, and the refrigerator room, the ceiling ol which is twelve feet in the clear, has a capacity for hanging 150 full length carcasses of dressed Immediately over the refrigerator room TtiP tftfi wlllch has n capacity for storing .'fiT> tons of ice. IiKSt HII'TIOX (IF Till: KKKHIUKKATon. The main walls of the building are con- structed of brick and stone, and are two leet in thickness. The main walls, however, are weather-boarded on th" ovte'dr, wi'h ,1 ;r- spare between, am! tin inside arc lined with three layers of plank, with a thick layer of felt between each layer of plank. The standing temperature of trie re- frigerator room registers above the freezing point the year round. The beef is conveyed to the refrigerator building by an ingenious over-head railway system, which forms a continuous circuit from the slaughtering department and the room where the meat is dressed to every portion of the refrigerator room. The basement of the re- frigerator building will be used for curing pickled meat, and no expense has Ix-en spared in preparing this portion of the building for af Wie -The in commodious stock yards supplied with pure running water, and it is safe to say that his new refrigerator building for the preservation of fresh meat is one of the bent buildings ever constructed for the purpose. The various brands of pickjed meats sent Quit by this house are, it is well known, unwirjuuiseU in- cut, trim, cure and flavor by any other similar establishment in the country. The best recommendation, however, of the uniform standard of quality, maintained is the im- mense trade- of the house, which extends to every city and town within a radius of two hundred miles. The annual trade of .the house reaches the enormoiM sum of one and half million dollars, and duriug the juist year it juuounted to At present only -about twenty-live people are employed alxmt the establishment, but during the hog killing season the number of employees is increased to seventy-live The house employs no traveling salesmen to drum up trade, relying .solely on the merits of its goods for ite busi- ness. The majority of the employees of this house have been connected with the establish- ment a number of years, and many-uf them have been provided with cornfoi table on easy terms by their employer. Out of the fifty-eight brick.dwelling bouses erected near his pork-packing establishment, Mr. Taylor has sold all but twenty-four on the instal- ment plan, principally to men in his employ. JAKRAKD'S WHOLE STOKV. The Kx-Ilouft of Middlesex Tells Why He He- Specinl Dispatch to THE TIMES. N'KW BKfNSWK'K, August 24. Full details of the hearing before the Cana- dian Court iu the extradition case of Levi Jarrard are published here to-day. From them it appears that the county presented very slen- (I; r evidence to support its charge of forgery, and it is generally expected that the Canadian Coiitti will refuse to surrender him. It may be, however, tint t'ie wi.'-h is father to the tHimght iM i1 c. t'i. i '.i :i yciicra! sentiment i.i'c'Jty public meii. m sy.npji! hv with the fugitive defaulter. .l.u raid's of the tinder which 'ie became a criminal, which are now published Vr the iirsi time, will undoubtedly iiicieasc this I1I> .story in substance My property on the hill in New Brunswick me When 1 went into the olliee if County Collector I was behind in my taxes, if course 1 did not wish to be advertised as a leliii'iueiit taxpayer. Boss's had a heavy i hiim upon iiV'tnTd Theodore B. Booraem, as their agciu, me that if 1 the taxes on it, keep the place in good repair and live there, that 1 should have the disposing of it, and that all I could get for it over and above Ross's claim should be my own. 1 had a fine prospect of selling the place at a tine li'.urt. kept --uptime property and-iwver had a hint that my home was to be taken from me. Having fulfilled uiy part of the contract, I was surprised one day when Bporaeiu told HIP.. that they had disposed of the house and grounds to Johu N. Carpender. He bought it for and it coit me over I found no fault and made preparations to move. I was ready to leave the old home iu April, 1880." This sale to Carpender, Jarrard says, fell through temporarily, and he gives full details of subsequent concealing the prop- erty in which he claims he was systematically over-reached by Ross's agent. While the mat- ier was still hanging fire, Jarrard says: I went to Mi lea Ross (this was a bitter hu- miliation for me, as I had not spoken to Ross in mauy years) and gave him the history of the whole thing, asking him to stop the with Carpender and to give mo back my homo on the terms that they were giving it to Carpen- di-r.. His reply was that he knew nothing about the transaction that Booiaem was doing the business ajid he could not step in and inter- fere. "My great desire and anxiety for keeping the place was that I had a good offer in prospect, imd I HOW know that if I could have held the property ten months longer I could have dis- posed of it at over This sum would have paid all my debts and set me on my feet. This was the. beginning of my troubles, and, by gad, sir, it was the end, too! It cost me about yJ.OOO a year more to live in that place than it would iu a cosy little home, but I paid it year after year because I had been assured that the place W'ltihi not >e taken from me. Therefore I can say, and honestly, too, that I lay my absolute ruin to Theodore B. Booraem and John N. Car- Jii-lidci.fOl til" dvYt'jllioil iKi., htn.5 jjini.- ticed upon me! Xo one will ever know how 1 tried to stave off this ruin. Men whom I had assisted to power and for whom I had paid out thousands of dollars to place them in position, turned coldly from mo when I asked them for a small loan Jarrard tii6nti6ned their names a score or of whom reside in Middlesex, I'tiion and Krwex counties. New Jersey. He said that the money hrhad taken from the county was to keep him from ruin, but that he had meant to pay back every cent. He said that when he away from N'ew Brunswick he had only with him, and that was all the money he iu the would JS'iniij kind pi'onlp. iu Middle- sex county bad sent him small funds which he was using to live on. His family was living, now at Detroit, Michigan. When asked as to whether Middlesex county's affairs were hon- estly conducted, he 1 do not believe that t in-County Collector's office has been run hon- estly during the past A man who takes t'ril orV I li'i'.n behind. This I'-er "vi T.ike th.'way in which coirity C'.ir.ts are run. It U the most dam- nable piece of work in the country. There is where tin- innocent tax-payer's money goes into :v If I ever KO back to New ilruusvvick 1 will have no mercy on men. I will nntke-a sick looking set of individuals in a very Khort time. I would have, as little mercy on them as they exhibited toward me. But they will never ttke me to State Prison I will die first. I came near taking my life a few ago. If taken to New Brunswick I will do M I said, and then I don't, care becomes of me 1IAKKKTT SMITH WILL RfclTllX. lie Denied that IH a Swindler, and De- nounces Vehemently. Samuel Barrett Smith, the East State street baker, who left town so suddenly a week ago, lias be.en 'igum hoard from. .'f HF; TJMKS from 1 1 Park street, Albany, X. V., denying in detail the story furnished the press by Mrs. Hums' He says that the statement that he induced Mrs. Burns to buy the East State street bakery is an uumitigatu lie." The accusation that he collected for sev- eral patented articles without making returns "is from a. lying; villain who seeks to heap when it i.s thomjht I cannot'defend myself. I have show that I paid every dollar. In regard to Iiobbins, the paper man, 1 transacted business for them anil col- lected and paid their agent ouly a few days before 1 left Trenton so here is another lie. x 1 did not owt: Cook Mr. Fisher here i.s another lie for the father of it to swallow." He denies further that he inten- tionally bought, any goods in Mrs. Burns' name, or that there is any girl in the trouble, lie simply failed, be to gel money prom- ised hence his financial embarrass- ment. "When I bought the the letter was no more than worth ol stock the fixtures were mortgaged for I paid Mrs. Burns she has all the fixtures all the same, a larger trade, a bet- ter set of bakers than she ever had on State street. I will return to Treutou and will pay all my just It i.s natural for some to cover their own shortcomings by trying to in- jure one who is down and unable to defend. Nothing nor no one but a dastardly villain would use the language, under the circum- staiieo, that was published in TDK TIMKS and other Trenton papers of Saturday's issue." Michael Nicholson, of this city, writes to say that Smith does not owe him any money. IH J 1 J l lliird Iidilion. LATKST NEWS BY WIRK. WAS PADUY RYAN bHOI Investigation Fulls to Discover That the l glllitt Sho I The Mutter In Doillit A Itohl (iKiiie in I'.anton In Til K MORNING NKWS. By Associated Tress to T HI; TIMKS. Cn K August Numerous reporters kept up u prolonged ywt-crday for (lie. wounded pnyi.- list. Paddy Ryan. No positive information was obtainable lip to a very late hour, and it is thought that Uyau not shot at all, but i_s otf on a !MK spree. Johnny Files, a and friend of Ilyan, stated yesterday that Ryan was Hotshot, and that lie .Files; had him in ens- tody. The theory put forward by Ryan's friends is that he had hurt liiius.'lt' in a drunken tit, aim nau oceu secreted liy lus Iriends. to Hi! Consoled. A second tragedy lias very nearly followed that of the strange suicide of Herbert Mayer on Wednesday. I'.ver since the death of Mayer his widow has seemed inconsolable and has b.itlltd all the- kindly attempts of to Another comfort her. Sl-e has wept continually and linally her mind appeared to be giving away. six o'clock last evening her strange actions particularly alarmed her friends and a cartful watch was set upon her. She kissed her infant child, put on a.hat and shawl and left the house. To questions as to her inten- tions she returned wild and incoherent an- swers. She was followed to the spot from which her husband took his fatal leap into the canal, and when it became plainly mani- fest Ilia! .she intended to drow U herself, hV had done, (he crowd which had gathered in- she was forcibly compelled to leave, the spot and return to her home and her child. During' the balance of the night she rontinnt-'l -to-.trt but aS' more quiet to have gaveri up the idea of tak- ing her own lite. A careful watch is kept over her, however, for fear she may repeat the attempt. A flairs of the Inter-State Association. Representatives of the Inter-State clubs met at the tlirard House Philadelphia yesterday. The disputed Active-Anthracite game of Aug- ust 11. wax to the Actives, and the one announced for August and which was not played because of dissatisfaction with the um- pire, will be played iu Pottsville. The Har- Quickstep game the" score of which was'Quickstep, 1, 17 when of the Athletic, pitched for the Harrismirg club, is to be played over, because Secretary Williams, of the American Association, had not received notice of Blake- ly V, release by the Athletics. The two protested Harrisburg-Brooklyn games were both allowed to stand as already decided. Trenton claimed a game against the Quicksteps, for August 15, because, it is as-erted. though it was rainy, the Quicksteps did not appear on the ground. This was finally withdrawn, with the under- standing that the game be played iu the future. The Anthracite-Brooklyn li-1 game, iu Brook- lyn, WHS allowed to remain as scored. Richard 1'earce, of Brooklyn, was elected umpire, to fill the place formerly held by Hurt, McCaffer- ty to remain substitute umpire. The Double Track To Be Votfld On To-Night. A special meeting of Council will be held this evening for the purpose of on the ordinance to authorize the Trenton Hor.stN Railroad Company iu lay a double, truck i'rom the State Capitol to the Clinton Street Station. There will -be no opposition from merchants, but it is understood that some members of Council will endeavor to postpone the ordinance with a view to urg- ing the Pennsylvania Railroad Company, which is largely interested, to make certain improvements which the city demands. One ol is thv Hill nlniot The Fourth Ward members want flagmen at the I'liiou and Warren street crossings all night, nnd the Third Ward members would like to have the whistling of locomotives near Broad street suspended during the night. Whether or not this opposition will be strong enough to defeat the pending ordinance re- mrtins to be seen. A Itold Came. By AsBoeliitfd Press to THE KtsTON, Pa.. August A man last evening entered the druji store of I K. liecker, at this place, mid presenting a bottle to the clerk, Charles Killiaui, u-sked him to taste its contents. Killuun did o.s requested and soon alter became unconscious. The stranger then robbt d the money drawer of about and departed after dragging Killiani into the cellar, wheie he found by the proprietor some time afterward. He remained nnconscioiislor several hours. He is still seriously though not dangerously ill, The Count De Chstmhord Demi :tt Lust. By Associated Press to Tun TIMKS. VIENNA, August A dispatch has just been received from Frohsdorf, announcing that the Count Chainbord is dead. His death occurred at 7. this morning. ATTEMPTING SI ICIDK. nf 1'ound lirief at the leading of VForld for Twenty-Four Honri. The French troopw have been seriously de- feated m Annum. Paddy Ryan, the pugilist, was shot seriously in Chicago night. Another comet has been discovered so Prof. of Kuchester, says. All the on Coney Island suddenly went out 1nsT evrniTTjf rowing to nn accident at ga5t works. The inhabitants of PensHcola are lleeing by hundreds fmin the city on account of the yel- low fever. Seventeen million yards of cloth were sold at auction in  n n II o 'J o I 0 0 1 'r (T 1 1) Urudlcy, r.f. I 1 '1 2 1 u I 'i- 1 u Smith, ss.... o 1 Morris, p. l.nrkini.lf... ('HIToll C...... .liicnl'iy, tlntpln, Hli... Kriel, rf.... 4 3 2 0 0 0 V 0 i) 1 0 1 3 14 2 1 ;TugiMtns Wagner, of 11 Centre street, a siin-llower thirteen feet high, and has lit flow- rs out in bloom. Totals'... Trenton 20 y HY Ii I) 1 0 0 0 1 U 4 2 U 2 0 0 p 1 1 Totals.......12 11 27 16 1 3 4 S R 0 0 2 0 789 I n 1 Knnsearned --Active 1. Two- base hi ta Three-base hits Boyle, Morris, Wide bases ball- Taylor's dressed is from choice Weatem long .fttV.AlL' lEWSPAPERiP from noon. An I Taken A brother of Kdward dement- ed lad who was picked up in the streets of this wit W> taki.n-Krtft.r thin by his brother, a lawyer residing in I'lnl'ulclllhin H IS brill her t.hut. Kjlwaril (jail on, n tqiree. for two and never before of in-, A stained gloKs window in the State Street M. ('him Ii brokrh to M breaking of the cord holding the sash. Bayside Lodge, No. I. O. O. F., was in- stituted Kvyphrt-last niglM-by S. N. 4 >ne ami fifty (Irsind Master, and (Jeorge W. Hanicll, Past ii and. Joint llnrtow. H hitiitiiian plying between South Ainboy and irccnville, was committed to tlie County Jail yesterday upon a charge of illicit scTtiTiK Ifiiute Tiy Hie Tiutliontitw. f Mr. Fletcher Beatty. of the House, took a nap in tlie yard of bis hotel Wednesday evening, and awoke to find tliV) miwun from his He would like to know who Btole it. Flla Purcell, aged 17, a daughter of James I'urccll, of 1'lninsbo.ro, was found on the streets in this city Wednesday night Uy Kire Warden Bradley, and was taken homre at IHMIII to-day, from tlie Police Station. Dojiicl McKinney, a laH at I'.x- ton it Co.'s Cracker Bakery, (Vtitro street, had K with a cog-wheel yrsterday afternoon. The came out ahead but Dr. Schwartz fixed up the almodt M good ax new. John Fox, who has recently Wen making his bouie the Countv Jail on account of it .laroby. (juintoii. Passed balls Qninton 1. pitclies Morris I, Harkins -2. Left on Active Trenton Bases giveu on Morris I. Harkins Struck out Active 8, I retittm Doiible iilays .Tacoby, Boyle i'.'i. First base by errors -Active 'A, Tren- ton I'mpire -McCatferty. Time of gatno and Atlantic aad West Jersey roads will run forcible ilitlereiice of opinion with Policeman Murray, is enjoying liberty again, having fur- nished bail to await the action of tho 
                            

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